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Wednesday, November 8, 2017

Everything about your Bedlington Terrier

Everything about your Bedlington Terrier
  If you saw this dog walking down the street, you may do a double take. Was that a lamb or a dog? The Bedlington Terrier is most certainly a dog, even if it’s unusual looking. A true terrier in every sense of the word, this breed makes a wonderful family addition. He loves playing with the kids and enjoys a good cuddle session at the end of the day. He’ll also keep an eye out for people he thinks are unsavory and let you know if they’re getting a little too close for comfort.
  When he’s not vying to be the center of attention, the Bedlington Terrier is active and athletic, and does well in agility competitions, Earthdog trials and in the show ring. He gets along well with other dogs when raised with them and will give smaller outdoor animals a run for their money. Read on to learn more about this interesting dog.

Overview
  The Bedlington Terrier, also known as the Rodberry or Rothbury Terrier, the Northumberland Fox Terrier, the North Counties Terrier, the Gypsy Dog or simply the Bedlington, comes from a small mining village in the county of Northumberland, England. This lamb-like dog, with its pear-shaped head and arched back, looks like nothing else in the canine world. While the Bedlington’s body type and coat do not resemble that of the typical terrier, their personalities do. Bedlingtons have boundless energy and are intelligent, tenacious, friendly and bold. They are terrific family dogs and form strong bonds with their human companions. Despite its wooly cuteness, this is a tough breed with a strong work ethic – a terrier through and through. The Bedlington Terrier was accepted by the American Kennel Club in 1886 and is a member of the Terrier Group.

Highlights
  • Bedlingtons can be stubborn at times.
  • Early socialization with other pets is a must to prevent problems.
  • Bedlington Terriers need exercise and mental stimulation or they will get bored, which leads to trouble.
  • Males can be fierce fighters if challenged by another dog.
  • Bedlingtons are highly intelligent and moderately easy to train. They don't respond to harsh training methods.
  • Bedlingtons require grooming once or twice weekly to maintain the coat and prevent matting.
  • Bedlingtons can be one-person dogs.
  • Bedlingtons are terriers and like to dig.
  • Bedlingtons require a fenced yard. They will chase other animals and they are very fast.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Bedlington has a very different look than other terriers, with his unusual coat, roached back, arched loin, hare feet and distinctive, springy gait. The tail, shaped like a scimitar, tapers to a point.
  • The Bedlington has a narrow head covered with a topknot that is lighter than the body color, dark, small, almond-shaped eyes, triangular ears with rounded tips and a thin, velvety texture, and a mild, gentle expression, belying the fact that he is a terrier at heart.
  • In addition to backing off animals as wily as foxes and badgers, the Bedlington Terrier is an excellent water dog.
  • Bedlington Terriers often live for upwards of 17 years.
  • Borrowing form the dog's simultaneous pluck and likability, non-league UK soccer club the Bedlington Terriers have recently brought the breed's name to prominence in Hollywood.   
Breed standards
AKC group: Terriers
UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan: 11-16 years
Average size: 17 to 23 pounds
Coat appearance: Corded, Harsh and Rough, and Short
Coloration: white, blue, liver, sandy, blue and tan, sandy and tan or liver and tan
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles and seniors, apartments, houses with/without yards, watchdog
Temperament: Playful, loyal, gentle, friendly
Comparable Breeds: Whippet, Dandie Dinmont Terrier


History
  The Bedlington Terrier was developed in the north of England, but where he came from is anybody's guess. One theory has it that he traveled with Rom, or gypsies, who used him to poach game on the estates they passed by. His talents in ridding the land of rats, badgers, and other vermin drew the attention of the local squires, who acquired some of the dogs for themselves.
An image of a Bedlington Terrier, circa 1889.
  One of their noble fans was Lord Rothbury, whose estate was located in Bedlington in the county of Northumberland. For a time, they were known as Rothbury terriers, but eventually the name Bedlington stuck. The first dog to actually be called a Bedlington Terrier, in 1825, was Ainsley's Piper, owned by Joseph Ainsley of Bedlington. Piper went up against his first badger when he was only 8 months old, and he was still showing other dogs how it was done when he was old, toothless, and nearly blind.
  There is speculation that the Whippet was added to the breed at some point to increase the dog's speed and agility. He also has similarities to the Dandie Dinmont, Soft Coated Wheaten, and Kerry Blue Terriers, so he may share common ancestors with them.
  The popularity of Bedlingtons crossed all social boundaries. They were favorites of factory and mine workers, who used them to rid the premises of rats and then raced them in their off hours, against each other and against Whippets.
  Bedlingtons joined other dogs in the show ring in the mid-1800s, and the National Bedlington Terrier Club was formed in England in 1877. The first Bedlington Terrier to be registered by the American Kennel Club was Ananias in 1886. Today the Bedlington ranks 128th among the 155 breeds and varieties recognized by the AKC.

Personality

  Alert, energetic, and intelligent, the Bedlington is an excellent companion and watchdog. He enjoys being the center of attention and likes to entertain his people. He can be aggressive toward other dogs of the same sex and will chase small furry animals.
  Temperament is affected by a number of factors, including heredity, training, and socialization. Puppies with nice temperaments are curious and playful, willing to approach people and be held by them. Choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one who's beating up his littermates or the one who's hiding in the corner. Always meet at least one of the parents — usually the mother is the one who's available — to ensure that they have nice temperaments that you're comfortable with. Meeting siblings or other relatives of the parents is also helpful for evaluating what a puppy will be like when he grows up.
  Like every dog, Bedlingtons need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Bedlington puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog. Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.

