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Thursday, June 28, 2018

Everything about your Weimapeake

Everything about your Weimapeake
  The Weimapeake is a deliberate cross between the purebred Weimaraner and the purebred Chesapeake Bay Retriever. Bred to have the ‘die hard’ retriever instinct known only to the Chessie and the close working prey drive the Weimaraner is known for.  This mix makes an excellent all year hunting companion. The webbed feet and heavier coat from the Chessie allow the Weimapeake to hunt waterfowl with ease. The Weim birdiness and the Chessie retrieval instinct make the Weimapeake an outstanding upland hunter with little training needed.  Weimapeakes tend not to have the smelly, oily coat known to other retriever breeds.  Our weimapeakes are very easy to train, are close working in the field and are excellent retrievers.  They have great dispositions and are great family pets.

Overview
  They may look like your typical Labrador Retriever at first, but the Weimapeake is a unique breed all its own.
  This cross between a Chesapeake Bay Retriever and a Weimaraner has a natural retriever instinct and prey drive, but you can also expect that these attractive, large dogs will make great family pets who are loyal and protective of the humans they love.
  Whether or not you hunt, the Weimapeake could be the ideal pet for your family, but to be absolutely sure that this designer dog breed will be the right fit, get the facts below.

Breed standards
Dog Breed Group: Mixed Breed Dogs
Average lifespan: 10-12 years
Average size: 60-90 lb
Coat appearance:  short but thick
Coloration:  grayish-brown  to chocolate brown and black.
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Singles, families with children and other pets, and those living in homes with yards
Temperament: Calm, protective, playful, loyal, intelligent, and loving
Comparable Breeds: Chesapeake Bay Retriever, Weimaraner

History 
  As a fairly new hybrid, not a lot is known about the Weimapeake.  This breed is a mix of the Weimaraner and the Chesapeake Bay Retriever who are both recognised by the American Kennel Club.  The Chessie is skilled at retrieving birds and its genetics can be traced back to 1807.  It was recognized as a breed by the American Kennel Club in 1878 and sources claim that the breed descended from the English Otterhound and the curly-coated Retriever, but the Newfoundland breed is also its ancestor. The Weimaraner was recognized by the AKC much later, in 1943. This breed originated from Germany and was created in the early 19th century by the Weimar court. The Bloodhound is part of its ancestral make-up, and some sources believe that it is in fact, a direct descendant.  The Weimapeake was originally created to try and get the best of both breeds.  It was the intention to create an ideal hunting dog that possessed speed, agility, courage, and intelligence.  
  The American Kennel Club recognizes both parental breeds as a sporting breed, as they are known for their hunting skills both in the woods and in water.  The Weimapeake inherits its webbed feet from both parent breeds which makes swimming and wading easy.  
  Sources say that the Weimapeake has been bred in mid-west America for decades, but the exact dates and whereabouts are unknown.  Although the Weimapeake is not recognized by the American Kennel Club, it is recognized by both the International Designer Canine Registry and the Designer Breed Registry as a hybrid breed. 


Temperament
  The Weimapeake requires proper socialization at an early age. The Weimapeake gets along with dogs and other household pets. The Weimapeake is friendly towards people of all ages if socialized properly. The calm, yet playful nature of the Weimapeake makes it an excellent family dog. The Weimapeake is often reserved with strangers and will protect its family if threatened.

Health 
  As a hybrid breed, the Weimapeake could potentially inherit the diseases that its parents, the Weimaraner and Chesapeake Bay Retriever, are prone to. However, there is no way to predict an individual dog’s health, and he may never develop any of the common problems associated with his parents’ breeds.
  Weimapeakes have the Weimaraner ear, which features a wide ear canal and a large opening, so it can become dirty quite easily. You should take extra care to ensure that water doesn’t become trapped within your dog’s ear canal when bathing or swimming, as that could result in infection.

Care
The short hair of the Weimapeake makes it an easy keep.  Periodically brush to remove dead hairs. Normal ear cleaning, nail clipping and bathing will help keep the Weimapeake in top condition.

Living Conditions
  The Weimapeake can do okay in small house or apartment only if they are walked and exercised at least 2 to 3 times a day. If you don't have a large yard, access to a fenced in area or dog park would be great because they need to run.


Training
  You should expect that housetraining your Weimapeake could potentially take a couple of months, so persistence is key. With this breed, it is all about consistent and short training sessions, and every session should end on a positive note.
  These dogs are really eager to please, and they are intelligent, so they will learn quickly. However, they can be stubborn. Establish yourself as the pack leader, and be gentle yet firm in order to make training your dog easier and to prevent your dog from becoming your boss. Once trained, this multi-talented pooch will make you proud.

