LUV My dogs

LUV My dogs

Everything about your dog!

Thursday, June 5, 2014

Dogs that love summer

Dogs that love summer
  It's essential to keep pets safe as temperatures leap up, whether via a cool kiddie pool or chilly spray bottle!
  Dogs with thick, double coats are more vulnerable to overheating. So are breeds with short noses, like Bulldogs or Pugs, since they can't pant as well to cool themselves off. If you want a heat-sensitive breed, the dog will need to stay indoors with you on warm or humid days, and you'll need to be extra cautious about exercising your dog in the heat.
  Although most breeds can live in hot climates with the proper care, some breeds do much better in hot weather. Dogs living in areas known for hot temperates need special care because they cannot handle the temperature extremes the way people can. When you adopt a dog, consider his outdoor environment and how much time he will be spending outdoors. When selecting a breed for hot climates, consider the following:
  • Size
  • Hair coat 
  • Facial conformation
  Panting is one method that dogs use to cool off. Breeds with pushed in noses and short faces such as English Bulldogs, pugs, Pekingese and boxers, tend to have a more difficult time in a hot climate.
  Giant dog breeds such as Newfoundlands and St. Bernard’s cannot handle exercise in hot weather as well as smaller dogs can. They are prone to sluggishness and obesity.


  If you’re looking for a dog that enjoys hot weather, consider dogs that come from high-temp locales. Dogs originating from warmer, drier climates, like the Basenji, are best suited for summer weather. This hard-working dog originated in central Africa and has hot-weather hunting in its blood, and even today it is used by Pygmy tribes to take down lions. As a bonus, the Basenji naturally does not bark and sheds little.



  That small, short-haired dogs, such as the Mini Pin, can handle the heat better than their large, heavily furred counterparts. Miniature Pinschers have a short, smooth coat and no undercoat, which helps them dissipate heat.



  Long, lean and known for speed, the Greyhound is another ancient breed with history in Egypt. The dog’s smooth, low-maintenance coat helps in keeping it from overheating. Greyhounds are slim and capable of exercise when the weather is hot.

  Smaller dogs can tolerate heat well. If you’re into small dogs, Chihuahuas have a short coat and are typically pretty resilient. Of note, small dogs with flat faces, such as Pugs or Bulldogs, do not do well in the heat.

  The Pharaoh Hound happily soaks up the sun rays. This slender, athletic canine has a fuss-free short coat and loves to play outdoors. One of the oldest dog breeds, the Pharaoh Hound originated in Egypt but is now the national dog for Malta, bred for hunting rabbits.

  The terriers can do well in the heat. The Cairn Terrier is a rugged pup with a weather-resistant coat that protects it in hot- and cold-weather conditions. This spunky canine lives for outdoor activity and craves physical and mental stimulation, particularly hunting-type games.

Also other dogs that  do well in hot weather are:
Hot-weather tips for dogs
  Though some dog breeds tolerate or even thrive in higher temperatures, it's important to providing ample opportunity for your pawed pal to cool off. During hot summer months, dogs should have multiple clean-water sources and plenty of shade. This is particularly true if you have a pet that doesn’t do well in the heat, especially flat-nosed dog breeds, such as the Pug and Bulldog. These breeds can easily overheat due to their facial structure, which impedes efficient panting and cooling off. Regardless of breed, keep a close eye out for signs of heat exhaustion.
 Always make sure that his dog water bowl is filled at all times, especially during hot weather.

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Which are the more intelligent dogs?

Which are the more intelligent dogs?
   Dog intelligence, like human intelligence, comes in various forms. And although the best in any breed can be nurtured by owners willing to put in the time and effort, there are fixed realities when it comes to your animal's inherent qualities.
  If it's bred to hunt, herd, or retrieve, the dog is more likely to be quick on its feet, eager to work, to move, and to please you. It will learn faster. If it's bred to be a livestock guard dog or a scent hound, it may seem distracted and just a bit dense. The key is knowing what your pooch is built for and how to motivate him.
  But keep in mind that the smartest dogs often don't make the best pets. Your job is to find a breed that suits your lifestyle and to focus on bringing out the best in your dog.

The Intelligence of Dogs is a book on dog intelligence by Stanley Coren, a professor of psychology at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver.
  Coren defines three aspects of dog intelligence in the book: 
  • Instinctive intelligence refers to a dog's ability to perform the tasks it was bred for, such as herding, pointing, fetching, guarding, or supplying companionship. 
  • Adaptive intelligence refers to a dog's ability to solve problems on its own. 
  • Working and obedience intelligence refers to a dog's ability to learn from humans. 
  When Coren's list of breed intelligence first came out there was much media attention and commentary both pro and con. However over the years the ranking of breeds and the methodology used have come to be accepted as a valid description of the differences among dog breeds in terms of the trainability aspect of dog intelligence. In addition, measurements of canine intelligence using other methods have confirmed the general pattern of these rankings including a new study using owner ratings to rank dog trainability and intelligence.

  The Australian Cattle Dog is a very active breed. A working dog that is traditionally occupied with controlling and herding cattle, its qualities are exceptional intelligence, alertness, resourcefulness, and a fiercely protective loyalty over its property and people. They are agile, strong, active dogs, both physically and mentally, which revel in new experiences. The flip side is that they bore easily and will unintentionally find trouble while looking for activities to occupy themselves with. They need to be exercised on a regular basis, both mentally and physically. The Cattle Dog is very organized; many are known for putting their own toys away after playing.

