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Monday, April 10, 2017

Everything about your Puli

Everything about your Puli
  Best known for his long, corded coat resembling dreadlocks, the Puli is a hardworking herding dog and family companion. Energetic and lively, this moplike dog breed hailing from Hungary appears much larger than he is due to that distinctive coat. Thanks to his self-confidence and intelligence, the Puli will have no problem being the center of attention in your home.

Overview
  The Puli, also known as the Hungarian Puli, the Hungarian Water Dog, the Drover and, when plural, the Pulik, has been assisting Hungarian sheepherders for centuries. Its name is thought to be derived from “Puli Hou,” which means “Hun Destroyer” – a reference to its link with the ancient Magyar people. The Puli’s most distinctive feature is its unique, dense double coat, which can be corded or brushed. Due to the qualities of their coat, Pulik can live happily in any type of climate. These are highly intelligent dogs that retain their herding instinct. They are naturally wary of strangers and are deeply loyal to their people. The Puli was recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1936 and is a member of the Herding Group.

Highlights
  • The Puli is vocal and tends to bark.
  • The Puli loves his family but is suspicious of strangers.
  • Because he's a highly intelligent dog with a great deal of self-confidence, the Puli gets bored with repetitive tasks, such as obedience. Agility and herding are much more to his liking.
  • The Puli can be a bit stubborn, so housetraining might be a challenge at first. Crate training is recommended.
  • Pulik have a reputation for remaining puppyish well into their older years. They love to play and like to have a lot of toys.
  • Grooming the Puli is difficult, especially if the coat is corded. New owners should seek help to learn how to properly groom their dogs.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts

  • The plural of Puli is Pulik.
  • The medium-size Puli has a square body covered in shaggy hair that furls over his head like an umbrella and covers his body profusely, giving the illusion that he is bigger than he is. He moves with a springy gait and is much more agile than he might appear to be at first glance.
  • Comparable Breeds: Komondor, Tibetan Terrier
History 
Hungarian Post stamp with a Puli
  The Puli has been known in Hungary for at least 1,000 years. Dogs like the Puli were brought to Hungary by Magyar invaders. The dogs bear a resemblance to the Tibetan Terrier, and it’s possible that breed is one of their ancestors.
  The type of work the dogs did depended on their size and color. Light-colored dogs were most useful at night so they could be easily seen, while dark-colored dogs worked during the day. Among the white flocks, they were easier to spot by the shepherd.
  During the 17 th century, the Puli was almost lost as a breed because of interbreeding with sheepdogs from France and Germany. In 1912, a program was begun to revive the breed. A breed standard was written in 1915 and approved by the Federation Cynologique Internationale in 1924. The dogs had made their first appearance at a Budapest dog show a year previously and were divided into three classes: working, show, and dwarf. In 1934 the breed standard was revised and divided the dogs by height: large, medium, and dwarf. A 1935 entry in the Hungarian stud book notes four sizes: large (police), medium (working), small, and dwarf. The medium size was most popular.
  The American Kennel Club recognized the Puli in 1936, but the Puli Club of America wasn’t formed until 1951. The breed ranks 145 th among the dogs registered by AKC.

Personality
  The Puli is best known for his corded coat, which looks a lot like he is sporting dreadlocks. These sheepdogs were designed to work hard in the field herding and guarding flocks both by day and by night. The modern Puli is an active dog with energy to spare who soaks up as much time and attention as his family is willing to give. They make excellent companions for active families who have the time and energy to commit to properly exercising and socializing their Puli.

Health
  The Puli, which has an average lifespan of 10 to 15 years, is susceptible to major health issues such as canine hip dysplasia (CHD). Progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) and deafness are also occasionally seen in Pulis. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may recommend hip, eye, and hearing exams for this breed of dog.

Care
  The Puli can live outside in cool or temperate climates, but is also excellent as a house dog. As it is an energetic breed, it is always on the lookout for a task, like herding livestock. A good jog or walk, or a training and lively game session, can satisfy its exercise needs.
  Its non-shedding coat holds debris and should be brushed on alternate days. If it is corded, the cords should be separated regularly because the coat tends to accumulate dirt. Bathing takes a lot of time and it takes an entire day for drying. Pulis kept as pets may be clipped, but the breed's distinctive appeal is lost.

Living Conditions
  The Puli will adapt to almost any circumstance, be it an apartment or a farm. This breed is suited to all climates. In the heat of Australia and Florida it does extremely well and, conversely in the extreme cold of areas like Denver in winter it also does likewise. It is fairly active indoors and will do okay without a yard.

Training
  Pulik were bred to be independent as well as for their ability to make certain decisions while herding and protecting livestock. This will never be bred out of them. These traits can make it difficult to train a Puli unless training begins from the time he is a pup. Highly intelligent and headstrong, the Puli requires an experienced trainer who can prove to be a leader without being aggressive. The use of tasty treats tends to make a Puli more interested in training sessions so have plenty on hand.
  If training continues throughout the life of the dog, a Puli can excel in obedience and herding trials, agility courses and the breed ring. Many have even gone on with their training and became certified as therapy dogs or water rescue dogs. With training, Pulik can do almost anything.

Exercise Requirements
  Pulik are athletes so they do require a fair amount of exercise. For an active family, the Puli would be thrilled with romps in the yard, a bit of fetch and maybe a hike in the woods. Without proper exercise, the dog will become anxious and destructive. You never want to meet a bored Puli because there won’t be a whole lot left of your belongings. When he’s left alone, mentally stimulating toys should be provided to keep him out of trouble.
  After a hard day of work or play, the Puli will want to chill out with the family on the couch. Although active, he still needs time to relax with the family and get the attention that he loves so much.