Exercise
  The Weimapeake must be walked at least twice a day or have a large yard to run in. Like all sporting breeds the Weimapeake is an active dog which needs regular ‘off leash’ exercise. Without an outlet for pent-up energy the Weimapeake can become destructive and behavior problems can arise.
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Everything about your Canadian Eskimo Dog

 Everything about your Canadian Eskimo Dog
  The Canadian Eskimo Dog looks very much like a Husky being a Spitz-type breed that hails from the Arctic regions of the world. These handsome dogs are recognised by The Kennel Club and over the years, although their numbers still remain low here in the UK, they are becoming a popular choice with people who are familiar with the breed and who enjoy competing with dog teams. Often called Qimmiqs, the Canadian Eskimo Dog boasts a lot of stamina having been bred to pull sleds over vast distances in challenging conditions and arctic terrains. They are true working dogs rather than pets and are highly prized in Greenland where a renewed interest in cultural heritage saved the breed from extinction.

Overview
  Canadian Eskimo Dogs greatly resemble medium-sized American wolves. However, the dogs have shorter and curvier tails than their wild counterparts. They also lack the black wrist markings that are characteristic of European wolf breeds. Canadian Eskimo Dogs are part of the Spitz family of dogs. Therefore, they have the typical curly tails and thick coats that their kin do. These dogs also have strong, muscular bodies that are well-suited for working in harsh Arctic environments. Canadian Eskimo dogs typically have dark colored, yellow or hazel eyes. 
  Blue eyes are considered by the United Kennel Club to be a disqualifying flaw. These dogs also have wedge-shaped heads, broad skulls, short necks, and tapered muzzles. Their teeth should meet in a scissors bite. Erect ears with rounded tips are yet another breed feature. Canadian Eskimo dogs also have round feet and muscular limbs. These dogs should move at a brisk trot.

Breed standards
AKC group: Utility
UKC group: Northern Breed
Average lifespan: 10-15 years
Average size: 40-88 pounds
Coat appearance: Long, dense, double, thick
Coloration: Black, Black & White, Grey, Liver, Red, White
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles, houses with yards
Temperament: Affectionate, hard-working, gentle, brave
Comparable Breeds: Alaskan Malamute, Siberian Husky

History
  Canadian Eskimo Dogs are thought to date as far back as 1100 A.D. when the Inuit people and their pets arrived in the area that was to later become Canada. Members of this breed are very closely related to the Greenland dog. Eskimo dogs are among the oldest indigenous breeds in North America. They are also one of the few native Canadian dog varieties.
  Early members of this multi-purpose breed were used to pull sleds, hunt game, and carry goods. Canadian Eskimo Dogs became especially popular during the arctic explorations that took place in the 19th and 20th centuries, but demand for these dogs began to wane once snowmobiles became prevalent in the region. This breed was eventually recognized by the United Kennel Club in 1996.


Temperament
  Unsurprisingly, Eskimo Dogs are incredibly tough, stoical characters. They are also, in some ways, “softer” than other Spitzes, especially the Arctic breeds, with many people describing them as being naturally submissive, readily deferring to human authority rather than being inclined to challenge it. These hard workers are intensely loyal, and are gregarious with their own kind; indeed, Canadian Eskimo Dogs should be kept in groups, rather than as individuals.
  It is difficult to imagine that many homes can provide the right environment for this breed; it has colossal energy reserves, and is highly motivated by work. Owners involved in sledding or skijoring may be an exception, although they are likely to choose another more racy breed if they have any competitive inclinations.

Health 
  The Canadian Eskimo Dog is generally a healthy breed not troubled by the consequences of inbreeding due to a large foundation stock. Like all breeds, however, the breed is prone to several minor health issues including hip dysplasia, gastric torsion, entropion, cataracts, heat intolerance, and arthritis.

Living Conditions
  They are not usually recommended for apartments, however they can live in apartments if well trained and properly exercised. Canadian Eskimo Dogs are very active indoors and do best with a fenced-in large yard. Because of their heavy coats, these dogs prefer cool climates. One has to use common sense with respect to maintaining them in the heat by providing adequate shade and air conditioning. This breed prefers to live in packs.

Trainability
  The Canadian Eskimo Dog is a smart dog and a fast learner. The downside to this is they are just as quick to pick up lots of bad habits as they are the good. They need to be well socialised from a young age and their training has to begin early too. It also has to be very consistent and always fair throughout a dog’s life so they understand what their owner expects of them. They are a good choice for people who want to take part in sledding-type competitions and other pulling activities because these dogs like nothing more than to work.
  They excel at many canine sports which includes activities like dry land mushing because they thrive on the attention they are given during their training and the one-to-one contact when they are competing with their handlers.  The key to successfully training a Qimmiq is to make their training as interesting as possible and to avoid too much repetition. It's also a good idea to keep training sessions that much shorter which helps dogs stay more focussed on what it’s being asked of them, bearing in mind that the more intelligent a dog is, the faster they get bored and Qimmiqs are extremely smart.
  They do not answer well to harsh correction or any sort of heavy handed training methods, but they do respond extremely well to positive reinforcement which always brings the best out of these intelligent and quick witted dogs, especially when there are high value rewards involved bearing in mind that Qimmiqs find it hard to digest anything that contains grains.