  They are freethinking, resourceful, and very protective of their property, including people!



  Another herding dog, the Rottweiler began in Germany as a true work companion. They are still primarily used for work as guard dogs and as police dogs. They are well known for their stoicism, keen perception, courage, and unflagging loyalty. 
 Often due to inadequate training and human behavior with them, they are aggressive, but it does not mean that they are not intelligent. Sometimes these dogs are working in the police, because they have strong jaw and deep bites. In ancient times they were used to carry heavy items. If you are looking for a dog to protect you or your property, this dog will for you.

  The Papillon (from the French word for butterfly), also called the Continental Toy Spaniel, is a breed of dog of the Spaniel type. One of the oldest of the toy spaniels, it derives its name from its characteristic butterfly-like look of the long and fringed hair on the ears. A Papillon with dropped ears is called a Phalène.
  This deceptively cute, butterfly-eared dog is smarter, tougher, and stronger than it appears . Often described as big dogs in little bodies, they have the athletic stamina to keep up on long walks, and the bravura of a canine ten times its size. The Papillon is a true companion and watchdog.  
  Does this dog scare you at all?  Well it should, because Papillons are actually a lot tougher than they look!  Some would characterize Papillons as a little moody and aggressive, but they are simply very possessive of their masters and “home turf”.  It may surprise some that the Papillon is considered one of the most affectionate dogs.  Another very intelligent dog, and very easy to train. Let's not forget they can be litter trained, a big plus.
  This breed is proof that small and cute puppy can be very smart. These dogs have always been symbols of elegance. They are well trained and eager to work. These dogs often live in nursing homes as therapy dogs. They are obedient and very friendly.

Labrador Retriever
  The Lab, as it is affectionately called, is the most popular breed chosen by families. Another member of the working class of dogs, the Lab is best known for its intelligence, affection, patience, and gentility, making them perfect companions for households with kids. They are easily trained, and, in fact, are one of the top dogs chosen for search and rescue, assisting the disabled, and police work. They are also known to self train, observing behaviors in humans and repeating them - a great asset in emergency situations.
  This is not only one of the most popular breeds in the world, but also one of the smartest. The breed was trained to hunt waterfowls. Now these dogs in police work and is used to search for bombs and drugs. Dogs, which is able to do this, certainly are intelligent. Many of these dogs can be trained to help the disabled. Also this dog is very friendly, loving and obedient.

  Another herding dog, the Shetland takes this ability into the home, showing the same commitment and protectiveness over its human "herd" as the farm raised version does.They are small to medium dogs, and come in a variety of colors, such as sable, tri-color, and blue merle.  Highly intelligent, the Sheltie handles life with great efficiency and diligence, learning new commands with little repetition, and making sure that all of the family is safe, sound, and in place. They show great devotion to their families, and are happy to live just about anywhere. In fact, the Sheltie very much craves human companionship. 
  Many Shetland owners swear that their dog has nearly human intelligence!

  The Doberman Pinscher (alternatively spelled Dobermann in many countries) or simply Doberman, is a breed of domestic dog originally developed around 1890 by Karl Friedrich Louis Dobermann.In many countries, Doberman Pinschers are one of the most recognizable breeds, in part because of their actual roles in society, and in part because of media attention. Although they are considered to be working dogs, Doberman Pinschers are often stereotyped as being ferocious and aggressive. As a personal protection dog, the Doberman was originally bred for these traits: it had to be large and intimidating, fearless, and willing to defend its owner, but sufficiently obedient and restrained to only do so on command.
  Due to an inborn fearlessness and deep stamina, the Doberman is one of the most popular of guard dogs. Smart and assertive, they can easily be trained for dominance or docility. Because of their past as war and police dogs, they may appear fearsome, but they are actually quite gentle. Their loyalty and acuity make Doberman's great additions to the family.

Golden Retriever
  The Golden Retriever is a large-sized breed of dog. They were bred as gundogs to retrieve shot waterfowl such as ducks and upland game birds during hunting and shooting parties, and were named retriever because of their ability to retrieve shot game undamaged. Golden   Retrievers have an instinctive love of water, and are easy to train to basic or advanced obedience standards. 
  The Golden Retriever personifies everything we love about dogs-loyal, loving, patient, great with children and eager to please.  With such great intelligence, it’s no wonder that Golden Retrievers excel in obedience competitions and at performing tricks.
  A very affectionate and popular breed, the Golden Retriever is highly regarded for its intelligence. They can learn well over 200 commands, making them indispensable companions, both in the home and in the workplace. Loyal, loving, and patient, with a willingness to please and a love of learning, this is a fabulous companion pet to bring into your family.
  The temperament of the Golden Retriever is a hallmark of the breed, and is described in the standard as "kindly, friendly and confident”.