Health 
  This is a healthy breed, but the Bedlington Terrier has a few health problems owners should be aware of. One of the most common issues in the breed is copper toxicosis, a hereditary disease where the liver can’t expel dietary copper, which leads to a buildup in the body that result in illness and death. Be sure to have your Bedlington tested. Other issues include renal cortical hypoplasia, retinal dysplasia, patellar luxation and distichiasis.

Care
  Bedlington Terriers are a hardy breed with moderate activity levels. They are capable of running at high speeds, so a safely fenced area is important. They are not suited to living outdoors. They are small enough to be appropriate for an apartment as long as they have a safe place to exercise.
  Exercise for the Bedlington can mean a nice walk or a vigorous game of fetch. He can jog with you or go on a hike. You can also train him for agility, obedience, or tracking. He's quiet in the home, happy to relax on the sofa with you.
  The Bedlington is intelligent, and that intelligence makes him only moderately easy to train. He does best when you can persuade him that doing what you want is really his idea or benefits him in some way. Use positive reinforcement techniques such as praise, play, and food rewards. Harsh words and physical force will not work with this breed, as they will only bring out his stubborn streak and begin a battle of wills that you will probably lose.
  Like all dogs, Bedlington puppies can be destructive. Crate them to prevent them from getting into trouble if you're not around to supervise.

Living Conditions
  This breed will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. They are fairly active indoors and will do okay without a yard.

Training
  Even though this is an intelligent breed, he’s still a terrier. You may have a challenge on your hands, especially if you haven’t had much dog-training practice. Bedlington Terriers tend to have a mind of their own, so they may not take kindly to your commands. For the best results, treats and positive reinforcement will garner what you want. If you let him think that the training benefits him, he’ll be more likely to pick up good behaviors.
  Once basic obedience has been taught, you may want to enroll your Bedlington Terrier in agility or Earthdog training. He loves to dig, so Earthdog will help him tap into these instincts. And with his lithe body, he’s a natural for agility courses.

Activity Requirements
  This breed requires moderate exercise and has been known to tailor their activity level to that of their owner. Older people can raise an active, happy Bedlington just by taking daily walks just as a young person who brings their Bedlington on jogs can, too. Apartment living is OK for the Bedlington, so long as daily walks are part of his schedule.
  Bedlington Terriers enjoy playing with children, however they can be counted on to set their own boundaries. Children should be cautioned not to play too roughly with this breed, as they won't hesitate to nip or bite when pushed too far.

Grooming
  The Bedlington coat is a mixture of hard and soft hair with a texture that is crisp but not wiry. It tends to curl, especially on the head and face.
  The distinctive look of the Bedlington, with the Mohawk-type head style and shaved ears, doesn’t come naturally. It is achieved through regular grooming, including bathing, brushing and styling. The Bedlington’s coat must be trimmed every six to eight weeks to maintain its look. Brush it once or twice a week. Frequent bathing and heavy conditioners are not recommended because they will soften the coarse coat.
  The Bedlington’s unique hairstyle may look simple, but it is not for beginners. It is best to take him to a professional groomer who is familiar with the breed unless you are extremely ambitious and skilled. If you want to learn how to create it, apprentice yourself to a Bedlington breeder or show dog handler. The Bedlington Terrier Club of America gives a detailed explanation on its website of how the dog should be groomed for the show ring.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually once a month. Brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath. Check the ears weekly for dirt, redness or a bad odor that can indicate an infection. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball dampened with a gentle ear cleaner recommended by your veterinarian. Watery eyes and tear stains are not uncommon with the light-colored Bedlington. Wipe around the eyes with a soft, damp cloth to minimize staining. Introduce your Bedlington to grooming at an early age so he will become accustomed to it and accept it willingly.

Children And Other Pets
  When he's raised with children, the Bedlington can be an energetic playmate. He's probably best suited to homes with older children. While a Bedlington will tolerate a certain amount of rough handling, he will set limits when things get too rough, and he doesn't understand that a child's skin isn't as tough as another dog's.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Bedlingtons can get along with other dogs, especially if they're raised with them, but they may be aggressive toward dogs of the same sex. And like most terriers, they might not start a fight, but they won't back down from one. Bedlingtons can be fierce fighters if aroused, so be cautious when introducing them to new canine companions, especially other adults of the same sex. Male Bedlingtons especially will persist in a fight until major damage is done. A Bedlington might learn to get along with your indoor cat if he's raised with him, but outdoor cats and other animals will be fair game for him to chase.

Is the Bedlington Terrier the Right Breed for you?
High Maintenance: Grooming should be performed often to keep the dog's coat in good shape. Occasional trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Moderately Easy Training: The Bedlington Terrier is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Good for New Owners: This breed is well suited for those who have little experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  Bedlington Terrier puppies are born black or brown. As they mature, the coat lightens to blue, sandy, liver, blue and tan, sandy and tan, or liver and tan. The tan markings are found over the eyes, inside the ears, under the tail, and in traces on the inside of the legs.

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Everything about your American Hairless Terrier

Everything about your American Hairless Terrier
  Although a fairly new breed, the American Hairless Terrier has gathered quite the fan club in its few decades of existence. Identical in appearance to the Rat Terrier, barring its obvious lack of hair, the American Hairless Terrier, or AHT, is a fairly small dog with strong shoulders, a well-muscled neck and powerful legs. And although it looks more like a toy breed, it is actually a highly intelligent working breed.

