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Everything about your dog!

Thursday, February 25, 2016

Everything about your Irish Setter

Everything about your Irish Setter
  When you bring an Irish Setter into your home, prepare for a downright giddy housemate. Full of boisterous energy and love, Irish Setters will want to be involved in everything you do. They love family time, whether indoors or out, and they get along famously with children.

Overview
  This charming Irish redhead is known for its carefree personality and rocket-launcher energy. “Tireless” and “enthusiastic” are the two words frequently used to describe the breed. The Irish Setter loves to run, but given an ample daily quota of exercise, he's a calm, fun-loving companion. The Irish Setter can be a good choice for families with older children, but he’s probably too rambunctious to be set loose with toddlers. He also gets along well with other pets such as cats if he’s raised with them. Irish Setters are alert and will loudly and excitedly announce when someone is approaching.
  Choose an Irish Setter if you are an active person who can give him the exercise he needs. A long walk or run of an hour or so will do, or you can take him hiking or run him alongside your bicycle. He’s also a super competitor in dog sports such as agility, obedience, and rally and can be an excellent therapy dog. Be warned: if you don’t give him an outlet for his energy, he will become frustrated. A frustrated Irish Setter is a destructive Irish Setter.
  As with so many sporting breeds, there are differences between Irish Setters bred for the field and those bred for the show ring. Field-bred dogs are smaller with a lighter coat and have much more hunting instinct than their show-ring siblings, but both types make good companions.
  Last but not least, it should go without saying that a people-loving dog like the Irish Setter needs to live in the house

Highlights
  • Irish Setters become very attached to the people in their lives and can suffer from serious separation anxiety. They become very unhappy when they are left alone for more than a few hours and this unhappiness usually results in destructive behavior. Irish Setters do not make good outdoor dogs and need to stay inside, close to their family.
  • The high-energy, athletic Irish Setter needs room to run and the best place for him to do that is in a large, fenced yard.
  • Irish Setters need lots of exercise and should be exercised twice a day for at least half an hour each time.
  • Irish Setters need obedience training to channel their mischievous and sometimes stubborn nature.
  • Irish Setters do very well with other animals and children. It is important, however, to properly socialize your puppy regardless of the breed's temperament or your living situation. You might not have children or other pets now, but that could change. Lack of socialization can cause many difficulties.
  • Irish Setters need to be groomed daily or every other day to keep their long, silky coats from becoming tangled. They are moderate shedders, so you will have some hair in your house, especially during shedding seasons.
  • Irish Setters do not mature quickly. Some dogs settle down by the age of 2, but others remain puppylike their entire lives.
  • Irish Setters are inquisitive by nature and will get into anything they can find or reach. This trait can also make training more difficult because they generally have a hard time staying focused. If you can keep them interested in training, they learn quickly.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Irish Setter’s stunning, medium-length coat is mahogany or rich chestnut red with no black. He may have a small amount of white on the chest, throat, or toes, or a narrow streak of white on the head.
  • The Irish Setter’s head is long and lean with a delicately chiseled appearance. The head is framed by long ears and set off by dark eyes that show intelligence and good humor.
Breed Standards
  • AKC Group: Sporting
  • UKC Group: Gundog
  • Average Life span:10 to 11 years
  • Weight: 24 to 27 inches at the shoulder
  • Height: 35 to 70 pounds
  • Coat : The Irish Setter’s deep reddish distinctive coat can be characterized as long and silky, and you’ll want to make sure it’s properly groomed in order to ensure your animal is comfortable and healthy.
  • Comparable Breeds: Golden Retriever, Labrador Retriever
History
  It's not surprising that this handsome redhead comes from Ireland, which is famous for fine and beautiful dogs. The Irish Setter appears to have been developed there in the 18th century, probably the result of combining English Setters, spaniels, pointers, and Gordon Setters.
  Those first Irish Setters were sometimes called red spaniels — a clue to their heritage, perhaps — or modder rhu, Gaelic for "red dog." Often, they were white and red instead of the solid dark red we see today. Some, described as "shower of hail" dogs, had red coats sprinkled with small white spots. The Irish Earl of Enniskillen may have started the fad for solid red dogs. By 1812, he would have no other kind in his kennels. Other Irish breeders of the time who preferred the red dogs were Jason Hazzard of Timaskea in County Fermanagh and Sir St. George Gore. 
  A dog named Elcho was the first Irish Setter imported to the United States. He arrived in 1875 and became a star not only in the show ring but also in the field. The first Irish Setter registered by the American Kennel Club was Admiral, in 1878.
  They quickly became one of the most popular breeds in America and a favorite in the show ring. Between 1874 and 1948, 760 Irish Setters became conformation champions, while only five became field champions. This sparked alarm for some fanciers of the original breed, and in 1940 the magazine Field and Stream called for a resurrection of the breed as a working dog. Today, it's not unusual to see two types: the larger, heavier show dog, and the lighter, sleeker field dog.
  The Irish Setter's popularity soared in the 1960s and 1970s, thanks to the books and movie featuring an Irish Setter named Big Red, as well as the presence of Irish Setter King Timahoe at the White House during the Nixon administration. Today, the Irish Setter ranks 68th among the 155 breeds and varieties recognized by the AKC.