German Shepherds
  German Shepherds are extremely intelligent, courageous, and have a very strong protective instinct .  As long as they are trained in obedience from an early age by a loving but firm hand, they can be great family dogs, and excellent with children.  Because of their intelligence, a German Shepherd needs a purpose or job in life to be truly happy. This intelligence, coupled with their courageous nature make German Shepherds excellent police and search dogs.   These dog's mind is used to help people. German Shepherds can do what people do not, for example finding drugs. They are also great protection.    Beyond the fact that these dogs are useful in people's lives, and they are very friendly and devoted to their family. They are easy to train and teach innumerable teams. For his master's German Shepherd can do anything.

 Poodle
  Yes, many people are surprised, but the poodle is in the list.  The standard Poodle is highly intelligent and one of the easiest breeds to train.  They love to be around people, and really hate to be left alone.   Even with the frou-frou hairdos, Poodles are sometimes made to endure and can be quite effective as guard dogs, especially the standard sized Poodles. In fact, the "poodle clip," was created specifically for the working Poodle, so that it could swim more effectively, while still having fur to protect its organs as it went about the business of hunting and retrieving. The Poodle excels at training and obedience, and also loves creative play time. This is what made them so popular as circus performers. But, this can be a drawback as well. If left alone to boredom, Poodles can be creative about finding ways to amuse themselves, sometimes finding trouble along the way.  
  Overall, Poodles are a sensitive, pleasant and happy breed.

Border Collie
  Like many intelligent breeds, the Border Collie needs a job to do.  If they don’t have a purpose in life or some kind of job, they will not be happy.  Border Collies should  definitely not be left at home alone all day, and if they are, they can become quite destructive. They need constant companionship, praise, and extensive exercise.  So if you work and live in the city, a Border Collie probably isn’t the dog for you!  Because of their legendary intelligence, Border Collies set the standard in competitions for such skills as agility, obedience, and of course, sheepdog trials.  In January 2011, a Border Collie was reported to have learned 1,022 words, and acts consequently to human citation of those words.
  The dog must do something good that he would feel happy. This dog has been used for livestock grazing, and nowadays he want a lot of to physically move.  The new command he learns incredibly fast. This dog is perfect for dog sports.
  They have an intense connection with humans, making them ideal work and home companions. However, keep this in mind: Border Collies invariably will not do well unless they are with people who are as high energy as they are; they do best with humans who can participate in dog sports with them. Also, because of their background as herding dogs, they may be frustrated by small children, as their inability to herd the children as they deem fit is confounded. For the right human, the Border Collie is well behaved, exceptionally good at learning, and a true-blue companion.

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Wednesday, May 28, 2014

What Dog Breeds Have Blue Eyes?

What Dog Breeds Have Blue Eyes?
  Genetically, there are four ways in which a dog can have blue eyes. Three of these are linked with pigment loss in the coat.
  The most common way is as a side effect of the merle gene. Merle dilutes random parts of the pigment, including the eyes and nose. This sort of dilution causes blue colour in the iris. Because of the random pigment loss, often merle dogs have "butterfly" noses and blue, wall or split eyes. Wall eyes are when a dog has one blue eye and one brown or amber eye, and a split eye has some blue in it and the rest is brown or amber. Split eyes vary from mostly blue to mostly brown or amber. 
  The more dilution there is in the coat of a merle , the more likely they are to have blue eyes or a butterfly nose. A heavily merled dog  is unlikely to have either of these traits. Double  merles are highly likely to have blue eyes and a completely or almost completely pink nose because of the combination of merle dilution and large amounts of white around the face .
  The second way in which blue eyes can occur is when a dog has large amounts of white around its eyes. White areas on the coat are where the cells are unable to produce any pigment, so if these areas spread to the face then there may be pigment loss in the eyes and on the nose, making the nose pink and the eyes blue. This only tends to occur on very high-white dogs with the extreme spotting pattern, such as white Boxers, and even then is fairly unusual.
  The third way is when a dog is affected by the C series. The C series is albino. There are no confirmed cases of true albinism in dogs, however "white" Dobermanns have a very light coat, blue eyes and a fully pink nose, and this is thought to be a form of albinism.
  Lastly, blue eyes can be inherited as a completely separate gene, unaffected by coat colour. This gene is, however, rare. It is rumoured to occur occasionally in the Border Collie, but mainly it's seen in the Siberian Husky. Huskies can have one or both blue eyes, regardless of their main coat colour, ranging in shade from almost white to sky blue. This is particularly striking when seen on black dogs.
  
Therefore, any breed of dog can be born with blue eyes in spite of its breed and coat color. Even if the puppy's parents do not have blue eyes, a puppy can have it. Of course, this is a very rare case.
  Let's talk more about those dogs that mostly may have blue eyes regardless of the color of their coat.


Siberian Husky. Sledge dog breed is considered one of the oldest dog breeds. These dogs can be several colors, from black to white. Usually white are muzzle and belly. Eyes are blue, brown, amber color. The dogs may have different eyes - for example one blue and one brown. At present, very popular with dogs Sky-blue eyes. This is a very strong dogs that can survive in extreme cold. In terms of the character of these dogs can distinguish three features - a energetic, playful and friendly dog. These dogs love human company and do not like to be alone. They are not suitable for protection. Huskies rarely bark, but sometimes screaming just for fun. For these dogs require strenuous physical exercise, about 80-100 minutes. However, these dogs are prone to escape, so better to let go of their fenced area.



