LUV My dogs: yorkshire terrier

LUV My dogs

Everything about your dog!

Showing posts with label yorkshire terrier. Show all posts
Showing posts with label yorkshire terrier. Show all posts

Saturday, July 8, 2017

10 Most Popular Dog Breeds in America

10 Most Popular Dog Breeds in America
  Americans really, really love their dogs. And that’s in spite of dogs not being the easiest pet you could bring into your home. Training a dog is difficult, especially if you end up with a headstrong canine. Choosing the right dog breed for your lifestyle or your family can be a challenge. And owning a dog can be surprisingly expensive thanks to an assortment of hidden costs.
  So which dog breeds do Americans love the most? Take a look at the American Kennel Club’s ranking of the most popular dog breeds in America for 2016. Some of them might surprise you.

10. Boxers
  In 10th place is the boxer, part of the AKC’s Working Group. The boxer is a fun-loving dog that, interestingly enough, was one of the first breeds selected in Germany for police training. The AKC recognized the boxer in 1904. This breed is a medium-sized, square-built dog with an alert, curious face and a distinctive muzzle. Boxers move smoothly and gracefully. They’re related to practically all recognized breeds of the bulldog type. Boxers are patient and protective, which makes them great family dogs.
  Boxers were originally bred to be medium-size guard dogs. Today, although they are a part of the AKC’s Working Group, they mostly find homes as loving family companions.


  In ninth place is the Yorkshire terrier. The AKC first recognized this member of the Toy Group in 1885. Yorkies first became popular pets in the late Victorian era, and they have a distinctive coat and confident manner of carrying themselves. The AKC notes that Yorkshire Terriers “offer big personalities in a small package.” They’re brave and energetic, and most owners would say these dogs don’t know how small they are.
  Small in size but big in personality, the Yorkshire Terrier makes a feisty but loving companion. The most popular toy dog breed in the U.S., the “Yorkie” has won many fans with his devotion to his owners, his elegant looks, and his suitability to apartment living.

  In eighth place is the Rottweiler. This breed, a member of the Working Group, is one of the descendants of Roman drover dogs. The AKC recognized it in 1931. Rottweilers are powerful dogs, and the AKC notes that “the Rottweiler is happiest when given a job to perform.” The breed’s intelligence and endurance makes Rottweilers great service dogs and companions. And according to the AKC, “No one told him that he’s not a toy breed, so at some point he’s going to plop onto your lap for a cuddle.”
  If you want a Rottweiler, learn how to raise it first! If you don't get these dogs off to the right start, you may never be able to control them, and they will be a constant danger to you, your family, and others. With a bite strength roughly 25% greater than a German Shepherd, they must be trained - it isn't optional. If you do learn to do it right, you will own one of the best and safest pets it is possible to own.

  In seventh place is the poodle, a member of the Non Sporting Group. Poodles, officially recognized by the AKC in 1887, are a single breed commonly divided into standard, miniature, and toy sizes. Poodles are known for being very intelligent and active dogs. They excel in obedience training and are eager to please their humans. All sizes of poodles can be trained successfully. The standard poodle tends to be more outgoing.
  These fluffy dogs weren't always the delicate beauties they are today. Poodles were once natural-born hunters and were originally bred as water retrievers. These prim and proper pups are still excellent swimmers with a knack for anything that involves using their brains as well as their brawn. Named after the German word for puddle, this breed's webbed feet and water-resistant coat make them great lake and pool companions who love the challenge of obedience training at the highest levels.

  In sixth place is the French bulldog, which is included in the Non Sporting Group. The AKC notes that two distinctive features of this breed, which it recognized in 1898, are its bat ears and the unique silhouette of its skull. French bulldogs are affectionate and playful. And the AKC reports that this breed “is a great companion for single pet owners, as well as families with young children.” They’re a little bit stubborn in nature, so you’ll need to exercise some patience when training a French bulldog. But in general, Frenchies are intelligent and eager to please their family.
  The Frenchie will make you laugh. He's a charming, clever dog with a sense of humor and a stubborn streak. Bred for centuries as a companion, he's very fond of people, and becomes particularly attached to his family. In fact, sometimes he becomes a little too attached, which means he's not the best choice for someone who'll be away long hours every day. It also means he absolutely, positively cannot live in the backyard or garage, but only indoors as a member of the family. That's doubly true given that he, like all brachycephalic, or "flat-faced" breeds, has difficulty regulating his body temperature and needs to live in a climate-controlled environment.

  In fifth place is the beagle, part of the AKC’s Hound Group. The AKC first recognized the breed in 1885. The beagle was bred primarily for hunting rabbits and hares, and beagles are still excellent hunting dogs and companions. They enjoy the company of people and other dogs; however, they’re a challenge to train because they want to follow their noses. As the AKC puts it, “Beagles are at best temporarily obedient due to their independent nature, which is common among most hounds.”
   Small, compact, and hardy, Beagles are active companions for kids and adults alike. Canines in this dog breed are merry and fun loving, but being hounds, they can also be stubborn and require patient, creative training techniques. Their noses guide them through life, and they're never happier than when following an interesting scent. The Beagle originally was bred as a scenthound to track small game, mostly rabbits and hare. He is still used for this purpose in many countries, including the United States.

