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Thursday, December 8, 2016

Everything about your English Toy Spaniel

Everything about your English Toy Spaniel
  A true lapdog, the English Toy Spaniel is dedicated to becoming the world’s best couch potato. This breed does like to play too but he prefers doing so on the living room carpet as opposed to outside in the dirt and grass. After all, the dirt and grass could make his beautiful, silky coat dirty! English Toy Spaniels love being spoiled and absolutely enjoy living in the lap of luxury. To them, luxury doesn’t have to be an English estate. It could very well be a small and cozy apartment providing the dog is with the people he loves.

Overview
  Originally bred as a woodcock hunter, the English Toy Spaniel was loved by royalty as a constant companion and foot and lap warmer. Very similar to the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, the two are often confused with each other and bred together as well. A preferred lap dog, he's a good companion that gets along well with school-aged children and other animals. Not prone to barking, he does need regular grooming and a push for regular exercise.
  English Toy Spaniels (nicknamed Charlies or ETs) are not as well known as their Cavalier King Charles Spaniel cousins, and that’s too bad. People who know them appreciate their small size and calm, devoted nature. Even though his ancestors lived in palaces, the ET is the perfect roommate for an apartment dweller. If you're allowed to bring a dog to work, he’s a good cubicle pal, too. And if you like to travel? Well, he fits perfectly in a carrier beneath your seat.

Highlights
  • Socialization is important with this breed because they can be timid when they are exposed to new people or situations.
  • Considered to be an average shedder, the English Toy Spaniel should be brushed every week to remove loose hair and to keep the coat from tangling.
  • For the dog's own safety, the English Toy Spaniel should be kept on leash whenever they are walked and they should also have a fully fenced yard.
  • English Toy Spaniels do well in apartments.
  • English Toy Spaniels do not handle heat very well and need to be monitored on hot days to ensure that they do not overexert themselves. It is recommended that the dogs reside in an air-conditioned dwelling.
  • English Toy Spaniels have low energy levels and low exercise requirements. They are happy spending their days sitting on your knee, and a leisurely walk around the neighborhood will meet their exercise needs. They make excellent companions for older owners.
  • English Toy Spaniels are loving dogs that usually do well with children, but they are not the ideal breed for a home with busy children since they can become overwhelmed by the noise and excitement children make.
  • English Toy Spaniels are companion dogs and thrive when they are with the people they love. They should not live outside or in a kennel away from their family.
  • Separation anxiety is a common problem in the English Toy Spaniel and they can become destructive when they are separated from their owners for a period of time.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store.
Other Quick Facts

  • The most recognizable feature of the English Toy Spaniel is his head, with its domed skull, large eyes, black nose, and soft, intelligent expression.
  • The English Toy Spaniel comes in four colors or patterns: Blenheim (red and white), Ruby (solid red), Prince Charles (tricolor), and King Charles (black and tan). In dog shows, the Blenheim and the Prince Charles compete in one class and the King Charles and the Ruby in another.
Breed standards
AKC group: Toy
UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan: 10 - 12 years
Average size: 8 - 14 pounds
Coat appearance: Silky, medium-length
Coloration: Tricolored (beige, white and black), black and tan, red and white
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Dark eyes and dark-eyed rims; well-proportioned body; scissor-bite teeth; long ears with feathering and medium-to long-length wavy coat; soft expression
Possible alterations: Coat may be straight
Comparable Breeds: Japanese Chin, Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

History
  Little spaniels probably descend from dogs that were popular in Chinese and Japanese imperial courts. They may share an ancient ancestor with the Pekingese and the Japanese
Portrait of Queen Mary I and King Philip of England
 by Hans Eworth (1558)
Chin. At some point, they made their way to Europe and became prized as companion dogs. Johannes Caius mentioned toy spaniels in his book, Of English Dogges, which was published in 1574. Mary, Queen of Scots had at least one toy spaniel, and it’s said that her son, King James I, received a litter in 1613 as a gift from the Emperor of Japan.
  In England, this breed is known as the King Charles Spaniel, because both Charles I and Charles II were very fond of the little dog. Because they were popular with royalty, they were also popular with everyone else, and it wasn’t unusual to see one pictured with the family in a portrait painted by Gainsborough, Rubens, Rembrandt, or Van Dyck. After the death of Charles II and the ouster of his brother, James II, Charles’ niece Mary and her husband William ascended to England’s throne. They brought their own favorite dogs with them: Pugs. Some people bred the toy spaniels and the Pugs together, eventually changing the look of the breed. The body became wider, the face flatter, and the skull more domed.
  The American Kennel Club recognized the English Toy Spaniel as a member of the Toy Group in 1886. Today, the ET ranks 126th among the breeds registered by the AKC.

Personality
  The sweet and lovable English Toy Spaniel is a true companion dog. He has an aristocratic bearing, but he's not a snob at all; picture instead a happy, devoted, quiet dog. He enjoys spending time with the people he loves and will fit himself into their lives. The ET requires little exercise and is happiest perched on his owner's knee. He does well with other dogs and cats if socialized to them and is gentle and loving to children although he's not best suited to living with them. He can become overwhelmed by excitement and can be shy and timid when he meets new people or is exposed to new situations.