Grooming
  The Puli has a dense, weather-resistant coat that can be wavy or curly but never silky. The undercoat is soft, woolly and dense. The hair clumps easily and if left to itself will form woolly cords as the dog matures, starting when he is about 9 months old. Depending on the coat’s texture and the amount of undercoat and outer coat, the cords may be flat or round. It takes four to five years to grow out completely and may eventually reach the floor.
  The Puli coat can be brushed or left to cord. If you plan to brush the coat rather than let it cord, start early and expect to brush it every day or two. 
  The coat doesn’t shed much, but the cords must be separated regularly to maintain their look, and they do attract dirt and debris. The Puli’s coat should never be dirty, matted or bad-smelling. To prevent problems, ask the breeder to show you how to care for the coat. Trimming the hair around the mouth and cleaning the dog’s face after meals is one way to help reduce odor. Bathing and drying a Puli can take hours. Be sure he is dry all the way down to the skin or he will smell as if he has mildewed. If you don’t plan to show him, you may choose to keep his coat trimmed short for easier upkeep.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, and brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath. Check the ears weekly for dirt, redness or a bad odor that can indicate an infection. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball dampened with a gentle, pH-balanced ear cleaner recommended by your veterinarian. Begin grooming the Puli while he is young so he becomes accustomed to it and accepts it willingly.

Children And Other Pets
  The well-socialized and well-trained Puli is a good companion for children. He's playful — probably even more playful than the kids. He's protective of the children in his family and shuttle them around the house, tugging gently at them to move them away from perceived (or real) danger.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  The Puli gets along with other dogs and pets, as long as he taught to do so from a young age. Early, positive introductions to other animals make it easy for the adult Puli to accept other pets into his home.

Is the Puli right for you?
  If you are looking for a loyal, active companion to join you on life's adventures, the Puli could be the dog breed for you. Puli owners are dedicated to their dogs' grooming needs and take obedience training seriously. The Puli, like most herding dogs, is better suited for more experienced dog owners, as the breed is both physically strong and strong-willed. Pulik get along well with children and other pets, and their playful personality will charm all of your dog-loving friends.

Did You Know?
  Several dog breeds have coats that cord, but the Puli coat is unique. No other dog coat is quite like it. The outer coat is long and profuse, and the undercoat is soft and woolly. The puppy coat is tufted, and as it grows the undercoat becomes tangled with the top coat, forming long cords and giving the Puli a look that is unkempt to say the least.

Notable Pulik
  • In 1978 a Puli called Cinko Duda Csebi won the world exposition organized by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale. The Mexican-born dog was owned by breeder Roberto Hernández Ávalos.
  • The dog known as "The Auditor" is assumed to be a Puli. It lived in the contaminated Berkeley Pit copper mine in Butte, Montana. Notable for being one of the few things that could live, and thrive in such a place, in time it became a sort of mascot for the town. After The Auditor died, several memorials were erected, celebrating its existence.
  • British grunge-rock band Bush featured a picture of a leaping Puli in the booklet to their album Sixteen Stone. This particular Puli belonged to frontman Gavin Rossdale and was named Winston.
  • Lovey and Dude Romeo of Pittsburgh Pennsylvania have appeared extensively online and in YouTube videos Puli PrayingOriginally from Green Bay Wisconsin.
  • Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has a white Puli named Beast.
  • In the 1960s, writer Harlan Ellison adopted a Puli named Ahbhu and wrote about him in the 1975 Hugo-winning novelette "The Deathbird" (part of the 1975 collection Deathbird Stories). In addition, Ahbhu appeared in the 1969 short story "A Boy And His Dog" as a predecessor to the main character's telepathic dog Blood.
  • American novelist T.C. Boyle used to own several Pulik and still has one. One of them, named "Kutya" (Hungarian for "dog"), is commemorated in his novel The Harder They Come.


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Everything about your Portuguese Podengo Pequeno

Everything about your Portuguese Podengo Pequeno
  The Portuguese Podengo Pequeno is an ancient, no-nonsense hunting hound from Portugal. They are multi-sensory hounds that hunt using both their sight and scent and come in three distinct sizes: The smallest Pequeno, the medium sized Médio and the large Grande. These three sizes are generally not cross-bred and each has their own purpose. Podengos also comes in two coat variants – wiry haired and soft haired.

Overview
  One of the later breeds to come to the U.S., the Portuguese Podengo Pequeno arrived in America in the 1990s. The National Dog of Portugal, these smaller pups are bred to chase rabbits. Traced back to 1000 B.C. from breeds that were trained to hunt the thickets of Portugal, this breed has a high endurance and obedience level. The smallest of the three Portuguese Podengo breeds, he's also the fastest.

Other Quick Facts
  • The largest of the Podengos, the Grande, hunts larger prey than rabbit, including boar.
  • The Podengo has a slender, rectangular body, well muscled, with a wedge-shaped head and large, upright ears. The coat can be short and smooth or somewhat wiry and comes in any shade of red, with or without white markings. Most Pequenos in the U. S. are the wirecoated variety.
  • Podengos have appeared in several movies, including Three Wishes, Soccer Dog, and Zeus and Roxanne.
  • Comparable Breeds: Andalusian Podenco, Basenji

History 
  Like his cousins the Cirneco dell Etna, Ibizan, and Pharaoh Hounds, the Podengo is known as a rabbit hunter in his homeland of Portugal. The breeds probably share a common ancestor back through the sands of time.
  The dogs were first imported into the United States in the 1990s, so their history in the U. S. is young. They are recognized by the Federation Cynologique Internationale in Europe, as well as the United Kennel Club and the American Rare Breed Association in the U. S.   They are also part of the American Kennel Club’s Foundation Stock Service, a first step toward AKC recognition. The Podengo Pequeno is now a member of AKC’s Miscellaneous Class, the last step before AKC recognition.