Exercise
  Canadian Eskimo Dogs need a fair amount of exercise, including a daily walk or jog, but should not be excessively exercised in warm weather. They need a large yard with a high fence, but bury the wire at the base of the fence because they are likely to dig their way out and go off hunting.

Grooming 
  The CED's coat should be brushed at least a couple of times a week to keep in good condition. It does shed so some hair will be around the home at any time of the year, but then it has heavy shedding during seasonal times so then it needs daily brushing and clean up is quite a chore. When it is having its blow outs use a rake on its coat to stop clumps of hair forming mats. Bathe only when it needs one to avoid drying out its coat.
  Over needs will include trimming its nails of its activity does not wear them down, cleaning and checking its ears for infection and brushing its teeth. The latter should be done at least twice a week, the ears can be done weekly, but do not insert anything into them, and the nails done as needed taking care not to cut too far down. There are blood vessels and nerves in the lower half of the nail that if nicked or cut will cause pain to the dog and bleeding.

Children and Other Pets
  The Canadian Eskimo Dog is not the best choice as a family pet because these dogs thrive on being in a work environment rather than in a home. As such, they are not a suitable choice for families with children either and care has to be taken when they are around other pets and animals because they boast such a high prey drive. As such any contact is best avoided.
  They can be a little "off" with other dogs which is why it's so important for a Canadian Eskimo Dog to be well socialised from a young age and even then, they have a tendency to want to dominate other dogs they encounter or live with in a household because Qimmiqs like to establish a hierarchy which often leads to fights breaking out.

Is this breed right for you?
  The Canadian Eskimo Dog is a breed of working sled dog native to the far north of Canada. This ancient breed is famous for its ability to survive and work in some of the most difficult and challenging environments on the planet. This  dogs are incredibly loyal to their owners and often bond with one person or family, they are usually not aggressive towards unfamiliar people.
  Canadian Eskimo dogs can be domineering and stubborn, which means that they require an owner with plenty of experience, preferably one that has handled sled dog breeds in the past. These dogs will also need to be heavily socialized with children from a young age to prevent them from regarding youngsters as a threat to their own well-being.

Famous Canadian Eskimo Dogs
  An unnamed Canadian Eskimo Dog became a viral celebrity in 2016, when it was filmed being “petted” by a polar bear that approached the chained dog. However, the incident was misinterpreted by the public as the bear striking up a friendship with the animal; in fact, the same polar bear went on to kill and eat another dog belonging to the pack later the same day.

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Everything about your Labrador Husky

Everything about your Labrador Husky
  Though the name of this breed might suggest that it is a cross between the Labrador Retriever and the Siberian Husky, the Labrador Husky is actually a completely separate breed. This dog looks remarkably like a wolf, having the same double coat and wild appearance. The dog is still a largely unknown breed but if you are lucky enough to meet one you will never forget the experience.

Overview
  The Labrador Husky has a similar temperament to other Northern breeds which means that they can often be unfriendly or even aggressive with strangers.  However, they can be good if socialized, and they often do well with children.  Being with other dogs always makes them happy, because they are bred to work well in a pack and actually many people believe they should be bought in pairs.  Small animals do not usually do well with Nordic dogs but if they are raised together it should be fine.  Training is easy and fun for them because they naturally learns things well.  However, sometimes stubbornness will prevent them from learning silly tricks or other useless commands.  Intelligence can be their gift but can be your nightmare if they are bored.

Breed standards
Dog Breed Group: Mixed Breed Dogs
Average lifespan: 10-13 years
Average size: 60 - 100 pounds
Coat appearance: Thick double coat - thick undercoat and soft outer coat
Coloration: Solid white, solid black, black and white, red and white, and grey and white
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, active families, active singles, house with a yard
Temperament: Friendly, good-natured, intelligent, quiet
Comparable Breeds: Siberian Husky, Canadian Eskimo Dog

History
  In order to best understand the history of the Labrador Husky, an explanation of the people that these dogs live alongside and serve is necessary. The Thule Inuit people developed along the coast of Alaska sometime after 200 B.C. These people migrated east across Canada, along with their dogs, and occupied the Labrador region by 1300 A.D. The Dorset people originally inhabited this region, but due in part to their lack of canine use for travel, hunting, and companionship, they were driven to extinction by the Inuit. The Inuit brought Husky dogs with them , and over time, bred these dogs with wolves to improve their strength and endurance. As these people became indigenous to the Labrador region, this breed developed independently from the aforementioned Spitz dogs, and became distinct.
  The Labrador Huskies were used for transportation as sled dogs. Prior to the advent of the snowmobile, sleds were the only viable means of transportation across large swaths of land. The dogs contributed to the hunting success of the Inuit people, allowing them to travel further and hunt in a wider geographical range. In addition, the dogs helped keep their human companions warm in encampments. After the snowmobile was invented, these dogs were not needed as sled dogs, except in sled races, but have been utilised as companions and as search-and-rescue canines. In addition, due to their intelligence, they have also been used in bomb or narcotic detection.