  In fourth place is the bulldog, a member of the Non Sporting Group. The bulldog originated in the British Isles, and the AKC recognized it in 1886. Bulldogs are thick-set dogs with short faces and sturdy limbs. The AKC describes these medium-sized dogs as “equable, resolute and dignified.” Despite a “well-earned” reputation for stubbornness, bulldogs are very intelligent and can be very successfully trained.
  Bulldogs originally were used to drive cattle to market and to compete in a bloody sport called bullbaiting. Today, they’re gentle companions who love kids. A brief walk and a nap on the sofa is just this dog breed’s speed.

  In third place is the golden retriever, a highly identifiable breed, which the AKC recognized in 1925. Golden retrievers are a member of the Sporting Group and are active, alert, and confident. As the AKC explains, “It’s not surprising that golden retrievers are one of the most popular dog breeds in the United States. Along with being exuberant and friendly, they are strong dogs and hard workers.”
  The Golden Retriever is one of the most popular dog breeds in the U.S. The breed's friendly, tolerant attitude makes him a fabulous family pet, and his intelligence makes him a highly capable working dog. Golden Retrievers excel at retrieving game for hunters, tracking, sniffing out drugs, and as therapy and assistance dogs. They're also natural athletes, and do well in dog sports such as agility and competitive obedience.
 This sporting breed has a sweet, gentle, people-pleasing personality. A well-bred Golden Retriever does not have strong guarding instincts, so don’t expect him to protect your home from burglars. He will, however, make friends with them and show them where the treats are.

  In second place is the German shepherd, a member of the Herding Group. The AKC recognized this breed in 1908. These dogs are smart and courageous, and they come from a long lineage of old herding and farm dogs. German shepherds are loyal family dogs and good guard dogs. According to the AKC, German shepherds are “considered dogdom’s finest all-purpose workers.”
 The German Shepherd Dog is a natural protector and so adaptable and intelligent that he has performed just about every job known to dog. If he had opposable thumbs, he would be unstoppable.
  The German Shepherd Dog is one of America's most popular dog breeds — for good reason. He's an intelligent and capable working dog. His devotion and courage are unmatched. And he's amazingly versatile, excelling at most anything he's trained to do: guide and assistance work for the handicapped, police and military service, herding, search and rescue, drug detection, competitive obedience and, last but not least, faithful companion.

  In first place is the Labrador retriever, a friendly and active member of the Sporting Group. The AKC recognized the breed in 1917. The Labrador retriever, the most popular dog breed in the United States, comes in three colors: yellow, black, and chocolate. These dogs are eager to please, which means they excel not only as family dogs, but also “as guide dogs for the blind, as part of search-and-rescue teams, or in narcotics detection with law enforcement.”
  Labrador Retrievers are among the most popular dog breeds out there today. Loyal, easy to get along with, and easy to train, these retrievers could be considered a neighborhood classic all around the United States and even in other parts of the world. But what exactly makes them such popular, well-respected dogs… and does a strong breed always mean that a Labrador Retriever will be the right dog for you?
  The Labrador Retriever was bred to be both a friendly companion and a useful working dog breed. Historically, he earned his keep as a fisherman’s helper: hauling nets, fetching ropes, and retrieving fish from the chilly North Atlantic. Today’s Labrador Retriever is as good-natured and hard working as his ancestors, and he’s America’s most popular breed. These days the Lab works as a retriever for hunters, assistance dog to the handicapped, show competitor, and search and rescue dog, among other canine jobs.



Read More

Friday, June 30, 2017

Everything about your Biewer Terrier

Everything about your Biewer Terrier
  The Biewer Terrier, also known as the Biewer Yorkshire Terrier a la Pom Pon, the Biewer Yorkie or just the Biewer, is a fairly new toy terrier breed. It has not yet been recognized by the American Kennel Club, but is recognized by the American Rare Breed Association (ARBA) and of course by their own American breed club, the Biewer Terrier Club of America (BTCA).

Overview
  At first glance, the Biewer Terrier looks like a colorful tricolored Yorkie or a hybrid mix between a Maltese and Yorkie . 
  Biewer Terrier is a modern breed in the making right before our very eyes.
Pronounced “Bee-Vair,” the breed was first discovered and developed in Germany by a couple, Werner and Gertrude Biewer, Yorkshire terrier breeders.  They mated two of their dogs together in 1984 and produced a blue, gold, and white dog named Schneeflocken von Friedheck.  The explanation for this unusual “Yorkie” was a rare recessive piebald gene mutation. 
  From there it was introduced into the United States in 2003 and continues to gain in popularity as people learn about this incredibly sweet, happy, even-tempered terrier that is a fiercely loyal companion to all those humans he determines are his family.
  As you known, in USA, most Yorkies have docked tails, but the Biewer keeps his full tail as part of the  standard began in Germany.  As in many European countries, the practice of docking tails and cropping ears is banned and the breed’s founders in the U.S. determined that it was in the best interest to maintain this look. 