Temperament
  The Portuguese Podengo Pequeno is a cheerful, versatile, rambunctious little dog with a strong desire to please the people he loves. However, it is an independent thinker and is naturally wary around strangers. Though they are lovable and loving, Pequenos are not lap dogs. They are tireless hunting hounds that need to actively engage with people and other animals to stay physically and mentally fit. They should be treated like the bright, active animals that they are. This is not to say that they are stodgy. To the contrary, Podengo Pequenos are known for their silliness. They run around the house with wild abandon, jumping onto and banking off of furniture and engaging in any number of other amusing antics. They become very attached to their owners, are patient with children and make terrific family companions. Loyal, tenacious and fearless, they also make great watchdogs.

Health Problems
  The Portuguese Podengo Pequeno is a breed that has had little to no human intervention over the years and as a result does not suffer from any known hereditary health conditions.

Living Conditions
  The Podengo Portugueso Medio is not recommended for apartment life. This breed is well-suited for hot sunny climates and can live and sleep outdoors so long as they have adequate shelter.

Trainability
  The Podengo Pequeno is a very bright breed and is easy to train. Reward-based techniques, using positive reinforcement rather than harsh verbal or physical corrections, makes teaching these dogs standard obedience commands a breeze. Training them to do things that exploit their physical prowess is another good strategy. Recall training is important for all dogs, but a reliable recall is especially important for this independent, sometimes willful breed. Podengo Pequenos’ independence and intelligence should be harnessed and focused, not suppressed.

Exercise Requirements
  Podengo Pequenos were bred to have enough stamina and endurance to hunt throughout the day, for consecutive days. As such, they have seemingly limitless amounts of energy and require a great deal of exercise. Although their small size makes them suitable for small homes or apartments, they should only be housed in small living quarters if their owners are able to cater to their exercise needs each day. They often do best in houses with large gardens or rural farm yards where they can frolic about at will.

Grooming
  The smooth Podengo has a short, dense coat. The wirecoated variety has a medium-length coat with a harsh texture. On his face he has a distinctive beard. Neither type has an undercoat, so the dogs don’t shed much.
  Whether he has a smooth or wire coat, the Podengo is easy to groom. Both varieties can be brushed weekly. The smooth will probably enjoy being groomed with a rubber curry brush or hound mitt, while the wire is probably best cared for with a pin brush. The wirecoated Podengo should not be trimmed; his coat is supposed to have a rustic look, as if he just came in from a field in Portugal. Baths are rarely necessary for either type. Every three to six months is plenty.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Remember that sighthounds are sensitive about having their feet handled. Be careful not to cut into the quick—the blood vessel that feeds the nail. This is painful and your Podengo will put up a fuss the next time you try to trim the nails. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Is this breed right for you?
  A wonderful companion, the Portuguese Podengo Pequeno is devoted to a confident leader. Good with children, the breed is a wonderful family pet and watchdog, and does best with human interaction. Suited for apartment life if exercised regularly, this pup is in need of an active lifestyle. Due to a high jumping ability, he does best if living in a home with a high fence in a sunny and warm climate. Like other hounds, he only does well with cats if raised with them, otherwise his instinct will be to chase them.

Did You Know?
  The Podengo is a multitasker who hunts by sight and scent. The dogs can be hunted in a pack or separately, and when they sight their prey they jump straight up.

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Everything about your Toy Fox Terrier

Everything about your Toy Fox Terrier
   A wonderful combination of both a toy breed and a terrier breed, the Toy Fox Terrier can be a bit like the Napoleon of the dog world: small in stature, but full of confidence. Able to complete a number of tasks just like the Toy Fox Terrier, but coming in a little package, it’s hard to deny that this dog can be one of the most endearing breeds around. After all, it’s rare to find a toy breed so durable, sturdy, and generally outgoing. These qualities are a mark of the Toy Fox Terrier’s unique pedigree, which we’ll detail in this overview of the breed.

Overview
  Bred as a means to make the Fox Terrier smaller, the Toy Fox Terrier was created by breeding a standard-sized Fox Terrier with a Chihuahua, Miniature Pinscher, Manchester Terrier and Italian Greyhound. A natural-born hunter, the Toy Fox Terrier enjoys chasing and playing around the yard. Extremely intelligent, this dog can be trained to assist the physically handicapped and as a hearing dog for the deaf.
  His intense loyalty to his family can make him aloof with strangers, but socialization and training to accept strangers should help your dog to realize there is no danger from visitors you allow in your home.

Highlights
  • The Toy Fox Terrier is not a suitable companion for all children. While a sturdy little dog, they cannot tolerate excessive rough handling, especially as they are prone to broken legs.
  • Terrier instinct may cause it to chase small animals, and thereby will need close supervision if outdoors off-leash with out a fence. Your dog should never be off-leash in an area where you cannot contain him should the need arise.
  • Being terriers they may not do well with smaller pets in the household such as hamsters, mice and gerbils.
  • They are a small dog but do not realize this; they sometimes challenge other dogs much larger than themselves. Supervised interaction with larger dogs is advisable.
  • Beneath the cute exterior of your TFT puppy can reside the heart of a tyrant. Be sure to train your puppy early to be a responsible and well-behaved member of your family.
  • Most Toy Fox Terriers would prefer to share your bed with you. However, jumping from such heights, especially when a puppy, can cause broken bones. Teaching your TFT to sleep in his own bed on the floor is a safer route.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • With their thin skin, Toy Fox Terriers like their comforts. Besides cuddling in a lap or snuggling under bedding, they’ll want a sweater to keep them warm whenever they’re exposed to prolonged cool or cold temperatures.
  • A Toy Fox Terrier’s worst qualities are his love of barking and his belief that he’s capable of taking on dogs many times his size. You have to protect him from himself.
  • A TFT’s best quality is his loving nature. He bonds strongly to his family and loves being a lap dog and companion.
  • Toy Fox Terriers don’t like getting wet.
Breed standards
AKC group: Toy
UKC group: Companion
Average lifespan: 13 - 15 years
Average size: 4 - 10 pounds
Coat appearance: Short, smooth and thick.
Coloration: White, tan, chocolate, tricolored, white and black, white and tan
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Healthy, athletic body; small muzzle; small black eyes; black nose; erect V-shaped ears and docked tail
Possible alterations: Chocolate-colored dogs have like-colored noses; tail may not be docked
Comparable Breeds: Chihuahua, Rat Terrier