Temperament
  The Labrador Husky is an unknown and often misunderstood breed. It is not a mix between a Labrador and a Husky, but a purebred dog native of coastal Labrador. It is similar in a lot of ways to the wolf. It does not bark, but can howl like a wolf. The objective in training this dog is to achieve pack leader status. It is a natural instinct for a dog to have an order in its pack. When we humans live with dogs, we become their pack. 
  The entire pack cooperates under a single leader. Lines are clearly defined and rules are set. Because a dog communicates his displeasure with growling and eventually biting, all other humans MUST be higher up in the order than the dog. The humans must be the ones making the decisions, not the dogs. That is the only way your relationship with your dog can be a complete success.

Health
  The Labrador Husky is fairly unknown so not much information is available about genetic disorders or their life expectancy.  However, special care has been taken in their breeding which could suggest that few health problems exist.

Care
  The Labrador Husky probably needs plenty of brushing as any double coated breed would.  Plus, they shed once a year and during that time they should be brushed every day to make sure the loose hair gets cleaned from their coat.  Exercise is, of course, essential to this sled dog.  A large yard to run in and long walks will help keep them calm.  However, they should also have some sort of work to do such as agility or fly ball which will keep them calm and happy.

Training
  The Labrador Husky is an intelligent breed so it should respond well to training. These dogs are likely to learn quickly as long as you maintain a firm and consistent hand in training. Positive reinforcement training methods are recommended for this breed and you should keep your training sessions short and fun to ensure that your dog doesn’t lose interest and stop paying attention. Because this breed is so smart it needs plenty of mental and physical stimulation to prevent it from becoming bored and developing destructive behaviors.

Exercise
  This breed needs to be taken on a daily long walk or jog. While out on the walk the dog must be made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as in a dog's mind the leader leads the way, and that leader needs to be the human.

Grooming
  Labrador Huskies require extensive grooming during all parts of the year. Its extremely thick and durable coat, also known as a double coat. was made to be able to withstand harsh winters in Labrador Canada. Daily brushing is required to maintain the coat. A bath is sometimes the best way to fully groom and clean the dog. Bathing the dog does not have to be done on a regular basis, but is important in order to ensure a clean and well-groomed dog. It is also vital that the owner of a Labrador Husky checks for fleas and ticks during the warmer months. 
  Because this dog has such a thick coat, it is the perfect place for a tick or flea to nestle in. Not checking for these things can lead to serious problems such as Lyme disease, which can be life-threatening to the dog. The Labrador Husky sheds constantly throughout the year, so it is important to keep up with its grooming.




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Everything about your Irish Water Spaniel

Everything about your Irish Water Spaniel
  He may look and act like a curly-coated clown, but the Irish Water Spaniel is a serious water retriever with excellent hunting skills. Given plenty of exercise and training, he can also be a wonderful family companion. Choose him if you enjoy running, hiking, water sports, or other activities that he can do with you. His coat is high maintenance but sheds little.

Overview
  The Irish water spaniel is built like no other spaniel, being much taller and racier. The body is of medium length, the whole dog being slightly rectangular in appearance. The general appearance suggests both dash and endurance. The gait is smooth and ground-covering. The coat is one of the breed's distinctive features. The body is covered with a double coat consisting of crisp ringlets. This combination imparts water, weather and thorn resistance to the dog, enabling it to hunt in the harshest of conditions. The Irish water spaniel's expression says it all: alert, intelligent and quizzical.
  Like most dogs of the American Kennel Club Sporting group, the Irish Water Spaniel is essentially an active, willing and energetic companion. Because it has been bred from stock used to fetch game and return it to hand without a fuss, it has the natural instinct of wanting to please. Its keen sense of working as a team makes it a relatively easy dog to train and discipline. Because of its great intelligence and quizzical nature, it has the reputation of being the clown of the spaniel family and will do ordinary things in extraordinary ways to achieve that which is asked of it. Some individual dogs can be very wary of strangers and not every IWS can be trusted to get along with other pets. Early socialisation and training is a must.

