LUV My dogs

LUV My dogs

Everything about your dog!

Tuesday, June 26, 2018

Everything about your Pomsky

Everything about your Pomsky
  Cute, silly, and suited for apartment life, the Pomsky is a dog that likes to be the center of attention, and with their adorable looks and playful antics, they often get the adoration they crave. Their unfortunate start as a designer breed mixed between Siberian Husky and Pomeranian parents hasn’t stopped them from earning popularity with dog lovers. Unfortunately, those who rush to buy Pomsky puppies from breeders are often overwhelmed and unprepared for their needs, and dogs of this breed sometimes find themselves left at shelters or with rescue groups. 

Overview
  The Pomsky is a mixed breed the result of crossing the Siberian Husky with a Pomeranian. She is a medium sized dog with a life span of 13 to 15 years. She is bred using artificial insemination as natural breeding would be dangerous due to the size difference between the parents. She is a fun and watchful dog who is great for families with older kids, couples or singles or seniors as long as she can be given the exercise she needs.
  The Pomsky is a dog best suited for a household that does not have children or other pets unless she is going to be raised with them. Early socialization and training are important for her. If you love the look of the Husky but do not have the room or the energy for a purebred the Pomsky is a great though expensive substitute.

Highlights
  • Pomsky are very trainable, but may inherit some stubbornness from the Siberian Husky, so they are best suited for experienced dog owners.
  • The Pomsky's thick coat makes it more tolerant of cold weather than most other kinds of lap dogs.
  • Pomskies are vocal dogs that tend to be yappy if they aren't properly trained.
  • The coat of the breed comes in a variety of colors, just like its parent breeds.
  • Socialization with other dogs and people is important, especially at an early age.
  • Pomsky are highly adaptable, don't have large space requirements, and only have moderate exercise needs, making them good apartment dogs.
Other Quick Facts

  • A Pomsky typically has a soft, fluffy, silky coat, prick ears and a furry tail that swishes over the back.
  • The Pomsky is usually bred from a Siberian Husky female and a Pomeranian male. Breedings are usually done through artificial insemination because of the size difference in the two breeds.
  • The size of a Pomsky can vary dramatically, from toy size to medium size. Like their parent breeds, the dogs can come in many different patterns and colors, such as grey/white, brown red, blue merle, blonde and more.
Breed standards
Dog Breed Group: Mixed Breed Dogs
Average lifespan: 12 to 15 years
Average size: 20-30 lb
Coat appearance: Fluffy, soft, wavy, double
Coloration: black-and-white coloration,this breed can exhibit a wide range of colors including black, grey, brown, red, blue, blonde, and more
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with older children, singles and seniors, apartments and houses with/without yards
Temperament: Loving, friendly, energetic, playful
Comparable Breeds: Pomeranian, Siberian Husky

History
  Pomsky breeders have formed the Pomsky Club of America, with the goal of achieving a recognized purebred dog. This can take years, however, and will not be accomplished any time soon.
  But crossing two breeds over and over does not a breed make. To achieve consistency in appearance, size and temperament, breeders must select the puppies with the traits they want and breed them over several generations for the traits to become set.
Crossbreeds such as Pomskies have become popular over the past 10 or 20 years as people seek out dogs that are different from the everyday Yorkie or Poodle. It’s also often claimed that crossbreeds are hypoallergenic or have fewer health problems or will carry the best traits of each breed, but this just isn’t true.
  Whatever his breed, cross or mix, love your dog for what he is: a unique and loving companion.

Personality
  The Pomsky is a bit of a comedian and tends to know that its cute antics will be met with plenty of adoration from human onlookers. They are highly adaptable to change, and their moderate exercise needs make them fairly suited to apartment living, so long as they get at least one long walk per day. That said, they tend to inherit their Husky parents' chatty howling and whining tendencies along with their Pomeranian parents' penchant for yapping.   This makes them very vocal dogs that may get on the neighbors' nerves. Also, they shed a ton, so be prepared to find hair everywhere and have some lint rollers and a vacuum cleaner at the ready. Pomskies tend to latch on to one favorite family member, though they may get along with all humans in the household. Socialization is very important and should begin at an early age. Pomskies can be nervous around strangers if they haven't been properly socialized.

Health
Since the breed is so new, not much is known about any common Pomsky health conditions. Keep in mind, though, that as is common with most mixed breeds, any hereditary health conditions that show up in either the Pomerian  or the Husky  may show up in your Pomsky, as well.

Care
As with any other breed, Pomskies need to be groomed on a regular basis to make sure their coats and skin are kept in top condition. They also need to be given regular daily exercise to ensure they remain fit and healthy. On top of this, dogs need to be fed good quality food that meets all their nutritional needs throughout their lives.

Living Conditions
The Pomsky’s generally small size makes this breed the perfect companion for someone living in an apartment all the way up to a larger home.