History of the Toy Fox Terrier
  This small American-bred dog has been around for the better part of a century. He was first known as a little farm dog, whose job it was to clear rats and other small vermin from barns and granaries.
  The Toy Fox Terrier was developed by breeding small Smooth Fox Terriers with several toy breeds, including the Chihuahua and Manchester Terrier. Some of the Chihuahua and Manchester Terrier traits did not fit with the type that the developers of the breed were trying to achieve, so after the initial crosses to set the size for the new breed, later breedings involved only smaller Smooth Fox Terriers.
   The United Kennel Club registered its first Toy Fox Terrier in 1936, but the breed didn’t gain American Kennel Club recognition until 2003. The TFT ranks 99th among the breeds registered by the AKC, and his size and temperament are sure to bring him greater popularity in the future.



Temperament 
  Intelligent, obedient, willing to work, this is the kind of toy dog that people who really love “working” dogs can still enjoy. It’s small but with the personality of a regular terrier, in many ways, and will even show these instincts by hunting small rodents and pests around the house. Given good discipline, it will be a good companion and willing to obey commands. Because it’s a small dog, be sure to teach children how to handle it and not to be aggressive with it.


Health
  The average life span of the Toy Fox Terrier is 12 to 14 years. Breed health concerns may include Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, patellar luxation and Von Willebrand disease.

Care
  The Toy Fox Terrier loves a soft warm bed or a lap. Because it is not an outdoor breed, coat care remains simple. It should, however, be provided with a daily exercise routine and sufficient playmates. Fortunately, a small area and some toys make for an excellent playground. The dog tends to bark and dig when it does not get sufficient training, attention, and exercise.

Living Conditions
  The Toy Fox Terrier is good for apartment life. It is very active indoors and will do okay without a yard. It cannot tolerate cold weather. It should wear a coat in the winter to help keep it warm.

Trainability
  Toy Fox Terriers are highly trainable and catch on to new behaviors quickly and easily. All you need to train a Toy Fox are treats and lots of excited praise. These tiny dogs don't take kindly to being treated harshly and will mistrust you if you use physical corrections. Luckily, training them is a joy and they are naturally well-behaved, so they hardly ever test a person's patience.
  Toy Fox Terriers are a snap to house train, unlike almost every other terrier and toy breed. They are small enough to use pads of canine litter boxes in the house, which is an added benefit for elderly owners or for people who live in apartments or condos.

Exercise Requirements
  Play is important; a daily walk is, as well, and they love a good yard. Just make sure the yard or area is fenced in, as these little dogs can escape through cracks and holes fairly easily. As they are small dogs, remember that their small strides can mean extra work to keep up with you.

Grooming
  All it takes to groom a Toy Fox Terrier is a lick and a promise. Give his short coat a quick brushing once a week and you’re done. Baths are needed only rarely, maybe after he’s rolled in something stinky. He sheds a little, but he’s so small that the amount of hair floating around is manageable.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Small breeds are prone to periodontal disease, so brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  They can be active, fun loving companions for older children, but like most toy breeds, they are not recommended playmates for very young children. Their small size, tendency to break bones easily, and terrier tenacity can make a bad combination with very young children.
  They get along well with other dogs and cats in their home, although they may be territorial toward strange dogs passing or approaching their property.

Is this breed right for you?
  A friendly and playful breed, the active Toy Fox Terrier requires a lot of physical and mental stimulation. OK for apartment living, he'll need regular exercise and toys to play with. Doing well with a fenced-in yard of his own, he'll constantly be at the side of his owner. Trained easily and well, he can be taught to learn many new tricks. This dog does better with older children; he may lose patience with younger children who don't know how to handle him. Getting along with cats if raised with them, he's likely to chase smaller animals and vermin. Not a fan of cold weather, he'll need a sweater when venturing outdoors in cooler climates.

Did You Know?
  Toy Fox Terriers are active and agile. They have even been known to climb trees in pursuit of squirrels.



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Everything about your Bolognese

Everything about your Bolognese
  The Bolognese dog was prized in its early existence in Italy, and has always been regarded as a great companion to people. This small Bichon type breed is calm and known to be very intelligent and playful, but is still a rare breed in the United States.

Overview
  Looking out of a fluffy ringletted body are round dark eyes that draw you in with their sweet expressiveness. Beneath that cloud of curls, the Bolognese is a sturdy little dog who loves to have fun. He doesn’t need long walks every day, but if that’s what you want to do, he’s right there with you, willing and able. If being a couch potato is more your style, he’s good with that, too. He is curious, comical, devoted and smart.
  The Bolognese, sometimes known as the Bichon Bolognese, is one of several little white dogs that have been known in the Mediterranean for at least 2,000 years. You may be familiar with his cousins: the Bichon Frise, the Coton de Tulear, the Maltese, the Havanese. The dog was popular at ducal courts in Italy, in particular, Bologna, from where he takes his name.