Temperament
  People rarely have a negative thing to say about the temperament of Irish Setters, being friendly to adults, children, other animals and strangers alike. This easy going nature will not, of course, make them a good guard dog, however, you will have a playful, affectionate and loyal member of the family if you choose an Irish Setter to share your home. One thing to be slightly wary of with Setters is the hunting instinct which is still alive and kicking and as a result, it is advisable to supervise them around small animals you may have in the household such as rabbits, birds, hamsters etc.
  They are a very active and alert dog, and enjoy long daily walks and runs. Due to their highly trainable nature, they are usually good off the lead, provided you have trained them with a reliable recall. This of course may vary according to the dogs personality as some Irish Setters are so playful they may develop selective hearing when called back to go home!
  This is a breed of dog which does not relish being alone for long periods of time and inactivity may lead to separation anxiety, boredom and destructive behaviour. 
  Due to their pliable and gentle nature Irish Setters are often used as PAT dogs in schools, hospitals and hospices where they will receive the attention and affection with pleasure.

Health
  Irish Setters tend to be a very healthy breed. Problems that have been noted in Irish Setters include: Hip dysplasia, cancer, progressive retinal atrophy (PRA), epilepsy, entropion, hypothyroidism, hyperosteodystrophy, bloat (a.k.a. gastric torsion), osteosarcoma, Von Willebrand's disease, patent ductus arteriosus, canine Leukocyte adhesion deficiency (CLAD) and celiac disease.
  It should be noted that Irish Setters are now one of the few breeds for which genetic tests have been developed to detect the presence of both CLAD and PRA (RCD-1).

Activity Requirements
  Irish Setters require a lot of activity to maintain an even temperament. Prospective owners should be prepared to dedicate at least one hour per day to a Setter's physical activity requirements. Brisk walks are good, but they should be allowed to run several times per week. Irish Setters are country dogs, they require wide open space and room to roam.
  Agility training is often a good outlet for Irish Setters as it works the mind and the body. Though they aren't as reliable as a Golden Retriever and may not win agility championships, Irish Setters enjoy the activity and appreciate the bonding time.

Care
  Irish Setters require regular brushing to prevent matting of the coat; even more so in the winter, when the under coat is thicker. Even without a show standard trim, this breed looks its best when it is given an occasional trimming. A thorough round of exercise for at least an hour a day is a must for this breed. Irish Setters cannot bear cold climates, preferring temperate weather.

Living Conditions
  The Irish Setter is not recommended for apartment life unless the owners are active daily joggers or bikers and plan on taking the dog along with them. This breed does best with a large yard.

Trainability
  Irish Setters need very little training when it comes to hunting birds, but household obedience is a different story. Don't let the long hair fool you – this is not a Golden Retriever. Training and Irish Setter requires patience, consistency and a calm-assertive attitude. This breed develops habits quickly, and bad habits can be nearly impossible to break, so the earlier you begin training a Setter, the better.
  Irish Setters can be rambunctious well after puppyhood passes and even if they receive adequate exercise. It is very important to teach your setter proper manners and not to jump on people, no matter how excited he may be to see them.

Grooming
  This Irish redhead has a coat that’s moderately long on the body and short and fine on the head and front legs, with long, silky feathering on the ears, the backs of the legs, the chest, the belly, and the tail.
  The coat needs brushing and combing two or three times a week to prevent or remove mats and tangles. A bath every two to four weeks or so doesn’t go amiss. Tips on grooming and the best tools to use are available from this Irish Setter breeder.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath. Keep the long, hanging ears clean and dry to help prevent bacterial or yeast infections from developing.