Breed standards
Other Names Used: Biewer a la Pom Pon, Biewer Yorkshire Terrier, Biewer Yorkshire, or Biewer Yorkie
Affiliation:  AKC FFS (May 2014); ARBA (American Rare Breed Association)
Group: Toy Dog, Companion Dog
Size: Height: 8 12 inches, Weight:  4-7 pounds
Coat Type: Long and Silky; No undercoat
Colors: Black/Blue with Tan/Gold and White
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Country of Origin:  Hunsruck, Germany
Activity Level:  Moderate
Life Expectancy:  12 to 15 years
Good with Children:  Yes (Older children)
Good with other pets:  Yes
Comparable Breeds: Yorkshire Terrier, Silky Terrier

History
  The Biewer Terrier came to be its own breed as a result of a Yorkshire Terrier puppy born in Germany in January of 1984 that had an extreme amount of white patterning throughout his coat. This unusual puppy, named Scheefloeckchen von Friedheck, caused his breeders, Werner and Gertrud Biewer, to wonder whether their Yorkies carried a recessive piebald gene, which apparently they did. Over the next several years, the Biewers bred for the piebald gene and produced blue, white and gold Yorkshire Terriers that bred true to their color. Mr. Biewer showed two of his unique dogs as “black and white Yorkies” in 1988, and the breed took off from there. Biewer Terriers were first officially recognized by the Allgemeiner Club der Hundefreunde Deutschland e. V., one of Germany’s dog clubs. The Biewers signed off on the Biewer breed standard in the late 1980s. Mr. Biewer died in 1997; thereafter, his widow stopped breeding dogs. The Biewer Terrier Club of America was established in 2007. Today, this is still considered to be a rare breed.


Temperament
Having a friendly and affectionate nature, the Biewer Terrier is quite comfortable enough to mingle.
They also possess a highly loyal and dedicated nature, loving to spend quality time with their masters and other family members.
The Biewer Terriers are at times childlike and whimsical in their behavior, loving to do a lot of amusing things like carrying a toy in his mouth.
In spite of their pleasing nature, they may sometimes be strong willed and yappy just like the Yorkshire Terrier, trying to have the upper hand over their masters.
They are wary and suspicious on seeing an unfamiliar face at the beginning, even going to the extent of warning the owner about the same. However, they gradually get along well with the stranger once they realize that he is not a threat to their household. Inappropriate socialization might make these small breeds little aggressive towards strangers.
These dogs are said to have a greater personality than their size, thus making them a little difficult while dealing with other dogs particularly the bigger ones or even cats.
Besides being perfect companions to all, especially the elderly group, this breed is ideal for homes with older children who can deal with them in a responsible way rather than the little ones who can be restless enough with them.

Health 
  Given the fact that Biewer Terrier was bred from the Yorkshire Terrier, they share the same sort of health problems. Some of the most common genetic disorders seen in this breed include patellar luxation, Legg-Calve-Perthes syndrome, portosystemic shunt, bladder stones, and tracheal collapse. Other conditions these dogs may develop include distichiasis and hypoglycemia.

Care
  As with any other breed, Biewers need to be groomed on a regular basis to make sure their coats and skin are kept in tip-top condition. They also need to be given regular daily exercise to ensure they remain fit and healthy. On top of this, they need to be fed good quality food that meets all their nutritional needs throughout their lives.

Living Conditions
  The Biewer Terrier can live in an apartment if it gets enough exercise. They are fairly active indoors and will do okay without a yard.

Training
  The Biewer Terrier is a smart little dog that generally responds well to a firm and consistent hand in training. Like many toy breeds, the Biewer Terrier is prone to developing small dog syndrome if not properly trained. Biewer Terriers can be somewhat difficult to housebreak and they can be a little overprotective at times. As long as you start training early and remain consistent, you shouldn’t have any trouble training your Biewer Terrier.

Exercise Requirements
  Toy breeds don't need a whole lot of room to run, but even apartment Biewers should be walked regularly, to avoid becoming overweight. In a fenced-in yard they will run and play with children, but should never be left off leash, as they will chase after just about anything that catches their eye – even cars.
  Though Biewers can get along swimingly with larger dogs, they should be socialized as early as possible to learn to accept new people and situations. They can be wary of strangers and once a fearless little Biewer postures, it's difficult to talk them down.
 The Biewer Terrier is a naturally active breed that requires regular daily exercise to work off his excess energy. If a daily walk is not possible, some active playtime will usually fulfill this dog’s needs for exercise. Without enough exercise of some form, however, this breed is likely to develop behavioral problems such as digging and chewing.

Grooming Needs
  The long, silky coat may appear to be intimidating to groom, but it is easy to care for. Daily brushing is required to keep the coat free from dirt and tangles. Biewers should not be brushed when they are completely dry, as it will damage the hair. A spray bottle with water or a mix of water and dog conditioner will do the trick. Weekly baths are necessary to keep the coat in good condition, and some keep bath wipes on hand to clean the underside of the dog on a daily basis. While some owners elect to trim the dog all over, the only trimming that is absolutely necessary is around the ears (so they don't get weighed down), the rectum (for hygienic reasons) and under the pads of the feet.
  Regular tooth brushing and ear cleaning sessions should also be part of the grooming routine, as these practices promote good health and keep harmful bacteria from growing in the mouth or ear.