Other Quick Facts
  • Works of art that feature the Bolognese include a Titian portrait of Federico Gonzaga, Duke of Mantua, which hangs in Madrid’s Prado Museum; paintings by Goya and Watteau; and 17th-century Flemish tapestries.
  • When you look at a Bolognese, you should see a small, stocky dog with a squarish body covered in a long, fluffy white coat. He has a large black nose, dark round eyes and long ears that hang down. His tail curves over his back.
  • Comparable Breeds: Bichon Frise, Maltese
History
  They belong to the Bichon family group, which includes the Bichon Frise, Maltese, Lowchen, Havanese and Coton de Tulear. Although there are some similarities, the Bolognese are a distinctive breed in their own right. The Bolognese is an ancient breed of noble origins, and has its roots with Italian aristocracy.
  The precise ancestry of the Bolognese is unknown. Its closest relative within the Bichon group is the Maltese but it is unclear as to whether the Maltese is its direct ancestor or descendant. The Bolognese are named after Bologna, a city in northern Italy, thought to be the place of the breed's establishment. The existence of the Bolognese has been recorded since the year 1200.
  Bolognese dogs may be seen in tapestry work produced by Flemish craftsmen dating as far back as the 17th century. The Venetian painter Titian painted the Duke Frederico Gonzaga with his Bolognese. The breed is also seen in paintings by Goya, Gosse and Watteau. Other notable owners of the breed include Catherine the Great of Russia (1729-1796), Madame De Pompadour (1721-1764) and Empress Maria Theresa of Austria.
  The breed was brought into England in 1990 by Liz Stannard and is first shown during that year in the breed registry. In 2001 the breed was able to be shown at all shows with their own classes. They were at Crufts, an annual international dog show, for the first time in 2002.



Temperament 
  Cute bolognese dogs Entertaining and affectionate, the Bolognese makes a wonderful companion dog. As well as being playful and inquisitive, he’ll want to be the center of attention whenever he as an audience. Don’t be fooled by his small size – the Bolo will impress you with his tenacity.
  The most important thing to a Bolognese is to be with you and make you happy. What noble employment! He loves to be by your side and on your lap. But because he is so devoted, he won’t like being without you for too long. This may lead to separation anxiety, which brings out behaviors such as barking, chewing and using the living room as a bathroom.
  Even though the Bolognese likes children, he needs to be with older kids due to his small size, As well, he may get irritated when smaller children push him or pull him, and may nip to protect himself.

Health Problems
  For the most part, Bologneses are a typically healthy breed. But with most purebred dogs, there are some issues that may occur. These include hip dysplasia, luxating patellas, Legg-Calve-Perthes disease and periodontal disease due to the small size of their mouth.

Living Conditions
  The Bolognese is a good dog for apartment life. It will do okay without a yard.

Training
  You’ll be glad to hear that the Bolognese is an intelligent and highly trainable dog. He takes well to obedience training, especially when you’re using positive feedback, praise, petting and treats. If you don’t take the lead and treat your Bolo like a dog, you run the risk of promoting small dog syndrome. This is when your small dog picks up human induced behaviors and believes he is pack leader. Make sure your dog knows the rules, and enforce them gently and consistently.

Exercise
  These are active little dogs that need a daily walk. Play will take care of a lot of their exercise needs, however, as with all breeds it will not fulfill their primal instinct to walk. Dogs that do not get to go on daily walks are more likely to display behavior problems. They will also enjoy a good romp in a safe open area off-lead, such as a large, fenced-in yard.

Care
  This toy dog breed does not require an excessive amount of exercise, but should you be the exercising type, the Bolognese is likely to be able to keep up with you. The breed hardly sheds, but brushing its coat daily or a few times a week will keep the coat healthy and tangle free. The Bolognese can be an ideal apartment dog as it will do fine without a yard.

Grooming
  When it comes to grooming, the Bolognese is a high-maintenance breed. He requires considerable time for grooming and bathing to keep his white, curly locks looking their best. You should brush your Bolognese at least three times a week — daily is best — to keep the coat in good condition. To keep the coat bright white, bathe him whenever he gets dirty in a whitening shampoo. Some owners trim the coat short for easier care or take the dog to a groomer for a professional coif.
  If you fell in love with the Bolognese because of the way the pure white coat sets off those dark eyes, you'd better be prepared to spend a lot of time cleaning away tear stains, which cause a rust discoloration that most people find unsightly.Wipe around the eyes daily with a soft cloth dampened in warm water to clean and prevent tear stains.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the toenails at least once or twice a month. Check the ears every week to make sure they are clean and odor free. If they look dirty, wipe them out using a cotton ball dampened with a mild ear cleaner recommended by your veterinarian. Sometimes, it is necessary to pluck out the hair that grows in the ear canal to allow for better air circulation inside the ear. Eye discharge tends to accumulate in the hair that grows around the eyes and if not cleaned regularly, can even lead to eye problems.

Did You Know?
  You may have heard these dogs' non-shedding coats make them a "non-allergenic" breed, but that's not true. It's a dog's dander – flakes of skin – that triggers allergic reactions, not the coat. The non-shedding coat means less dander in the environment and sometimes fewer allergic reactions. But they still produce dander, and can still cause an allergic reaction.


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Everything about your Sealyham Terrier

Everything about your Sealyham Terrier
   The Sealyham Terrier dog breed was originally bred to hunt otters, foxes, and badgers. Today these clowns of the terrier family are primarily companion dogs and a good choice for the novice terrier owner.