Training
Pomskies are highly intelligent and respond well to reward based training methods. However, they can sometimes inherit the Pomeranian’s stubbornness and the willfulness of the Siberian Husky and should therefore be handled with calm and assertive leadership. Failure to do so can result in “small dog syndrome” and other behavioral problems. For instance, Pomskies can be prone to resource guarding like the Pomeranians, and catching early signs of this behavioral problem will help you eliminate before it becomes a serious issue.
  For most new dog owners, it’s important to start with the basics such as potty training and learning to walk on a leash. Depending on the breeder you’ve got your Pomsky from and the puppy’s age, they might already know a trick or two, but it’s also highly likely you’ll need to be the one that that housetrains them. Training a puppy is not an easy feat, but it’s important to teach your Pomsky fur baby manners while they’re still young. If they sniff out you’re not an alpha, they’ll shamelessly exploit your weak side to their advantage- as any smart pupper would do!

Exercise
  Pomskies are high energy, intelligent dogs, much like both parent breeds. As such they must be given the right amount of daily exercise and as much mental stimulation as possible for them to be truly happy, well-rounded dogs. They need to be given a minimum of 30 to 40 minutes exercise a day, but more would be better so that boredom does not set in which could lead to a Pomsky developing some unwanted behavioural issues around the home.
  A shorter walk in the morning would be fine, but a longer more interesting one in the afternoon is a must. These dogs also like to be able to roam around a back garden as often as possible so they can really let off steam. However, the fencing must be extremely secure to keep these energetic dogs in because if they find a weakness in the fence, they will soon escape out and get into all sorts of trouble.

Grooming
  A Pomsky has a double coat that is usually soft, fluffy and silky. Brush or comb the Pomsky coat with a bristle brush at least weekly to distribute skin oils and prevent or remove mats and tangles.
  Bathe a Pomsky as needed. That might be weekly , monthly or somewhere in between.
Twice a year he “blows coat” as it’s called, losing a great deal of hair so new hair can grow in. This period can last up to three months during each shedding season — typically spring and fall. Brushing him daily at this time will help to ensure that loose fur comes out when you want it to and helps to keep it off your clothing and furniture.
  Other grooming needs include trimming his nails every few weeks, keeping his ears clean and dry and brushing his teeth regularly — daily if you can — with a vet-approved pet toothpaste. Small dogs can be especially prone to periodontal disease.

Children And Other Pets
  Pomskies are often wary of small children who may not be properly trained on how to handle animals, and they can nip if they feel uncomfortable or threatened. They can get along with other dogs if they are socialized, especially if they have been raised with them, though the high prey drive they inherit from the Husky means they might like to give chase to smaller animals like cats. It is best to socialize them early, especially if you plan to have them in a household with children or other pets.

Fun Facts About the Pomsky
  • The Pomsky is usually made by crossing a female Siberian Husky with a male Pomeranian to avoid complications caused by the smaller Pomeranian bearing a litter of larger puppies.
  • There is no way to predict which characteristics the Pomsky will inherit from each parent breed, but many Pomskies become protective of their owners and are skittish around children – they may not be the best family pet.
  • Though the black-and-white Husky-like coloration is the most popular for Pomskies, these dogs can range in coat type and length as well as color, including shades of brown, red, and even blonde.
  • Is the Pomsky a vulnerable breed? No, they have become one of the more popular cross breeds thanks to their kind natures and charming looks
  • A Pomsky’s sire is a Pomeranian and their dam is a Siberian Husky to avoid birthing complications
  • They come in lots of sizes, but prospective owners should be careful when considering buying an extra small Pomsky because of the health issues associated with their size
Did You Know?
Pomskies can be smart and learn quickly, especially when motivated by praise and food rewards.
  
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Everything about your Rat Terrier

Everything about your Rat Terrier
  Rat Terriers are extraordinary pets. While it is interesting to learn about the breeding purpose of Rat Terriers, their genetics actually influence health, outward appearance and behavior. Some behaviors make the Rat Terrier and some can be quite irritating! Understanding her unique needs will help you keep her healthy and will create a stronger bond between the two of you. 

Overview
  The Rat Terrier, also known as the American Rat Terrier, the Decker Giant, the Squirrel Terrier and the Feist, was developed in England to control vermin. Rat Terriers became so adept at killing rats both above and below ground that breed enthusiasts in England entered them in rat-baiting contests, where bets were wagered on how many rats a particular dog could kill. One Rat Terrier reportedly killed 2,501 rats in a seven-hour period. Today’s Rat Terriers retain their strong hunting instinct and also make terrific family companions.