Overview
  The American Hairless Terrier is a well-muscled small dog who descends directly from the Rat Terrier. He has a typical terrier personality and loves to make mischief. His tail must be long and cannot be docked or naturally bobbed. He is originally a hairless breed, but like all other hairless breeds, there is a smooth coat variety.
  Hairless puppies have normal eyebrows and whiskers. The American Hairless Terrier is lively and makes an excellent companion for anyone. He does great with children and can have boundless energy. He can be destructive if left to his own devices and he thrives on attention. Interactive toys will keep him mentally engaged when you do not have the time to play with him.

Quick Facts
  • The term “Pit Bull” is often applied indiscriminately to APBTs, American Staffordshire Terriers and sometimes Staffordshire Bull Terriers, a British breed. The term may also be used to label any dog who resembles those breeds, even if he is a Lab mix with little or no “Pit Bull” in his background.
  • An APBT comes in any color, pattern or combination of colors, except merle.
  • Celebrities who count Pitties as their best friends include actresses Jessica Alba, Jessica Biel and Alicia Silverstone; cooking guru Rachael Ray; and political satirist Jon Stewart.
Breed standards
AKC group: Terrier Group

UKC group: Terriers
Average lifespan: 14-16 years
Average size: 30 to 60 pounds
Coat appearance: hairless and coated varieties
Coloration: near-solid (with some white), brindled, spotted (piebald) and saddled
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles and seniors, houses with yards
Temperament: Lively, inquisitive, alert, intelligent
Comparable Breeds: Xoloitzcuintli, Rat Terrier

History
  During a period of American history, dog fighting was a legal and popular activity. Many wealthy people and prominent politicians could be found at dog fights, betting on their dogs, which went by several names: Pit Bull, Yankee Terrier and half-and-half dog — a reference to their origin as a cross between Bulldogs and Terriers. 
  The same dogs were equally popular with farmers and families. They tended to be good ratters and useful in hunting dangerous wild pigs and bears, and they were said to be good with people. Pit Bulls could do it all, from being the kids’ playmate to serving in the military.    A Pit Bull represented the United States on World War I recruiting posters, and pop culture Pitties included Tige in the Buster Brown comic strip; Nipper, the RCA trademark dog; and Petey, who starred in the “Our Gang” comedies of the 1930s.
The United Kennel Club has registered the American Pit Bull Terrier since 1898, when the club was established. The American Kennel Club does not currently recognize the American Pit Bull Terrier as a breed.
  In 1998, the breed gained recognition as the American Hairless Terrier (AHT) by the American Rare Breeds Association and the National Rat Terrier Club. Canada was the first country outside the US to gain recognition, by Canadian Rarities in 1999. In 1999, the breed was recognized as Rat Terrier, Hairless Variety by the United Kennel Club.
  In the US, the American Hairless Terrier Association is the provisional breed club. Other national breed clubs around the world include the Canadian American Hairless Terrier Association and the Japanese Hairless American Terrier Club.
  On January 1, 2004, the United Kennel Club (UKC) recognized the AHT as a distinct breed.
  The American Kennel Club (AKC) also includes the AHT within its Foundation Stock Series and allows them to participate in AKC Performance events and in Open shows.
  Despite its smaller size, the AHT is not a toy breed. Rather, like its Rat Terrier cousin, the AHT is a working breed.
  In January 2016 the American Hairless Terrier was recognized fully by the AKC in the terrier group.



Temperament
  The American Hairless Terrier (AHT) is an intelligent, curious, and energetic breed.
Graceful and elegant, the American Hairless Terrier is also strong and athletic. The AHT enjoys participating in agility games like its other terrier cousins. The AHT typically likes to dig, chase small game and will bark when alarmed and will act as a good watch dog. The AHT is not a strong swimmer and should be monitored around water.
  Its ancestry gives the AHT a strong hunting instinct, but its lack of coat makes it a less likely candidate for a hunting dog as rough underbrush may hurt the AHT's unprotected skin. As a breed founded by working dogs, the prey drive is strong in many AHTs. This has led to debate among owners as to whether or not AHTs are appropriate for families with young children. Anecdotal evidence suggests that AHT's can be trained to be less aggressive to children, especially if the dog is shown that it may not dominate a child. Due to the small size of many AHTs, they can be hurt if roughly handled. Positive reward is the most effective form of training, however, some AHT require a more care-giver dominant approach to correction in giving the AHT direction.

Health 
  These dogs do not have absent premolars or any of the breeding complications associated with the hairless breeds. The AHT does not have the major skin problems commonly seen in hairless dogs. Sometimes they will get a rash on their skin. Because of their lack of hair, they do need protection from the sun. Sunscreen should be applied or a shirt should be worn, not only for the protection from the sun but from the cold as well. AHTs do have sweat glands and will get pimples! They go away on their own. Rashes due to grass allergies are not that uncommon. Other allergies do occur as well.

Living Conditions
  The AHT will do OK in an apartment so long as they get at least 20-30 minutes of exercise a day. They are fairly active indoors and should have at least a small to medium sized yard. AHTs love to dig. Since they have sweat glands they do not drool at the mouth or pant in order to balance their body heat. They should wear a sweater in cold weather.

Training
  Like Rat Terriers, AHTs are highly intelligent and are also eager to please. They are highly trainable and respond well to positive reinforcement based training methods. They can, however, turn willful and stubborn if an owner fails to demonstrate calm and assertive leadership.