Children And Other Pets
  Irish Setters are good friends for active older children, but they can be too rambunctious for toddlers. It's all too easy for an Irish Setter to accidentally knock a child down.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Irish Setters are also good with other dogs in the household, as well as cats, especially if they're raised with them, but they might see pet birds as prey since those are what they are bred to hunt.

Did You Know?
  • The 1962 Disney movie “Big Red” gave the breed’s popularity a big boost, as did the White House presence of King Timahoe, President Richard Nixon’s Irish Setter.
  • Bus √Čireann, the national bus company in Ireland, uses the Irish Setter as its corporate logo.
  • Alex the Dog from the Stroh's beer commercials (half Irish Setter, half Golden Retriever)
  • Chauncey, fictional dog of Duck Phillips in Mad Men
  • Garry Owen, pet of Maine Governor Percival Proctor Baxter
  • King Timahoe (1968–1979), pet of Richard Nixon, a 56th birthday gift from his White House staff in January 1969.
  • Kojak, fictional dog in the Stephen King novel The Stand
  • Mike, pet of US President Harry Truman
  • Milord, a red Setter which was Alexander II, Tsar of Russia's favourite dog
  • Plunkett, the only Irish setter depicted in George Earl's mythical painting of "A Field Trial in the Eighties"
  • Shannon, pet of Beach Boy Carl Wilson, whose death became the subject of the 1976 song by a friend, Henry Gross
  • T-Bone, mascot for the Pace University Setters sports teams
  • Thunder, first mascot for the University of British Columbia Thunderbirds sports teams
  • Seamus, owned by Mitt Romney.
  • Redbeard, owned by younger Sherlock Holmes in Sherlock
  • Sasha La Fleur, Charlie's love interest in All Dogs Go to Heaven 2.


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Everything about your Cairn terrier

Everything about your Cairn terrier
  Everyone remembers Toto from the movie The Wizard of Oz. Spunky, curious, fearless, and loyal, little Toto went everywhere with Dorothy and helped her stop the Wicked Witch of the West and even exposed the Wizard as simply a man behind a curtain. Most Cairn Terriers are exactly like Toto – loyal to their family, curious and brave. They are excellent companions for families of all shapes and sizes and can even be useful vermin exterminators on farms.

Overview
  The bright-eyed, up-for-anything Cairn Terrier was bred in Scotland to dig into piles of rocks – the cairns from which he gets his name – in search of vermin. Today he's a full-time family pet and companion, but he's no lap dog. With his head up, ears and tail twitching, he's always game for a long walk, wrestling with the kids, or ridding the backyard of invading squirrels.
  The shaggy-coated Cairn only weighs 13 or 14 pounds, but he's a little dog who clearly has no idea just how small he is. He's intelligent and fairly easy to train, with a streak of what some would call independence, but you might call stubbornness.
Cairn Terriers are very affectionate, particularly with children, and while some small dogs can't handle the rough-and-tumble games kids play, the Cairn Terrier loves them. He'll even invent some of his own.
  That's not to say every Cairn Terrier will automatically be great with children. Adult supervision of playtime along with training and socializing of the dog are still required. But in most cases, kids and Cairns are a match made in heaven.
With small furry creatures, it's a very different story. The Cairn still remembers rooting out otters, foxes, and other vermin on Highland farms, and he's not likely to make a distinction when it comes to cats, hamsters, and other small animals. Always walk him on leash so he can’t indulge the urge to chase other animals.
  The Cairn Terrier is a low-maintenance dog, needing just a weekly combing to keep shedding under control. Cairn Terriers don't do well if they're left alone for long periods, and are not happy as backyard dogs. Let him live as a member of your family, preferably with the company of another dog, or you might find yourself with a lonely, bored, noisy, and destructive nuisance.