Highlights
  • Lots of visitors to your home? Though devoted to his family, the Rat Terrier takes time to warm up to strangers.
  • A propensity for digging combined with a high prey drive means your Rat Terrier will leap over — or dig under — any fence he can.
  • A Rat Terrier has lots of energy; you should be able to spend at least 40 minutes a day exercising your dog. If you do not, the Rat Terrier can become destructive as a way to release pent up energy.
  • They need plenty of mental stimulation too. A bored Rat Terrier will resort to barking and chewing if he doesn't receive it.
  • The Rat Terrier's compulsion to chase doesn't make him the best choice for an off-leash dog. Even the most well-behaved are likely to "forget" their training in the face of tantalizing prey.
Other Quick Facts

  • A Rat Terrier’s ears can be erect or dropped, and both types can be seen in the same litter. In either case, they are always natural, never cropped.
  • The amount of white on a Rat Terrier can range from a small patch of white about the size of a quarter to as much as 90 percent of the body.
  • A Rat Terrier with blue eyes, wall eyes, or China eyes  may be more prone to deafness than those with dark or hazel eyes.
  • Rat Terriers come in what’s called a “pied” pattern: large patches of one or more colors with white. Colors you’ll see are black, chocolate, red, apricot, blue, fawn, tan, lemon or white, with or without tan markings.
Breed standards
AKC group: Terrier
UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan: 13 to 18 years
Average size: 8 to 25 pounds
Coat appearance: Single, smooth
Coloration: Black, tan, chocolate, blue, grey Isabella (pearl), lemon and apricot. May be tri-color or bi-color, with at least one color being white.
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles and seniors, apartments, houses with/without yards, farms/rural areas
Temperament: Loyal, active, playful, intelligent

History 
  One of the breeds that can proudly claim to be made in the USA, the Rat Terrier was bred to be an all-purpose farm dog whose job it was to kill rats and other vermin and hunt small game. In the early 20th century, this was one of the dogs you were most likely to see on a farm.
  Like so many Americans, the Rat Terrier has a highly diverse background. His ancestors include Fox Terriers and various other types of terriers, Beagles, Whippets, Italian Greyhounds, and dogs known as feists. The Whippet and Italian Greyhound blood added speed, while the Beagle brought in scenting ability and a pack mentality. The result was a dog with speed, versatility, “nose,” and a great disposition. President Theodore Roosevelt was a fan of Rat Terriers, and they were among the many pets he and his family brought to the White House.
  For many years, Rat Terriers were simply farm dogs and pets. They faded in popularity as more people moved to cities and fewer lived in rural areas. Fortunately, they weren’t completely forgotten and  in 1999 the United Kennel Club recognized Rat Terriers as a distinct breed. In the American Kennel Club, the Rat Terrier belongs to the Miscellaneous Class, the final step before AKC recognition.


Personality
  Intelligent, wary, and stubborn, this breed is a dynamo. Understand their general dislike of strangers and know that most warm up to visitors (although chances of that happening are slimmer if you're not there). If they're not properly socialized they will be fine with their family but they could become aggressive to strangers and other animals. They are also absolutely fearless, which can be a wonderful trait, though not if they are aggressive. 
  A good family pet, Rat Terriers are amazingly perceptive and intuitively respond to your moods. They have a great desire to please, love praise, and will follow you around the house. Bred to work all day on the farm, these guys need a lot of exercise and if they don't get it, their sharp little minds can turn devious to amuse themselves. Their people live with the mantra that a tired dog is a good dog. As with every dog, the Rat Terrier needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. 
  Socialization helps ensure that your Rat Terrier puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog. Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.

Health
This is an extremely long-lived and healthy breed, with an average life span of 13 to 16 years. Breed health concerns may include food and contact allergies, elbow and hip dysplasia, malocclusion (bad bites), demodicosis (demodectic mange) and patellar luxation.

Care
The Rat Terrier requires a good amount of daily outdoor exercise such as a long walk or jog. It will do fine as an apartment dog so long as it is provided with an adequate amount of exercise. The Rat Terrier sheds lightly and requires occasional brushing.

Living Conditions
Rat Terriers will do okay in an apartment so long as they get at least 20-30 minutes of exercise a day. They are fairly active indoors and should have at least a small to medium-sized yard. Rat Terriers love to dig, and they can get out of a fenced yard relatively easily. Provided they have the proper protection, they are able to spend a good amount of time outdoors. They love to be inside the house and outside to play.

Training
  The Rat Terrier is quite intelligent, but is also stubborn. They aren’t eager to please you – they’re in it for their own fun! That’s why you should either have some experience training dogs or be prepared to enlist the services of a professional. A good way to get the upper hand when it comes to training is to start early. Keep training sessions short and interesting in order to keep your dog focused.
  After you’ve conquered the basics, your Rat Terrier will be ready to take training to the next level. This breed excels at agility training and Earthdog activities. Anything you can do to keep these dogs occupied is helpful, as it keeps both their minds and bodies active and engaged.