Exercise
  The breed enjoys challenging games and outdoor romps. They need to be taken on a long daily walk.
  American Hairless Terriers are extremely strong and athletic and require a significant amount of exercise. Owners should not purchase these dogs if they cannot take them on a long walk every day. When deprived of an outlet for their excess energy, these dogs can turn destructive and develop other behavioral problems.

Grooming
  The only special care required is preventing sunburn and keeping them warm in cold weather. They should be bathed one to three times a week; owner’s preference. Their nails should be trimmed weekly. If their skin becomes dry, lotion (without lanolin) can be applied. This breed obviously does not shed and they do not get fleas, but they do shed skin cells about every 20 days, therefore there is some dander but it is very minimal. AHTs forget they do not have any hair and romp around outside. Scratches and cuts do happen and they need to be attended to with hydrogen peroxide or any other antiseptic agent.This breed is very good for allergy sufferers. 
  Many AHT breeders have experiences doing hands-on and remote allergy tests with people who have allergic responses to dogs and more often than not, individuals who cannot tolerate even those breeds that are known to be 'hypoallergenic' can tolerate an AHT. Studies have found them to be the best breed of dog for people with dog allergies. 

Is the American Hairless Terrier the Right Breed for you?
High Maintenance: Grooming should be performed often to keep the dog's coat in good shape. No trimming or stripping needed.
Easy Training: The American Hairless Terrier is known to listen to commands and obey its owner. Expect fewer repetitions when training this breed.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  Pit Bulls descend from crosses between Bulldogs and Terriers. The goal was to create a dog with the strength and tenacity of the Bulldog and the speed and agility of the Terrier.
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Wednesday, November 1, 2017

Everything about your Airedale Terrier

Everything about your Airedale Terrier
  Known as the “King of Terriers,” the Airedale is indeed the largest of all terriers. The dog breed originated in the Aire Valley of Yorkshire, and was created to catch otters and rats in the region between the Aire and Wharfe Rivers. An able sporting dog, he became an ideal working dog as well, proving his worth during World War I. Intelligent, outgoing, and confident, the Airedale possesses a wonderful playful streak that delights his owners.

Overview
  Of all the terriers, there may be none that so embody what we imagine this type of dog to be than the Airedale Terrier. An authentic English terrier finds its home in a specific place – Airedale, of all places – but is just as happy to make its home with and your family. Like many terriers, you will find that this dog is capable of a lot of love, a lot of companionship, and can even make an excellent playmate. Its overall attractive coat is hard to resist for the younger members of your family and you’ll find there’s nothing quite like petting a terrier.   There’s a reason, after all, they call Airedale Terriers the so-called king of terriers.
  But is the Airedale Terrier for you? Depending on the type of “dog person” you are, your answer will vary. Each dog breed has its own strengths and weaknesses, and these strengths and weaknesses mean specific breeds can be more suitable to certain types of dog owners. As we learn about the Airedale Terrier, we’ll also learn about the terrier group as a whole and hopefully you’ll just find a little something out about the types of dogs you’d prefer to bring home. Let’s find out more about the Airedale Terrier.

Highlights
  • Like all Terriers, Airedales have a natural inclination for digging , chasing small animals, and barking.
  • The Airedale Terrier is an active collector of human memorabilia. He will pick up just about anything  to add to his stash of treasures.
  • Being a high-energy working dog, the Airedale Terrier needs daily exercise. In general, the he remains active and full of energy throughout his life. He is not suited to apartment life, and needs a home with a large, fenced yard.
  • Chewing is another favorite Airedale habit. He will chew anything, and should be left in a crate or secure kennel with sturdy toys when you are away from home.
  • The Airedale is an independent dog, but he enjoys being a member of a family. He is happiest when inside with his owners, and is not meant to be a backyard dog.
  • Airedale Terriers are very good with children and are fondly called reliable babysitters. However, children and dogs should never be left unsupervised.
  • Grooming is necessary, so plan on paying a professional groomer or learn to groom your Airedale yourself.
  • Training and socialization is essential to teach the Airedale proper canine manners. If he is not used to other dogs and people, he can be quarrelsome.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts

  • The Airedale has a long, flat skull, V-shaped ears that fold over, small dark eyes full of terrier keenness and intelligence, a black nose, and a muscular, squarish body. The tail is carried up but not over the back.
  • The Airedale’s coat is hard, dense and wiry, with a softer undercoat, and comes in both tan and black and tan and grizzle.
Breed standards
AKC group: Terrier
UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan: 10 to 13 years
Average size: 40 to 65 pounds
Coat appearance: Dense and Wire
Coloration: black mixed with gray and white,speckling of red in the black and a small white star on the chest
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Families with older children, active singles and seniors, experienced dog handlers, houses with yards
Temperament: Protective, intelligent, loyal, sensitive
Comparable Breeds: Rat Terrier, Wire Fox Terrier

History
Airedale Terrier circa 1915

  Airedale Terriers are a relatively young breed, created in the 19th century by the working class rather than by aristocrats in the industrial Aire River Valley region of northern England. Their exact origin is not well-documented, but the Otterhound , the Irish and Bull Terriers  and the now-extinct Old English Rough Coated Black-and-Tan or Rat-Catcher Terrier  are considered to be prominent in their development. Other contributors include assorted setters and retrievers, sheepdogs such as the Yorkshire Collie, and Bedlington Terriers
  What we know today as the Airedale Terrier first emerged around 1840 and was bred to hunt otter, duck, weasel, badger, fox, water rat and other small game. The breed’s intelligence, agility and strength, combined with almost boundless energy, made them equally valued as guard dogs and personal companions. These unique terriers have been used as rat-killers, duck-catchers, deer-trackers, working dogs, war dogs, hunting dogs, guard and police dogs, gun dogs, army-messenger dogs and all-around sporting dogs. They were used in both World Wars to locate the wounded and to carry messages and medical supplies. They have also been used to hunt large game.