Highlights
  • The Cairn is a Terrier, which means his natural instincts are to bark, dig, and chase. These behaviors can be minimized with training, but they can't be eliminated. If you don't enjoy the typical terrier temperament, you should consider another breed.
  • The Cairn is intelligent and curious. He also has a mind of his own. He will challenge your authority — good naturedly, of course — but you must be able to establish and maintain your role as pack leader, or he'll get the upper hand.
  • The Cairn loves the attention of his family. Do not leave him alone for long periods of time or he may become destructive.
  • The Cairn Terrier often thinks he's bigger than he actually is. Don't be surprised if he stands up for himself against large dogs or animals.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Cairn Terrier is a rugged little dog with a shaggy coat, sharply pointed ears, large teeth, and dark eyes. He’s a bit longer than he is tall and has a natural tail, meaning it isn’t docked for length. His coat can be cream, deep red, brindle, light gray, or black.
  • When you get a Cairn puppy, you never know what color he will turn out to be. A Cairn’s coat color can change over the years, often becoming darker with age.
Breed Standards
  • AKC Group: Terrier
  • UKC Group: Terriers
  • Average Life span:12–17 years
  • Weight: 10-16 pounds (4.5-6.8 kg)
  • Height: 9–13 inches (23–33 cm)
  • Coat : Abundant shaggy outer coat, soft downy undercoat. Can be cream, deep red, brindle, light gray, or black. The Cairn Terrier has a harsh weather-resistant outer coat.
  • Comparable Breeds: Norfolk Terrier, Norwich Terrier
History
  The Cairn Terrier was developed more than 200 years ago on the Isle of Skye, where Captain Martin MacLeod is credited with developing one of the oldest strains of the breed.
All terrier breeds in Scotland were originally classified as Scotch Terriers. In 1873, a new system was implemented and Scotch Terriers were separated into two classes: Dandie Dinmont Terriers and Skye Terriers.
  The Skye Terrier classification included Cairns as well as dogs that are now known as Scottish Terriers, West Highland White Terriers. These breeds were distinguished only by color, as all three could come from the same litter. A club for Hard-Haired Scotch Terriers was formed for the three breeds in 1881; a standard was approved in 1882.
Toward the end of the 19th century, Scottish Terrier breeders began to select for different characteristics, color among them. The West Highland White Terrier became a separate breed in 1908.
  In 1912, the Cairn Terrier was designated as a breed, taking its name from the piles of stones that marked ancient Scottish burial or memorial sites. These stone piles were often hideouts for the vermin sought by the terriers.
  The first Cairn Terriers were imported to the United States by Mrs. Henry F. Price and Mrs. Byron Rodgers in 1913. In both the U.S. and in England, the Cairn and the West Highland White were interbred until 1917, when the American Kennel Club barred registration to any dog from such interbreeding. That same year, the Cairn Terrier Club of America was granted AKC membership.



Temperament
  The Cairn Terrier is an alert, animated, hardy, little dog. Loyal, curious, cheerful, lovable and friendly, they enjoy playing with children. Independent, but will listen if it sees the human is stronger minded than itself. Meek and passive owners will find the dog to be willful. This breed can be taught to do tricks. 
  A fearless, bold vermin hunter, Cairns like to dig. With enoughmental and physical exercise along with consistent leadership they will be calm and easy-going. Cairns adapt well to their new homes. They need firm, but not harsh, training and discipline. Without the proper leadership, the Cairn can become destructive and bark excessively. 
  If they spot a rabbit or other small animal they may take off chasing it. Do not allow this little dog to develop Small Dog Syndrome, human induced behaviors where they believe they are pack leader to humans. Cairns with this syndrome will develop all types of varying degrees of behavior problems, including, but not limited to separation anxiety, stubbornness, snapping, growling and guarding.

Health
  The Cairn Terrier, which has an average lifespan of 12 to 14 years, may suffer from major health concerns such as Globoid cell leukodystrophy (GCL), or minor issues like glaucoma, portacaval shunt, and Craniomandibular osteopathy (CMO). Veterinarian often recommend tests to confirm GCL in Cairn Terriers.

Activity Requirements
  Cairns don't need a lot of vigorous exercise and can happily dwell in an apartment or condominium. One daily walk and the occasional chance to get out and run in a yard or park will cover their exercise requirement . Cairns should always be kept on a leash or in a fenced in yard, as they will take off after small animals and will not respond to calls to return home.

Care
  Caring for a Cairn Terrier isn't difficult. Because of his small size, he's a good dog for apartment dwellers, but he's also hardy enough to enjoy ranch life. He must have sufficient exercise and activity, however. A long daily walk or vigorous play for 20 to 30 minutes will help keep him healthy and alert.
  Despite the fact that he's a quick study, remember that the Cairn also has a stubborn streak. Regular obedience training  is essential to teach him good manners and respect for your authority. Don't be surprised if he challenges you — just keep training. Be positive, kind, and consistent.
  A "quiet" command should be one of your Cairn's basics. Don't let him off-leash in public places; he's likely to give in to any temptation to chase. And don't give him unsupervised free time in the yard. He'll dig, and he doesn't care whether he excavates a secluded area by the fence or your lovely new flower garden.