Exercise 
  Don’t let its size fool you – the Rat Terrier as plenty of energy to spare. It needs at least 40 minutes of exercise a day in order to keep healthy and happy. If you live on a farm, this breed will go to work keeping the rodent population in check. If not, take your Rat Terrier for walks a few times a day, or take him to the dog park to work off all that excess energy. And there’s nothing that the Rat Terrier likes more than to play catch for hours on end.
  Because of its small size, this breed can live in an apartment, but you have to be committed to making sure they get outside for daily exercise. Once they get tuckered out, your Rat Terrier will happily curl up on the couch by your feet.

Grooming
  Rat Terriers have short, easy-care coats. Brush them weekly or more often with a soft bristle brush or rubber curry brush. The more often you brush, the less loose hair you’ll have floating around your house. Rat Terriers shed moderately year-round and they have a heavier shedding season in the spring and fall. An occasional bath is all he needs to stay clean.
  Be sure you don’t trim your Rattie’s whiskers, and don’t let a groomer do so. Whiskers are an important tactile aid for the Rattie.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Small dogs are prone to periodontal disease so brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
Although Rats who aren't used to children should be supervised, most Rats are wonderfully patient with kids, even kids who aren't part of the family. They are extremely fond of their family kids. Parents who don't like the idea of the family dog sleeping under the covers with the kids might be in for trouble. 
As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child. Although there may be a few disagreements regarding food and sleeping arrangements, the Rat Terrier likes other dogs. 
He doesn't spar with them and generally is not aggressive towards them. As a matter of fact, many Rats want to play with other dogs, so you need to be on your lookout for dog-reactive or aggressive dogs. Once an aggressive dog provokes a fight, these terriers return the emotion. Unfortunately, they are size-blind and don't care if the aggressor outweighs them five times over. Rats are prey-driven so any small, quick moving animal, including a hamster, mouse, chinchilla, and of course, a rat, is seen as prey, and may be chased. If a Rat is raised with a cat, bird, chicken, or other animal in a household, they will generally get along as family members.

Is the Rat Terrier the Right Dog for You?
If you are looking for an active, energetic, family-friendly dog, the rat terrier should be one of your considerations. Exercise needs are high, but grooming and health problems are substantially lower than with other breeds. If you have small animals or rodents, you will need to take extreme care around a rat terrier because of their high prey drive. If it sounds like these requirements are what you are looking for, the rat terrier might be a good fit for your household.

Did You Know?
One of the breeds that can proudly claim to be made in the USA, the Rat Terrier was bred to be an all-purpose farm dog whose job it was to kill rats and other vermin and hunt small game.



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Thursday, June 21, 2018

Everything about your Belgian Sheepdog

Everything about your Belgian Sheepdog
  Elegant, sporting a lovely basic black coat, the Belgian Sheepdog is not only graceful but versatile as well. Don’t let his good looks fool you. This dog is a workaholic in disguise. His work ethic is second to none and he is happiest when he has specific duties to perform. This breed is incredibly intelligent and can learn to do almost anything, with proper training. The Belgium Sheepdog isn’t all work and no play. He is an active fellow and will keep the kids busy playing fetch or Frisbee for hours.

Overview
  The Belgian Sheepdog, known as the Groenendael in Europe, is the solid-colored variety of the four Belgian shepherd dogs. Elegant and graceful, he has a long black coat and an imposing appearance. He's athletic as well as beautiful and maintains the working ability for which he was originally known, making him an excellent choice for agility, herding, and obedience competitions.
  His high energy levels necessitates much more activity than a simple walk around the block. Choose this breed only if you are a high-energy person who enjoys active daily exercises such as running, bicycling, and hiking. He’s also well suited any dog sport or activity you can teach, including agility, flyball, herding, obedience, rally, search and rescue, and tracking.
  Loving and loyal, the Belgian Sheepdog will always protect "his" children, but it's important for parents to supervise play when neighboring children are around. The Belgian may mistake the noise and high spirits of play as an assault and try to nip at your child's friends. With proper supervision and corrections, you can teach him that this isn't appropriate behavior. Belgian Sheepdogs do best with children when they're raised with them from puppyhood or socialized to them at an early age.

Highlights
  • The Belgian Sheepdog is also known as the Groenendael. He is the long-coated black variety of the four Belgian herding breeds. In Europe, the four Belgian Shepherd breeds are also known collectively as Chiens de Berger.
  • Belgian Sheepdogs shed year-round and require 15 to 20 minutes of brushing weekly.
  • Although they are good-size dogs, they are very people-oriented and want to be included in family activities.
  • Shyness can be a problem in this breed. Choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one beating up his littermates or the one hiding in the corner.
  • Belgian Sheepdogs can get along well with other dogs and cats if they're raised with them, but they have a chase instinct and will go after animals that run from them.
  • Belgian Sheepdogs are play-oriented and sensitive. Keep training sessions fun, consistent, and positive.
  • Belgian Sheepdogs require at least an hour of exercise per day. If you don't provide them with exercise and mental stimulation in the form of training or play, they'll find their own entertainment, and chances are it will be expensive to repair.
  • Belgian Sheepdogs will chase joggers, bicyclists, and cars, so they need a securely fenced yard.
  • Belgian Sheepdogs are very intelligent and alert. They also have strong herding and protection instincts. Early, consistent training is critical!
  • When you look at a Belgian Sheepdog, you see an elegant dog with a square body, wedge-shaped head, triangular ears, dark brown eyes, and a long black coat with 
Breed standards
AKC group: Herding
UKC group: Herding Dog Group
Average lifespan: 10–14 years
Average size: 60 to 75 pounds
Coat appearance: double-coated breed,long, straight hair that's moderately harsh to the touch, never wiry or silky
Coloration: depends on variety,completely black or black with a bit of white between the pads of the feet
Hypoallergenic: No
Shedding Propensity: Seasonally heavy twice per year, with light shedding year-round
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles, houses with yards, farms/rural areas