Australian Shepherd. This breed name may be misleading, because these dogs are descended not from Australia as it may seem, but they are from United States. In ancient times, these dogs are cared for very large flocks of sheep. It is a medium-sized dogs. Their fur can be black, blue marble, red marble, brown tri-color, black and white. Their coat is with spots and star on the head. Australian Shepherd eyes are amber and brown, blue and azure. One of the finest Australian Shepherd properties are big desire to please their owners, so these dogs are fast learners and great friends. These dogs are good guard dogs. They are wary of strangers, but not fearful. They are noisy - lots of bark and howl. This breed is affectionate and playful, but without sacrificing the basic working instinct. They need a big physical exercise, about 80-100 minutes. They are not enough for walking, but be free and jogging.


Dalmatians
  Blue-eyed Dalmatians are thought to have a greater incidence of deafness than brown-eyed Dalmatians, although a mechanism of association between the two characteristics has yet to be conclusively established. Some kennel clubs discourage the use of blue-eyed dogs in breeding programs.





  Some people think that the blue eyes come from a Husky ancestor, but that is not true. The blue eye color always appears in the Border collie. Border Collies with 2 eye colors was once considered useful, or desirable for working Border Collies. Blue eyes are often called glass eyes, or watch eyes.If a Border collie has a white head and blue eyes, it would very likely become deaf.




Shetland Sheepdogs
  Note that many of these dogs are blue eyed because of the dominant merle coat colour gene, which may be connected to deafness. The blue-eyed factor in Siberians is NOT connected with deafness, unlike some of the other breeds in which blue eyes may occur. Deaf Siberians are very, very rare. The Merle gene is actually a semi-lethal dominant: dogs with one dose of Merle show the effects of the gene - scattered patches of missing pigment - including on the iris of the eye. They will also show a structural defect of the iris called 'iris coloboma'. Dogs with two doses of the merle gene are frequently deaf and seem to have otherwise reduced vigor. 
  It is important to add that the blue eye colouring is a recessive gene existing in almost all breeds. In other words, any dog can have blue eyes regardless of its breed and coat colour. A puppy can be born with blue eyes even though its parents do not have it. This is a rare instance though. Moreover, in some breeds blue eyes are considered a disqualifying fault .
  Some dog breeds such as Weimaraners have blue eyes as puppies. As they grow up, the eye colour change.
 
However, blue eye coloring is a recessive gene in most breeds. Even if the breed is not known for it, and the parents do not have it, a puppy can still be produces with one or both eyes blue. This means that ANY breed can throw a blue eyed pup in a very rare instance. Health concerns associated with blue eyed dogs are cateracts and deafness, so be sure you get your puppy from a reputable breeder.

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Wednesday, May 21, 2014

Are Human Pain Meds Safe for Dogs?

Are Human Pain Meds Safe for Dogs?
  As dog owners, naturally, when our pets appear to be suffering, we want to do anything and everything in our power to help. In the case of aspirin and ibuprofen, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (or NSAIDs) for humans may be easily attainable and ready to hand, but they are almost universally toxic to dogs. There are veterinarian-approved and prescribed NSAIDs specifically formulated for dogs - always consult with a veterinary health care professional before attempting to treat your dog at home. 
  
Analgesics are drugs used to relieve pain. There are many classes of painkillers. Demerol, morphine, codeine, and other narcotics are subject to federal regulation and cannot be purchased without a prescription.
  Buffered or enteric-coated aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) is an over-the-counter analgesic that is reasonably safe for a short time for home veterinary care in the recommended dosage for dogs. Buffered or enteric-coated aspirin is much safer than regular aspirin because it is less likely to cause stomach and duodenal ulcers.
  
Is Aspirin Effective?
Aspirin is one of the most common medicines used for relieving pain in dogs. However, enteric coated aspirin is safer than the usual aspirin. Aspirin can be given to dogs in case of a musculoskeletal injury, bleeding or clotting. Dosage of aspirin clearly depends on the body weight of the dog. 5 to 10 mg of aspirin per pound is sufficient. Repeat the dose after every 12 hours. However, it should not be used if the dog is pregnant.


Can you give a dog ibuprofen?
  When it comes to ibuprofen for dogs, all of the same terms and conditions for over-the-counter NSAIDs like aspirin apply. While buffered aspirin and buffered baby aspirin may be given to dogs - only with great care, and preferably after a veterinary consultation - ibuprofen has an even narrower margin of safety. In point of fact, ibuprofen for dogs is even worse and more dangerous than aspirin, and should be avoided at all costs. The same issues caused by aspirin can be caused by ibuprofen, including stomach ulcers and kidney failure. If a possible side effect of a medication is death, it's probably not worth the risk when there are canine-specific NSAIDs that your vet can prescribe.

Symptoms of accidental aspirin or ibuprofen ingestion
  What if the circumstances are different? What if you didn't give aspirin or ibuprofen to your dog, but have come home to find your bottle of Motrin or Advil open on the floor? How do you spot accidental ingestion of these NSAIDs? Since the primary ill-effects dogs suffer from these medications are related to digestion and filtration, the symptoms of poisoning are reliably related to those systems. Things to look out for if you suspect your dog has gotten hold of human pain meds include vomiting. If the dog has enough aspirin or ibuprofen in its system, that vomit may contain blood, as may the dog's feces, which may express itself as bloody diarrhea.
  Seemingly innocuous symptoms include lack or loss of appetite, which can lead to fatigue and lethargy. In large enough amounts or given enough time, the dog may experience abdominal pain, which can lead the dog to hunch over or struggle to find a comfortable resting position. The dog may also seem confused or disoriented. In more advanced cases, a dog who has ingested aspirin or ibuprofen not meant for them can have seizures and even lapse into a coma. Basically, it's bad news all the way around.