Highlights
  • Can have life-threatening reaction to sulfa drugs, Ivermectin and vaccines especially the leptospirosis component.
  • This is a breed that is probably not suitable for the first time dog owner because he can be headstrong, and an independent thinker.
  • Irish Water Spaniels have lots of energy and need daily exercise.
  • Socialization — exposure to many different people, places, sights, sounds, and experiences — at an early age is needed.
Other Quick Facts

  • Among the distinguishing characteristics of the IWS are a topknot of long, loose curls; the crisply curled, liver-colored coat; and the smooth "rat tail," which is hairless except at the base where it is covered for two to three inches with curls.The face is entirely smooth and the feet are webbed between the toes.
  • When an Irish Water Spaniel’s feet are properly conditioned, the tough pads allow the dog to go over sharp saw grass or river rocks without injury.
Breed standards
AKC group: Sporting
UKC group: Gun Dogs
Average lifespan: 10-12 years
Average size: 45 to 68 pounds
Coat appearance: double coated,consisting of dense curls, sheds very little
Coloration: liver/puce
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Families with older children, active singles and seniors, houses with yards, hunters
Temperament: Enthusiastic, energetic, mischievous, independent
Comparable Breeds: Portuguese Water Dog, Irish Setter

History
  The Irish Water Spaniel is a native Irish breed dating back at least 1000 years. It is believed in Irish folklore to be the descendant of the Dobhar-chú. It is probable that more than one ancient breed of spaniel has gone into its makeup. It is not known from which other breeds Irish Water Spaniels were developed. 
 The acknowledged father of the breed, Justin McCarthy from Dublin, left no breeding records. All manner of dogs have been suggested including: the Poodle, Portuguese Water Dog, Barbet, generic old water dog, the now-extinct English Water Spaniel as well as the Northern and Southern Water Spaniels, but whether Irish Water Spaniels are antecedents, descendants, or mixtures of these other breeds is a matter of some speculation. What is clear is that the breed has ancient roots.   The modern breed as we know it was developed in Ireland in the 1830s.
The breed has retained type for over 150 years, and is very popular in Ireland. The Irish Water Spaniel was recognized by the AKC in 1884.

Personality
  The individual personality of Irish Water Spaniels vary from dog to dog. Some are energetic and outgoing, others are shy and prefer to laze around the house. You can't really tell what your adult Water Spaniel will be like based upon his behavior as a puppy, either. However, all Water Spaniels are loving family companions who adore their families, have a zest for life and have a propensity for clowning around. 
  He can make a game out of just about any activity, and no matter what he's doing he appears to be having the time of his life. Water Spaniels are spirited companions and will want to be included in all family activities. They are polite to strangers and can be trusted around well mannered children.

Health
  The Irish Water Spaniel, which has an average lifespan of 10 to 12 years, is prone to otitis externa and canine hip dysplasia (CHD). It may also succumb to to minor health problems like distichiasis, and a major issues such as nail-bed disease, seizures, and megaesophagus. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may run hip ear exams on this breed of dog. Be aware that the dogs of this breed may react negatively to ivermectin or sulfa drugs.

Care
  To properly care for an Irish Water Spaniel provide it daily mental and physical exercises such as running, playing, and obedience lessons (the earlier, the better). Otherwise, brush comb, and trim your Spaniel's coat regularly to prevent its hair from becoming coarse and twisting on itself.

Living Conditions
  Because he needs plenty of daily exercise and loves the outdoors, he does best in the suburbs or country. This breed does best with at least an average-sized yard.

Trainability
  Water Spaniels are fairly easy to train, but they do have a willful streak which can can make them inconsistent students. Positive reinforcement and lots of treats help the process along, as does mixing up training activities. Keeping training sessions light and fun is also helpful, as Water Spaniels will enjoy any activity he thinks is a game. Once leadership is established and basic obedience mastered, Water Spaniels should graduate on to advanced obedience or agility training to keep their bodies and minds active.
  Early and frequent socialization is important to building an even tempered Water Spaniel. While they adore their own family, they are often wary of strangers. Teaching him early on to accept new people and new situations can keep them from becoming shy or fearful.

Exercise 
  Irish Water Spaniels are bundles of energy and quite athletic by genetics. They thrive when they are able to run, play, chase down game and retrieve fowl. They are not at all happy leading sedentary lives and can become destructive without regular activities that will enthrall and exert them. 
  They require at least an hour of playtime daily in order to keep them in tiptop shape. Of course, they love water so if you sit in your yard and have a hard plastic wading pool, they will happily retrieve dummies for hours. This is what makes Irish Water Spaniels awesome companions for families with sturdy kids.

