LUV My dogs

LUV My dogs

Everything about your dog!

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Everything about your Samoyed

Everything about your Samoyed
  Nicknamed the “Smiling Sammie,” the gentle and outgoing Samoyed loves his family, including cats if he’s raised with them. This reindeer herder is a tad stubborn, and positive reinforcement training works best with him. His beautiful white coat must be groomed two or three times a week and sheds heavily.
  Originally bred to hunt, haul sledges, and herd reindeer, the Samoyed dog breed proved a valuable companion for northwestern Siberia's Samoyede people. Among the breed's duties: pack hiking, tracking, and warming their owners by sleeping on top of them at night. A working breed, the Samoyed can be strong-willed at times, but above all they remain friendly, gentle, and devoted family dogs.

Overview
  Sam, Sammy or Smiley, the Samoyed is known to have many nicknames and with a smile that can light up any room, you can bet "Grumpy" is never one of them. Among many cool-weather jobs, the Samoyed was born to herd and protect reindeer but its primary function was to keep adults and children warm in the most freezing of temperatures. A natural-born cuddle bug, the Samoyed loves nothing more than snuggling up to his human counterparts.
  The Samoyed combines strength, agility, dignity and grace in a general spitz outline. Slightly longer than it is tall, it is nonetheless compact. It has a strong, muscular body that is able to combine power, speed, agility and endurance. It has a quick, agile stride with good reach and drive. Its double coat is heavy and weather resistant. The undercoat is soft and thick, whereas the outer coat is straight and harsh, standing straight out from the body, and glistening with a silver sheen. Its expression is animated, with the characteristic "Samoyed smile" created by the upturned corners of its mouth. 
  Gentle and playful, the Samoyed makes a good companion for a child or person of any age. It is a closely bonded family dog. It is amiable with strangers, other pets and usually, other dogs. It is calm indoors, but this clever, sometimes mischievous breed needs daily physical and mental exercise. If allowed to become bored, it will dig and bark. It is independent and often stubborn, but it is willing to please and is responsive to its owner's wishes. It may tend to herd children.

Other Quick Facts
  The Samoyed is a strong, beautiful working dog with a muscular body, a heavy, weather-resistant white coat tipped with silver, and a plumed tail that curves over his back. His wedge-shaped head is surrounded by a ruff, more prominent on males than females. He has dark-brown almond-shaped eyes, a black or sometimes brown or flesh-colored nose, and erect ears. The mouth curves up at the corners, giving him a smiling expression.
The Samoyed’s name can be tricky to pronounce. Most people call him a “Sa-MOY-ed,” but the correct pronunciation is “Sammy-ED.” If that doesn’t trip lightly off your tongue, just call him a Sammy. Everyone else does.

Breed at a glance
  • Playful temperament
  • Great companion dogs
  • Long lifespan
  • Hypoallergenic
  • Good with kids
Breed standards
  • AKC group: Working
  • UKC group: Northern Breed
  • Average lifespan: 12 - 14 years
  • Average size: 35 - 70 pounds
  • Coat appearance: Long, thick, soft
  • Coloration: White
  • Hypoallergenic: Yes
  • Other identifiers: Medium-sized build; pricked ears; fluffy, white double coat; corners of mouth turn up and produce a "smiling" appearance
  • Possible alterations: None
  • Comparable Breeds: Alaskan Malamute, Siberian Husky
The History of the Samoyed
  Legend says that the Samoyed people, and their dogs, were driven by other tribes far away, north and north and north, until at last they were on the very edge of the world, in a vast land of snow and ice. They lived as nomads, herding reindeer, aided by their able dogs, who also pulled sleds and kept them warm at night.
  The Samoyed is one of fourteen breeds identified as ancient through DNA analysis of the canine genome. They give us a good picture of what some of the earliest dogs probably looked like.
  The nomadic Samoyed people, for whom the Samoyed dog is named, came to northwestern Siberia from central Asia. They depended upon herds of reindeer for food and had to keep on the move so that the reindeer could find sufficient food for themselves. They also depended upon strong hardy spitz dogs to herd the reindeer and to guard them against the fierce predators of the Arctic. They occasionally helped to hunt bears and tow boats and sledges. These dogs lived as part of the family in the hide tents of their people, where one of their "jobs" was to keep the children warm in bed. The first Samoyeds came to England in the late 1800s, but not all these early imports were the pure white the breed is known for today. One of these dogs was presented to Queen Alexandria, who did much to promote the breed. Descendants of the queen's dogs can still be found in modern pedigrees. In 1906, the first Samoyed came to America, originally a gift of Russia's Grand Duke Nicholas. Meanwhile, the breed was becoming a popular sled dog because it was more tractable than other sledding breeds. In the early 1900s, Samoyeds formed part of the sled teams on expeditions to Antarctica and shared in the triumph of reaching the South Pole. The breed's exploits, combined with its glistening good looks, soon won the public's attention in America, and its popularity has grown tremendously since the Second World War. Although the once nomadic Samoyed people have long since settled in one place, the breed they created has journeyed around the world.
  In more modern times, Samoyeds took part in Arctic and Antarctic explorations of Nansen, Shackleton, Scott, and Amundsen. Britain’s Queen Alexandra, wife of Edward VII, loved the breed, and many of her dogs appear in the pedigrees of English and American Samoyeds today.

  The American Kennel Club recognized the Samoyed in 1906. Today he ranks 72nd among the breeds registered by the AKC.


Is this breed right for you?
  If you live in a cold climate and are looking for a warm and cuddly fur-friend that will stay by your side, then the Samoyed is right for you. With appropriate exercise, this breed does well in most dwellings, big or small. Big families with lots of children will love the sweet temperament of the kind and smiling Sammy. However, neat freaks should steer clear of this breed as heavy shedding comes with the territory. If you don't mind the shedding, the odorless and hypoallergenic properties of the Samoyed's magnificent coat provide an excellent source of warmth for cold winter days. Samoyeds tend to be prone to diabetes and hip dysplasia, among other minor health issues. Regular exercise and routine vet checkups are a must.