What is Glucosamine?
  Glucosamine is a herbal medication that gives immediate relief from pain to dogs. It is also effective in humans. These can be easily found in drug stores. You can also get it from your veterinarian. Taking it from a veterinarian would be a better idea since he/she will know the safest brand to take.

Use of Acetaminophen as a Pain Reliever for Dogs
  Always consult with your veterinarian before giving your dog acetaminophen. The medication is easy to overuse if you don't know the exact safe dosage. Overuse of this pain killer can cause liver and kidney damage.
  If your veterinarian does advise you to use acetaminophen over drugs approved for use in dogs, the dosage should never be more than 10 milligrams per pound. In addition, you'll never give more than two or three doses per day or serious side effects could occur.

What is Tramadol?
  Tramadol is an analgesic. These can be given in place of NSAIDs or along with them. Tramadol do not have side effects to the extent of NSAIDs or aspirin. They are great for chronic pain in both dogs and humans. Tramadol are given to arthritis patients also. The dosage should be limited to what is prescribed by the veterinarian. Overdose can lead to damage to the liver, nervous system or kidney.
What is Adequan?
  Adequan is meant to heal the pain caused by joint injuries and arthritis. They are also known to repair the areas of problems. It does not have any side effects and can be given to dogs safely. However, you will need the assistance of a specialist, since this medicine can only be given through injections.

Are Narcotics Safe?
  Narcotics are considered as an unpleasant aspect. However, it is one of the best pain relievers known. If narcotics are given in a controlled manner and under expert supervision, they can be the best way you can help your dog escape the pain. Narcotics is usually used in serious health conditions, post-surgical conditions, to fight cancer, or to treat large amount of pain. Some of the examples of narcotics that veterinarian are allowed to use are Fentanyl Patches, Amantadine, and Neurontin etcetera.

Is your dog in pain? Consult a vet!
  Can you give a dog aspirin? Technically yes, but only under certain conditions and doses.   Can you give a dog ibuprofen? Best not. The rule of thumb to follow is that if it's human pain medication, think twice before offering it to your dog, even with the purest motives and the best of intentions. After you think twice, put the bottle of ibuprofen or aspirin back in the medicine cabinet. If you cannot get to a vet, then at least give one a call - in the long run, it's possible you'll spare your dog further and completely unnecessary pain.
  If you have dogs, especially if they have free reign of the house, make certain that all human medications are safely and securely bottled. Then see to it that your cache of aspirin, ibuprofen, and all your other medications for that matter, are stored in cabinets, boxes, cupboards, or other home-storage facilities well out of reach. As we all know, dogs can get into mischief around the house; knock the wrong thing over, or the wrong thing open, and trouble can follow.

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Dog Adoption Checklist

Dog Adoption Checklist
  Congratulations on deciding to adopt a dog! You are embarking on a wonderful and rewarding relationship. When you adopt a dog there are many responsibilities and lifestyle adjustments to consider.

Questions for All Adopters:
  • Do you have any other dogs and how will they react to a new dog?
  • Is your current residence suited to the dog you’re considering?
  • How will your social life or work obligations affect your ability to care for a dog?
  • Do you have a plan for your new dog during vacations and/or work travel?
  • How do the people you live with feel about having a dog in the house?
  • Are you  intolerant of hair, dirt and other realities of sharing your home with a dog, such as allergies?
  • Do you or any of your household/family members have health issues that may be affected by a dog?
  • What breed of dog is the best fit with your current lifestyle?
  • Is there tension in the home? Dogs quickly pick up on stress in the home, and it can exacerbate their health and behavior problems.
  • Is there an adult in the family who has agreed to be ultimately responsible for the dog’s care?
Your dog is more likely to get loose from you and lost in the first few weeks they are home than any other time.  Be sure to provide them a secure collar and ID tag as soon as possible.  Actually, its a great thing to bring with you when you pick up your newly adopted pet.  And make sure they wear their collar at all times.  Often people make the mistake of removing the collar when their dog is in the house thinking they will never get out of the house without it.  Sadly, too often owners forget to put the collar back on or the dog slips out the door unexpectedly and is now lost without any identification.  Get a collar and tag as soon as possible!

  All dogs require a veterinary exam, a series of vaccinations and regular grooming.  While we will given them their Parvo Distemper (DHLPP) vaccination, Bordatella (INB - kennel cough) and worming, puppies may require additional vaccinations and worming after adoption, so make sure and follow up with your vet for these if needed.  Also all dogs will need their Rabies vaccination if they have not had it already.

  Your home and yard should provide proper confinement and reasonable space for the size of your dog.  When outside, your new dog or puppy should always be on a leash if you don’t have a safe enclosure.

   New house pets should be closely supervised when with other pets and children while they become familiar with their new home.

  Housebreaking your new dog should be done with encouraging words. They should be taken outside after meals and right before and after sleeping. Crate training is an effective training method. There is lots of useful training information on the Web and specifically crate training.