Health
  The English Toy Spaniel, which has an average lifespan of 10 to 12 years, is susceptible to major health conditions like patellar luxation, and minor issues like early tooth loss, and "lazy tongue," a condition which causes the tongue to protrude from the mouth. A veterinarian may recommend regular knee tests for the dog.
  Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), hydrocephalus, and fused toes are also seen in some English Toy Spaniels, as well as a soft spot in the dog's skull due to an incomplete fontanel closure. Some English Toy Spaniels react adversely to anesthesia.

Care
  Even though the English Toy Spaniel is not very active, it enjoys a fun indoor or outdoor game or a good on-leash walk. Hot weather does not suit it and, by nature, it cannot live outdoors, away from the comfort of its family. It has a long coat that requires combing twice a week.

Living Conditions
  They are good for apartment life, relatively inactive indoors, and will do okay without a yard if they are sufficiently exercised. English Toy Spaniels do not do well in temperature extremes.

Training
  English Toy Spaniels are pretty bright dogs. They have a strong desire to please their owners however; they have a short attention span. To keep this breed interested during training sessions, delectable treats are necessary. Charlies love tasty treats so this will keep him focused and be his reward for working hard during the session.
  This breed makes a wonderful therapy dog. Their small size and love for riding in the car make traveling to hospitals and nursing home facilities easy. Patients enjoy allowing this cute little dog to sit on their laps while stroking their soft coats. Everybody feels better with an English Toy Spaniel around!

Exercise Requirements
  English Toy Spaniels are not fans of exercise. They would much rather chill on the couch than to chase a ball in the yard. Although this breed does not require a lot of activity, he does need some exercise to stay healthy and fit. Regular walks are important, but the occasional brisk trot will be beneficial to the Charlie. He might not like it; but it is needed.
  This breed is easily enticed with tasty treats. Puzzle toys which hide a treat within tend to keep the English Toy Spaniel intrigued and active inside of the house. Those that have a fenced yard for the dog to play in will find that the Charlie’s playfulness will have him chasing balls and other toys around the yard. Though not the most energetic breed of dog, the English Toy Spaniel will happily spend time playing with kids. That is, until he becomes bored and needs a nap.

Grooming
  The English Toy Spaniel has a long, silky coat that is usually straight but can be slightly wavy. Despite his long coat, this is a wash-and-go dog. Comb him out weekly to prevent mats and tangles, especially those that form behind the ears, elbows, and back legs. A bath every two to four weeks will keep him smelling good, and it doesn’t hurt to wash his face daily — mainly to prevent him from doing it himself by rubbing it on your furniture.
  Otherwise, simply clean the ears, trim the toenails, and brush the teeth frequently. The latter is especially important with toy breeds, which are often prone to dental disease. Charlies often have fused toes, which are a normal characteristic of the breed and not something to be concerned about.

Children And Other Pets
  English Toy Spaniels can be loving toward children, but they can become overwhelmed by the noise and stimulation young children create. This can lead to biting if they are handled roughly. English Toy Spaniels do very well with other pets, especially if they are raised with them.

Is this breed right for you?
  Although the English Toy Spaniel enjoys engaging in play and walks, it is necessary that he lives indoors with his family. Good with school-aged children, the breed is completely content sitting on his owner's lap all day. In need of regular companionship, he will need to be with a family that is home and available to him constantly.

Did You Know?
  English Toy Spaniels used to have their tails docked, and some still do, but this practice is becoming less common. Tail docking is done at an early age, so if you want a puppy with a natural tail, let the breeder know before the pups are born.

Urban myth
Portrait of a King Charles Spaniel,
 by Jean-Baptiste Huet 1778
  An urban legend claims that Charles II issued a special decree granting King Charles Spaniels permission to enter any establishment in the UK,overriding "no dog except guide dogs" rules. A variant of this myth relates specifically to the Houses of Parliament. This myth is sometimes instead applied to the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel.
  The UK Parliament website states: "Contrary to popular rumour, there is no Act of Parliament referring to King Charles spaniels being allowed anywhere in the Palace of Westminster. We are often asked this question and have thoroughly researched it." Similarly, there is no proof of any such law covering the wider UK. A spokesman for the Kennel Club said: "This law has been quoted from time to time. It is alleged in books that King Charles made this decree but our research hasn't tracked it down."

A dream day in the life of the English Toy Spaniel
  The English Toy Spaniel will be in no rush to wake up in the morning. Perfectly happy staying in bed with his family members, he will follow you to breakfast once you finally move from your comfort zone. Fill up his bowl to allow him to leisurely eat for the remainder of the day. Engage in a bit of play with his favorite toys, take him for a short walk and end the day with your English Toy Spaniel on your lap.

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Everything about your Belgian Malinois

Everything about your Belgian Malinois
  Intelligent and easily trained, the Belgian Malinois exudes confidence and is an exceptional watch and guard dog. Active and energetic, he's terrific at search and rescue, agility, and pretty much anything else you can teach him.