Children and Other Pets
  Biewer Terriers are not the best choice for people with toddlers and young children because these little dogs can be a little snappy if they feel threatened in any way. They are a good choice in households where the children are older and therefore know how to behave around dogs and more especially when they are interacting with such small dogs.
  They are known to be a little aggressive around other animals and this includes cats which is why they need to be well socialised from a young age although it would be a mistake to trust a Biewer around other smaller pets because of their "terrier" traits. They can be aggressive towards other dogs too, bearing in mind that Biewers have no idea of how small they really are. As such care has to be taken when out on a walk in a public place where other dogs are commonly being walked too.

Is the Biewer the Right Breed for you?
High Maintenance: Grooming should be performed often to keep the dog's coat in good shape. Professional trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Easy Training: The Biewer is known to listen to commands and obey its owner. Expect fewer repetitions when training this breed.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.


Read More

Thursday, August 4, 2016

Everything about your Yorkshire Terrier

Everything about your Yorkshire Terrier
  Yorkshire Terriers, affectionately known as "Yorkies," offer big personalities in a small package. Though members of the Toy Group, they are terriers by nature and are brave, determined, investigative and energetic. Named for the English county from which they originally hail, Yorkshire Terriers were used in the nineteenth century to catch rats in clothing mills. Surprisingly enough, in its beginnings, the Yorkie belonged to the working class, especially the weavers; in fact, facetious comments were often made about how the dogs' fine, silky coats were the ultimate product of the looms. Eventually, the breed left the workforce and became a companion animal to families of European high society.

Overview
  The Yorkie's terrier heritage can be seen in its sharp, intelligent expression, confident carriage, and compact body. It is a diminutive breed, however, now more noted for its long, silky hair, which should be fine, glossy, and perfectly straight. Color is a hallmark of this breed, with the blue a dark steel blue and the tan a clear tan. 
  The Yorkshire Terrier seems oblivious of its small size, ever eager for adventure and trouble. It is busy, inquisitive, bold, stubborn, and can be aggressive to strange dogs and small animals in other words, it is true to its terrier heritage. Although some tend to bark a lot, it can easily be taught not to do so.

Highlights
  • Yorkshire Terriers are known for being difficult to housetrain. Crate-training is recommended.
  • Yorkshire Terriers don't like the cold and are prone to chills, especially if they're damp or in damp areas.
  • Because of their small size, delicate structure, and terrier personality, Yorkshire Terrier generally aren't recommended for households with toddlers or small children.
  • Some Yorkshire Terriers can be "yappy," barking at every sound they hear. Early and consistent training can help. If you don't feel qualified to provide this training, consult a professional dog trainer.
  • Yorkshire Terriers can have delicate digestive systems and may be picky eaters. Eating problems can occur if your Yorkie has teeth or gum problems as well. If your Yorkie is showing discomfort when eating or after eating, take him to the vet for a checkup.
  • Yorkshire Terriers think they are big dogs and will try to pick a fight with a big dog if allowed. Be sure to keep your Yorkie under control. Even better, try to socialize your Yorkie at an early age by taking him to obedience classes.
  • Yorkies tend to retain their puppy teeth, especially the canines. When your puppy is around five months old, check his teeth often. If you notice that an adult tooth is trying to come in but the baby tooth is still there, take him to your vet. Retained baby teeth can cause the adult teeth to come in unevenly, which may contribute to tooth decay in later years.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Yorkshire Terrier has an inquisitive temperament — not to mention an impish sense of humor.
  • Yorkies have stunning blue-and-tan coats, but they’re not born that way. Puppies are black, and their coat color develops as they mature.
  • Despite their Toy status, these dogs love speed, action, and plenty of applause, so sports such as agility and rally are tailor-made for them.
  • Show dogs should weigh between four to seven pounds, but pet Yorkies can weigh as much as 12 to 15 pounds. A Yorkie who weighs less than four pounds is more prone to health problems, and more likely to suffer complications while under anesthesia.
  • Comparable Breeds: Cairn Terrier, Pomeranian

History
  The Yorkshire Terrier’s bold nature descends directly from his ancestors, which include the long-extinct Clydesdale Terrier and the Black-and-Tan Terrier. Scottish weavers who migrated south to England during tough economic times took their terriers with them to York, Manchester, and Leeds. The weavers ultimately crossbred their little terriers with local dogs, creating the small but feisty terrier known today for its shimmering cloak of blue and gold.
  Yorkies proved to be fine ratters in the English woolen mills, a skill they retain to this day. As they became more and more of a companion dog, breeders began to select for smaller size. The dog considered to be the foundation sire of the modern Yorkie, Huddersfield Ben, was born in 1865. At the time, the dogs were called Broken Haired Scotch Terriers or Toy Terriers, but by 1870, they were known as Yorkshire Terriers, after the region where they were first produced. It wasn’t long before these tough ratters morphed into domestic sidekicks for fashionable ladies, and began appearing at dog shows as “fancy terriers.”
  By 1872, Yorkshire Terriers had made their way to the U.S., where they quickly became upper-crust favorites and even political mascots. The Nixon family shared the White House with their beloved Yorkie, Pasha. The Yorkshire Terrier currently holds third place among the breeds registered by the American Kennel Club.

Personality
  Smart and self-assured, the Yorkshire Terrier is a combination of endearingly small size and adventurous terrier spirit. The breed displays a range of personalities. Some are cuddly and perky, wanting nothing more than to follow in their people's footsteps throughout the day. Others are mischievous, outgoing, and into everything.
  Set limits, and your Yorkie will be a wonderful companion, but if you spoil him, watch out! Start training when they're puppies, and you'll have much better luck than if you let them have their way and then try to correct bad habits.
  Like all dogs, Yorkies needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Yorkie will be a friendly, well-rounded dog.