Personality
  The Airedale is a hard-working, independent, and athletic dog with a lot of drive, energy, and stamina. He is prone to digging, chasing, and barking — behaviors that come naturally to terrier breeds. These traits can be frustrating to owners unfamiliar with the Airedale personality.
  The Airedale is a lively breed, and he needs plenty of activity. Don't leave him alone for long periods of time, or he is likely to become bored, which leads to the aforementioned destructive behaviors. Keep training interesting and fresh — repetitive exercises will become a bore to the Airedale. He is best motivated by treats and other positive reinforcement methods; drill-and-jerk training methods should be avoided.
  A reliable watchdog, the Airedale takes pride in protecting his family. He can be a fierce guardian, but is friendly with his family and friends.
  Like every dog, the Airedale needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Airedale puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.

Health
  The Airedale Terrier, which has an average lifespan of 10 to 13 years, sometimes suffers from colonic disease. Other serious health issues this breed is prone to include canine hip dysplasia (CHD), gastric torsion, and hypothyroidism. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may run thyroid and hip exams on the dog.

Care
  The Airedale Terrier is a working dog, and has the energy and stamina that goes with it. He needs regular exercise — at least one walk a day, although two is preferable, coupled with a good romp in the backyard. The Airedale loves to retrieve, play, swim, and goof around. He is a great jogging companion, and in many cases, will tire out his owner.
  Training and socialization are essential for the Airedale, beginning with puppy classes. Incorporate socialization with training by taking your Airedale with you to many different places — the pet supply store, outdoor events, long walks in busy parks. Anywhere there are a lot of people to meet and sights to see is a good place to take an Airedale.
  Crate training is also strongly recommended with the Airedale Terrier. Not only does it aid in housetraining, it also provides him a safe den in which to settle down and relax. In general, Airedales do very well with most training as long as you remember that they have a mind of their own. Ask him to sit or stay in full sunlight in the middle of the summer and it's very likely he'll decide he'd prefer to do so in the shade.
  Positive reinforcement is the best way to teach an Airedale. If you approach training with a positive, fun attitude, and you have a lot of patience and flexibility, there's an excellent chance you will have freethinking Airedale who is also well trained.

Living Conditions
  The Airedale Terrier is not recommended for apartment life. They are very active indoors and will do best with at least an average-sized yard.

Trainability
  The Airedale is a thinking breed – in addition to keeping his physical activity high, he will require mental stimulation as well. Basic obedience should be conducted with confidence and positive reinforcement. This breed likes to be the Alpha Dog, so it is important to establish who is in charge from an early age, and always be consistent, because Airedales will take a mile if given an inch. They excel in advanced obedience, tricks and agility training, thanks to their high intelligence.
  Training should be conducted with treats, and a drill-style of repeat tasks works best to keep an Airedale Terrier's attention.

Exercise Requirements
  Regular walking and play is recommended – and, in fact, regular discipline with exercise should be considered mandatory for dogs of this size. They can handle a lot and love getting outside and exploring their agility and instincts.
  Airedale Terriers are a high-energy, thinking breed. They need as much mental activity as they need physical activity, and apartments are not the right living situation for them. Families with large, fenced yards are ideal, as the Airedale needs plenty of room to run during the day. They enjoy chasing and hunting, so fetching and hide-and-seek games are among an Airedale's favorite activities.

Grooming
  Airedales need a weekly brushing and professional grooming every two months or so to look their best. That is all they need – unless you’re planning to show your dog, in which case you’ll need to be doing a great deal more laborious work on that wiry coat.
  The family Airedale doesn’t have to be trimmed, but many owners do have him groomed by a professional groomer three to four times a year to give him a neat appearance . The coat is either trimmed with clippers or by stripping, a process by which coat is thinned and shortened with a stripping knife, a sharp, comb-like tool, or a combination of both. 
  The Airedale Terrier is not known for extreme shedding, but he does shed certain times of the year. Regular brushing with a slicker brush once or twice a week keeps the coat in good condition. Bathe the Airedale only when he’s dirty. Bathing him too often softens the coarse terrier coat.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Keep the ears clean and dry to prevent infections. Check them weekly for redness or a bad odor that might indicate infection. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball moistened with a mild pH-balanced cleanser recommended by your veterinarian. Brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath.
  It is important to begin grooming the Airedale when he is very young. An early introduction teaches the independent Airedale that grooming is a normal part of his life, and teaches him to patiently accept the handling and fuss of the grooming process.  

Children And Other Pets
  The fun-loving Airedale makes a good family pet. In some cases, he may even become protective of the children in the home, but his large size and high activity level may prove too intense for extremely young kids.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  The Airedale gets along well with other dogs in his household, as long as he is properly socialized and trained. He can be aggressive, however, with strange dogs that he perceives as threatening. And given the Airedale's reputation as a hunter, he is very likely to chase animals he perceives as prey, including cats, rabbits, gerbils, and hamsters.