Living conditions
  The Cairn Terrier will exist happily in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised.Cairn Terriers are very active indoors and will suffice even without a yard.
  Cairn Terriers should have a fenced-in yard, or be kept on a leash. Cairns are particularly stubborn; ethical breeders will strongly suggest obedience school or some other type of training to direct Cairn Terrier's focus on the owner as the one in command. If allowed to take control of the household, behavior problems may develop that can only be resolved by hiring a professional dog trainer. Many breeders will only sell puppies to dedicated dog owners who agree to basic obedience school.
  Daily walks will help keep a Cairn Terrier happy and healthy. Fenced-in yards are strongly recommended for safety and well being.

Trainability
  Like nearly all terrier breeds, the Cairn can be stubborn and willful. Training requires consistency, patience, and lots of treats. Discipline is wasted on the Cairn as they will just stop listening to you all together. They must be trained early on to understand who is in charge of the house, and that the leaders mean what they say. If a Cairn Terrier sees even one opportunity to bend the rules, they'll take it and run with it.

Grooming
  Cairn Terriers shed very little but should always be hand stripped. Using scissors or shears can ruin the dog's rugged outer coat after one grooming. Hand stripping involves pulling the old dead hair out by the roots. If done incorrectly this can cause discomfort to the dog, causing it to shy away from future hand stripping. Removing the dead hair in this manner allows new growth to come in. This new growth helps protect the dog from water and dirt.
  Cairn Terrier ancestors are from Scotland, where the wire coat repels water and keeps the dog dry even in rainy or damp climates. Keeping the Cairn Terrier coat in its original state will prevent possible skin irritations. As dead hair is removed by stripping the coat, new growth comes in and the skin and coat will remain healthy. Clipper-cutting a Cairn might destroy the protective wire coat unique to this breed.
  It is wise to have a pet examined to rule out heritable skin diseases if a Cairn is obtained from unknown sources .

Children And Other Pets
  The Cairn Terrier loves kids and is highly tolerant of them. In fact, he enjoys the noise and commotion that goes along with children. As for other pets, a properly socialized and trained Cairn tends to get along with and respect those in the household. He's apt to chase any other animal that comes into his yard, however.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.

Did You Know?
  The most famous Cairn of all? Why, that would be Toto, who along with Dorothy wasn’t in Kansas anymore in “The Wizard of Oz.”
 Terry, the dog who played Toto in the 1939 screen adaptation of The Wizard of Oz, was a brindle Cairn Terrier. 
  Due to the identification of the State of Kansas with the original story The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, a resident of Wichita has begun a drive to make the Cairn Terrier the official dog of the State of Kansas.
  Terry also had a role in the Shirley Temple film Bright Eyes, and twelve other films.

In media:
  • In I Love Lucy, Little Ricky had a Cairn Terrier named Fred.
  • UK TV presenter Paul O'Grady often features a Cairn Terrier called Olga on his prime time chat show; dark in colour, Olga is a rescue dog.
  • Also in the UK, Pauline Fowler actress Wendy Richard in the BBC TV show EastEnders had a Cairn she fondly named "Betty." Betty made an appearance as Toto on BBC's "Strictly Come Dancing"  after Vincent Simone and his celebrity partner Dani Harmer danced a waltz to "Over the Rainbow" from The Wizard of Oz.
  • George Lopez's family dog on the ABC TV series George Lopez, is a Cairn Terrier named Mr. Needles, named by the son, Max, for the extremely high number of shots that the incredibly sick former stray received from the veterinarian.
  • Australian television soap series Neighbours had a Cairn Terrier named Audrey who belonged to the character Libby Kennedy.
  • National Treasure: Book of Secrets
  • A Wheaten Cairn Terrier named Kobe was featured in the following movies: Dunston Checks In / Lost And Found and the opening scenes of Twister
  • In USA Network's Mr. Robot, Rami Malek's character Elliot Alderson has a Cairn Terrier named Flipper.
In books:
  • In the Maximum Ride book series Total, the talking dog, is a Cairn Terrier.
  • In the first edition of L. Frank Baum's book The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, though Baum did not specify in the text what breed Toto was, illustrator W. W. Denslow drew him as a Cairn Terrier.
  • In Donald Barthelme’s short story “Chablis”, the narrator says that his baby wants, according to his wife, a “Cairn terrier.”