Overview
  The Sealy peers out at the world from beneath bushy eyebrows, ever curious about the goings-on around him. Although he certainly has the look of a feisty terrier, the Sealyham Terrier doesn't have the typical attitude. He's a very mellow, laid-back dog, with modest exercise requirements and a clownish spirit. He even gets along well with other dogs. All these traits serve to make him a good pet for someone who loves the high-style look of a terrier but isn’t enamored with or capable of handling that in-your-face kind of dog.
  The Sealyham Terrier is all terrier on the outside, with the scruffy charm of his cousins and the white color of his ancestor, the West Highland White Terrier. But on the inside he's a very different dog.
  Originally bred to hunt badger, he's better described as a lover, not a fighter. He's a playful dog with a big sense of humor, and while he has a tendency to bark a bit more than most people might like, at only 20 to 25 pounds he is the perfect size for an apartment. He's a light shedder, inclined to be child-friendly and dog-friendly, and doesn't even have an overwhelming desire to chase cats.

Highlights
  • If your Sealyham Terrier becomes overweight, he can develop back problems. Be sure to monitor his food intake and give him regular exercise to keep him in shape.
  • Sealies are independent and can be stubborn when it comes to housetraining. Crate training is recommended.
  • They are reserved with strangers and make good watchdogs. Their bark is surprisingly loud and deep, but they can be trained to be quiet on command.
  • Sealies are fond of chasing rabbits, birds, and even other dogs and cats. Be sure to keep your Sealyham Terrier on leash when he's not in a secure area.
  • Because of their unusual looks and small size, they could be targets for dog thieves. Although Sealyham Terriers do well outdoors when it's cool (they don't like heat), they should be kept in your house when you can't supervise them.
  • Sealyham Terriers are a rare breed. It may be difficult to locate a reputable breeder, and even when you locate one, you may have to wait several months for a litter to be born.
  • Sealyham Terriers can be aggressive toward dogs they don't know, even dogs much larger than they are. Keep your Sealyham Terrier under control until you know that both he and the other dog are friendly to each other.
  • Although loyal and affectionate with their families, Sealyham Terriers can be a bit reserved around strangers.
  • Sealyham Terriers are happy little dogs, but they can have a dominant personality if not kept in check by a firm, consistent master.
  • Sealyham Terriers have an independent, stubborn streak. Successfully training them requires firm, consistent handling. They respond well to positive reinforcement techniques such as food rewards, praise, and play.
  • Never buy a Sealyham Terrier from a puppy mill, a pet store, or a breeder who doesn't provide health clearances or guarantees. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies and who breeds for sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts

  • The Sealyham’s long, broad head and rectangular body are two of the features that differentiate him from other terriers.
  • The Sealyham’s double coat can be all white or white with lemon, tan or badger markings on the head and ears. “Badger” is a mixture of white, gray, brown and black hairs.
  • Comparable Breeds: Dandie Dinmont Terrier, West Highland White Terrier

History
  The Sealyham Terrier derives his name from Sealyham, the estate of Captain John Tucker Edwards, in Haverfordwest, Wales. Captain Edwards developed the breed in the mid-1800s to hunt for small but tough game such as badgers, otters, and foxes. He crossed various breeds and tested the offspring for gameness and hunting ability.
  As word got out about the little white terriers, they became popular in England. In 1903, the breed made an appearance in the show ring, and the first Sealyham Terrier club was formed in 1908. In 1910, the breed was officially recognized by England's Kennel Club. The breed's first champion in England was a dog named St. Brides Demon. He achieved his championship in 1911.
  Sealies were especially popular in the early 1900s. They stood out in the show ring, and show entries often were in the hundreds. At the Pembrokeshire Hunt Hound Puppy and Sealyham Terrier show in Slade, Pembrokeshire, in 1914, , there were 600 Sealyham   Terriers entered, with 71 in the Open Dog Class and 64 in the Open Bitch Class, numbers that have never been equalled since.
  Sealyham Terriers were also recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1911, shortly after the first Sealies were imported into the U.S. The American Sealyham Terrier Club was formed in 1913.
  Since their show debut in San Mateo, California, in 1911, they have remained a popular show dog. Among the breed's many honors, a Sealyham Terrier has won Best in Show at Westminster four times.
  They have not, however, ever become a very popular dog with the general public. Despite his excellent companion dog credentials, the Sealy today is a rare breed, ranking 149th among the 155 breeds and varieties recognized by the AKC.



Temperament
  An independent dog, the Sealy is perfectly fine with being left alone while his humans work but he is also thrilled to snuggle up on their laps when they get home. This breed does tend to be relentless barkers however; they are not quite as bad as other terrier breeds. Their personalities and clown-like antics will keep the family laughing for hours.
  The Sealy might be small but he doesn’t understand the concept of this. Because he can be food and toy aggressive, this breed is not appropriate for families with young children. Considering his strong instinct to chase, he should not live with cats or other small animals. If raised with another dog in the home, the Sealy will get along famously with it, but can be aggressive toward strange dogs.

Health
  This is a hardy breed with few breed specific health problems. The main hereditary problem highlighted by the American Sealyham Terrier Club is an eye condition called lens luxation, for which there are DNA tests. Lens luxation is a condition in which the lens slips out of position in the eyeball due to the weakening of the fibers that holds it in place.
  This in turn blocks the flow of fluids in the eye, leading to a painful increase in intra-ocular pressure glaucoma and often irreparable optic nerve damage, leading to visual field loss and eventual blindness.
  As of November 2011, the Kennel Club has not highlighted any specific concerns regarding the breed's health to conformation show judges. Due to the low numbers of the breed, two of the most prevalent problems facing the breed today is the popular sire effect and the general problem of genetic diversity within the breed.