Did You Know?
  The Airedale is the largest of the terrier breeds and was one of the first breeds trained for police work in Germany and Great Britain. In World War I, he worked as a guard and messenger dog.

Is the Airedale Terrier the Right Breed for you?
High Maintenance: Grooming should be performed often to keep the dog's coat in good shape. Professional trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Moderately Easy Training: The Airedale Terrier is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Not Good for New Owners: This breed is best for those who have previous experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.
  
Notable Airedales
The memorial fountain for Paddy the Wanderer, Wellington

  • Laddie Boy- (July 26, 1920 – January 23, 1929) was an Airedale Terrier owned by US President Warren G. Harding. He was born in Toledo, Ohio. His father was Champion Tintern Tip Top. He was presented to US President Warren G. Harding by Charles Quetschke of Caswell Kennels and became a celebrity during the Harding administration.
  • Paddy the Wanderer- was an Airedale Terrier who roamed the streets of Wellington, New Zealand, during the Great Depression. He was a friend of cabbies, workers, and seamen alike, who took turns at paying his dog licence every year.Paddy was known for greeting sailors in the Wellington Harbour and accompanying them, as a stowaway,on their coastal steamers.



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Everything about your Cirneco dell'Etna

Everything about your Cirneco dell'Etna
  The Cirneco dell’Etna is a small and slender dog, similar in appearance to the Greyhound but with larger ears and a chestnut/tan coat. These dogs are an ancient breed native to the island of Sicily where they were valued for their intelligence and for their natural hunting ability. If you are looking for a small, active breed – especially one that takes well to dog sports – the Cirneco dell’Etna may be the right breed for you.

Overview
  The outgoing Cirneco (the plural is Cirnechi) weighs between 18 and 27 pounds, making him suitable for just about any home. Thanks to his innate athleticism, he’s a natural at agility and lure coursing, and he also does well in obedience, rally, and tracking. The Cirneco has a reputation for being easier to train than some other sighthounds — as long as you keep the training sessions short.
  Like most dogs, the Cirneco can become bored, noisy, and destructive if he doesn’t have other dogs to keep him company or if he doesn’t receive enough attention from his people. Despite his chase instinct, if a Cirneco is raised with other pets from an early age, he can live amicably with cats and small dogs.

Other Quick Facts
  • The Cirneco dell’Etna is a rare breed not readily found outside Italy — there are only 200 or so Cirnechi in the United States.
  • Although they are mainly companion dogs today, Cirnechi are known for their silent method of hunting, which allows them to catch animals off guard.
  • Since the breed is so uncommon, little is known about the health history of the Cirneco.
  • Like most sighthounds, Cirnechi aren’t too keen on having their feet touched.

Breed standards
AKC group: Hound Group
UKC group: Sighthound & Pariah
Average lifespan: 12 to 14 years
Average size: 18 to 27 pounds
Coat appearance: Close-Fitting, Long, Sleek, Smooth, Stiff, and Straight
Coloration:  tan- to chestnut-colored coat
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles, houses with yards
Temperament: Gentle, alert, independent, playful
Comparable Breeds: Pharaoh Hound, Ibizan Hound

History
  The Cirneco dell’Etna, also known as the Sicilian Greyhound, may resemble a small Pharaoh Hound, but he’s a distinct breed of Italian origin, with his own color markings, tail shape, and triangle-shaped ears. He gets his name from Mount Etna, on the Italian island of Sicily, where his ancestors hunted rabbit and hare. He stalks silently — so much so that he can even sneak up on birds. Today, this rare breed is predominantly a family companion.
  The Cirneco was recognized by the United Kennel Club in 2006. The breed is also part of the American Kennel Club’s Foundation Stock Service, the first step toward AKC recognition. In 2012, the Cirneco dell’Etna will be admitted to the AKC’s Miscellaneous Class.

Personality
  The Cirneco dell'Etna has a strong, inquisitive, independent temperament, which is important in keen hunting dogs. It is also outgoing, friendly, affectionate and smart. Cirnechi are loyal and loving with their owners and friends. They are willing and eager to please and love to receive pets and praise. They usually make great family pets, although they can be reserved around strangers. 
  The Cirneco is an extremely adaptable breed that can thrive in a wide variety of environments. However, these are house dogs that definitely need to live indoors due to their short coats, thin skin and absence of body fat. They like to nestle on warm soft furniture, blankets and bedding, almost as much as they like to snuggle with their favorite people. 
  Cirnechi typically are tolerant of children, although this is not a bomb-proof breed and probably isn’t the best choice for families with very young kids. Cirnechi are social animals that tend to get along well with other dogs. They rarely cause problems in multiple-pet homes and, unlike most sighthounds, get along remarkably well with familiar cats. Of course, the earlier any dog is exposed to other household pets and small children, the more likely it is to get along with them as they age.

Health
  Since there are so few of these dogs, little is known about the health of Cirnechi. In general, they appear to be a hardy breed, but they can get muscle and toe injuries while running. A reputable breeder will discuss potential health problems with you, including any conditions that she has noticed in her own lines.
  As an ancient breed that has been largely unmanipulated by man, the Cirneco dell’Etna is hardy and healthy. The main health concerns to which this breed is prone include injuries that can occur while running. Responsible breeding practices and genetic testing can help to reduce the risk for inherited conditions in this and other breeds.
  Careful breeders screen their dogs for genetic disease, and only breed the best-looking specimens, but sometimes Mother Nature has other ideas and a puppy can develop a genetic condition. In most cases, he can still live a good life, thanks to advances in veterinary medicine. And remember that you have the power to protect your Cirneco from one of the most common health problems: obesity. Keeping him at an appropriate weight is a simple way to extend your Cirneco’s life.