Size
  The standard states males at 21 to 23.5 in. at the shoulder; bitches 19 to 21 in.  There is no disqualification for size in this breed.  Size may vary from 17 to 25 in. though these extremes are typically sold as pets and seldom seen in the show ring.  The majority of winning Sammies today fall within the middle of their standard size, rather than at the bottom or the top.

Personality
  The well-bred Samoyed is an intelligent, gentle, and loyal dog. He is friendly and affectionate with his family, including the children, and thrives on being part of household activity.
  The Samoyed is not a "lone wolf" dog — he enjoys close association with those he lives and is mentally and physically unsuited for being left alone in a kennel or back yard. His loyalty and alertness often make for a good watchdog.
  At heart, the Samoyed is still a hunter. He is likely to chase after small animals that he perceives as prey. For his safety, he should always be leashed when he's not at home in his fenced yard.
  Temperament is affected by a number of factors, including heredity, training, and socialization. Puppies with nice temperaments are curious and playful, willing to approach people and be held by them. Choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one who's beating up his littermates or the one who's hiding in the corner.
  Always meet at least one of the parents — usually the mother is the one who's available — to ensure that they have nice temperaments that you're comfortable with. Meeting siblings or other relatives of the parents is also helpful for evaluating what a puppy will be like when he grows up.
  Like every dog, the Samoyed needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Samoyed puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.
  Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.

What You Need To Know About Samoyed Health
  All dogs have the potential to develop genetic health problems, just as all people have the potential to inherit a particular disease. Run, don’t walk, from any breeder who does not offer a health guarantee on puppies, who tells you that the breed is 100 percent healthy and has no known problems, or who tells you that her puppies are isolated from the main part of the household for health reasons. A reputable breeder will be honest and open about health problems in the breed and the incidence with which they occur in her lines.Health conditions that have been seen in the Samoyed include hip dysplasia, progressive retinal atrophy (PRA), heart problems (like aortic stenosis and pulmonic stenosis), diabetes, and hypothyroidism.
  The Samoyed Club of America, which is the American Kennel Club parent organization for the breed in the United States, participates in the Canine Health Information Center Program. For a Samoyed to achieve CHIC certification, he must have hip evaluations from the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) or the University of Pennsylvania (PennHIP), an OFA cardiac evaluation, an OFA DNA test for PRA, and an eye clearance from the Canine Eye Registry Foundation. Breeders must agree to have all test results, positive or negative, published in the CHIC database. You can check CHIC’s website to see if a breeder’s dogs have these certifications.
  Do not purchase a puppy from a breeder who cannot provide you with written documentation that the parents were cleared of health problems that affect the breed. Having the dogs "vet checked" is not a substitute for genetic health testing.
  Remember that after you’ve taken a new puppy into your home, you have the power to protect him from one of the most common health problems: obesity. Keeping a Samoyed at an appropriate weight is one of the easiest ways to extend his life. Make the most of your preventive abilities to help ensure a healthier dog for life.

Care
  The active Samoyed is not suited to apartment or condo life. A home with a large, securely fenced yard is the best choice. Because the Samoyed is a working dog, he needs room to romp and play.
  Keep him mentally challenged with ongoing training and dog sports. Allow him to become bored and he's likely to dig, escape, or chew to entertain himself. Note: The Samoyed should be kept on leash whenever he's in public; he seldom can resist the lure of small, scurrying animals.
   With his Nordic heritage, the Samoyed is a natural fit for cold climates, and he loves to play in the snow. Conversely, with his thick coat, he can be sensitive to heat. Do not allow him to exercise strenuously when it is extremely hot — limit high-level activity to early morning or evening when it's cooler. During the heat of the day, keep your Sammy inside with fans or air conditioning.
  You'll need to take special care if you're raising a Samoyed puppy. Like many large breed dogs, the Samoyed grows rapidly between the age of four and seven months, making them susceptible to bone disorders and injury. They do well on a high-quality, low-calorie diet that keeps them from growing too fast.
  Additionally, don't let your Samoyed puppy run and play on hard surfaces (such as pavement), jump excessively, or pull heavy loads until he is at least two years old and his joints are fully formed. Normal play on grass is fine, and so are puppy agility classes with one-inch high jumps.
  Another important step in training a Samoyed puppy is socialization (the process by which puppies or adults dogs learn how to be friendly and get along with other dogs and people). Like any dog, he can become timid if he is not properly socialized and exposed to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences when he's young. Formal puppy and obedience classes are also recommended to teach the Samoyed proper canine manners.

The Basics of Samoyed Grooming
  The Samoyed’s thick double coat in white, white and biscuit, cream, or all biscuit stands out from the body as if surrounding the dog with a halo of hair. The undercoat, which is what protects the Sammy from the elements, is soft, short, thick and woolly. The outer coat is made up of harsh longer hair.
  Brush the Samoyed’s coat at least once a week to prevent or remove mats and tangles and remove dead hairs that will otherwise wind up on your floor, furniture, and clothing. Expect to brush it daily during seasonal shedding periods. You’ll need a slicker brush, pin brush and metal Greyhound comb. Bathe the Sammie about every three months.
 The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath. Check the ears weekly for dirt, redness, or a bad odor that can indicate an infection. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball dampened with a gentle, pH-balanced ear cleaner recommended by your veterinarian. Introduce your Sammy to grooming at an early age so he will learn to accept it willingly.

Children and other pets
  The Samoyed is deeply attached to his family, and this certainly includes children. A properly socialized Sammy truly enjoys the attention and company of youngsters if they are instructed on how to treat the dog with care and respect. Due to his size and strength, a Samoyed can easily knock over a small child without even being aware of what has happened, so a responsible adult should supervise all interactions between kids and canines.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  The even-tempered Samoyed also enjoys the company of other dogs. This is especially true if he has been raised with other dogs from an early age. (As in any breed, dogs of the same sex that have not been spayed or neutered may not be as tolerant of one another.)
  Remember, though, that the Samoyed is hardwired to chase prey. For harmonious coexistence with cats and other animals in his household, training, socialization, and a proper introduction are essential. Following that, close supervision is advised.