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Monday, November 30, 2015

5 ways to train your dog

5 ways to train your dog
It is important to have a well-trained puppy. Not only does it make you look good in your friends’ and neighbors’ eyes, but it also means fewer accidents for you to clean up. Also, a well-trained puppy means a well-trained grown-up dog.

Teaching your dog to do tricks is a fun extension of basic obedience training. Indeed, similar principles apply to teaching tricks. Dogs thrive on the one-to-one attention they get from an owner during training sessions, and they also benefit from the mental stimulation. If you want to teach your dog some basic tricks or something more advanced, learn about reward based training and get started.


1. Focus on reward-based training. 


Prize based preparing uses treats, acclaim, toys, and play as sparks to show your canine new practices. This strategy for preparing shows your canine that in the event that he does what you need then he gets a prize. Prize based preparing is the most ideal approach to show your pooch new things on the grounds that it is powerful, basic, and it upgrades your relationship.


2. Identify your dog’s ideal reward. Identify your dog’s ideal reward. 


Prize based preparing works best on the off chance that you recognize what propels your canine. Normal prizes incorporate modest bits of nourishment and uncommon pooch treats, however you can likewise utilize acclaim or compensate your puppy with a diversion or an exceptional toy.


3. Reward your dog immediately.Reward your dog immediately.


The timing of the prize is vital on the grounds that it offers your pooch some assistance with understanding what conduct is being remunerated. In this manner, it is vital to give your canine his prize at precisely the same that your pooch performs the sought conduct.


4. Replacement Therapy


A puppy does not recognize what it can and can not do until it is told. Rather than rebuffing your pup when it bites on a shoe, say "no" in a firm voice, and after that take the thing endlessly, supplanting it with one of the puppy's admissible bite toys. Quickly applaud it for biting on the "great" toy. Before long, your puppy will be molded to the standards of the house.


5. Be Consistent


This says it all. Ensure you are steady with all that you do as such your puppy does not get befuddled. Pooch treatment and hostile to tension meds for a sporadic puppy can be costly not far off, so better to get the strides right the first run through.





This says it all. Ensure you are steady with all that you do as such your puppy does not get befuddled. Pooch treatment and hostile to tension meds for a sporadic puppy can be costly not far off, so better to get the strides right the first run through.



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10 reasons a dog is the best investment you will ever make

10 reasons a dog is the best investment you will ever make
Are you tired of being let down by life? We feel your pain. 

There is one thing in life, though, that will never disappoint you.


A dog.


1. Imagine being greeted by this when you come home. EVERY DAY. 

2. Imagine never feeling unloved again. 
3. Making people happy makes dogs happy. It's like having your own personal happiness machine.
4. Let's put it this way. You'll never find a cat doing something like this, will you?
5. A dog, on the other hand, will be there for you when you need him most.
6. They care about your health, so they'll go out of their way to get you up and outside.
7. They never judge. They just love.
8. And when they say they'll love you forever, they mean it.
9. A dog can teach you everything you need to know about how to enjoy life.
10. You'll never eat alone again.

Of course. There can be more than 100 reasons to investment in a dog, but we said here 10 funny reasons, but all of them are one hundred percent real! 


Don't be sad if you don't have a dog. Buy one!


You have no money? Adopt one! 


You will see your life with other eyes. I promise!



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Wednesday, November 25, 2015

Creating a Safe Thanksgiving Dinner for Your Dog

Creating a Safe Thanksgiving Dinner for Your Dog
  For all the love and loyalty they give us throughout the year, we show gratitude to our pets by...excluding them from the Thanksgiving feast?
  As we gather our family members for a happy, full meal, we often forget that pets can benefit from this day of giving thanks. What better way to reward them for their unconditional love and companionship than by cooking up some homemade edibles? These goodies are for pet-friendly stomachs with some recipes good for humans too! Preparing a Thanksgiving dinner for dogs, it turns out, isn’t an outrageous idea.

Recipe 1: Winning ways with leftovers
  Dogs love turkey and sweet potatoes, too. Cook this meal from scratch or use up the leftovers—either way, your chow hounds will chow down with gusto!