Care
  The Sealyham Terrier's small size and robust build make him a good choice for city or country dwellers. He's relatively inactive indoors and can adapt to life without a yard as long as he's walked daily. If he does have a yard, it should be fenced to prevent him from chasing other animals or wandering off to go hunting.
  Sealyhams are rather low-key, not "busy" like most terriers. Due to their size, their loyalty to their families, and their preference for cool temperatures, they do best as housedogs.
Like most terriers, Sealies likes to dig and bark. This dog is an independent thinker and requires firm and consistent handling, but he responds well to training with positive reinforcement techniques such as food rewards, praise, and play.
  Sometimes Sealies can be difficult to housetrain, but patience and a regular schedule usually brings success. Crate-training is recommended.

Living Conditions
  Good for apartment living. They are relatively inactive indoors and will do okay without a yard. Prefer cool weather.

Training
  Sealyham Terriers are feisty and strong-willed dogs. They require an assertive but kind family that won’t let the dog walk all over them. The Sealy needs regular training sessions to keep him from misbehaving. Consistency, along with loads of praise and treats, is best when working with a Sealy. Training should begin from the time you get the new puppy. This should go on throughout the dog’s life to ensure that he never forgets his place within the family.
  Sealies were bred to hunt small animals so they do remarkably well at Earthdog competitions. Being the mellowest of the terriers, this breed can be wonderful therapy dogs as well as family companions. Of course, with a lot of hard work, the Sealy can do well in obedience trials as well as in the breed ring.

Exercise
  This breed needs a daily walk. Play will take care of a lot of their exercise needs, however, as with all breeds, play will not fulfill their primal instinct to walk. Dogs that do not get to go on daily walks are more likely to display behavior problems. They will also enjoy a good romp in a safe, open area off lead, such as a large, fenced-in yard. The breed is a low-energy dog that makes a good walking companion. The overriding characteristic about Sealyhams is that they are low energy, couch potatoes. They are not "busy," not "active" and therefore make a low-key companion.

Grooming
  The Sealy has a long, weather-resistant double coat that doesn’t shed much but requires stripping or clipping in addition to regular brushing or combing with a slicker brush, pin brush, or stainless steel Greyhound comb. Be sure you brush or comb all the way down to the skin. The beard requires daily combing to keep it clean.
  The Sealy doesn’t shed much at all, but his hard terrier coat may need special care. If the show ring is in his future, the Sealyham's coat will have to be “hand-stripped,” a labor-intensive task that involves pulling out dead coat a little bit at a time, using a special tool.   Dogs whose career involves your sofa and garden will simply need to be kept brushed and occasionally clipped for neatness and to minimize shedding and matting of the coat. Clipping will soften the texture of the coat, so think about whether that’s important to you before you have it done.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  All Terriers are rambunctious, even the laidback Sealyham. This breed is best suited to families with older children who understand how to handle and interact with dogs.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how good-natured, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Sealies are generally good with other pets, including cats, especially if they're raised with them. They can be aggressive toward dogs they don't know.

Did You Know?
  The Sealyham is named after the estate of the man who developed the breed, Captain John Edwardes, who lived in Wales.



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Saturday, April 8, 2017

Everything about your Tibetan Spaniel

Everything about your Tibetan Spaniel
   A prized pet and watchdog for the Tibetan monasteries, the Tibetan Spaniel is lovingly referred to as a "little lion dog." Thought of highly, the breed was gifted to royals throughout Asia. Given to other countries, the popularity of the Tibetan Spaniel grew. A devoted human companion, the breed is immediately loved by all families that own it.

Overview
  The Tibetan Spaniel, also known as the Tibbie, is a dog breed in the Non-Sporting Group. This little Spaniel is not only an excellent companion, but they are highly valued watch dogs that were once called ‘little lions’ by the Buddhist monks of Tibet. The Tibetan Spaniel was approved by the AKC in 1983.
  The average Tibetan Spaniel stands 10 inches high at the shoulders and weighs between 9 and 15 pounds. Their coat requires frequent brushing to help prevent mats and control shedding, and their ears should be cleaned regularly and frequently checked for any signs of infections.

Highlights
  • Although Tibetan Spaniels can learn quickly, they may be stubborn when it comes to obeying commands.
  • Tibetan Spaniels shed small amounts year-round and need weekly brushing to get rid of dead hair.
  • Although Tibetan Spaniels are affectionate toward and protective of children, they're better suited for homes with older children because they can be injured during rough play.
  • Tibetan Spaniels generally get along well with other dogs and pets. They do well in homes with multiple dogs.
  • Tibetan Spaniels thrive when they're with their families. They're not recommended for homes where they'll receive little attention or will be left alone for long periods.
  • Barking can become a favorite pastime of Tibetan Spaniels if they're bored. They'll also bark when people come to the door or when they hear something suspicious. The upside is, they make great watchdogs.
  • Tibetan Spaniels only need moderate exercise and are quite happy with a daily walk or free play in a fenced yard.
  • Tibetan Spaniels must be walked on leash to prevent them from running off to explore. Yards should be fenced.
  • The Tibetan Spaniel is fairly rare, so if you're buying a puppy, it may take a while to find a good breeder, and once you do, there may be a wait for puppies to be available.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from a puppy mill, a pet store, or a breeder who doesn't provide health clearances or guarantees. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies and who breeds for sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts:
  • When you look at a Tibetan Spaniel, you should see a dog with a rectangular body covered in a silky double coat, dark-brown oval-shaped eyes, medium-size ears that hang down and are well feathered, and a plumed tail that curls over the back, falling to one side.
  • The Tibetan Spaniel’s coat can be any color or mixture of colors.
Breed standards

AKC group: Non-sporting
UKC group: Herding
Average lifespan: 14 - 16 years
Average size: 9 - 15 pounds
Coat appearance: Silky
Coloration: Gold, cream, red and sable with white markings on paws
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Small body, short to the ground and longer than it is tall; dark brown, oval eyes and black nose; feathering between the toes; plump and fluffy feathered tail
Possible alterations: May be multicolored
Comparable Breeds: Japanese Chin, Pekingese