Rescue Groups
  Samoyeds are often purchased without any clear understanding of what goes into owning one. There are many Samoyeds in need of adoption and or fostering. There are a number of rescues that we have not listed. If you don't see a rescue listed for your area, contact the national breed club or a local breed club and they can point you toward a Samoyed rescue.

Did You Know?
  You can save your Sammy’s hair from when you brush him and have it spun into yarn that can be knitted into a soft, warm cap, socks or scarf.

Famous Samoyeds:
  • Kaifas and Suggen, the lead dogs for Fridtjof Nansen's North Pole expedition.
  • Etah, the lead dog for Roald Amundsen's expedition to the South Pole, the first to reach the pole.
  • Samoyeds serve as the sled dogs of Stone Fox in the book of the same name.
  • Xiah Junsu, member of South Korean boy band JYJ formerly from TVXQ, owns a Samoyed named Xiahky (which translates as "Raised by Xiah").
  • Mush was the name of the Samoyed dog owned by Karen Carpenter of the popular music group The Carpenters.
  • Denis Leary owned a Samoyed named "Little Bastard".
  • Michelle Collins, star of British television soap operas EastEnders and Coronation Street owned a Samoyed called Jingle.
  • Annabel Karmel (a British children's cookbook author) owns a Samoyed called "Hamilton".
  • Sangchu is the name of the Samoyed in the 2012 Korean drama To The Beautiful You.
  • King, the dog that appears in South Korean boy band EXO's 19th teaser with Lay, Baekhyun and Chen, is a Samoyed.
  • Johnny is the name of the Samoyed owned by Academy Award winning Actress Helen Hunt.
  • Soichiro is the name of Kyoko Otanashi's Samoyed in Maison Ikkoku.
A dream day in the life of a Samoyed
  Playing in snow-covered fields with kids and adults, pulling sleds and keeping his human family warm is all in a day's work for the Samoyed. This breed has a heart of gold and his true purpose in life is to simply be loved and help keep you warm with snuggles. As long as there are plenty of humans for the Samoyed to play with, this breed is a happy camper. Due to overheating tendencies, it's best to keep the Samoyed clear of warm-weather climates.


Enjoy that  Samoyed!

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Everything about your Chihuahua

Everything about your Chihuahua

This sassy little dog has a super-size personality. He knows what he wants and goes after it with single-minded determination. For his size, he’s an excellent watchdog, but he can be yappy if he’s not taught to moderate his barking.

  Chihuahua's need special requirements because of their small size. So, they need a loving family to care for them. If you want to pay care and respect to your chihuahua, then this is the article for you!

 History 
  The Chihuahua is a native of Mexico, and his ancestors were surrounded by many myths. They were believed to be spirit guides that protected souls as they traveled through the underworld. While the stories about the dog’s origins are interesting, there’s no real evidence about how long they’ve existed or that they were known to the Aztecs or other peoples who inhabited Mexico before the Spaniards came.
  Some dog experts say they were among the first native dogs of the Americas, others that they were brought to the New World after the Spanish conquest of Mexico. Still others believe the little dogs may have originated as miniaturized versions of pariah dogs, the nondescript brown dogs with prick ears that result when dogs are left to breed on their own with no selection for color or other specific characteristics. Whatever the case, the breed takes its name from the state of Chihuahua, where late-19th-century American tourists first encountered the tiny canines.
  The Chihuahua we know today was developed by North American breeders. The first Chihuahua registered by the American Kennel Club, in 1904, was named Midget. The Chihuahua Club of America was formed in 1923. Today, the Chihuahua ranks 13th among the breeds registered by the AKC.

Breed Characteristics
  • Easy grooming
  • Pleasant temperament
  • Long lifespan
  • Portable
  • Territorial tendencies
Overview

  Don't let their compact size fool you — when it comes to Chihuahuas, big personalities come in small packages. Confident, intelligent and passionate, Chihuahuas love to play, cuddle and speak their minds when necessary. These little guys take loyalty to the next level. Primarily bred as human companions, Chihuahuas are known for attaching themselves to their owner. They can be protective, territorial and even jealous. Undeterred by their small size, Chihuahuas use their loud, high-pitched barks as a way of "guarding" their beloved masters.



Breed standards
  • AKC group: Toy Dog
  • UKC group: Companion Dog
  • Average lifespan: 12 - 20 years
  • Average size:  6 pounds and under
  • Coat appearance: Varies
  • Coloration: Tan, red, black, white or splash
  • Hypoallergenic: No
  • Other identifiers: Small frame and fragile head structure; ears are pointed and erect
  • Possible alterations: Head shape can be apple- or deer-shaped; coat can be long- or short-haired
  • Comparable Breeds: Papillon, Pekingese
Is this breed right for you?
  Chihuahuas are a great fit for many, but households with young children may want to think twice about bringing home this tiny breed. Due to their size, Chihuahuas must be handled with gentle care and require constant supervision around young children. Chihuahuas make excellent companions for apartment dwellers and families with older children as they require little maintenance and space. Whether you opt for a pet with a smooth coat or a long-haired Chihuahua, grooming for this breed is fairly low-maintenance. Chihuahua owners should also beware of a soft spot in their dog's skull known as a molera. As the only breed born with an incomplete skull, it's important to treat this breed with extra-gentle care, especially during the first six months of growth.


Other Quick Facts

  For the show ring, the Chihuahua should not exceed six pounds, but many Chihuahuas are actually larger than that, making them a better choice for families with children.
Chihuahuas that weigh less than three pounds often have a short life span.
Don’t think that the Chihuahua is a gentle lapdog. He is tenacious and terrierlike in attitude.
Chihuahuas are highly intelligent and take well to training when it comes with positive reinforcement in the form of treats and praise.
Chihuahuas come in any solid color or combination of colors, including fawn, black and tan, chocolate and white, blue and red. Avoid breeders who try to get you to pay more for supposedly “rare” colors.