Photo from The Healthy Dog Cookbook
Ingredients: 3 lb/1.3 kg skinless turkey pieces (light and dark meat); 1 cup (about 6 oz/175 g) oatmeal (cooked); 1 lb/450 g sweet potatoes, cubed; 2 tbsp cranberry sauce; 4 tbsp turkey gravy (optional; to reduce the fat content, omit the gravy or substitute olive oil)
  • Preheat oven to 350°F/180°C. Lightly oil a roasting pan.
  • For boneless breast or thigh, cook 30–45 minutes; boned breast or thigh, 45–60 minutes; whole turkey, 1 1/2–2 hours or until the meat juices run clear when pierced with a skewer. Let cool.
  • Remove all the bones and dice the meat into large pieces.
  • If using fresh sweet potatoes, roast with the turkey for about 25–30 minutes or until tender. Let cool, then peel and dice.
  • Meanwhile, cook the oatmeal according to package instructions.
  • Mix together the turkey meat, oatmeal, sweet potatoes, and cranberry sauce. If using gravy or oil, add it now and mix thoroughly. (If your dog is at all prone to pancreatitis or other fat-related upsets, omit the gravy.)
Recipe 2: Woof-Worthy Souffle’ 
Ingredients: 
  • 2/3 cup deboned, skinned, unseasoned cooked chicken, shredded
  • 2 eggs, lightly beaten (no milk)
  • 1/4 cup diced cooked carrots
  • 1/4 cup cooked mashed pumpkin
  • 1/4 cup cooked diced green beans
  Combine all ingredients in an oven-safe casserole dish that has been greased with a bit of olive oil. Microwave for 3 minutes or until eggs are set, or bake at 350°F for 10 minutes. Cool thoroughly, invert casserole dish onto a plate, and present with pride to your pup.


Recipe 3:Pumpkin smoothies
  While your guests sip cocktails, dogs and cats can wet their whistles with this creamy pumpkin drink that’s packed with fiber and digestion-friendly probiotics.
Ingredients: ½ c. canned pumpkin puree; ½ c. plain non-fat yogurt.
  • Place pumpkin and yogurt in a blender and blend on high until smooth.
  • Evenly pour mixture into 8 small paper cups. Either refrigerate or freeze overnight, or serve right away.

  Remembering Thanksgiving food safety is just as important as making sure everything is delicious — and this goes double for dogs! From stuffed bellies to splintering bones, furry friends should be kept safe from a whole host of hazards. To help you make sure the holiday is happy and healthy fur all, here are our top tips for tackling Thanksgiving dinner for dogs.
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Thanksgiving Dinner Is Not for Dogs

Thanksgiving Dinner Is Not for Dogs
  With the holidays approaching, your dog or cat will inevitably be begging to partake in the big turkey dinner. People admitted to sharing Thanksgiving table scraps with their pets. While this can be a wonderful way to add lean protein and fresh veggies to your pet’s diet, there are also hidden dangers in holiday fare. 

 This year, before preparing a heaping plateful for your pet, consult a vet and consider these tips to keep Thanksgiving a safe, healthful holiday for your dog .

Talkin’ Turkey: If you decide to feed your pet a small bite of turkey, make sure it’s boneless and well-cooked. Don't offer her raw or undercooked turkey, which may contain salmonella bacteria. Do not give your pet the left over carcass–the bones can be problematic for the digestive tract.
+Turkey can be a wonderful lean protein to share with your pet. 

No to Alliums: Nothing with alliums (i.e., onions, garlic, leeks, scallions) should be ingested by your pet. While it is true that small, well-cooked portions of these foods can be okay if your pet is used to it, ingesting these foods in large quantities can lead to toxic anemia.

Your dog can get very sick from eating onions or garlic, because they contain sulfides—which are toxic to dogs and can cause destruction of red blood cells, leading to anemia.

Don't Let Them Eat Cake: If you plan to bake Thanksgiving desserts, be sure your pets keep their noses out of the batter, especially if it includes raw eggs—they could contain salmonella bacteria that may lead to food poisoning.

  It's no myth: chocolate is dangerous for dogs. The toxic component is theobromine, something easily metabolized by humans but a big problem for dogs. In large quantities, theobromine can cause seizures, internal bleeding and heart attacks in dogs, but even a small amount will probably cause your pup some discomfort. Keep all chocolate treats away from your pet. While some desserts aren't as dangerous, it is best for pups to stay away from all sweets. Too much sugar ingestion can lead to diabetes and obesity.