Health
  Some Yorkies are prone to slipped stifle, bronchitis, eye infections, early tooth decay, poor tolerance of anesthetic, and delicate digestion. Exotic treats should be avoided. They sometimes suffer paralysis in the hindquarters caused by herniated disks and other problems of the spine. Falls or knocks can cause fractures of fragile bones. Abnormal skull formations in Yorkies measuring less than 8 inches (20 cm). Dams often have trouble delivering puppies and sometimes need to have cesareans. Be sure to feed Yorkies some type of dry food or bone to chew on to help keep their teeth clean and strong. They should get their teeth cleaned at the vet to keep them from falling out and creating infection.

"Teacup Yorkies"
  "Teacup" Yorkshire terriers is a term used to describe very small Yorkshire terriers. The AKC and other Kennel clubs do not acknowledge the Teacup as a variation of the breed or recognize it as a separate variety.Usually a teacup is any dog weighing less than 4 lbs (1.8 kg) when fully grown, when the actual breed standard is given at 7 lbs maximum. Breeding for "Teacup" is a controversial practice that is not encouraged by responsible breeders.
  A fashion pressure, they are bred to appeal with their puppy-like features, rather than bred to expel health issues. There is great risk to a dam (mother) during pregnancy who is too small, most of these litters are a result of cesarean sections and have a high mortality rate.
  There are many health issues associated with teacup dogs, such as luxating patella, heart disease, hydrocephalus, hypoglycemia, chronic pelvic pain syndrome, open fontanels and seizures.

Exercise
  These are active little dogs that need a daily walk. Play will take care of a lot of their exercise needs, however, as with all breeds, it will not fulfill their primal instinct to walk. Dogs that do not get to go on daily walks are more likely to display behavior problems. If your Yorkie zooms around the house like a speeding bullet, it is a sign that he needs to go on more/longer walks where he is made to heel beside or behind the human. Remember, in a dog’s mind, the leader leads the way. They will also enjoy a good romp in a safe, open area off lead, such as a large, fenced-in yard.

Care
  Yorkshire Terriers enjoy taking a walk with you or playing outside, but since they're very active while indoors, it doesn't take a lot of effort to keep them well exercised.
  In general, Yorkies are receptive to training, especially if it brings them attention for performing cute tricks or performing in agility or obedience trials. They can be difficult to housetrain, however, because their "accidents" are so small and easy to clean up that people let it slide. That's a mistake. It's better to show them where to go from the beginning and reward them for doing their business in the right place. When you make the effort, you can end up with a very well trained Yorkie indeed.
  They definitely are housedogs and don't tolerate extreme heat or cold well. Many people paper train their Yorkshire Terriers so they don't have to take them outdoors when the weather is too hot or cold.

Living Conditions
  The Yorkie is a good dog for apartment life. It is very active indoors and will do okay without a yard. The Yorkie is sensitive to the cold and prefers warm climates.

Grooming
  Yorkies are definitely not low-maintenance pooches. If you keep their coats show-dog long, they need to be brushed daily, with their long topknot tied up and kept out of their eyes. Most pet-owners opt for a “puppy” clip, with the facial hair left a bit longer than the hair on the body. Regular trips to a professional groomer are a must, along with weekly baths.
   On the plus side, Yorkies don’t shed much, possibly making them less problematic for some people with allergies. However, this varies from dog to dog, so don’t believe anyone who tells you that Yorkies are “non-allergenic.”
  The rest is basic care: Trim his nails every week or two. And brush his teeth regularly with a pet toothpaste for overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Because of their small size, Yorkies aren't suited to families with young children. Most breeders won't sell puppies to people whose children are younger than 5 or 6 years old. It's just too easy for children to drop them, step on them, or hold them too tightly.
  Yorkies can get along well with other pets, including cats, if socialized to them at an early age. They're bold in going after strange dogs, however, even those that outweigh them by a factor of ten, and protecting them from themselves becomes second nature to people with Yorkies.

Is this breed right for you?
  Yorkies make excellent companions for pet owners looking for a shed-free and allergen-free addition to their family. A Yorkie's compact size makes it a perfect apartment dog as long as exercise is part of the daily routine. This breed is sensitive to extreme temperatures, and leaving them outside unattended can cause severe health issues. Due to their independent and stubborn nature, this toy breed may not do well with small children, as most Yorkies enjoy personalized attention. Don't be overwhelmed by the long locks of AKC-bred Yorkies — regardless of hair length, this breed simply needs a weekly brushing to keep up its looks.

Did You Know?
  The feisty Yorkie was once coveted in England for its excellent ratter abilities. In the U.S., the diminutive breed became a popular lap dog for society ladies — and even set paw in the White House. President Nixon had a Yorkie named Pasha.