How to Care- Step
1.Consider if you really should get a Chihuahua. They may be tiny, but they still need food, vet care, daily walks, and care for up to seventeen years. They are also prone to eye problems, weight gain, and can easily be injured if you accidentally step or sit on them. 

2.Decide if you want to buy or adopt your Chihuahua. Because they're so common, you can easily find a purebred in a shelter, but if you want a puppy your best bet will be a responsible breeder. However, never buy from a pet store or casual breeder, which can give you unhealthy puppies and are contributing to our huge pet overpopulation issue.

3.Don't baby your Chihuahua! You should treat your Chi like a big dog. For example, if a German Shepherd jumped up onto you, you would correct him. You should do this with your Chi too! If a Labrador snapped at another dog, you would correct him. If your Chi does the same, she should be corrected too!

4.Chihuahuas don't need much food, but the food they get should be high-quality and not random kibble. This might cost more, but it'll save you down the road by preventing health issues caused by bad food. Remember not to overfeed them, as Chihuahuas tend to grow fat, which is dangerous and unhealthy.

5.Take your Chihuahua to the vet for yearly check ups. Choose a vet who's experienced with Chihuahuas and their care!

6.Give your Chihuahua a daily walk! You might assume they get enough exercise running around the house, but walks offer mental stimulation that is necessary for your Chi. However, because of their short muzzles they can be susceptible to heat stroke; keep the walks short and only walk them during cool weather.

7.Grooming your Chihuahua is fairly easy. If your Chi is short-haired, he'll only need to be brushed or wiped over with a damp cloth occasionally. However, if your Chihuahua is long-haired, you'll need to brush her hair daily, and take care to watch for mats in the hair.

8.Love your Chihuahua! They can be difficult to care for, but their wonderful personalities, adventurous spirit, and lovable nature will win you over quickly.


What You Need to Know About Chihuahua Health
  Tiny dogs often come with big health problems, and the Chihuahua is no exception. Many Chihuahuas live long, healthy lives, but conditions seen in the breed include breathing difficulties caused by a windpipe that collapses in on itself; luxating patellas; eye disorders; congestive heart disease; certain neurological conditions including hydrocephalus (fluid buildup in and around the brain), neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, a condition in which fatty pigments in the brain cause the progressive loss of brain function, and atlantoaxial subluxation, a neck deformity that may require surgical correction; obesity; and dental problems caused by the small size of their mouths. 
  Luxating patellas are an orthopedic problem. The patella, or kneecap, of most very small dogs, including the Chihuahua, can very easily become displaced, causing pain and lameness. In mild cases the knee quickly slips back into place on its own, but severe cases must be corrected surgically. Ask your veterinarian to examine your dog's knees regularly, especially if you notice him limping or "bunny hopping" while running.
  The Chihuahua's round, protruding eyes are one of his most distinctive characteristics, but they are prone to a number of genetic eye disorders as well as to frequent injuries.
  Chihuahuas frequently have what's called a "molera," or an open fontanelle, which is a soft area under the skin of the forehead where the bony plates of the skull have not fused together. It may eventually close up and become hard, but in some dogs, the molera never fully closes. While many dogs can live a normal lifespan with a molera, some may have a condition called hydrocephalus (fluid buildup in and around the brain), which can cause seizures and even death if not treated. A Chihuahua with a molera can live a perfectly normal life, but he is more prone to head injuries so he’s not the best candidate for a home with rambunctious children or bigger, rougher dogs.
  Chihuahuas can also be born with a liver defect known as a portosystemic shunt, in which blood is diverted away from the liver. This may cause a buildup of toxins in the dog's body, stunted growth, and can be fatal if not corrected with surgery.
  Although Chihuahuas are prized for their small size, they're often fed to obesity. A Chihuahua's skeleton is not designed to carry much weight, and even a few extra ounces can be a significant burden to a dog this size. As with all dogs, leanness is far healthier – and cheaper, when it comes to veterinary costs. Keeping a Chihuahua lean is particularly important if he has luxating patellas.
  Tiny mouths frequently mean there's no room for proper development of teeth. It's essential to get regular veterinary dental care for a Chihuahua, and he may need to have some teeth pulled to make room in his mouth for proper development of the rest of the teeth.


Getting Their Attention 
  Sometimes when they are barking, it is impossible to get their attention. Try throwing a can of pebbles or can of coins in front of them or near them (don't hit them!) They will be startled and after a few times may conclude that barking brings about this startling thing and stop barking! Don't let your dog see you do this!

Chihuahua Grooming
  Chihuahuas come in two coat types: smooth and long. Smooth Chihuahuas wear a velvety, shiny, close-fitting coat and have a ruff — an area of thicker, longer hair — around the neck. They have a scant covering of hair on the head and ears. The tail should be furry, not bare.
  Smooth Chihuahuas shed, but they are so small that the amount is manageable for all but the most house proud. Brush them weekly with a rubber grooming glove or soft bristle brush to remove dead hair and keep the skin and coat healthy.
  The longcoated Chihuahua is the product of a recessive gene, meaning a puppy must have the gene from both parents for the long coat to express itself, so he isn’t seen in litters as frequently as the smooth. The long, soft coat is flat or slightly curly, and the dog has a ruff around the neck, fringed ears, feathering on the legs and a plumed tail. The hair on the rest of the body is almost as smooth as that on the smooth Chihuahua. Longcoated Chihuahuas are beautiful, and they’re easy to groom, but they do shed seasonally.
  Keep your Chihuahua’s big ears clean with a solution recommended by your veterinarian. Don’t use cotton swabs inside the ear; they can push gunk further down into it. Wipe out the ear with a cotton ball, never going deeper than the first knuckle of your finger.
  Trim his nails regularly, usually every couple of weeks. They should never be so long that you hear them clicking on the floor.