Overview
  Bred in Malines, Belgium, where the breed gets its name, the Belgian Malinois is often confused with the German Shepherd. One of the four Belgian sheepdogs, the dog was the first of its kind used as a herding dog and watchdog. Enjoying work, this breed is typically used today as a police or guard dog. Naturally protective, the Belgian Malinois requires early socialization to become a loving family dog.
  The Belgian Malinois, also known as the Chien de Berger Belge, the Mechelaar, the Mechelse Herder, the Mechelen and the Pastor Belga Malinois, is one of four distinct types of Belgian sheepherding dogs. This breed is sometimes mistaken for a German Shepherd due to its superficial resemblance to that breed, but the Malinois has a lighter and leaner build and longer legs in proportion to its body. The Malinois is smart, self-confident, sensitive and stable. The breed was first recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1911, as a member of the Miscellaneous Class.

Highlights
  • Belgian Malinois have a great deal of energy and need a lot of exercise. Make sure you have the room and time to provide it.
  • Malinois are very intelligent and alert. They also have strong herding and protection instincts. Early, consistent training is critical!
  • Although they are good-size dogs, they are very people-oriented and want to be included in family activities.
  • Malinois are constant shedders. They shed heavily twice a year.
  • Belgian Malinois are intense dogs that are play-oriented and sensitive. Training should be fun, consistent, and positive.
  • Because of their intelligence, high energy, and other characteristics, Malinois are not recommended for inexperienced dog owners.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts

  • The Malinois is one of four Belgian herding dogs that are all considered varieties of a single breed in their homeland.
  • The Malinois’ fawn to mahogany-colored coat is tipped with black, and he has a black mask and ears.
  • Because of his herding heritage, the Malinois tends to move in big circles
Breed standards
AKC group: Herding Group
UKC group: Herding Dog
Average lifespan: 12 - 14 years
Average size: 55 - 65 pounds
Coat appearance: Short, straight, water-resistant double coat
Coloration: Fawn, red or mahogany with black tips, or all black
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Medium-sized, square body similar to a German Shepherd; pointed, erect ears; deep chest; black nose; thin, tight lips; brown almond-shaped eyes; cat-like paws; and strong tail.
Possible alterations: Minimal mask on face, drooping or hanging ears, docked tail
Comparable Breeds: German Shepherd, Border Collie


History
  Known as the Chien de Berger, Belge  in Europe, the Malinois is often seen riding in a police car. This herding breed from Belgium — he takes his name from the town of Malines — does not have a well-known history before the late 19th century the late 1800s. He may have been helping shepherds care for flocks for centuries, but it wasn’t until 1891, in a burst of national enthusiasm, that Belgian herding dogs were divided into types and given names.
  The shorthaired Malinois became quite popular as a herder, and his abilities were later turned to police and military work. Photos at police dog trials in 1903 show Malinois climbing 10-foot ladders and performing other displays of agility. It’s not surprising that many of the dogs were conscripted during World War I.
  The American Kennel Club accepted the breed in 1911, calling them Belgian Sheepdogs and not separating them by coat type. There was little interest in the breed, though, and they had disappeared in the United States by 1939. After World War II, more were imported, and in 1959 the AKC decided to separate them into three different breeds . The Malinois was less popular than the Tervuren and the Belgian Sheepdog, so he was relegated to the   Miscellaneous Class and was not fully recognized again until 1965.
  Today the Malinois is a popular police and military dog and can be a good family companion in the right home. He ranks 76th among the breeds registered by the AKC.



Personality
  The Belgian Malinois is a member of the Belgian Sheepdog family. Like other Belgians, the Malinois is a sturdy, alert, loyal companion, and can thrive as a farm dog or a family dog. As with all Belgian Sheepdog breeds, Malinois were bred to herd and protect livestock, so they must have constant activity, whether playing with children, going on long walks, or chasing a frisbee. Ever vigilant, they make excellent watchdogs, and can be trained to do a variety of tasks.

Health
  Although the Belgian Malinois, which has an average lifespan of 10 to 12 years, is not prone to any major health issues, it does suffer occasionally from elbow dysplasia, pannus, progressive retinal atrophy (PRA), hemangiosarcoma, and cataract. To identify some of these issues early, a veterinarian may recommend regular tests on the dog's eyes, hips, and elbows.

Care
  Although it can survive outdoors under various weather conditions, it prefers to remain indoors with access to fields or wide open spaces. Its favorite activities include herding, playing, and jogging, all of which are excellent sources of exercise for the breed. The Belgian Malinois' coat must be combed occasionally and more during periods of shedding.

Living Conditions
  The Belgian Malinois will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. It is moderately active indoors and will do best with at least an average-sized yard. This breed prefers cool climates, but adapts well to others. It can live outdoors but would much rather be with his people.

Training
  Training is very important to this breed. Proper training, a consistent set of boundaries and discipline, and a master with a good presence of mind will all be important. This dog is not like the Golden Retriever, where training and socialization can be quite easy. Instead, the Belgian Malinois can be territorial and fearful of strangers if not raised properly, and will become uncooperative if not trained for obedience.
  When trained properly, there are few dogs more loyal and obedient than the Belgian Malinois. As long as you can demonstrate authority over this dog, you should be fine. If this worries you, another breed might be more appropriate.