Temperament: Independent, watchful, protective, alert

History
  The earliest documentation of the true Belgian Sheepdog dates back to the late 1800’s, when people in European countries were developing individual spirits of pride and nationalism that included developing dog breeds that would be identified with their particular homeland. The Club du Chien de Berger Belge  was founded in 1891 for this very purpose, and it adopted the first Belgian Shepherd standard in 1893. The breed was registered by the Societe Royale Saint-Hubert in 1901. The long-haired Belgian Sheepdog was primarily developed and promoted by Nicolas Rose, a restaurateur and owner of the Chateau de Groenendael just south of Brussels. He established a thriving kennel dating back to 1893, and his stock became the basis of today’s beautiful black Belgian Sheepdogs, which were officially named the Groenendael in 1910.
  While originally prized as superior herding dogs and as representatives of their home country of Belgium, this breed’s versatility and skills as a working dog became apparent even before World War I, when they were used as police and customs dogs in Europe and the United States. During the war, Belgian Sheepdogs were distinguished as message carriers and ambulance dogs. The fame of this breed took off after the war. The Belgian Sheepdog Club of America was founded in 1919, and by 1926 the breed was ranked 42nd out of 100 breeds recognized by the American Kennel Club. During the Great Depression, the Belgian Sheepdog’s popularity in the United States declined dramatically, and the American breed club ceased to function. 
  During World War II, the breed resurfaced as a military assistant and guard dog. The current Belgian Sheepdog Club of America was formed in 1949, and the breed standard was approved by the AKC in 1959. This breed continues to thrive in obedience, agility, conformation, tracking, schutzhund, herding, sledding, police work, search and rescue and as guide and therapy dogs. Perhaps their most profound accomplishment is being loving, gentle and devoted companions.

Temperament

  Belgian Shepherd Dogs are described as highly intelligent, alert, sensitive to everything going on around them and form very strong relationship bonds. They are said to be loyal, intelligent, fun, highly trainable and well suited to family life.They should receive plenty of socializing as puppies and will benefit from regular activity and close interaction with people throughout their lifespan. Their herding heritage gives them a comparatively high energy level, and mental as well as physical exercise is necessary to keep a Belgian happy and healthy. In 2012, the North Wales Police force harnessed a Belgian Shepherd herding behavior, headbutting, in a novel approach to subduing criminals. The dogs are muzzled to prevent bites, and trained to forcefully headbutt targets at the midriff on command, knocking them off balance.
  Belgian Shepherds do well in sports such as obedience training and dog agility. They are used as assistance and search and rescue dogs, as well as police, military and narcotics dogs.

Health

  Both elbow and hip dysplasia are prevalent in the breed. Other health issues such as epilepsy, cancer and progressive retinal atrophy have been diagnosed as well. Belgian Sheepdogs often have sensitivity to anesthesia so caution should be taken when considering any kind of sedation.

Care

  The Belgian Sheepdog loves to live inside the house with its human family, although it can adapt to outdoor living. It also performs best when given access to the yard. Apart from that, exercise on a regular basis is essential for the breed and should ideally combine long hours of play and jogging. The Belgian Sheepdog's coat requires the occasional brushing to keep away dead hairs, even more so during times of shedding.

Living Conditions
  The Belgian Shepherd/Groenendael will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. It is moderately active indoors and will do best with at least an average-sized yard. The Groenendael can sleep outdoors, although he prefers to be with his people.

Trainability
  Though sometimes willful and stubborn, Belgians are highly trainable and thrive on advanced obedience, trick and agility training. They can read small movements and even changes in facial expression, and are famous for being so “in tune” with their trainers that they can literally stay one step ahead of the person giving commands. For this reason, Belgian Sheepdogs are often competitors in agility and herding competitions.
  Though easily trainable, Belgians are not for the first-time dog owner. They are highly intelligent and manipulative, and can easily walk all over someone who does not know how to remain consistent with training. Positive reinforcement is the best method to train a Belgian Sheepdog, as discipline can lead to avoidance behavior and stubbornness.