Adopting a Dog from a Chihuahua Rescue or Shelter
  There are many great options available if you want to adopt a dog from an animal shelter or breed rescue organization. Here is how to get started.

1. Use the Web.
  Social media is another great way to find a dog. Post on your Facebook page that you are looking for a specific breed so that your entire community can be your eyes and ears.

2. Reach Out to Local Experts
  Start talking with all the pet pros in your area about your desire for a Chihuahua. That includes vets, dog walkers, and groomers. When someone has to make the tough decision to give up a dog, that person will often ask her own trusted network for recommendations.

3. Talk to Breed Rescue
  Networking can help you find a dog that may be the perfect companion for your family. Most people who love Chihuahuas love all Chihuahuas. That’s why breed clubs have rescue organizations devoted to taking care of homeless dogs.

4. Key Questions to Ask
  You now know the things to discuss with a breeder, but there are also questions you should discuss with shelter or rescue group staff or volunteers before you bring home a pup.
  • What is his energy level?
  • How is he around other animals?
  • How does he respond to shelter workers, visitors and children?
  • What is his personality like?
  • What is his age?
  • Is he housetrained?
  • Has he ever bitten or hurt anyone that they know of?
  • Are there any known health issues?
  Puppy or adult, take your Chihuahua to your veterinarian soon after adoption. Your veterinarian will be able to spot problems, and will work with you to set up a preventive regimen that will help you avoid many health issues.

Did You Know?
  The Chihuahua is the most famous of the “purse puppies,” toy dogs toted around in chic upscale doggie bags by high-profile celebrities and socialites. The most famous celebrity Chihuahua is Tinker Bell, who spends her days nestled in socialite Paris Hilton’s handbag.

A dream day in the life of a Chihuahua
  Getting treated like the kings or queens they makes this tiny breed feel right at home. Chihuahuas love being carried around, and luckily, they're just the right size for it. Put this breed in a cute carrier, a stroller or gently carry them in your arms and consider their day made. This pint-sized pup is prone to suffering during extreme heat and cold so make sure they're appropriately dressed for the occasion.


Enjoy that Chihuahua!

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Everything about your Rottweiler

Everything about your Rottweiler
   Choosing to add a furry friend to your growing household is a long-term commitment, and picking a breed that fits your lifestyle presents the key to a happy home. With over 160 American Kennel Club-recognized breeds, that decision can seem overwhelming. We're here to help you meet the breed that's right for you. If you're looking for a gentle four-legged giant to add to your pack, find out everything you need to know about the Rottweiler.
  Rottweilers are one of the breeds that tends to be misunderstood and misrepresented way too much. They are NOT mean dogs, nor are they wantonly aggressive or 'born fighters'.
Photo by Vladyslav Dukhin from Pexels

  The REAL Rottweiler is a highly intelligent, brave, loyal and loving dog who will be your companion for life. Bred and raised properly, a Rottweiler puppy is the perfect 'mans-best-friend'.
  If you want a Rottweiler, learn how to raise it first! If you don't get these dogs off to the right start, you may never be able to control them, and they will be a constant danger to you, your family, and others. With a bite strength roughly 25% greater than a German Shepherd, they must be trained - it isn't optional. If you do learn to do it right, you will own one of the best and safest pets it is possible to own.

History
  The breed's history likely dates to the Roman Empire. It is likely that the Rottweiler is a descendant of ancient Roman drover dogs, a mastiff-type dog that was a dependable, rugged dog with great intelligence and guarding instincts. During their quest to conquer Europe, the Roman legion traveled in large numbers across the continent. The non-existence of refrigeration meant the soldiers had to bring herds of cattle with them on their excursions for food. These drover dogs were not only used to keep the herds of cattle together, but to guard the supply stock at night. Around 74 A.D. the Roman army travelled across the alps and into the southern part of modern day Germany. For the next two centuries the Roman drover dogs were continually utilized in herding and driving cattle for trade even after the Romans were driven out of the area by the Swabians.
  A town in this region was eventually given the name Rottweil. It became an important trade center and the descendants of the Roman cattle dogs proved their worth by driving the cattle to market and protecting the cattle from robbers and wild animals. The dogs are said to have been used by traveling butchers at markets during the Middle Ages to guard money pouches tied around their necks. The dogs eventually came to be called Rottweiler Metzgerhunds, or butcher dogs. As railroads became the primary method for moving stock to market, the need for the breed declined, as did the number of Rottweilers. The number of Rottweilers diminished so severely that by 1882 in a dog show in Heilbronn, there was only one very poor representative of the breed.
  The buildup to World War I saw a great demand for police dogs, and that led to a revival of interest in the Rottweiler. During the First and Second World Wars, Rottweilers were put into service in various roles, including as messenger, ambulance, draught, and guard dogs.
  The Deutscher Rottweiler-Klub (DRK, German Rottweiler Club), the first Rottweiler club in Germany, was founded on 13 January 1914, and followed by the creation of the Süddeutscher Rottweiler-Klub (SDRK, South German Rottweiler Club) on 27 April 1915 and eventually became the IRK (International Rottweiler Club). The DRK counted around 500 Rottweilers, and the SDRK 3000 Rottweilers. The goals of the two clubs were different. The DRK aimed to produce working dogs and did not emphasise the morphology of the Rottweiler.
  The various German Rottweiler Clubs amalgamated to form the Allgemeiner Deutscher Rottweiler Klub (ADRK, General German Rottweiler Club) in 1921. This was officially recorded in the register of clubs and associations at the district court of Stuttgart on 27 January 1924. The ADRK is recognised worldwide as the home club of the Rottweiler.
  In 1931 the Rottweiler was officially recognised by the American Kennel Club. In 1936, Rottweilers were exhibited in Britain at Crufts. In 1966, a separate register was opened for the breed. In fact, in the mid-1990s, the popularity of the Rottweiler reached an all-time high with it being the most registered dog by the American Kennel Club.