Activity Requirements
  Malinois need a lot of vigorous activity in order to remain happy and healthy and should not be kept in an apartment. If they don't get enough activity, Malinois can quickly become destructive.
  Farms or houses with big, fenced-in yards are the most ideal settings for this breed. Active and able participants in outdoor activities, Malinois will want to be included in all family activities, whether doing farm chores, chasing a frisbee in the yard, or taking long walks in the park. They love to spend time outdoors, among their family and engaged in interesting and fun activities.

Grooming
  The Malinois has a short, straight coat that sheds heavily. The coat is heavier around the neck, on the tail, and near the back of the thighs. Brush it at least weekly to remove dead hair and distribute skin oils. Brush a little more often to help keep loose hair from landing on your floor, furniture, and clothing. Bathe him only as needed.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Brush the teeth frequently for high overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Well-socialized Malinois are good with children, especially if they are raised with them, but because of their herding heritage they may have a tendency to nip at their heels and try to herd them when playing. You must teach your Malinois that this behavior is unacceptable. An adult Malinois who's unfamiliar with children may do best in a home with children who are mature enough to interact with him properly.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Malinois can be aggressive toward other dogs and cats unless they're brought up with them from puppyhood. If you want your Malinois to get along with other animals you must start early and reward them for appropriate behavior. If your Malinois hasn't been socialized to other animals, it's your responsibility to keep him under control in their presence.

Is this breed right for you?
  Meant as a working dog, the Belgian Malinois is happiest if given a job to do. A devoted companion, it does not enjoy living outdoors or being kenneled. The breed requires regular grooming, sheds heavily once a year and is best in cooler climates. Enjoying family, it needs to be socialized early with both children and other animals. Although the Belgian Malinois does OK with apartment life if efficiently exercised, it does best with a yard. If not trained in obedience or given daily athletic opportunities, this breed may become restless and destructive. The Belgian Malinois needs a strong and dominant owner to avoid any aggressiveness.

Did You Know?
  This breed's strong tracking skills made the Malinois a popular choice for police, military, and search and rescue work. That's why many of these dogs were conscripted into World War I.

In popular culture
  • Kane, the co-star of James Rollins and Grant Blackwood's Tucker Wayne series, is a Belgian Malinois
  • The American science fiction crime drama television series Person of Interest features a Malinois named Bear as a regular cast member.
  • The titular character of the 2015 feature film Max is a Malinois, returning from service with the US Marine Corps.
  • It was also used in Naaigal Jaakirathai (English: Beware of Dogs)in Tamil,India
  • The police dog killed in the aftermath of the Paris terrorist attacks was a Malinois named Diesel who was given a funeral with full honours.
  • Rocket, a Belgian Malinois raised in India's National Security Guard's K-9 unit, as an expert assault and sniffer dog, was recommended for gallantry award in 2016, for detecting fidayeen presence in Pathankot airbase attack. During the operation he received burn injuries on his paws and forehead, but after treatment for weeks he was back on duty.
A dream day in the life
  The Belgian Malinois will wake up at the crack of dawn to get down to work. After a hearty meal, it'll be out the door, set for its day of guarding and herding. Once inside, this dog will be happy to hang with the family and do a bit of obedience training. It'll be happy to end its day with a run around the block and a bone.
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Everything about your Whippet

Everything about your Whippet
  The Whippet is one of the most popular of the hunting dogs. A member of the sighthound class of hunting dogs, it is bred to hunt by sight. The Whippet's keen wide range of vision gives it the ability to zero in on its prey, whereupon it breaks into a fast run to apprehend it.   What makes this breed truly outstanding is its particular affection for humans. Athletic and enthusiastic while at exercise or play, the Whippet is docile and tranquil at home, and especially patient with children and friendly with guests.

Overview
  A cousin to the Greyhound, the Whippet gets his name from the phrase "to whip it" due to his fast pace. Running at speeds of up to 37 mph, the Whippet is a born hunter and racer. Referred to as "the poor man's racehorse" in early England, this breed is not only fast, but intelligent and loyal.
  While the Whippet is often described as gentle, this word doesn’t apply to a Whippet in pursuit of cats or other small, furry creatures. If you have bunnies or hamsters, you may want to think twice about bringing a Whippet into your home. Whippet puppies raised with other pets can coexist peacefully, but instinct is a powerful thing, so it’s essential to keep them separated when you’re not around to supervise.
  Like most dogs, Whippets can become bored and destructive when left to their own devices, especially if they don’t have other dogs to keep them company or if they don’t receive enough attention from family members. To counteract this, aim to walk your Whippet several times a day. You can consider taking him to a dog park at least twice a week, so he can really run. But be aware that small dogs may resemble prey to him.