Notability
  • Show dogs: In 1997, Champion Ozmilion Mystification became the first Yorkie to win Best in Show at Crufts, the world's largest annual dog show.
  • Small dogs: Sylvia, a matchbox-sized Yorkshire Terrier owned by Arthur Marples of Blackburn, England, was the smallest dog in recorded history. The dog died in 1945 when she was two years old, at which point she stood 2.5 inches tall at the shoulder, measured 3.5 inches from nose tip to tail, and weighed 4 ounces.
  • War dogs: Smoky, a war dog and hero of World War II, was owned by William Wynne of Cleveland, Ohio. Wynne adopted Smoky while he was serving with the 5th Air Force in the Pacific.
  • White House dogs: Pasha, Tricia Nixon Cox's pet Yorkie, lived in the White House during the Richard Nixon presidency.
A dream day in the life of a Yorkshire Terrier
  Because they were bred as working dogs, Yorkies love a challenge and mental stimulation. This intelligent breed can pick up training techniques faster than most pooches and enjoys the special attention and bonding time of training sessions. Weighing in at an average of 5 to 7 pounds, Yorkies make first-rate travel companions, as they can fit in most purses or carriers. This tiny breed is very attentive to their human counterparts, and constant companionship is a must.


Read More

Which Small Dog Breed Is Right For Me?

Which Small Dog Breed Is Right For Me?
  Toy dogs, lapdogs and other tiny canines are incredibly popular as pets, as they can be comfortably housed in smaller apartments and homes and are of course, undeniably cute!
   If you’re thinking of getting a small dog because they’re cute, cuddly and quiet, you probably should think again; what they lack in stature, they often make up for in arrogance. Sure, small dogs are cute, and some of them look cuddly, but not all small dog breeds have meek personalities. Like people, small dog breeds come with different personalities, so before you pick up your small-framed dog, it’s a good idea to know exactly what you’re getting.
  Small dogs have been known to bite, in some cases more than larger dogs. Yet small dogs do have a certain advantage. For starters, they can go with you virtually anywhere. There are so many purse and bags out now in pet stores that you can literally take your dog with you everywhere you go.
  For the many city dwellers who still really want to share their lives with a canine companion, a small dog is the way to go.


1. Chihuahua
  • The Chihuahua comes in two varieties: long and smooth coat.
  • A graceful, alert, swift-moving compact little dog with saucy expression, and with terrier-like qualities of temperament.
  • Legend and history are rich in tales of the ancestors of the present Chihuahua. He is described as a popular pet, as well as a religious necessity.
  • Chihuahuas are tiny dogs that come in many different colors and markings, and can have either long or short coats, but they all have large, alert ears, big moist eyes, and huge personalities. Inside each little Chihuahua is a miniature king or queen ready to rule their realms, so they need to be taught what is acceptable in human kingdoms. They are intelligent and enthusiastic, so they usually don’t need extensive training.
  • More : Everything about your Chihuahua.

2. Yorkshire Terrier
  • The Yorkie became a fashionable pet in the late Victorian era.
  • That of a long-haired toy terrier whose blue and tan coat is parted on the face and from the base of the skull to the end of the tail and hangs evenly and quite straight down each side of body. The body is neat, compact and well proportioned. The dog's high head carriage and confident manner should give the appearance of vigor and self-importance.
  • The Yorkshire Terrier traces to the Waterside Terrier, a small longish-coated dog, bluish-gray in color, weighing between 6 and 20 pounds.
  • The Waterside Terrier was a breed formed by the crossing of the old rough-coated Black-and-Tan English Terrier  and the Paisley and Clydesdale Terriers. It was brought to Yorkshire by weavers who migrated from Scotland to England in the mid-19th century.They do not realize how small they are. Yorkies are easily adaptable to all surroundings, travel well and make suitable pets for many homes. Due to their small size, they require limited exercise, but need daily interaction with their people. Without strong leadership they tend to become bossy, especially if their owners allow them to get away with naughty behaviors - like yapping and pulling - that would never be acceptable in a larger dog.
  • More: Everything about your Yorkshire Terrier.

3. Papillon
  • The name Papillon means "Butterfly" in french.
  • The Papillon is a small, friendly, elegant toy dog of fine-boned structure, light, dainty and of lively action; distinguished from other breeds by its beautiful butterfly-like ears.
  • The dwarf spaniel of the 16th century, depicted in many paintings by the Masters of that era, is the dog that became known as the Papillon.
  • Although the Papillon owes its name and much of its breed development to the French, it was Spain and Italy that gave rise to its popularity.
  • Papillons are more robust than they look. They thrive in warm or cool climates, in the country or city, and are eager to join family fun. Papillons are athletic, fast, and versatile. They’re especially good in competitive agility trials, and are regular winners at the sport’s highest levels. For less ambitious owners, Papillons can be trained to do all kinds of tricks. Not particularly yappy for a small dog, requiring just routine grooming, and drop-dead adorable, Papillons are little dogs for all seasons and reasons.
  • More:  Everything about your Papillon.

4. Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
  • The Cavalier was featured on the hit HBO series, "Sex and the City", as Charlotte York's dog.
  • The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is an active, graceful, well-balanced toy spaniel, very gay and free in action; fearless and sporting in character, yet at the same time gentle and affectionate. It is this typical gay temperament, combined with true elegance and royal appearance which are of paramount importance in the breed. Natural appearance with no trimming, sculpting or artificial alteration is essential to breed type.
  • Dogs of the small spaniel-type have existed for centuries and the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel has documented its place among them.
  • The breed is adaptable in their need for exercise, happy with either sleeping on the couch or taking long walks. The Cavalier does not demand more than a loving home…and a fenced yard. Cavaliers are not reliable to obey commands if they are too busy chasing butterflies or birds, so a good fence is a must. Well-behaved children are happy companions, but parent must be careful that the kids are not too rough on their small charges.
  • More : Everything about your Cavalier King Charles Spaniel.