Overview
  This breed continues to excel at serving its original breeding purpose: to protect and serve. The fierce and friendly Rottweiler is known for its territorial instincts and warrior traits. It's so well known as a fighter that some cities have chosen to ban this tough breed from households. Without a doubt, the no-nonsense Rottweiler has massive power — we're talking 328 pounds of pressure from a single bite. As tough as this pup can be, it's also known to show kindness and loyalty to its human masters.

Should you get a puppy or an adult dog? 

  I've had both, and there are several factors that play into this decision. A puppy will give you the advantage of starting all training from scratch, on a clean slate if you will. This is helpful because training a Rottie can be tricky, so the earlier the better! An adult dog may come with some excess baggage, such as a history of abuse (like my female, "Roxy") or neglect, lack of training, etc. However, these are not impossible to overcome for an experienced dog owner. In fact, not enough can be said for how wonderful it can be to rescue an adult Rottie from a shelter! Giving one a second chance may be the best for you both, it’s just important to be patient and allow extra time for the dog to adjust. So many animals are killed every year in shelters because there aren’t enough homes for them all, so adoption could be a great option! Also keep in mind that a puppy will need potty training, while many adult shelter dogs already have that experience. If you do decide on a puppy, never purchase one from a pet store; those usually come from puppy mills, which are kept in deplorable condition and usually result in pets with many health problems! 

Breed at a glace:
  • Active lifestyle;
  • Environmentally adaptable;
  • Easy grooming;
  • Guard dog capabilities;
  • Territorial.
  Grooming for Rottweilers is minimal, including bi-monthly baths, as well as regular nail trims and ear cleaning. Keep in mind, however, that they do shed quite a bit. Their fairly thick undercoat is short, but will still cause little black tumbleweeds of fur all around your house. Be prepared for weekly if not daily sweeping or vacuuming. Since they have black nails and you will be unable to see the “quick”  it is best to consult a professional groomer if you are not experienced with nail trimming.
  Considerable cost can be involved in caring for a Rottie. First you will definitely want to consider spaying or neutering your pet, not only to control pet overpopulation, but also to have a cleaner, healthier, more well-mannered dog. This can cost anywhere from $100 for a puppy to $400 or more for an adult. Shelter dogs should already be “fixed” before you adopt them. This procedure is routine and relatively safe, and reduces or even eliminates the risk of certain cancers and other health issues. Annual vaccinations can range in cost from $50-150, and monthly flea, tick, and heartworm preventative may cost around $30 per month.

  A Rottweiler’s lifespan can be 10-15 years with proper care. They can suffer from a number of health issues, for which you will need to be prepared financially, physically, and emotionally. Because of their size, they are prone to arthritis, which can make walking, standing and lying down very difficult, especially if they are overweight. If your dog needs help getting up from the floor, getting into the car for a vet visit, or using the stairs, are you physically capable of helping him? Also, there are a number of quality joint supplements on the market, which can be used as preventative care and for pain relief as well. These products will not come cheap for such a large breed, as the dosing is based on weight. Rotties are predisposed to different forms of bone cancer, and it is not uncommon for that to be the cause of death. There are conventional and holistic treatments available which can prolong and even improve the quality of your dog’s life, but currently there is no cure.  You may also encounter other less severe health problems, such as allergies, ear infections, or scrapes and cuts (they are a little clumsy!).


  Breed standards
  • AKC group: Working
  • UKC group: Guardian Dog
  • Average lifespan: 8 - 10 years
  • Average size:  75 - 110 pounds
  • Coat appearance: Short, sleek, coarse
  • Coloration: Black and tan markings
  • Hypoallergenic: No
  • Other identifiers: Large and muscular build; defined tan markings; small pendant ears
  • Possible alterations: Can be seen with either a natural-length tail or short-cropped tail
  • Comparable Breeds: Doberman Pinscher, Mastiff
  Is this breed right for you?
Rottweilers require immense amounts of constant training and discipline. This breed is not recommended for novice owners or those without the proper dedication to training this fierce dog. All potential owners should check their city guidelines, as some cities have created a ban against this tough breed. Due to its protective and territorial background, this breed requires early training and socialization to become a safe and loving family pet. Rottweilers can easily adapt to any living environment as long as daily exercise is part of their routine.

Steps
Do Your Research First
  Find out as much as you can about Rottweilers, read books, search online, go to local dog shows, talk to breeders and so on. As with any breed, Rotties have their own distinct personality traits and breed-specific characteristics. The better you understand them, the easier it will be to raise your pup properly.

Choose A Breeder Carefully
  There are lots of excellent Rottweiler breeders but also lots of not-so-good ones, take your time and don't go with the first one you see. Choose a breeder who does all the appropriate health-screenings (eg. OFA, cardiac, eyes) on their breeding stock. Also check for both conformation (show lines) and working ability (Schutzhund or tracking for example) as this shows that the dogs look and act like Rottweilers! Ask any potential breeder questions, and expect them to ask you questions too.

Take Time To Pick The Right Puppy
  Rottweiler puppies are irresistible, but you don't necessarily want to take home the first pair of puppy-dog eyes you see. Each pup is an individual with his/her own personality and combination of genes. A good breeder will be able to help you find the perfect pup for your home/lifestyle/plans.