  All dogs need exercise, so allow your dog to play outside everyday. Young dogs and puppies may have extra energy, causing them to chew. Try not to leave them alone for long periods of time and consider crate training to housebreak and curb bad habits.  Organized training is also beneficial and there are several obedience training schools in our area.  Ask friends or other dog owners for the name of someone you can trust. If you cannot find a trainer, HSOP will recommend someone for you.

 In addition to a collar and tag, we also encourage microchipping which we also can do for you here at the Shelter for a small fee.

New Dog Supplies Check List
  • Dog collar, leash, and identification tags
  • Nutritious dog food
  • Dog crate or carrier
  • Dog bed
  • Food and water bowls
  • Dog grooming tools (shampoo, brush and nail clippers)
  • Dog toys
  • Treats & chews  
Other Considerations:
  • What do you expect your dog to contribute to your life? For example, do you want a running and hiking buddy, or is your idea of exercise watching it on TV?
  • If you are thinking of adopting a young dog, do you have the time and patience to work with the dog through its adolescence, taking house-breaking, chewing and energy-level into account? 
  • Have you considered your lifestyle carefully and determined whether a younger or older dog would be a better match for you?
  • Can you train and handle a dog with behavior issues or are you looking for an easy-going friend?
  • Do you need a dog who will be reliable with children or one you can take with you when you travel?
  • Do you want a dog who follows you all around the house or would you prefer a less clingy, more independent character?
Size Considerations:
  • What size dog can your home accommodate?
  • Will you have enough room if your dog grows to be bigger than expected?
  • What size dog would suit the other people who live in or visit your home regularly?
  • Do you have another dog to consider when choosing the size of your next dog?
  • How big a dog can you travel comfortably with?
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How to Understand and Help Prevent Black Dog Syndrome

How to Understand and Help Prevent Black Dog Syndrome
   It's a truism among dog lovers that black dogs are less likely to get adopted at shelters. But is it actually true?
  Black dog syndrome or big black dog syndrome is a disputed phenomenon in which black dogs are passed over for adoption in favor of lighter-colored animals. Animal shelters often use the term BBD, or big black dog, to describe the type of larger dark-colored mixed-breed said to be typically passed over by adopters.
  The phenomenon may be due to a number of factors, including fear stigma against certain breed types, and the fact that large, black dogs are often portrayed as aggressive in film and on television.
  Some people believe that during the pet adoption process some potential owners associate the color black with evil or misfortune , and this bias transfers over to their choice of dog.Additionally, many shelters feature photo profiles of their dogs on the shelter website. Because black dogs do not photograph well, lighter-colored dogs have an advantage with potential adopters browsing the site. A study done by the Los Angeles Animal Services challenges some of these claims, saying that a full 28% of adopted dogs are black. However, the bias theory simply asserts that predominantly dark animals take longer to be adopted than their lighter counterparts, and that large dogs take longer to adopt than small ones.

History
  The issue has been gaining media attention since the mid-2000s. Tamara Delaney, an early activist against black dog syndrome, developed a website called Black Pearl Dogs in 2004 specifically to address the issue, both by educating the public about its existing, as well as showcasing individual dogs available for adoption. The website caught on quickly in the sheltering community, and helped lead
  However, appearance in general does play a role in potential adopters' selection of shelter dogs. In a 2011 study by the ASPCA, appearance was the most frequently cited reason for adopters of both puppies (29 percent) and adult dogs (26 percent).

Shelter studies
  • A 1992 article in the journal Animal Welfare, found that color was not a major factor in adoptions at a Northern Ireland shelter; black-and-white coats were most prevalent among adopted dogs, followed by yellow, solid black, gold, and black-and-tan coats.
  • A 1998 study of 1,468 relinquished dogs offered for adoption at a local humane society found having a primarily black coat color was a variable associated with euthanasia, while gold, gray, and white coats colors were significant predictors of successful adoption.
  • A 2002 study published in the Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science of dog and cat adoption in California animal shelters found pure black coat colors to be negative factors in adoption rates for both dogs and cats.
  • In 2008 the general manager of the Los Angeles Animal Services department reported that twelve months of data on the intake of 30,046 dogs showed slightly more dogs that were predominantly or all black were adopted than dogs who were not predominantly or all black.
  • A 2010 PhD thesis analyzing multiple factors found a measurable variance contributing to dogs with primarily black coats being euthanized rather than adopted.
  • A 2013 study of dogs' length of stay (LOS) at two New York “no-kill” shelters determined that canine coat color had no effect.The study noted that coat color's effect on LOS may be localized, or may not generalize to traditional or other types of shelters.
  • A Masters thesis analysis of 16,800 dogs at two Pacific Northwest shelters found that black dogs were adopted more quickly than average at both shelters.
  • A 2013 study of cat adoption rates published in The Open Veterinary Science Journal concluded that “Results indicated that black cats, regardless of age or sex, require the longest time to adopt. They are followed by primarily black cats with other colors.”
What you can do
  Whether or not you’re currently looking to adopt, you can do a lot to help pets who suffer from BDS!
  • Display your love of black pets proudly to demonstrate that there is nothing wrong with them. Share our Black Fur Badge on your website (see it below)!
  • Encourage friends to look past their first impressions of a black pet.
  • Tell people about BDS! It’s generally an unconscious prejudice and most people will move past it once they’re aware.
  • Remind people that their parents were right: personality is more important than appearance. It’s just as true for pets as for people!
Steps:
  • Understand why BDS occurs. If you're going to tackle the problem of BDS, then you need to understand the motivations behind it in order to respond to them.
  • Train the black dog. Several cute tricks may be the ticket to help get a black dog adopted. A higher education is many dogs' hope for a successful interview with a new family.
  • Use a bright background when photographing a dark dog, even a quilt will do. Dark dogs don't stand out in photos, so they don't tend to look their best photographed in a shelter. Black is a difficult color to photograph well, so select someone from the shelter staff or volunteers who loves a photography challenge!
  • Sell the breed, not the color. Think of all the qualities of the breed that will suit the person who might be adopting the dog and make these a strong selling point. For instance, rottweilers and dobermans are both very loyal breeds, and would be good for a one-master home. Perhaps print up a card or make a poster with the great new photo of the black dog and point out all the excellent traits of the dog's breed, using bullet points to make them stand out.
  • Make good points out of bad points. If the person considering the adoption of a dog says something like, "Oh, but he's too big!", promote the qualities of a big dog. Large dogs may be much more laid back than smaller, more energetic breeds, and also many large breeds have been shown to get along better with other dogs, which can be helpful for an owner looking to create a multi dog household. If the person wants a dog for security, point out that people tend to be more afraid of black dogs than dogs of lighter colors.
  • Tell everyone to spay and neuter all their pets. None of the black dogs came on a UFO from a distant planet; each came from a non-fixed pair of pets, as a result of poor human decision-making . Encourage all owners to be responsible by having the dogs spayed or neutered before they leave the shelter.