Exercise 
  This breed requires a lot of exercise and would not be suitable for a sedentary family. The Belgian Sheepdog loves to run and play and could do so for long periods of time. He’ll play fetch, ball and Frisbee with the kids or happily go jogging with one of the adults. As long as he is active, the Belgian Sheepdog will be happy.
  Without proper exercise, this breed can and will become destructive. They will bark incessantly and tear apart your furniture or chew up your shoes. All of this unwanted behavior can be avoided by keeping the Belgian Sheepdog physically active.

Grooming 
  Belgian Sheepdogs require a lot of brushing to maintain their year-round shedding and to keep the coat free of tangles and mats. Weekly brushing can take anywhere from 15 to 30 minutes, but daily swipes with a brush or comb can make the weekly sessions easier. Twice a year they will blow their entire coat, which will require extra grooming time. A warm bath can help release the hair and cut down the seasonal shedding time. Regular bathing only needs to occur as needed, if the dog is dirty or begins to emit a doggy odor.
  Weekly teeth and ear cleaning can help promote health and keep harmful bacteria to a minimum. Active Belgians will naturally wear down their toenails, but if the nails click on a hard floor, they should be trimmed.

Children and Other Pets
  Belgian Shepherds are known to become devoted to their families showing a lot of affection to everyone in a household which includes children. They love nothing more than being involved in things that go on in a home environment and this includes playing lots of interactive games with the kids. However, any interaction between dogs and children should always be supervised by an adult to make sure playtime does not get too rough, which is especially true if the kids have any of the friends over.
  If a well-bred and nicely-socialised Belgian Shepherd grows up with other animals and pets including cats in the home, they generally get on well together. Some dogs may show aggression to other dogs which is why it's so important for puppies to be well socialised from a young age which must include them meeting other dogs once they have been fully vaccinated. Care should always be taken when a BSD is around any smaller animals and pets they don't already know just to be on the safe side.

Is this breed right for you?
 The Belgian Sheepdog is a loyal, friendly and affectionate friend. It may have a strong working-dog background, but it craves companionship and family time above everything else. Highly protective of its family, property and territory, the Belgian Sheepdog is a passionate but restrained watchdog. An alert and watchful companion to children, it flourishes when given a steady dose of good-natured play and affection.

Did You Know?
  If you are crafty — or know someone who is — you can save a Belgian Sheepdog’s hair, have it spun into yarn, and knit it into socks, sweaters, hats, or afghans.


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Wednesday, June 20, 2018

Reasons Your Dog Has Diarrhea

Reasons Your Dog Has Diarrhea
Dog diarrhea is caused by a number of factors, ranging from simple digestive issues to serious illnesses. It is common health condition characterized by loose bowel movements and abdominal pains.
While most cases are mild and easily treated at home with natural remedies, others could be a sign of more serious problems.
Diarrhea that develops suddenly in an otherwise healthy dog is often due to scavenging behavior, stress, a sudden change in diet, or viral, bacterial or parasitic infections.
More chronic diarrhea can be caused by dietary allergies or intolerances, stress, some types of parasites , bacterial infections, pancreatic disease, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, some types of cancer, and diseases outside of the gastrointestinal tract. 

1. Dietary indiscretion
The most common cause of diarrhea in dogs is what veterinarians call dietary indiscretion. This means that the dog has eaten something other than normal dog food. Leftovers, food that is partly rotten, grease from the barbecue grill, and more: many dogs love to get into and eat what they shouldn’t, and it often leaves them with diarrhea.
There’s actually a name for it in veterinary circles—“garbage toxicosis” or “garbage gut.”

2. Change in diet
Dogs that experience a quick change in diet often develop diarrhea (and sometimes vomiting). This happens commonly when people feel that their dog is bored with a certain diet or when they introduce new treats. If a dog’s diet needs to be changed, it should always be done gradually so as not to induce gastrointestinal upset.

It may take a few days for a dog’s digestive system to adapt to new proteins. That’s why many dog-food manufacturers recommend that you go slow when you switch from one brand of food to another.

3. Food intolerance
Food intolerances, sensitivities, and allergies may cause diarrhea in dogs. Skin involvement, such as scratching, redness, and hair loss is also commonly seen in association with these conditions. One example of a food intolerance is that many dogs are lactose intolerant and develop diarrhea when given milk products.

4. Parasites
Parasites are frequently diagnosed in dogs with diarrhea, especially puppies. Hookworms, roundworms, tapeworms and whipworms are all parasites that cause dog diarrhea. Coccidia and giardia are single-celled organisms that are common causes of diarrhea in dogs as well.

5. Swallowing an indigestible foreign body, like a toy or a dozen or more socks
If a dog ingests something that isn’t edible, it is called a foreign body, and this can cause diarrhea (and often vomiting and decreased appetite). A foreign body may be a ball, stick, rock, toy, cloth, or any other non-food object that a dog may eat.