Be Prepared For Puppy Parenthood
  • A new puppy will take a lot of time, patience, love and money and you need to be ready for that. The first few days can be a bit hectic but things will soon settle into a routine. Here are a few things you'll need to know/do.....
  • Make sure your pup stays up to date with vaccinations and de-worming treatments. Rottweilers are especially vulnerable to a viral disease called Parvo and you need to be extra-vigilant during these early weeks.
  • Start housebreaking right away and use a crate to help prevent 'accidents' in the house. One of the biggest parts of housebreaking a pup is not allowing bad habits to form. Always take your pup to the same spot outdoors to 'do his business' and only allow him free-reign indoors when you're supervising closely.
  • Begin training immediately too. Rottweilers are very intelligent and eager to please. Start with basic name recognition and housebreaking as soon as you get home, and add simple commands like 'sit' and 'stay' as soon as your pup feels at home. Rottweilers don't need (or respond well to) harsh corrections or training methods. They're sensitive and smart, and will learn quickly if you use positive, reward-based training methods. Once your pup is fully vaccinated enroll him in a formal Puppy Obedience Class.
  • Socialize him early, and throughout his life. Rotties are a guardian breed and are naturally reserved, tending to be a bit aloof or 'stand-offish' with strangers.
Love Him!
  Rottweilers may be big dogs, but they love to sit in your lap and are big 'softies'. Give your Rottweiler puppy lots of love and attention so that he grows up happy and confident.

Tips
  • Kids  Rotties are great family dogs. They love children. These are not "one man" dogs. They belong to whichever family member they are with at the time. No one will feel left out. Be prepared though - if given their way, they will spend most of their time with the kids; They really love kids. For those with small children, remember: NEVER leave a young child alone with any dog for any amount of time!

  • House Pets  Rotties love to lounge around the house and soak up love and laziness with their masters. They enjoy being "house dogs" as long as they have a yard in which to play and plenty of attention from their master. Rotties tend to follow their masters around the house from room to room, settling in wherever you do. They are part teddy bear, part ornery best friend, part draft horse and part guard dog, all in one truly beautiful package. They love to be handled and you should get them used to having their mouths and paws handled to make your vet's job easier down the road. This is really important - they should allow you to handle any part of their body without stiffening up or getting stressed. Keep gently doing it until they get used to it.

  • More Than One?  Having two Rotties is great fun and they provide each other extra exercise. If you want two, I strongly recommend getting a male and a female instead of two males. Males are far more aggressive and ornery than females and if they get in a fight, they are going to be badly hurt, possibly killed. I also recommend getting your dogs neutered after they reach 6 months of age. This does not reduce their effectiveness as watch dogs and males will still learn to pee with their legs raised.

  • Intelligence  Rotties are incredibly intelligent. Ours learned to turn light switches on and off, open fence gate latches and open sliding cabinet doors. These are things they learned on their own! We have taught them tricks in addition to the standard obedience commands. They are really fun dogs. They actually plan complex diversions to distract the other Rottie's attention while they steal the desired toy.  Think ahead if you want to be their boss because Rottweilers are problem-solving smart.

  • Crates  Get a crate and use it! This is the place your dog will go when he doesn't want to be disturbed. Respect that - always. Never try to pull him out of his crate for anything, including punishments and treats. His crate is his one place that you must respect. It is also the place you will put your dog when you don't want him to disturb you. He won't mind. After all, it's "his place."  I do not recommend having the dog's food and water dishes in his crate unless absolutely necessary. Because Rotties have such warm coats, I strongly recommend wire frame crates instead of the plastic ones. The extra ventilation is very important. Wire crates have the added advantage of folding for transport.
  • Grooming and Maintenance  Rotties only need to be brushed once a week. A slicker brush is good. Of course, you can brush them as often as you like, but only bathe them about twice a year. Over-bathing will dry out their skins and their coats. They are clean smelling dogs and their coat should not develop any odor unless something is wrong. Because they have folded-over ears, you should clean their ears once a week. You can buy a solution at a pet store or from your vet for this. I prefer a one-step solution. You put your dog in a down-stay, straddle him, and squirt solution into an ear until it is about to overfill. Then stick a regular cotton ball in the ear to keep the fluid in, and fold the ear down. Hold his ear against his head to keep the cotton ball and solution in. Repeat for other ear and then hold their ears shut for 10 full minutes; then release and remove the cotton balls. Some dogs don't mind it and some hate it but it really needs to be done once a week. Trimming toe nails is really not hard with good sharp clippers, some practice and a regular routine. I do it every 2 weeks. If you start all these routines when your Rottweiler is a little puppy (8 to 10 weeks), they are much easier to do when he is grown. That way he just accepts them as the routine order of life.
  • The Vet  Get a good one, and keep him! Work out a written schedule of shots and HeartGuard for heart worm protection, and stick to it like glue. We use an animal hospital that treats farm and zoo animals, including tigers and such. This helps us know that the vets there are experienced and stay on top of medical advances, but are also practical minded. Rottweilers' immune systems tend to over-react to shots (vaccinations) and drugs. Expect your Rottie to feel under the weather for a day or two after getting a shot or series of pills. Usually, this is not a problem, just something of which to be aware
  • Food  Feed your Rott a high quality food if possible. One reader suggests making sure your dog's food contains the amino acid taurine to avoid heart problems. Read the ingredients on the dogfood bag and talk to your vet and local breeders about this. If your dog needs weight control, I suggest controlling portion size instead of going to a lower protein-lower fat dog food.
  • Guard Dog Or Pet?  You do not need to train a Rottweiler to protect you and your family. It is a strong instinct in them and is absolutely trustworthy. 
  • Read The Book!  Go to your local library and get the oldest available copy of the Monks of New Skete's book - "The Art Of Raising A Puppy," follow their basic techniques, and your Rottie will never let you down - and you will never let him down either. If your dog is already an adult, they still have a book for you - "How To Be Your Dog's Best Friend." The Monks' latest books have gone politically correct and gotten away from their earlier strength, which was observing natural dog behavior and using it to teach humans how to be part of their own "pack." Think about it: Non-domestic canines (dogs and wolves) use the dominance down constantly to maintain pack order while at the same time avoiding real fights. If it's awful, why do dogs do it and why does it work for them? I strongly recommend trying to find an older version of this book at a local library. The older books are more factual and straightforward.
A dream day in the life of a Rottweiler
  Work must be a part of this breed's daily lifestyle. Whether it's daily training, herding on a farm, hunting or protecting, it must be kept occupied with a job to fulfill its natural instincts. With proper training this breed makes a loyal and loving family pet that's happy spending his days looking after the household and protecting his family.