  So is Black Dog Syndrome a real thing? The best answer is "maybe-kinda-sorta." Some studies show it occurring in certain times and places, and sometimes dogs with dark coats actually get adopted faster. Fashions in what kind of dogs people want come and go with time, and there are factors that usually outweigh color, such as breed. In other words, it's there, but maybe not as important as we often are led to think.

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How to Persuade Your Parents to Get a Dog

How to Persuade Your Parents to Get a Dog
  This is a common question and something that a lot of kids need to deal with. Personally I think that all kids should be allowed to have a dog; not all parents agree with me, of course. Dogs require a lot of time, a lot of work, and sometimes they even require a lot of money. This is usually why parents decide not to get a dog.
  The most important thing to remember is that dogs are intelligent living beings that have thoughts and feelings. Dogs and other pets cannot be cast aside when we are busy or lose interest. When you get a pet, you get responsibilities that last a long time.
  The first step in convincing your parents to have a dog is to find out what they think about having a dog. The more you can find out what their concerns are, the better you can put forward your ideas.

What Every New Dog Owner Should Know
  If you are thinking about getting a puppy, you'll want to make sure that the puppy is right for you. First, you want to make sure the dog is child-friendly if you have kids. You want to figure out what size of dog you want and the energy level of dog you want. Then you need to start looking at good places to get your dog. This process could take a while but it's worth it. You may want to go to many different shelters and ethical breeders to make sure you have found the right dog. You really want to make sure that you and your family get along with the new puppy.