Trainability
  The Cirneco dell’Etna is an intelligent breed so they typically respond well to training. For the best results, start training early while your puppy is still young – that is when they will soak up the most training. Socialization is also important for this breed to help introduce them to new things and situations. Positive reinforcement training methods are recommended and you should be prepared to maintain a level of firm consistency with your dog to prevent him from becoming too strong-willed or independent. These dogs do very well when trained for hunting, lure coursing, agility, or other dog sports.

Exercise Requirements
  Cirnechi are high-energy animals that need quite a bit of regular exercise to keep them physically and mentally fit. They love taking long daily walks and having a chance to stretch their legs in safely-enclosed areas. It is important for Cirneco owners to have well-fenced yards, so that their dogs can run freely and burn off excess energy, which usually happens in short bursts. While they can be gregarious and playful, Cirnechi usually are calm and quiet, both indoors and out, as long as their exercise needs are met. They are great fans of toys of all sorts. A Cirneco can play with a single toy for hours, keeping it out of mischief. Cirnechi are active contestants in lure coursing and agility competitions. Participation in these and other canine sporting events provides a great opportunity to showcase the Cirneco’s athleticism, while at the same time giving him a chance to get physical exercise and canine socialization.
  Because the Cirneco dell’Etna was bred for hunting it is a fairly active breed with fairly high exercise requirements. This breed requires at least 30 minutes of moderate exercise each day in the form of a walk or jog – active play time is also appreciated. Training your dog for hunting, lure coursing, or other dog sports can help to meet its daily exercise requirements while also providing plenty of mental stimulation.


Grooming
  The Cirneco dell'Etna is a low-maintenance breed. Its short coat only needs an occasional brushing to keep it tidy and clean. A rubber curry brush or hound glove, or even a warm damp cloth, work well to keep its coat looking shiny and lustrous. Frequent bathing is not necessary and really should only be done when the dog is obviously smelly or dirty. Other routine maintenance is the same as for most breeds, including dental care to keep teeth clean, reduce plaque build-up and prevent bad breath. Regular nail clipping is also important. 
  Many sighthounds, including many Cirnechi, are sensitive to having their feet handled. Nail care should start at a very young age, so that it does not become a struggle. Owners should do their best to avoid cutting into the quick of the nail, which is quite painful for the animal. For those who are not comfortable clipping nails, a quick trip to a professional groomer can be a godsend for both owner and dog.

Did You Know?
  It’s believed that the Cirneco dell’Etna descended from dogs who were left behind by the Phoenicians along Sicily’s coast. The breed was depicted on Sicilian coins minted as early as the 3rd century B.C.


Is the Cirneco dell'Etna the Right Breed for you?
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep. No trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Moderately Easy Training: The Cirneco dell'Etna is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

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Monday, October 30, 2017

How To Stop Dog Diarrhea

How To Stop Dog Diarrhea
  Diarrhea is a common canine affliction and it varies in frequency, duration, and intensity from dog to dog.
  Diarrhea is a common problem in dogs, often because they will put almost anything in their mouth. But it can also be caused by more serious health problems, some of which require close attention, especially if the diarrhea is severe or occurs frequently.
  For the most part, diarrhea and vomiting are nature’s way of allowing the body to cleanse and remove a toxin. A small amount of blood or mucus can sometimes be seen in the stool when the intestinal bacteria are out of balance but this isn’t necessarily cause for alarm.
  A great many cases are mild and, with your vet’s advice, may be treated without a trip to the office.But if your dog is an otherwise healthy adult and, it is reasonable to try some home treatment.

An Important First Step
  The most important thing to remember when it comes to treating the diarrhea is that your primary goal should be to let the body do what it must while preventing any further damage.
Most animals will fast themselves when they have digestive disease and it’s a good idea to stop feeding your dog if he doesn’t fast himself. You can start with 6 to 12 hours of no food or water with most dogs. If your dog is very small and prone to hypoglycemia, you should give him tiny licks of honey or karo syrup each hour, or as needed, if he appears weak and trembly.
  After the fast, if there is no further vomiting and the diarrhea has stopped or slowed, offer small sips of water  every few hours.After six hours of water only, you may start some broth or small amounts of food. Gradually increase the amounts of food over the next four to five days.
  Diarrhea can lead to dehydration, so make sure to give your dog access to water at all times. 

Prevent The Recurrence Of Dog Diarrhea
  After a fast, food is usually introduced slowly and many people start with binders, which can normalize stool consistency. Once your dog is reintroduced to food, a bland diet will help prevent a recurrence of diarrhea. Starting with soup is a gentle way to smooth your dog’s transition back to his regular diet.