History
  Tibetan Spaniels were bred by Buddhist monks to resemble little lions, which are symbolic of Buddha. Like their cousins the Lhasa Apsos, they served as alarm dogs in Tibetan monasteries. Tibetan Spaniels were highly valued and often presented as gifts to great nobles or rulers. The many exchanges of dogs between Tibet and China mean that the Tibetan Spaniel likely shares a common ancestry with breeds such as the Pekingese, the Japanese Chin, and the Shih Tzu.
  British travelers and missionaries brought some of the dogs to the West in the late 19th century and early 20th century. They include Mrs. McLaren Morris, who brought the first Tibetan Spaniel to England; Sir Edward and Lady Wakefield, who bred several litters; and Colonel and Mrs. Hawkins, who brought a pair of the Wakefields’ dogs to England in 1941. Agnes R. H. Greig, who is also associated with the Tibetan Terrier, sent several to her mother in Britain, but only one from the breeding program survived World War II.
  The dogs didn’t get much attention in the United States until the 1960s when a litter was bred from a pair imported from Tibet. Trinity Lutheran Church sexton Leo Kearns is credited with popularizing the dogs after his litter was snatched up by his parishioners in New Haven, Conn. He imported more Tibetan Spaniels from Britain, and others became interested in the dogs. The Tibetan Spaniel Club of America was formed in 1971, and the American Kennel Club recognized the breed in 1984. Tibbies rank 104th among the dogs registered by the AKC.

Personality
  Trusting and affectionate toward family members, Tibetan Spaniels may be aloof toward strangers, although never aggressive. True to their heritage, they make excellent watchdogs and will bark to alert you of anything that seems unusual.
  Tibbies seem to be especially responsive to their people's moods and feelings. As loving as they are, however, they're independent thinkers and won't always obey, especially if they think they know better or don't see any good reason to do as you ask.
Maud Earl Tibetan Spaniels 1898
  As with all dogs, Tibetan Spaniels need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Tibetan Spaniel puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.

Health Problems
  The Tibetan Spaniel is a generally healthy breed. However, this dog may suffer from the following conditions: progressive retinal atrophy, cherry eye, patellar luxation, allergies, and portosystemic shunt (a liver condition).

Care
  The Tibetan Spaniel breed is meant for apartment life and should not be allowed to live outdoors. The daily exercise needs of the Tibbie are minimal and can be met by indoor and outdoor games or a short on-leash walk. Its coat requires combing and brushing twice weekly.

Living Conditions
  The Tibetan Spaniel is good for apartment life. It is relatively inactive indoors and will do okay without a yard.

Training
  Because of his stubborn streak, the Tibetan Spaniel can be difficult to train. For the best results, start early and establish yourself as the Alfa of the household. If your dog gets the upper hand, this will be difficult to train them out of. For the best results, use positive training reinforcements, such as praise and treats. And keep training sessions short and interesting to hold your dog’s attention. You’ll be happy to learn that Tibetan Spaniels are pretty easy to house train and it is recommended that you crate train your dog.
  Tibetan Spaniels are known to be vocal, alerting you to a stranger’s presence. With patience and consistency, it is possible to train them to stop barking once they’ve alerted you to the possible threat.

Exercise Requirements
  Because of his size, Tibetan Spaniels can live pretty much anywhere. They do as well in an apartment as they would in a large estate. They make wonderful companions for seniors as they don’t need a lot of daily exercise. A daily walk and some play time will cover all his exercise needs. If you have a back yard, do not leave your Tibbie unattended. This dog needs to be with you and will be happiest when playing with you.

Grooming Needs
  Tibetan Spaniels shed lightly year round, and brushing two to three times per week will keep loose hair under control and keep the coat free from tangles or mats. They typically require a bath every six to eight weeks.
  Check the Tibetan Spaniel's ears on a weekly basis for signs of infection, irritation, or wax build up. Cleanse regularly with a veterinarian-approved cleanser and cotton ball. Brush the teeth at least once per week to prevent tartar buildup and fight gum disease. Additionally, nails should be trimmed once per month if the dog does not wear the toenails down naturally.

Children And Other Pets
  Tibetan Spaniels are affectionate and protective of children, but because they're small, they can be injured easily by rough handling, so they're best suited to homes with children who are at least 6 years old and know to be gentle and not to tease.
  As with any dog, always teach children how to approach and touch your Tibetan Spaniel, and supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear pulling from either party.
  Tibetan Spaniels usually get along well with other dogs and cats. Most enjoy having another dog as a companion.

Is this breed right for you?
  A human lover to the bone, the Tibetan Spaniel goes well with young children and other pets. A great family dog, the breed also makes for an excellent watchdog. Suited for apartment life, he is a true-blue inside dog. Enjoying a daily walk and time out in the yard, he is a bit difficult to train. Requiring moderate grooming, the Tibetan Spaniel is a moderate shedder, but does lose a large amount once a year. In need of a master with good leadership skills, the breed is likely to show behavioral problems if allowed to develop small dog syndrome.

Did You Know?
  The Tibbie is not a true Spaniel. He was referred to as an “epagneul,” a French word used in the Middle Ages to refer to small comforter dogs.

A dream day in the life of a Tibetan Spaniel
   The Tibetan Spaniel is likely to wake up with a smile. Happily wagging his tail at his owner, he will gladly follow his master wherever she may go. Running outside for a romp in the yard, he'll bark at any possible intruders. A lover, he'll play with and lick the children at any available opportunity. Kindhearted, he'll be at your feet until the end of the day, where he'll cuddle close for bedtime.



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