Highlights
  • Whippets are suitable for apartment living if you have access to a safely fenced area where they can run. Whippets have low energy levels indoors, but will become overactive and destructive if their exercise needs are not met.
  • When Whippets are not socialized properly they can become timid and stressed by changes in their environment. A properly socialized Whippet is a polite and undemanding dog who's wonderful with strangers and other dogs alike.
  • Whippets aren't very good watchdogs as they rarely bark and are friendly toward everyone they meet.
  • Whippets need daily exercise and will enjoy romping and running in a fenced yard or on leash.
  • A Whippet should never be allowed to run off leash during walks.
  • Whippets have a strong prey drive and will pursue other animals for several miles.
  • Underground electronic fencing is not recommended for Whippets. They will ignore the shock if they see something to chase. A 5- or 6-foot fence should be enough to confine your Whippet.
  • Whippets don't shed excessively, and weekly brushing will help keep loose hair off your clothes and furniture.
  • A Whippet's thin skin is vulnerable to scrapes, tears, and nicks.
  • Without daily exercise, a Whippet can become destructive. When their exercise needs are met, Whippets are generally quiet and calm dogs.
  • Whippets are not outdoor dogs and should live in the house with their people. Whippets can suffer from separation anxiety and can become destructive when they do. It's important to spend time with your Whippet and allow him the freedom to follow you from room to room or just snuggle at your feet, or more likely on the couch with you.
  • Although Whippets do very well in multi-dog households, there have been cases of Whippets attacking and killing cats. There have been some Whippets who live happily with cats and other small furry pets, but these dogs were socialized to the animal at a very young age. If you have any other small pet besides another dog, please be aware that the Whippet might chase the other pet — or worse injure it  — if he's not properly socialized or trained.
  • Whippets are great companions for kids. Nonetheless, it's important to teach your child how to properly interact with dogs and to never leave a young child alone with any breed of dog.
  • Whippets get cold easily. Buy a sweater or coat for your Whippet to wear when it's cold, wet, or snowy outside.
  • To get a healthy pet, never buy a puppy from a backyard breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Find a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs for genetic health conditions and good temperaments.
Other Quick Facts


  • Whippets used to be known as snap dogs — for the way they snapped up rabbits and rats.
  • Whippet puppies are cunning little creatures, so you’ll benefit from signing up your pup for obedience classes at an early age; 10 to 12 weeks is highly recommended.
  • The breed is revered for its graceful, athletic build, which allows the Whippet to clock speeds of up to 35 m.p.h. Read: This is not a dog that should be allowed to run off-leash in open spaces.
Breed standards
AKC group: Hound
UKC group: Sighthound
Average lifespan: 12 - 15 years
Average size: 20 - 40 pounds
Coat appearance: Short, smooth and fine
Coloration: Brindle, black, red, white, blue
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: A medium-sized thin and long body similar to the Greyhound, long slender head shape, with a long muzzle and tapered black or blue nose, darks eyes in an oval shape, short ears folded back, long and lean straight legs, and long tail that curves upward.
Possible alterations: Color may be mixed variations of Brindle, black, red, white, and blue
Comparable Breeds: Greyhound, Italian Greyhound

History
Charles Compton,
 7th Earl of Northampton by Batoni
  The Whippet is a fairly modern breed, not much more than a couple of hundred years old. He was developed in Northern England, specifically Lancashire and Yorkshire, probably during the late 1700s, by crossing Greyhounds with fast, long-legged terriers. The result was a small, swift dog frequently used by poachers to hunt rabbits and other small game on local estates.
  The Whippet became popular with working men in Northern England, who spent their off hours seeing whose Whippets could kill the most rabbits or rats or whose was the fastest. Whippet races usually took place on a straight track that spread down roads and across fields. The Whippets would chase a rag or piece of cloth, and the contests became known as rag races.
  While the working class bred and perfected the racing and hunting spirit in the breed, it's said that the upper class perfected the look of the breed as it is today by adding in some Italian Greyhound for refinement. England's Kennel Club recognized the Whippet as a breed in 1891. The first Whippet to be registered with the American Kennel Club was a dog named Jack Dempsey, in 1888.
  Today the Whippet continues to inspire admiration for his stylish look, versatility, and devoted companionship. He's ranked 60th among the 155 breeds and varieties recognized by the AKC.

Personality
  Amiable, friendly, quiet, and gentle at home, the Whippet is intense in the chase. He requires a leash or a fenced yard to prevent him from taking off after any moving object, be it a bunny or a radio-controlled car. He doesn't bark much, but he's alert and makes an excellent watchdog. Guard dog? Not so much. He'll happily show the burglar to the silver.
  Temperament is affected by a number of factors, including heredity, training, and socialization. Puppies with nice temperaments are curious and playful, willing to approach people and be held by them. Choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one who's beating up his littermates or the one who's hiding in the corner. Always meet at least one of the parents — usually the mother is the one who's available — to ensure that they have temperaments that you're comfortable with. Meeting siblings or other relatives of the parents is also helpful for evaluating what a puppy will be like when he grows up.
  Like every dog, Whippets need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Whippet puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog. Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.