Grooming
  The Irish Water Spaniel’s dense, tightly curled double coat is short and thick next to the skin, for warmth, and topped with a long outer coat for extra protection. The coat sheds slightly, but it doesn’t cling to the fabric of furniture and clothing quite as much as other types of hair.
  Comb the coat one to three times a week, as needed. Be sure you comb all the way down to the skin to remove any mats or tangles. Use a slicker brush to remove dead hair. For a neat look, the coat must be scissored every six to eight weeks, including trimming the fur around the foot pads. Ask the breeder to show you how to do this, or take your IWS to a professional groomer who is familiar with the breed or willing to learn how to achieve the proper look.
  Any time your IWS goes in a pool, lake or ocean, give him a thorough freshwater rinse to remove chlorine, algae, and salt, all of which can dry and damage the coat. He doesn’t need frequent baths, which could dry out his protective oily coat, but getting wet helps to ensure that the coat has those pretty ringlets that give the IWS his distinctive look.
   The rest is basic care. Keep the ears clean and dry, especially if your IWS goes swimming a lot. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Irish Water Spaniels do best with children if they are raised with them. Early socialization — exposure to a variety of peoples, places, sights, sounds, and situations — also helps. Always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left    unsupervised with a child.
  Irish Water Spaniels can get along well with other pets in the family if introduced to them at a young age. Otherwise, supervise them carefully. They are hunting dogs and may view smaller animals, especially birds, as prey. Protect pet birds even if you're sure your IWS understands they're off limits. Some spaniels can learn that, if they're taught from puppyhood, but don't assume that it will happen with every dog. You may always need to keep the two separated, if only so your IWS doesn't pull your parakeet's tail or your parrot won't take a bite out of your Irish Water Spaniel's sensitive nose.

Did You Know?
The Irish Water Spaniel’s coat is naturally oily to repel water and keep the skin underneath dry even after he has been in the water numerous times.

Famous Irish Water Spaniels
As an Irishman, I may be accused of having a chip on my shoulder, but the Irish Water Spaniel does not seem to get the credit it deserves when appearing in the media. Though the breed appears in the television series The Irish R.M. and in The Long Kiss Goodnight, starring Samuel L. Jackson, the names of the dogs involved have never been revealed.

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Everything about your Basschshund

Everything about your Basschshund
  The Basschshund, often misspelled as Basschund, is created by cross-breeding two of the most popular purebreds in the world – a Basset Hound and a Dachshund. The medium-sized dog, with its lively nature and noble appearance, is regarded as a great family companion. The confident little Basschshund, like its parent breeds, has a long muscular body, an elongated head with its eyes having an intelligent look, drooping ears, and short legs.

Overview
  The Basschshund is not a purebred dog. It is a cross between the Basset Hound and the Dachshund. The best way to determine the temperament of a mixed breed is to look up all breeds in the cross and know you can get any combination of any of the characteristics found in either breed. Not all of these designer hybrid dogs being bred are 50% purebred to 50% purebred. It is very common for breeders to breed multi-generation crosses.

Breed standards
Dog Breed Group: Mixed Breed Dogs
Average lifespan: 12-15 years
Average size: 25-45 lbs 
Coat appearance: Short, smooth, shiny
Coloration:  Light Brown/Golden, Brown and White, Black and Brown
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, singles , couples, apartments, houses with/without yards, seniors
Temperament: Gentle, loving, stubborn, watchful
Comparable Breeds: Dachshund, Basset Hound

History 
  The Basschshund is a modern breed, so the documentation of their history is minimal. However, the Basset Hound originated in France and was primarily bred to hunt rabbits. Because of their keen sense of smell, they were also used to hunt squirrels, pheasants, foxes and deer. Their name is derived from the French word "bas" meaning low-set. It is believed that they are descendants of the Bloodhound. Therefore, they are a scent hound and are excellent trackers. 
  The Basset Hound started being imported into the United States in 1883. The Westminster Kennel Club recognized the Basset Hound in 1884 and the American Kennel Club first recognized the Basset Hound in 1885. The Basset Hound has been on different television shows such as Columbo, Dukes of Hazzard and Coach. A Bassett Hound named Sherlock dressed in white tie and tails appeared with Elvis on The Steve Allen Show. Elvis sang the song “Hound Dog” to Sherlock. This breed is a wonderful performer, companion and hunter. It is believed that the Dachshund originated in Germany in the early 1600s.
  The breed was developed so that it could go inside of an animal’s underground den. The Dachshund would bravely fight underground and force the badger or fox out of his den. Dachshunds first came to the United States in 1870. They were imported into the U.S for rabbit hunting. The American Kennel Club (AKC) registered its first Dachshund in 1885. 

Temperament 
  The Basschshund dogs are known to be fearless, intelligent, and full of energy but may act too hastily at times. When faced with certain tasks, they like to do them in their own ways without being instructed. Because of their independent, playful, and entertaining nature, they are often regarded as mischief-makers. Like most hounds, the Basschshund may show stubbornness with an instinct to chase small animals and toys.
  They remain close to their family and love to be cuddled. If introduced to the kids and other household animals early, these dogs get along well with them. Since they have an inherent suspicious nature, they can be aggressive towards strangers. These brave and alert pets warn their owners of intruders, which makes them a great watchdog.