6. Infections with common viruses 
Viral infections of the gastrointestinal system can cause diarrhea in dogs. The most common of these are parvovirus, distemper virus, and coronavirus. These illnesses are all more common in very young puppies or, in the cases of parvovirus and distemper, unvaccinated dogs.

7. Bacterial infections
Salmonella, E.coli, Clostridia, and Campylobacter are among the most common of the bacteria that cause intestinal infections and diarrhea in dogs. They are most often diagnosed in very young dogs and those that have conditions that cause immunosuppression. Dogs on raw food diets may be more susceptible to bacterial infections than other dogs, as well.

8. Pancreatitis
Inflammation of the pancreas, or pancreatitis, causes diarrhea in many dogs that suffer from it. This condition often causes vomiting and lack of appetite. Pancreatitis is commonly caused when dogs get into or are given a food item that is high in fat. If the dog is not used to this, pancreatitis can occur as a result. This causes pain, diarrhea, vomiting, decreased appetite, and sometimes other organ involvement.

9. Illnesses, such as kidney and liver disease, colitis, inflammatory bowel disease, and cancer
Chronic diarrhea, loss of appetite, and vomiting can be signs of more serious issues occurring within your dog’s body. Diseases of the digestive tract or the surrounding organs can cause bloody stools, painful bowel movements and many other debilitating side effects.
Conditions like inflammatory bowel syndrome may result from sensitivity to certain foods or allergies. IBS is the inflammation of a dog’s intestines that can cause chronic diarrhea, vomiting, gas, upset stomach, fatigue and weight loss. IBS can affect dogs of all ages, but it is commonly found in older dogs and certain breeds who are predisposed to digestive issues. Cancer treatments like  chemotherapy and other potent medication can also contribute to dogs with loose stools.

10. Poisonous substances or plants
Sudden diarrhea is one of the first symptoms of dog poisoning. Stomach discomfort is common after your dog has eaten a toxic substance. Lead-based products, poisonous plants, and household products are some of the few things that can result in gastrointestinal problems. These substances are dangerous and can cause a real health scare if left untreated. When your dog ingests these toxins, the body naturally wants to expel the poison, which leads to detoxification processes of vomiting and diarrhea. Always ask your vet in the case of dogs with diarrhea.
You can find toxic products all over your house. Things such as chocolate, human medications, mushrooms, laundry detergents, chalk, charcoal and plants can be very harmful to your pet if ingested.

11. Stress or emotional upset
Dogs that experience stress often develop diarrhea. This is most common in puppies just coming into a new home or dogs in shelters. It is also a common occurrence when new animals are brought into the home or a person in the household leaves or has a new schedule.

12. Antibiotics and other medications

Along with helping cure infections, antibiotics are also known to cause the runs. Gastrointestinal problems are common side effects of antibiotics. Antibiotics are used to kill harmful bacteria in our bodies caused by infections. However, antibiotics kill not only the bad bacteria but good bacteria as well. “Good” bacteria is needed to balance the digestive system, without them your dog will experience stomach discomfort and cramps. Antibiotics can disrupt this bacterial balance and result in diarrhea during and after your dog’s antibiotic treatment.





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Monday, June 4, 2018

Everything about your Czechoslovakian Wolfdog

Everything about your Czechoslovakian Wolfdog
  Named for its wolf-like appearance, the Czechoslovakian Wolfdog is a new breed of dogs developed in Czechoslovakia and is considered to be rare. These herding dogs have a rectangular build with large barrel-shaped chest, broad neck, muscular belly and a bushy tail. They stand upon two pairs of straight forelimbs, and strong, long-calved hind limbs. Its muzzle is black, ears are erect and eyes are amber-colored and positioned obliquely. They are best suited for rural setting where they have lots of space to roam, and a family property to guard. They are used to living in cold climates.

Overview
  The Czechoslovakian Vlcak or Czech Wolf Dog is a relatively new breed of dog first bred as a military attack dog. This breed is the result of an experiment in 1955 that involved crossing 48 working line German Shepherds with Carpathian wolves. The idea behind creating the Czech Wolf Dog was to create a powerful breed with the trainability, temperament and pack mentality of the German Shepherd as well as the strength and endurance of the Carpathian Wolf. Although first used by the Czech Special Forces in special military operations, the breed has since been used successfully in search and rescue, tracking, herding, agility, hunting, obedience and drafting.
  The Czech Wolf Dog, like it name indicates, looks more like a wolf than it does a dog. Its body is lithe and powerful with long feet and a strong back. Its head too is like that of a wolf and its powerful teeth meet in a razor sharp bite. The dog’s chest is large and flat and its stomach is strong and drawn in. The Czech Wolf Dog’s coat too is reminiscent of that of the Carpathian Wolf and is short, thick and is yellow-grey or silvery-grey in color.
   The Czechoslovakian Vlcak is calm, self-assured and intelligent. It is extremely brave and protective over its masters but will rarely attack without cause or command. However, they do require a great deal of leadership and handling skills and are not recommended for beginner dog owners.