Health
  Whippets generally have a life-span of about 12 to 15 years. Like many sighthounds, they are sensitive, and prone to barbiturate anesthesia and lacerations. Some of the problems that can occasionally be seen in this breed are eye defects and deafness. Eye problems are a major health concern for this breed. Hence, eye tests should be part of their regular health screenings

Care
  Whippets do not require a great deal of maintenance. However, as an athletic breed, they do need to be taken out for exercise regularly, with a combination of running and walking.   Because they are natural sprinters, they cannot run for prolonged distances, but they thrive when they are able to run with some freedom and space to get to their top speeds. These dogs love to play in the snow but cannot stand cold weather for a long time and cannot be kept as outdoor pets owing to their short coats and lack of heat retaining body fats. The main part of their time should be in a warm environment, with an access to a soft bed inside the house. Regular grooming should be part of overall care, though Whippets do not tend have the typical body odor that is associated with dogs, again owing to their short, fine coat.

Living Conditions
  This breed is sensitive to the cold. Wearing a coat is advised in the winter. These dogs will do okay in an apartment if they are sufficiently exercised. Whippets are calm indoors and a small yard will do.

Training
  Whippets are actually known as sensitive breeds, which mean they should not be over trained. Special care should be taken to avoid negative reinforcement. Instead, positive reinforcement will help develop a natural and healthy self-esteem, as it is easy to “cross over the line” with Whippets and confuse them as to why you’re angry or impatient. A good trainer will be able to handle a Whippet with relative ease.

Activity Requirements
  Though they love to run and are prone to unprompted laps around the house or yard, you don't need to be a runner yourself to raise this breed. Whippets should be allowed to run several times a week, but they are not built for endurance activities. A few sprints around the yard or track and a Whippet is done for the day, happily retiring to his bed for some rest and relaxation. They are fine city dwellers, as long as they are allowed to get to a park for regular sprints. Other than that, regular walking will keep the Whippet happy and healthy.  Their size and quiet natures makes them suitable for some apartments, but there should be enough room to accommodate random fits of running.
  Taking your Whippet to the lure course where he can run at top speed is an excellent way to keep him in shape and meet his exercise requirements.

Grooming Needs
  The Whippet's coat only needs to be brushed with a hound mitt once per week to remove loose hair and keep the coat healthy. They only require bathing as needed. The thin coat of the Whippet does not protect well against cuts and scrapes, so he may be more prone to minor skin injuries than other breeds. Be sure to clean all wounds, even minor wounds, to prevent infection.
  Check the ears on a weekly basis for signs of infection, irritation, or wax build up. Cleanse regularly with a veterinarian-approved cleanser and cotton ball. Brush the teeth at least once per week to prevent tartar buildup and fight gum disease. Additionally, nails should be trimmed once per month if the dog does not wear the toenails down naturally.

Children And Other Pets
  Whippets enjoy playing with kids. They're not so large that they knock them over easily, and they're not so small or delicate that they're easily injured by them. That said, a few ground rules will keep everyone safe.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Whippets like the company of other dogs, and the presence of another dog or two can help keep them from being lonely if you're gone during the day. They have a high prey drive, however, and aren't really suited to living in homes with cats. It's their nature to chase small furry creatures, after all. Some Whippets can learn to live peacefully with cats, especially if they're brought up with them from puppyhood, but you should always supervise them when they're together and separate them when you're not home.

Is this breed right for you?
  Great with children that do not play rough, the Whippet is a devoted and quiet family dog. Docile and easy to maintain, these pets are awesome to travel with and take care of. Best suited for warmer climates, the Whippet will need a coat if taken out in a cold climate.   Sensitive, they're on the easier side to housebreak and are OK for apartment living if taken out for regular exercise. Trained and prone to hunting, these dogs only do well with cats if raised with them. They do best living in a home with a small yard and as an inside pup.

Did You Know?
  Whippets were introduced to America by English mill workers who settled in Massachusetts and eventually turned the state into a mecca for Whippet racing.

A dream day in the life of a Whippet
  Waking up ready for affection from his owner, the Whippet will loyally watch the house once you leave for the day. Going out occasionally for a run around the yard and a sniff for any animal intruders, he'll spend most of the day tucked away indoors. A loving pat from the kids and a reserved glance at the neighbors and he'll keep himself entertained. After his best friend arrives home, he'll be ready and waiting for his daily run. Once home, he'll loyally sleep at your feet until you both hit the hay.








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Everything about your Old English Sheepdog

Everything about your Old English Sheepdog
  Beneath that shaggy coat and gentle disposition, the Old English Sheepdog is an independent thinker with his own agenda and a powerful herding instinct. He loves people and is an excellent watchdog, but proper care of his coat requires a serious time commitment.

Overview
  The exact origin of the Old English Sheepdog is unknown; however, there are traces of its heritage in the western counties of England. Bred by farmers as fast and intelligent sheep and cattle herders to take animals to the market, their tales were docked for identification purposes. When sheering the sheep, farmers would often do the same to the Old English Sheepdog for blankets and warm clothing. Known also for herding deer due to its dense coat and cold-weather durability, the breed makes a great working and guard dog.
  In reality, the OES — nicknamed "Bobtail" because of his docked tail — is an easygoing, fun-loving, intelligent dog. He's a member of the American Kennel Club Herding Group. He's certainly a large dog at 60 to 100 pounds, but his profuse coat of blue-gray and white makes him appear even larger. Known for his wonderful temperament, he's powerful, sturdy, and hardworking.