  Other bland diets include:
  • White rice
  • Rice water: Boil high-quality rice in a lot of water, remove the grains, and offer the dog the creamy white soup that’s left. A splash of broth or a bit baby food will make it more palatable.
  • Herbs, such as fennel, have gut-soothing properties
  • Canned pumpkin has the odd distinction of being effective for diarrhea and constipation.
  • Plain protein sources such as egg (prepared with no butter or oil) or chicken (without skin)
  • Probiotics, live bacteria that aid digestion- these are also found in yogurt
  • Yogurt, which has beneficial bacteria, can help in dogs who can tolerate milk and milk products.
  • Cottage cheese
  • Boiled potatoes, without skin
  • Specially-formulated dog foods: Some manufacturers offer foods that can sooth stomach problems. You may need to obtain these from your vet.
  • Over-the-counter medications for humans may also be effective for doggie diarrhea, but should be given with caution and you should talk to your vet before using them.
  If the diarrhea continues for more than 24 hours or your dog’s condition worsens at any time, call your vet immediately.
  If your dog’s digestive disease is severe or persistent, your veterinarian’s suggestions may include: fecal exams to rule out parasites; blood work to rule out liver, kidney, endocrine or other problems; x-rays or abdominal ultrasound to rule out foreign objects, obstructions, and cancer; and endoscopy to visualize the stomach and intestinal mucosa.
Prevention of Dog Diarrhea
  The best thing that you can do to prevent diarrhea in your dog is to treat it as you would a human. Keep your dog away from stray dogs as much as possible and administer vaccines as scheduled. Be sure to take your dog to the vet for a wellness visit to stave off any issues as soon as possible.
  And be sure to stay with food your dog and stick with it. Change brands if your pet develops allergies, but try to stick with a quality dog food and do not feed your dog table scraps.
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5 Tips for Healthy Dog Teeth and Gums

 5 Tips for Healthy Dog Teeth and Gums
  You brush your own teeth every day, right? And you get regular dental cleanings, don’t you? We’re not here to judge your oral hygiene, but we have a feeling your dog’s teeth and gums don’t get the same amount of care and attention as your own. And we get that. But did you know that by the time they’re 3 years old, most pets suffer from some form of dental disease? Slacking on dental care could lead to painful periodontal disease, tooth loss or worse.
  Gum disease can be avoided altogether but it takes a bit of effort at home. Veterinarians agree it is well worth the effort. By making dental care a regular part of your routine, you can improve your dog’s teeth, help her enjoy a healthier, more enjoyable life and minimize the need for costly dental treatments at the veterinarian’s office.  

1. Visit your veterinarian

  Make sure you ask about your dog’s teeth during checkups, and try to get that checkup at least annually. You can also ask the vet whether your dog is at particular risk of dental health problems and what kind of preventive care she might recommend. If your dog has current dental issues or is at higher risk, consider asking for a referral to a veterinary dentist. Also ask about any products that might be damaging to teeth such as chews that are too sharp or hard.
 Your vet will inspect teeth and gums, remove tartar and plaque, and take x-rays. If any teeth are loose  or diseased, they'll be pulled. Once you get the all clear, let the brushing begin!

2. Give him dental chews

  Chewing is a natural behavior in dogs - one that can also benefit their oral hygiene. Chew toys and ropes, bones, rawhide, and chews provide friction along the gumline and act as natural flossers. Provide your dog with chew toys that are an appropriate size and shape, and let them start chomping their way to healthier teeth. Be sure to replace chew materials when they are worn, and provide durable toys and bones to aggressive chewers. If your dog has sensitive teeth, try latex toys and other softer chewing materials.

3. Daily Brushing with a pet-friendly toothpaste

  The single best preventive treatment is brushing to break up bacterial films on the teeth before they develop into plaque and cause damage to teeth and gums. When it comes to toothpaste, a palatable, meat-flavored paste is going to be more fun for you dog. Do not use human toothpaste because the ingredients can be irritating. Make sure you select an applicator that is right for your dog’s size and gum sensitivity. Options range from brushes to rubber fingertip applicators and presoaked dental wipes. Brush the outside surface of the teeth in small circles, avoiding any contact with the gums.

  Using veterinary, species-specific toothpaste is essential. Human toothpaste has too much fluoride and is toxic for animals. You'll find animal-friendly flavors, like chicken, mint, and peanut butter, at most pet stores.

4. Add a medicated rinse to his water
  While not a substitute for brushing, medicated rinses may help by making the surface of your dog’s teeth less hospitable to plaque and bacteria. Ask your veterinarian for a recommendation and then simply add the product to your canine’s water or spray it in his mouth. Medicated rinses can also help combat stinky breath — a win-win for your pup’s oral health and your nose.
  No matter what, some pet parents simply can’t brush their dog’s teeth. If you fall into that category, think beyond the brush. Daily oral swishes and rinses, chew treats containing anti-plaque ingredients, and specialized teeth-cleaning diets are easy options. Be honest with your veterinarian if you struggle to clean your dog’s teeth; ask for alternatives to tooth brushing. I almost always find another technique the pet parent can use. Are these substitutes as good as brushing? Of course not. But they’re infinitely better than no oral care, and some work nearly as well. 

5.Monitor your dog's diet

 Diet can factor into overall dental health in a variety of ways. Make sure to feed your pets nutritionally balanced dog food. If tooth health is an issue, try using specially formulated dry foods that don’t crumble as easily to wear away plaque and tartar with chewing.Your veterinarian may recommend feeding your dog a specially formulated dental diet to help improve his oral health. This type of kibble tends to be larger and usually has an abrasive texture to aid with cleaning teeth and removing plaque build-up. Dental foods may also contain ingredients that help reduce tartar formation. These tasty snacks contain beneficial nutrients that aren't found in most dog foods.

 Talk to your vet before making a major change to your dog’s diet, and make sure to choose dental health food that has the Veterinary Oral Health Care (VOHC) seal. Avoid feeding your pooch table food, especially scraps that are high in carbs and sugars. And since dogs tend to eat pretty much anything, make sure your pets do not have access to trash, yard debris, or anything else they shouldn’t be munching on.



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