Breed standards
AKC group: The AKC Foundation Stock Service  is an optional recording service for purebred dogs that are not yet eligible for AKC registration.
UKC group: Herding
Average lifespan: 12-15 years
Average size: 44-54 lb
Coat appearance: Double layer, Straight, and Thick
Coloration: Yellowish-gray to silver-gray with a characteristic light mask
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Active singles, houses with yards, guard duty, farms and rural areas
Temperament: Lively, quick, courageous, sociable
Comparable Breeds: German Shepherd, Alaskan Malamute

History
  The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog, also referred to as the Slovak Wolfdog, could be a new breed, developed in 1958 being the offspring of an experimental crossing of a German shepherd with a Carpathian Wolf to ascertain that wolf and dog genes can be combined to form a healthy specimen. In 1982, it absolutely was recognized as a separate breed. Today, the Czechoslovakian Wolfdogs are not any longer used as the military dogs they are being used as companion and guard dogs.


Temperament
  The Czechoslovak Wolfdog is lively, very active, capable of endurance, docile with quick reactions. It is fearless, courageous, suspicious, yet does not attack without cause. It shows tremendous loyalty towards its master. Resistant to weather conditions. Versatile in his use. The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog is very playful. Without proper leadership it can be temperamental. 
  It learns easily. We can admire its all-around qualities rather than its specialization. However, we should not expect it should train spontaneously; the behavior of the CsV is strictly purposeful—it is necessary to find motivation for training. The most frequent cause of failure is usually the fact that the human is not as strong-minded as the dog, lacking leadership and/or the dog is tired out with long, useless repetitions of the same exercise, which results in the loss of motivation. These dogs have admirable senses and are very good at following trails. They are really independent and can cooperate in the pack with a special purposefulness. If required, they can easily shift their activity to the night hours. The independent work of the pack without the necessary control of a man was the reason for their use in the army. Sometimes problems can occur during their training when barking is required. 
  Czechoslovakian Wolfdogs have a much wider range of means of expressing themselves and in some situations barking is unnatural for them; they try to communicate with their masters in other ways. Generally, to teach CsVs stable and reliable performance takes a bit more time than it does to teach traditional specialized breeds. The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog can be a bit dog aggressive if the humans are not displaying the proper authority. It is not generally trustworthy with other pets. It is usually good with children, but suspicious and watchful with strangers.

Health 
  With his wild heritage, the Czechoslovakian Wolfdog is not known to be affected by any specific health problems. Because he is a larger breed, however, he may be prone to musculoskeletal issues like hip dysplasia and may also be prone to bloat.

Care
  The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog needs a lot of exercises, without which they would display restless behavior readily evident from their pacing back and forth inside the home. A minimum of 45 minutes of daily physical activities is recommended for this breed. Take them out every day for a long, brisk walk or jogging, leading their way, or allow them to play and run around openly in a broad, enclosed space.
  These dogs have a double coat and need special attention especially during heavy shedding seasons, occurring twice a year. Brush them thoroughly with a thick bristled brush.
  However, this dog is clean and do not typically develop any doggie odor. Hence, they seldom need bath since their coat can readily shed dirt. Although, you can dry shampoo them when required.

Living Conditions
  The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. It is moderately active indoors and will do best with a large yard. Well-suited for cold climates.

Training
  As a cross between the wild wolf and the German Shepherd, the Czechoslovakian Wolfdog is an extremely intelligent breed. These dogs learn quickly, though they can be tricky to train – they require a great deal of motivation since their behavior is strictly purposeful. It is also important to note that these dogs can be fairly independent as well, so they are best for experienced dog owners. You’ll need to maintain a firm hand in leadership with this breed and you’ll need to continue training throughout the dog’s life. Early socialization is also recommended, especially if you plan to keep the dog in a home with other pets.

Exercise Requirements
  The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog is a highly active dog that requires a lot of daily exercise. This breed needs a long walk at least once a day and will also appreciate having an outdoor space in which to run.

Grooming
  This breed sheds heavily twice a year. Bathing is most unnecessary, as the coat sheds dirt readily. Dry shampoo occasionally. This dog is clean and odorless.

Good with Kids
 This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Interesting Facts

  • The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog has a distinct 'facial mask', which is common to most wolf-like breeds.
  • Although these dogs were extensively used in the army, but they were less of a barker, sometimes problems occurred during their training sessions, when barking was required.
  • To own a Czechoslovak Wolfdog wolfdog in the UK, one needs to obtain permission from the local council since the breed is listed under 'Dangerous Wild Animals' license.
  • Like wolves, these wolfdogs have the ability to go without food for 2 to 3 days.
  • In 1982, the Czechoslovak Wolfdog was officially recognized as a national breed in Czechoslovakia.

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