5. Dachshund
  • The Dachshund was developed in Germany more than 300 years ago to hund badgers.
  • Low to ground, long in body and short of leg, with robust muscular development; the skin is elastic and pliable without excessive wrinkling. Appearing neither crippled, awkward, nor cramped in his capacity for movement, the Dachshund is well-balanced with bold and confident head carriage and intelligent, alert facial expression. His hunting spirit, good nose, loud tongue and distinctive build make him well-suited for below-ground work and for beating the bush. His keen nose gives him an advantage over most other breeds for trailing. 
  • The Dachshund can be found in historical accounts dating back to the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries, when illustrations reflected badgers being hunted with dogs with elongated bodies, short legs and hound-type ears.
  • The dogs of medieval Europe were noted to have the tracking ability of hounds and the proportions and temperament of terriers, much needed to pursue their main quarry of badgers.
  • You should always choose a dog based on what he’s like, not what he looks like, and the Dachsie’s unique physical appeal easily becomes the focal point. Luckily, he is as much fun to live with as he is to look at. But because he was an eager hunter, he can be a bit stubborn and sometimes wonders why you’re not onboard with his plans. It’s hard to stay in a bad mood with a Dachsie around—his upbeat, curious, and friendly nature is contagious.
  • More: Everything about your Dachshund.

6. Havanese
  • The Havanese is the National Dog of Cuba and the country's only native breed.
  • The Havanese is a small, sturdy dog of immense charm. The native dog of Cuba, he is beloved as a friendly, intelligent and playful companion. He is slightly longer than tall, with a long, untrimmed, double coat. The Havanese has a short upper arm with moderate shoulder layback and a straight topline that rises slightly from the withers to the croup. The plumed tail is carried arched forward up over the back. The unique springy gait is a result of the breed's structure and playful, spirited personality. These characteristics of temperament, coat, structure and gait are essential to type.
  • The Havanese, new to the AKC, is an old breed with title to a colorful history. The Havanese is the National dog of Cuba and its only native breed. The dog's journey to Cuba most likely was aboard the trade ships sailing from the island of Tenerife chronicled in ship's logs of the early sixteenth century.
  • Cuban trade was highly restricted by the Spanish, for many years allowing Tenerife to be one of the only open ports, and it would appear these little dogs who had found their way into homes of Cuban aristocracy developed without much outside influence.
  • Basic obedience training will teach skills you will use on a daily basis. The time you spend in training, especially during the first year of your pet’s life, will be repaid by giving you a well-behaved companion that is bonded to you and your family for the rest of his life. Today Havanese are seen in many areas of dog activities and competitions that are sanctioned by the AKC. Havanese excel in all levels of competition in Obedience, Rally, Agility and Tracking as well as Conformation, and owners are enjoying the challenge. The Havanese are happy little athletes and loyal family companions. As therapy dogs Havanese bring smiles to faces in hospitals, nursing homes and libraries around the country. The Havanese is trainable and intelligent and possesses a naturally affectionate temperament, which making the breed an ideal family pet. Although a toy dog, they remain energetic and require some form of daily exercise.
  • More: Everything about your Havanese.

7. Maltese
  • The greeks erected tombs to their Maltese.
  • The Maltese is a toy dog covered from head to foot with a mantle of long, silky, white hair. He is gentle-mannered and affectionate, eager and sprightly in action, and, despite his size, possessed of the vigor needed for the satisfactory companion. Size: Weight under 7 pounds, with from 4 to 6 pounds preferred. Overall quality is to be favored over size.
  • The Maltese, the ancient dog of Malta, has been known as an aristocrat of the canine world for more than 28 centuries. Their place in antiquity is well documented.
  • The Greeks erected tombs to their Maltese, and from the ceramic art dating to the 5th century innumerable paintings of the little dog are evident.
  • These living artifacts from antiquity can charm the most jaded modern sensibility. Like the little aristocrats they are, Maltese love sitting in the lap of luxury. But they’re also feisty watchdogs and game agility competitors. Maltese are low-shedding, long-lived, and happy to make new friends of all ages. Sometimes stubborn and determined, they respond well to rewards-based training. Many pet owners trim Maltese in a “puppy clip” to reduce grooming time. Happily, the dog beneath the ’do is irresistibly cute. 
  • More : Everything about your Maltese.