Highlights
  • Training and proper socialization is essential for Old English Sheepdogs. They are large, bouncy and enthusiastic, but when they are young they can be especially rowdy. Patient, consistent training is must.
  • Old English Sheepdogs are not for clean freaks. They tend to drool and are heavy shedders. Also, their heavy coats trap debris and dirt, which ends up on your furniture and floor.
  • Originally bred for driving cattle and sheep, the OES is an active breed that requires a lot of exercise.
  • The Old English Sheepdog coat is high maintenance. Keeping it clean and tangle-free is time-consuming and expensive.
  • Separation anxiety is common in Old English Sheepdogs. They live for their families, and they can become destructive if they're left alone too much.
  • To get a healthy pet, never buy a puppy from a backyard breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Find a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs for genetic health conditions and good temperaments.
Other Quick Facts

  • The Old English Sheepdog has a shaggy double coat that comes in any shade of gray, grizzle, blue or blue merle with or without white markings.
  • Besides herding, the Old English can be found competing in agility, obedience and rally.
  • His bobtail is a distinguishing characteristic of the Old English. Working dogs had their tails docked so their owners wouldn’t be taxed for them.
Breed standards
AKC group: Herding Group
UKC group: Herding
Average lifespan: 10 - 12 years
Average size: 60 - 100 pounds
Coat appearance: Double coat with hard and coarse hair; textured outercoat; and waterproof, soft undercoat
Coloration: Gray, grizzle or blue with or without white markings
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Strong, square body with deep chest; black nose; flat ears close to the head; brown or blue eyes; short tail
Possible alterations: Can have one brown- and one blue-colored eye; born tailless
Comparable Breeds: Bearded Collie, South Russian Ovtcharka

History
Ch. Slumber, best in show at the
Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show in 1914
  The Old English Sheepdog comes from the very old pastoral type dogs of England, but no records were kept of the dogs, and everything about the earliest types is guesswork. A small drop-eared dog seen in a 1771 painting by Gainsborough is believed by some to represent the early type of the Old English Sheepdog. In the early 19th century a bobtailed drovers dog, called the Smithfield or Cotswold Cor, was noticed in the southwestern counties of England and may have been an ancestor. Most fanciers agree that the Bearded Collie was among the original stock used in developing today's breed. Some speculate that the Russian Owtchar was among the breed's ancestors.
  The Old English Sheepdog was at first called the "Shepherd's Dog" and was exhibited for the first time at a show in Birmingham, England, in 1873. There were only three entries, and the judge felt the quality of the dogs was so poor that he offered only a second placing.   From that beginning, the breed became a popular show dog, and, although the shape of dog itself has changed very little over the years, elaborate grooming including backcombing and powdering the fur were recorded as early as 1907. The breed was exported to the United States in the 1880s, and by the turn of the 20th century, five of the ten wealthiest American families bred and showed the Old English Sheepdog. The breed continues to be a popular show dog today.

Personality
  The Old English Sheepdog is a playful, affectionate clown who delights in frolicking with his family and neighborhood children. In fact, adolescence in the OES often extends to about age three, and an adult OES will retain his playful demeanor well into his golden years.
  An intelligent breed, the OES is a quick learner, always looking for something interesting and fun to do. He's capable of performing numerous tasks, including herding, agility, obedience, and search and rescue.
  This breed requires significant physical and mental exercise. He doesn't enjoy being left alone for long periods of time and much prefers — in fact needs — to be in the company of his family.
  A properly bred OES is good-natured and kind, and this is what makes him an excellent children's companion and a super family dog. He's sometimes called a nanny, a term of endearment that arises from stories surrounding the role he sometimes takes on within his family.
  However, the OES is not known for being an assertive watchdog. He may bark when strangers come to his home — or he may not. Some OESs are highly protective, while others aren't.

Health
  The Old English Sheepdog, which has an average lifespan of 10 to 12 years, is prone to minor health conditions like deafness, cataract, gastric torsion, otitis externa, progressive retinal atrophy (PRA), cerebellar ataxia, retinal detachment and hypothyroidism, or major health issues like canine hip dysplasia (CHD). To identify some of these issues a veterinarian may run hearing, hip, thyroid, and eye exams on the dog.

Care
  The Old English Sheepdog can live outside in temperate or cool climates, but it should have access to indoor quarters or the house, as it seeks constant companionship. A moderate or long walk or an energetic romp can fulfill its daily exercise requirements. And the Old English Sheepdog's coat needs combing or brushing on alternate days to prevent it from getting matted.

Living Conditions
  The Old English Sheepdog will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. These dogs are fairly active indoors and will do best with at least an average-sized yard.

Training
  As with many assertive and sometimes strong-willed breeds, the training will be crucial. Old English Sheepdogs come from a clear hierarchy both in dog packs and in the farming structure in western England, which means they need to feel like they have a place within your home’s own hierarchy. Good training, setting boundaries, and even giving your Old English Sheepdog a job to perform are all good ways of establishing this hierarchy.
  A particularly weak-willed owner can sometimes find the Old English Sheepdog to be a handful, especially as the dog gets older and becomes more set in its ways.