  There are several reasons why your parents may not want a dog:
  • Dogs cost money.
  • They are a lot of work.
  • They need long-term commitment.
  • Some people are allergic to dogs.
  • Some people don't like dogs.
  The costs of a dog include:
  • the original purchase price
  • veterinarian bills
  • food
  • obedience classes
  • other things that the dog needs, such as leashes and toys.
Show the Benefits of Having a Dog!
  •   Say that having a dog will make you spend more time with your family. Parents love hearing more about family time and less about all the time you spend away from home with your friends, or all that time you spend online alone in your room.
  • Say that having a dog will make you spend more time outside. Are your parents tired of all the time you spend alone in your dark room, staring at your computer or playing video games? Are they always telling you to go outside and enjoy the sunshine? If so, tell them that having a dog will make you spend more time in the park, in the sunlight, and more time getting physical exercise instead of texting your friends or eating junk food.
  • Show them that having a dog can improve your mental health. Having a dog is therapeutic -people who own dogs have been known to live longer and to be happier. A dog knows when you're upset and can comfort you in times of stress. Dogs are intuitive creatures that know exactly how to cheer up their owners. Maybe your parents spend a lot of time at work - tell them that having a dog in the house will not only be soothing for everyone, but that a dog can keep you company while they're away.
  • Show them that having a dog will make them feel more secure. Homes that obviously have dogs inside are known to be much less likely to be robbed. Show your parents that a dog, once trained, will not only be your life long companion, but he'll also be your protector. If you're old enough for your parents to go on vacation without you, tell them how much more secure you'd feel if there was a dog by your side.
  • Show them that having a dog will teach you responsibility. Though you should already demonstrate responsibility to show your parents that you're capable of having a dog, tell them that having a dog will make you an even more responsible and careful person, whether you're headed to high school or college in a few years.
  • Show them the benefits of getting the particular dog you want. You should do your research to find the breed of dog you want and how and when you can get it. Don't just abstractly say, "I want a dog!" Instead, say, "I want a chocolate lab!" or whatever breed of dog you may like. This shows that you have put time and effort into thinking about what kind of dog you want and how it will benefit you and your family.'
Address Their Concerns
  • Show them that you will walk the dog. They may be worried that you will get the dog, get bored, and force them to take care of the little creature instead. Tell them that you've already selected the best walking times for the dog and are determined to walk the dog every day; if you have a sibling, show that you've split up the walking duties. To prove your point, you can even go for walks on your own during the appointed doggie-walking times. Show them that you mean business.
  • Show them that the dog won't destroy their home. Your parents may be worried that the dog will chew up all of their furniture and cords, bring dirt into the house, and shed all over the place. It's your job to show them that none of this will happen.
  • Show them that you'll be able to give the dog medical care. Do your research in advance and find the best vet in your area. Ask your friends with dogs which vets they recommend, or do research on your own. Try to find a vet that is close to home so you can walk to his office if you don't drive, and show your parents that you've already done your research and can take care of it.
  • Show them that the dog won't be expensive. If cost is really a big concern, you should get a puppy at a pet shelter; the dog won't be expensive and you'll be doing a great deed by taking in a puppy in need. Research how much dog toys, beds, food, leashes, and anything else costs, and make a chart showing your parents how much this adds up to, and how you'll go about paying for it.
  • Show them that you have a game plan for watching the dog if your family goes on vacation. Your mom might ask, "What will we do when we go away to the beach for a week?" Don't get caught off guard and do your research in advance. Find a doggie day care nearby that can take your dog in, or find a close friend or neighbor who is willing to take care of the dog.
  • Show them that you won't get bored with the dog. Your parents may worry that once you get the dog, you'll stop taking care of it after a few weeks. To ease their concerns on this front, tell them that you're willing to wait a few months and to keep discussing the dog to show that this isn't just a passing phase; you're really committed to getting a dog and are willing to wait to show them how dedicated you really are.
Demonstrate Your Responsibility
  • Pull your weight with household chores. If you want your parents to see that you'd be a great dog owner, then you have to be able to do the basics: make your bed, keep your room clean, wash the dishes, and do anything that is required of you. Then, take it to the next level - pick up more household chores, help cook dinner, mow the lawn, do laundry, or do whatever you can to go above and beyond what is required of you.
  • Keep your grades up. If you want your parents to see that you can handle the added responsibility of a dog, then you should make sure to keep your grades up as you continue to ask to add a new member to your family. If you can, try to do even better in school to show them that you're committed to working hard and doing whatever it takes to get the dog.
  • Show them that you can take care of something. Have your parents give you something to take care of for a set amount of time. It can be an egg , a sack of flour, a plant, or even a hamster. Doing well on this test run may show your parents that you're responsible and serious about wanting a dog. Though this may seem silly, you should treat the situation with the utmost seriousness.
  • Do a "test run." If you have a friend or family member who needs someone to take care of his or her dog for a little while, you should take them up on their offer. Taking in the dog for the weekend or a few days will show your parents that you're ready to take on a pet, and it will make them see how happy you are to be hanging out with a furry creature.
  • Get a part-time job if you can. Depending on your age, you can get a part-time job at the mall or at the store at your local pool club. Maybe you can deliver papers, babysit, or help out a neighbor with chores, mowing the lawn, or shoveling snow. Getting a part-time job or even just finding a small way to make money will help your parents see that not only will you be able to handle some of the expenses of having a dog, but also that you're able to take on added responsibility.
  • Give them time to think about it. Remember, don't ask them over and over every day, or they will shut you out. If they say no, keep showing maturity and understanding, keep being helpful in the house, and occasionally mention the dog, to make them get used to the idea. Being patient will also show them that you're so committed that you're willing to wait.
Tips

  • Dogs, especially puppies, need a lot of things to chew on while they are developing their teeth. You can also find suggestions on how to keep your dog from chewing your shoes and clothes. You must be prepared to get them appropriate toys to chew.
  • Offer to pay for the dog yourself. This will show that you want one enough to spend your own money on it, and that you won't think of it as just another toy to play with until you get bored.
  • While you are waiting for your parents approval, here are some other ways to be around dogs: find out where the animal shelters are in your neighborhood and go volunteer there to help take care of some homeless dogs or find out if there are elderly neighbors who have dogs and cannot walk them regularly. You could volunteer to walk their dogs for them, even for free if you are okay with that.
  • If your parents say no because the weather in your area doesn't allow the dog to live outdoors, find an indoor area that is acceptable to your parents where the dog can stay when the weather is bad.
  • In some cases, family members might be afraid of getting a dog. For example, if a previous dog bit a friend/ family member, was too aggressive,or was too hyperactive, most parents will hesitate before agreeing to get a dog. However, if you wait a while  and you still want a dog, they will most likely have gotten over their fears or peeves.
Your Pup's First Day Home
  When your new puppy is brought home, make sure to spend lots of time with him, so he gets used to the new environment. If you have any other pets at home, give them equal attention so they still feel loved. Bring your new pup to a room with all of his new toys, food and bed. This will be the "puppy" room for the next few days. Once the puppy has been in the house for a couple weeks he can explore other rooms.
  If you follow any tips or instructions above it will help prepare our family for a puppy. I hope this essay will convince you to get a new family member for our household.

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