Health 
  There are certain issues she is more prone to, some that can be inheritied from her parents and some particular to the type of dog she is. With her back it is important to make sure she is not allowed to jump from moderate or more heights, even jumping from the couch to the floor could cause injury. Her ears means she is prone to ear infections and her love of food means she is prone to obesity. Other issues include Bloat, Von Willebrand's, Panosteitis, Eye problems, Patellar Luxation, Thrombopathia, IDD, IVDD, Cushings, Diabetes, Deafness, Allergies and Hip Dysplasia.

Care
  The Basschshund does shed, so he needs to be brushed weekly with a slicker brush or a grooming mitt. The Basset Hound can develop a musky smell. Because of this, the Basschshund should be bathed monthly with a gentle dog shampoo. It is important to try to prevent water from getting inside those floppy ears as breeds with this type of ear are susceptible to yeast and bacteria developing into an infection. Afterwards, your dog will need to be dried off with a towel or carefully with a hair dryer on low heat. 
  The Basschshund’s nails should be trimmed every 10 to 14 days, to reduce stress on their tiny feet. The teeth should be brushed on a regular basis to prevent tartar build-up. The Basschshund’s ears will need to be cleaned once a week. Floppy ears do not allow for good air circulation and can be prone to trouble. 

Training
  The Basschshunds are quick learners, but they need proper motivation. Use their favorite toys or treats to catch their attention. Do not extend the training sessions by using the same instructions repeatedly. They might quickly become bored, so training should be made more fun and interesting. Housetraining these dogs can be a challenging task, so be patient and persistent in your approach. As the puppies are typically rambunctious, early socialization, obedience, and crate training will help them learn basic etiquettes of living with a family.

Exercise
  The activity level of Basschshunds depends on which parent it leans towards. It can be slightly active, requiring just 30 minutes of walk per day. But it can also be very energetic and will want to go to the park for play sessions and socialize with other pets and kids. It is necessary to leash it because it loves to chase. This dog is suitable for apartment life because of its small size and moderate exercise needs.

Grooming
  A gentle rubdown with a hound glove or brush will keep your Basschshund’s coat in top condition. Since it does not shed too much, a weekly brushing is sufficient to remove loose or dead hairs. It needs an occasional bath unless it has an unpleasant smell. Ear infections could be an issue with this breed as its long hanging ears prevent proper circulation of air in its inner ear. Therefore, clean your pet’s ears every week with a vet-recommended ear cleansing solution. Keep your dog’s nails neatly trimmed and brush its teeth 3-4 times a week.

Children and other Pets
  This is a great family dog and is very good with children, being playful and affectionate with them. She can get on well with other pets too though she does chase smaller animals. Some Basschshunds can get on well with other dogs but some need more help. Early socialization is key on helping her be at her best with other people, animals and dogs.
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Wednesday, June 27, 2018

Everything about your Skye Terrier

Everything about your Skye Terrier
  The Skye Terrier is a medium-size dog breed who was developed on the Isle of Skye in Scotland. They were originally developed to hunt and kill badger, otter and fox, but these days they’re appreciated as a versatile companion breed.

Overview
  The Skye terrier is a stylish and elegant dog that is, first of all, a working terrier. It is solidly built, with substantial bone, and twice as long as it is tall. The Skye's short legs enable it to go to ground in pursuit of fox and badger, and the long back imparts flexibility within a confined space. Its strong jaws further aid it in dispatching its prey. Its movement is free and effortless. The hard outer coat and close undercoat afford protection from the teeth of its quarry as well as harsh weather. 
  The Skye terrier's soft look belies its tough nature. It is a fearless and a deadly rodent hunter. It is also a mild-mannered house pet, one of the few terriers calm enough to live in the city. It still needs daily exercise in a safe area or on leash, however. It is sensitive yet stubborn. The Skye is affectionate with its family but cautious with strangers. It gets along fairly well with other dogs in the same household but may not mingle well with strange dogs. It is extremely courageous and game and makes a good watchdog.

Highlights
  • Skye Terriers need early socialization to people and other animals. They are naturally reserved, and socialization will help prevent shy, timid, or aggressive behaviors.
  • Skye Terriers can be very destructive if they are bored or are frequently left alone for long periods.
  • A Skye Terrier needs a fenced yard to prevent him from running after other animals or people who pass by his property.
  • Like many of the terrier breeds, Skye Terrier enjoys digging; after all, that's what he was bred to do.
  • The Skye Terrier is a great watchdog.
  • Skye Terriers can be aggressive toward dogs they don't know and will chase and kill smaller pets.
  • Skye Terriers respond best to positive training techniques, a firm tone, and consistent expectations. They have a mind of their own and can make training difficult if they choose to.
Other Quick Facts