Activity Requirements
  Apartment dwellers may be drawn to this breed because they have a reputation for being well-behaved indoors but Old English Sheepdogs are not city dwellers and should not be kept in apartments or condos. They are country dogs, who do best in the suburbs or on a farm where they can herd livestock. At least one hour of vigorous activity per day is required for Sheepdogs to maintain health, happiness and an even temperament.
  Sheepdogs make excellent walking, jogging, biking and hiking companions and should be included in these activities. Their heavy coats can make them prone to overheating, so most owners keep their long coats cropped short.

Grooming
  The glory of the Old English Sheepdog is his coat. The most difficult part of caring for an Old English is also his coat. Expect to spend at least a half hour to an hour a week keeping it groomed. Along with time devoted to coat care, be prepared for dog hair around the house and on your clothes, as well as dirt, mud and debris tracked in on the dog’s furry feet.
  One of the advantages of buying an Old English from a breeder is the opportunity to learn how to groom him from a master. Even if your dog’s breeder does not live nearby, she is only as far away as an email or phone call if you need advice on how to groom the dog.
  Get a puppy used to grooming from day one. Comb and brush him gently but thoroughly so that he learns to welcome the attention. If you neglect the coat, it will get so tangled, dirty and smelly that it will have to be shaved. Grooming tools that will come in handy are a dematting comb, a shedding rake and a wide-toothed comb. Use shears to trim the hair between his paw pads and to trim the hair around his rear end to keep it free of fecal matter and urine stains.
  The Old English also needs the basic care that all dogs get. Trim his nails as needed, usually every week or two, and brush his teeth with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  The well-bred and well-socialized Old English Sheepdog is a trustworthy children's companion. Some say he will supervise and herd young children, keeping them in a particular area. Others say the OES acts as a means of support to the toddler learning to walk.
  Unfortunately, there are some exceptions to the Old English Sheepdog's role as a loving nanny, due to poor breeding that has resulted in ill-tempered and neurotic dogs. Buy only from a reputable breeder and ask to meet the puppy's parents. And it is extremely important to note that children should never be left unsupervised with any dog, regardless of breed or temperament.
  The good-natured OES is friendly with other dogs and pets, provided he is properly socialized and trained.

Is this breed right for you?
  Friendly and active, the Old English Sheepdog is a lover of family and children. A gentle and loyal breed, it requires training to avoid herding humans. A natural-born worker, it does best when it has a job to do. Since it is active indoors, the breed needs a large yard to roam in and may not be satisfied with apartment living. Requiring a sufficient amount of exercise and an owner with strong leadership, the Old English Sheepdog can easily become distracted and troublesome. In need of brushing and regular grooming, the dog is not considered to be a large shedder.

Did You Know?
  There is no upper limit for the height of the Old English Sheepdog. Females are typically 21 inches and up, males 22 inches and up. That’s because sheep varied in size, so the dogs used to herd them also varied in size.

Famous Old English Sheepdogs
The Colonel in One Hundred and One Dalmatians

  • Ambrosius
    in Labyrinth (film)
  • Barney in Barney (TV series)
  • Barkley in Sesame Street
  • Barry in The Tale of Edward
  • Bebe in Captain Kangaroo
  • "Big Dog" in 2 Stupid Dogs
  • Boot in The Perishers
  • Broo in The Raccoons
  • Chiffon in The Shaggy Dog (1959)
  • The Colonel in One Hundred and One Dalmatians
  • Digby in Digby, the Biggest Dog in the World
  • Drooler in Krypto the Superdog
  • Edison in Chitty Chitty Bang Bang
  • Elwood in The Shaggy D.A.
  • Lat in The Brady bunch
  • Farley in For Better or For Worse
  • Hot Dog in Archie Comics
  • Martha, Paul McCartney's Old English Sheepdog was said to be the namesake of Martha My Dear.
  • Max in The Little Mermaid and The Little Mermaid II: Return to the Sea
  • Mooch in Lady and the Tramp II: Scamp's Adventure
    Sam in Cats & Dogs
  • Muffin Mclay in Hairy Maclary from Donaldson's Dairy, the first book in a series of children's picture books featuring Hairy Maclary
  • Nana in Hook (film)
  • Nate in Open Season 3
  • Niblet, Giblet, and Rebound on Pound Puppies
  • Sam in Cats & Dogs and Cats & Dogs: The Revenge of Kitty Galore
  • Samson in Samson en Gert (TV series)
  • Shag in Road Rovers
  • Schaeffer in The Raccoons
  • Tiger in The Patty Duke Show
  • Wordsworth in Jamie and the Magic Torch
A dream day in the life
  The Old English Sheepdog loves to be around its family members. Waking up surrounded by children and other people, it will happily greet each with a smile. Running outside for a bit, it'll guard the home as its number-one priority. Coming inside for a bit of play, this breed will be ready and waiting for its daily run. After its daily brushing, the Old English Sheepdog will engage in a game of fetch before snoozing at the foot of its favorite owner.
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