Media portrayal
  The portrayal of Rottweilers as evil dogs in several fictional films and TV series, most notably in The Omen, along with sensationalist press coverage, has created a negative image of the breed. However, some films and television shows, such as Lethal Weapon 3, the 1998 Film Half Baked, and the hit HBO show Entourage, have portrayed Rottweilers in a positive light. They are also featured in the children's book series Good Dog, Carl by Alexandra Day.
  In an event widely reported by the media, a two-year-old UK Rottweiler named Jake owned by Liz Maxted-Bluck was recognised for his bravery by the RSPCA. The dog was out walking with his owner when they heard screams. Jake chased off a man as he molested a woman on Hearsall Common, Coventry, in July 2009. He located the attacker and his victim in thick scrub, chased off the attacker, led his owner to the scene, then stood guard over the victim until police arrived. The attacker was convicted of serious sexual assault and jailed for four years. Jake was nominated by police for the bravery award and medallion after the incident. Det Con Clive Leftwich, from Coventry police station, said: "From our point of view Jake the Rottweiler stopped a serious sexual assault from becoming even worse."

Enjoy that Rottweiler!

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How to Keep Floors Clean From Dog Paws

How to Keep Floors Clean From Dog Paws
   After a long day at work, you come home and feed your hungry pup its dinner and then start your own meal. When you turn back around once your dog is finished, you see its bowl halfway across the floor, remnants of the meal scattered all around, water has dripped everywhere and its face and fur are covered in a mess of food. Now you have to take some time to clean it all up when at least one of you thinks the time would be better spent playing fetch
  Dogs get dirty, and they don't care one bit about tracking that dirt through your house. It seems as if dog paws are designed to trap as much dirt, mud and grass as possible -- even a quick romp in the yard can lead to a big mess in your house. If your dog's dirty paws are dulling your floors, take control of the situation and put an end to the parade of paw prints. 
  If you lay down a few ground rules, sharing your home with an animal needn't mean too much extra work. Don't worry that you might not be able to train your animal well enough to follow house rules — the rules are for you, not your pet!


 1.Designate one door for your dog to use when he comes inside your house. This enables you to focus your efforts in one location. Ideally, you should choose the cleanest entry point. Avoid doors that lead into dirt or grass. Instead, choose an entry point surrounded by deck or concrete to give your puppy's paws time to dust off before they reach your door.

2.Place a mat outside and inside the door your dog uses. Some mats are better for dislodging dirt than others, and this partially depends on the size of your dog's paws. Look for a mat made of rubber or another washable material.

3.Place a shallow bin of water inside your door and dip your pet's muddy paws into the water before allowing him loose in your house. This is also beneficial for removing debris or snow from between his toes after an outing. Have him step on a towel to dry off some of the water.

4.Consider dog booties after heavy rains or in snow. This will not only save your floors, but it will protect your pet from salted sidewalks and other winter hazards. Not all dogs take to booties right away; keep trying if your dog resists, and encourage him with lots of treats.

5.Be consistent. Keeping your house clean of paw prints will be a lot easier if your dog knows what to expect and cooperates because of it. Use the same door and clean his paws every time he comes back inside, using treats for distraction and positive reinforcement.

6.Clean up dirt, grass and mud immediately. If you leave dirt on your floor, your dog will keep walking through it and track it into every corner of your house. Keep a broom and dustpan handy at all times.

 And here are must-haves for the messy four-legged eater in your household — guaranteed to make everyone happy.

Elevated feeder
  Minimize the distance between your dog’s food and its mouth with the Our Pet's High Rise Diner Elevated Dog Feeder in the hopes of keeping the food off the floor. Made specifically for large dogs, this elevated feeder minimizes stress on bones and joints, is easy to clean and has a spill ridge to keep the food in the bowl and not all over the kitchen. 


Rubber mat
  If your pup is extra eager and noses its bowl all over the place, keep it in one place with the rubber Bella Spill-Proof Dog Mat that's slip resistant and has anti-skid feet. This bone-shaped place mat for dogs is nontoxic and BPA-free and made for both indoor and outdoor use. If food does start flying out of the bowl, at least it'll be contained and ready for easy cleanup.






Fun feeder
  Sometimes the mess comes from an over-eager eater that wolfs everything down in two seconds flat. Slow your dog down while making mealtime fun with The Company of Animals' Green Dog Slow Feeder. Like a maze for the mouth to navigate, getting the kibble becomes a game — one that makes it impossible to gobble everything in just a few messy bites. 
Snood
  A snood is a mealtime must-have in my house to keep long, furry ears tied up and out of the way. This goes double if your pup eats a raw diet that tends to be messier than kibble. Our fave is the handmade Beach Living Dog Snood from DayDogDesigns. It just slips over the dog's head and is held in place with elastic until the very last bite. Too cute!





Dental treats
  Messy eaters can have messy teeth, so keep your pup in tip-top shape with the new Milk-Bone Brushing Chews. When fed daily, these chews have been clinically proven to clean teeth as well as twice-weekly brushing. Low-calorie and affordable, these oral health must-haves don't involve you having to wrestle your dog's mouth open.


Wipes
  Crusty, smelly dried food in your dog's fur? Eww, no thanks! To combat that nastiness, wipe your dog’s face and fur after an award-worthy chow down with the PawGanics Natural Grooming Wipes For Dogs. The alcohol and lanolin-free formula is safe for even the most sensitive furry friends out there and are gentle enough for daily mealtime cleanup.




Sturdy bowl
  Flimsy plastic bowls are not what your messy eater needs. Instead, treat it to Loving Pets' Robusto Bowls, the sturdiest and most-solid bowls you'll ever buy that come in a variety of fun colors. The heavy gauge aluminum construction was put to the test and survived being run over by a 6500-pound Hummer. So it's safe to say nothing your dog can do will faze this wonder bowl that will stay put 'til meal's end.




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