  • When you look at a Skye, you see a dog longer than he is tall, with brown eyes and elegantly feathered ears that can be carried up or down, cloaked in long hair that hangs straight down each side, parting in the middle from head to feathered tail. The hair on the head falls over the forehead and eyes like a veil and goes on to form a beard and apron.
  • The Skye’s coat can be varying shades of a single color, which can be black, blue, dark, or light gray, silver platinum, fawn or cream. The points of the ears, muzzle and tail tip should be black.
Breed standards
AKC group: Terrier Group
UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan: 12-14 years
Average size: 35 to 45 pounds
Coat appearance: short, soft, and woolly, covered with an outer coat of straight hair with a hard texture
Coloration: black, blue, dark or light gray, silver platinum, fawn, or cream
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with older children, singles and seniors, apartments, houses with/without yards
Temperament: Courageous, stubborn, tough, affectionate
Comparable Breeds: Cairn Terrier, Norfolk Terrier

History
  Scotland has long been a stronghold of small plucky terriers, and the Skye Terrier is among the oldest of them. They developed along the west coastal area, where they hunted fox and otter.
  The purest of these dogs were found on the Isle of Skye, and the dogs were then named Skye Terriers. Skye Terriers were first described in the sixteenth century, when it was already noteworthy for its long coat. Some confusion exists in tracing its history because, for a certain time, several different breeds had the same name "Skye Terrier". The loyal dog, present under the petticoat of Mary, Queen of Scots at her execution, has been ascribed as a Skye Terrier. In 1840, Queen Victoria made the breed fancy, keeping both drop and prick eared dogs.
  This greatly increased its popularity and the Skye Terrier came to America due to this. The AKC recognized the breed in 1887, and it quickly appeared on the show scene. Its popularity has significantly dropped and now it is one of the least known terriers. There is little awareness of its former popularity.

Personality
  Skye Terriers demand to be the center of attention at all times and will do whatever it requires to maintain that attention, including make mischief around the house. Skyes are laid back when indoors, happy to curl up on the first available lap for an afternoon of rest and relaxation, but they do enjoy getting out and moving several times a day. 
  They are avid chasers and will bolt after anything that moves – no matter how big or how small – as these little dogs are fearless in the face of danger. They have minds of their own and don't like to be told what to do, but are affectionate and loyal dogs who adore their immediate family and make good companion animals.

Health
  The Skye Terrier is a very healthy breed. The only issue that's a potential concern is orthopedic problems that could occur during growth. The Skye is achondroplastic, meaning that he has a large body on small legs. If he's allowed to jump or climb excessively during puppyhood, before the growth plates in his legs have closed, he may limp or develop a condition called premature closure, which occurs when the growth plates don't close properly. Wait until he's 18 to 24 months old before taking him on long walks or letting him do any jumping or stair climbing.

Care
  The Skye Terrier is most comfortable living indoors as a house dog. However, it should be allowed outside to play daily. Also, to maintain its peak physical form, a daily short or moderate walk is required. Coat care involves regular combing, and unlike other terriers, a regular bath is necessary and won’t soften the coat much.

Living Conditions
  The Skye Terrier is good for apartment life. It is relatively active indoors and will do okay without a yard.

Training
  Although a rather bright dog, the Skye Terrier is not the easiest dog in the world to train. All training sessions must be made into fun events. Excited praise and special delicacies should be used consistently during the sessions. Never try to manually place the Skye into the correct position, such as sit or down. This type of method will cause the dog to growl or snap. Gently coaxing is the only training method that works for this breed.

Exercise
  The Skye Terrier needs a daily walk. Play will take care of a lot of its exercise needs, however, as with all breeds, play will not fulfill its primal instinct to walk. Dogs that do not get to go on daily walks are more likely to display behavior problems. These dogs will also enjoy a good romp in a safe, open area off lead, such as a large, fenced-in yard.

Grooming 
  The Skye Terrier coat should be brushed at least once per week with a pin brush. The coat should be misted with water before brushing so that the hair does not break. Baths are required every two to three weeks, depending on the dog's activity level.
  Check the ears on a weekly basis for signs of infection, irritation, or wax build up. Cleanse regularly with a veterinarian-approved cleanser and cotton ball. Brush the teeth at least once per week to prevent tartar buildup and fight gum disease. Additionally, nails should be trimmed once per month if the dog does not wear the toenails down naturally.

Children And Other Pets
  A Skye Terrier can make an excellent companion for older children if he's properly socialized. His terrier temperament may make him too feisty to be a playmate for children younger than six years old, however.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how good-natured, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  The Skye Terrier can be aggressive toward dogs he doesn't know, but he should get along well with dogs and cats he's raised with. He's not recommended for homes with smaller pets since he may view them as a tasty snack.

Did You Know?
  One of the best known and best loved Skye Terriers was Greyfriars Bobby, who faithfully watched over the grave of his owner, John Grey, for 14 years after the man’s death. A statue honoring the dog’s loyalty is visited in Edinburgh by dog lovers from around the world.
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