Yes to Mashed Potatoes: Potatoes are a great, filling vegetable to share with your pet. However even though the potatoes themselves are not harmful to pets, be aware of additional ingredients used to make mashed potatoes. Cheese, sour cream, butter, onions, and gravies are no-no’s in a pet’s diet.

Yes to Cranberry Sauce: Cranberries are full of antioxidants and vitamins that are great for your pup, but this trademark sauce is also full of sugar, so keep Fido's portion light. 

Cranberry sauce is just fine for pets but watch the amount of sugar in it. It is probably best to only provide a small helping to your pet’s plate.

Do pass a piece of pumpkin: Plain, cut, cooked pieces of pumpkin are a pawsome treat for pups. The smooth and colorful food is often used as a digestive aid for dogs with tummy troubles. Don't be afraid to share this squash with your furry sweetheart, just make sure there are no extra flavors added. 

Yes to Green Beans: Plain green beans are a wonderful treat for pets. Fresh vegetables are a great addition to any diet. If the green beans are included in a green bean casserole though, be conscious of the other ingredients in it.


No to Alcohol: Alcohol is definitely a big no for pets. What we people may consider a small amount can be toxic for a smaller animal. Also, keep in mind that alcohol poisoning can occur in pets from atypical items like fruit cake , as well as unbaked bread.
  Don't give your pup a sip of wine: Since most dogs are smaller than humans, intoxicants hit them harder. Ban your furry best friends from the bar and keep their drinks to fresh water only. 
  Beer: Keep the cold ones to yourself. Some dogs might love beer, but it can really mess with their stomach. And if the dog has too much, it can cause a fever, rapid heartbeat, seizures, liver damage, or even death.

We’re wishing everyone a happy and safe holiday season!

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Saturday, October 17, 2015

Autumn Safety Tips

Autumn Safety Tips
  Many of us love this time of year — the changing color of the leaves, brisk fall breezes, and finally a respite from the hot weather of Summer. For your dog, however, fall may be more work than fun.

Mushroom Season


  With the change of the season come certain changes in the environment. Fall and spring are mushroom seasons, which mean potential life-threatening problems to pets. Owners should watch out for umbrella-shaped mushrooms and brown mushrooms and call for help immediately when a pet ingests one. Symptoms of illness can range from vomiting to severe digestive problems to complete liver failure.

  Even with the darker mornings and nights and the worsening weather, your dog still needs regular exercise. Your dog is unlikely to get the same level of exercise and access to the outdoors that he had during the summer, but it can lead to behavioural problems if your dog does not have enough activity and mental stimulation. If your dog is getting less exercise during the week, his fitness levels will not be as high as in the summer, so don’t go crazy with his exercise at the weekends as he could experience health problems.

  The use of rodenticides increases in the fall as rodents seek shelter from the cooler temperatures by attempting to move indoors. Rodenticides are highly toxic to pets—if ingested, the results could be fatal. If you must use these products, do so with extreme caution and put them in places inaccessible to your pets. 



  Another turn of the season threat is snakes. As temperatures go down, snakes go into hibernation mode, which means they will be extra grumpy when disturbed. Pet owners who live in areas with snake-friendly conditions, such as woods, should take extra care. Fall is also hunting season, which makes the woods an extra unsafe place for taking pets out walking.

  The threat posed by the cold is a no-brainer: animals cannot withstand extreme temperatures. Pets should have warmth and shelter during the last few, cold months of the year. In addition, pets that spend a lot of time outdoors should be given more food during the cold season to help them produce energy and body heat. When ice begins to form outdoors, owners should take extra care in walking their dogs. Sharp ice edges can cut soft paws and ice sheets can cause slips and falls. The salt used to melt ice can also be tempting to lick for a dog, but some chemical deicers are toxic. Table salt or other pet-safe product can be used if driveways need to be de-iced.

  Many people choose fall as the time to change their car's engine coolant. Ethylene glycol-based coolants are highly toxic, so spills should be cleaned up immediately. Consider switching to propylene glycol-based coolants—though they aren't completely nontoxic, they are much less toxic than other engine coolants.


Holidays usually mean lots of yummy food, but make sure you don't leave any food out on the counter within reach of your dog. Watch out for foods like chocolate, grapes, and raisins. If you have a counter-surfer, now is a good time to work on that behavior.

  Keep your dog indoors on Halloween night. It may be a fun holiday for the kids, but it can end up being one traumatic evening for a dog.


  Put your kids' Halloween candy where your dog can't find it. That much chocolate could be seriously harmful to him if ingested.


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