8. Pekingese
  • Introduction of the Pekingese into the western World occurred as a result of looting of the Imperial Palace at Peking by the British in 1860.
  • The Pekingese is a well-balanced, compact dog of Chinese origin with a heavy front and lighter hindquarters. Its temperament is one of directness, independence and individuality. Its image is lionlike, implying courage, dignity, boldness and self-esteem rather than daintiness or delicacy.
  • The legend of the lion that fell in love with a marmoset is at the foundation of Pekingese lore. In order for him to be wedded to his lady-love, the lion begged the patron saint of the animals, Ah Chu, to reduce him to the size of a pigmy, but to let him retain his great lion heart and character.
  • The offspring of this union are said to be the dog of Fu Lin, or the Lion Dog of China.
  • An untrained dog, regardless of its size or its breed, can be a problem to its owner and to society in general. However if you get a puppy from a responsible breeder, you have a greater assurance that training and socialization began from the puppy’s early stages of awareness. Training should begin as early as possible and continue as the puppy grows into adulthood. Always reward your Pekingese with praise and encouragement when it has responded to a command, remembering that good habits are built upon positive reinforcement. It is advisable to take your puppy to training class as well as to public places to get it used to noises, different people and situations. Always be patient and convey to your puppy confidence, nonchalance and good manners, and it will adapt to your attitudes and make a well mannered pet throughout its life. Pekingese possess a regal dignity, intelligence and self-importance, making them good natured, opinionated and affectionate family companions. Their small size makes them a good choice for apartment life, but they are sometimes difficult to housebreak. They are relatively inactive indoors and do not need a yard, but enjoy walks.
  • More: Everything about your Pekingese.

9. Pomeranian
  • He Pomeranian is a member of the family of dogs knows unofficially as the "Spitz Group".
  • The Pomeranian is a compact, short-backed, active toy dog of Nordic descent. The double coat consists of a short dense undercoat with a profuse harsh-textured longer outer coat. The heavily plumed tail is one of the characteristics of the breed. It is set high and lies flat on the back. He is alert in character, exhibits intelligence in expression, is buoyant in deportment, and is inquisitive by nature. The Pomeranian is cocky, commanding, and animated as he gaits. He is sound in composition and action.
  • The Pomeranian descended from the Spitz family of dogs, the sled dogs of Iceland and Lapland.
  • The breed takes its name from the historical region of Pomerania that makes up the southern coast of the Baltic sea (now present day Germany and Poland), not because it originated there, but because this was most likely where it was bred down to size.
  • Because of their outgoing temperaments, they can be very good family dogs with the right training. ​Spritely and intelligent, Pomeranians are easily trained and make for great family pets. Poms are active, but can be thoroughly exercised with indoor play and short walks, so they’re happy both in the city and the suburbs. They will do well in certain dog sports, like agility and tracking, but at the end of the day, they’ll take comfort in curling up on your lap.
  • More : Everything about your Pomeranian.

10. Pug
  • The Pug is one of the oldest breed of dog; has flourished since before 400 BC.
  • Symmetry and general appearance are decidedly square and cobby. A lean, leggy Pug and a dog with short legs and a long body are equally objectionable.
  • The truth of how the Pug came into existence is shrouded in mystery, but he has been true to his breed down through the ages since before 400 B.C. Authorities agree that he is of Oriental origin with some basic similarities to the Pekingese.
  • China is the earliest known source for the breed, where he was the pet of the Buddhist monasteries in Tibet. The breed next appeared in Japan and then in Europe, where it became the favorite for various royal courts.
  • Basic obedience training is a must for all dogs. Learning a simple “stay,” “sit,” or “come” may save your dog’s life. Many kennel clubs provide obedience classes. You and your dog will enjoy them. Many Pugs compete in AKC obedience trials, dog shows, and agility trials. The Pug’s reason for living is to be near their people and to please them, and their sturdiness makes them a family favorite. They are comfortable in small apartments because they need minimal exercise, but the breed can adapt easily to all situations.
  • More: Everything about your Pug.

11. Shih Tzu

  • The Legend of the Shih Tzu has come to us from documents, paintings, and objects d'art dating from AD 624.
  • The Shih Tzu is a sturdy, lively, alert toy dog with long flowing double coat. Befitting his noble Chinese ancestry as a highly valued, prized companion and palace pet, the Shih Tzu is proud of bearing, has a distinctively arrogant carriage with head well up and tail curved over the back. Although there has always been considerable size variation, the Shih Tzu must be compact, solid, carrying good weight and substance. Even though a toy dog, the Shih Tzu must be subject to the same requirements of soundness and structure prescribed for all breeds, and any deviation from the ideal described in the standard should be penalized to the extent of the deviation.
  • The exact date of origin of the Shih Tzu is not known, but evidence of its existence has come to us from documents, paintings and objets d'art dating from A. D. 624. During the Tang Dynasty (618 to 907 A.D.), the King of Viqur gave the Chinese court a pair of dogs said to have come from the Fu Lin (assumed to be the Byzantine Empire).
  • Another theory of their introduction to China was recorded in the mid-17th century when dogs were brought from Tibet to the Chinese court. These dogs were bred in the Forbidden City of Peking.
  • Beyond regular weekly grooming, the occasional bath will keep them clean and looking their best. Grooming can be a wonderful bonding experience for you and your pet. Their strong fast-growing nails should be trimmed regularly with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting and cracking. Their ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris which can result in an infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly.
  • More : Everything about your Shih Tzu.

12. Poodle
  • The denominations standard, miniature, and toy are used tot describe size only. All the Poodles are one breed, governed by the same standard.
  • That of a very active, intelligent and elegant-appearing dog, squarely built, well proportioned, moving soundly and carrying himself proudly. Properly clipped in the traditional fashion and carefully groomed, the Poodle has about him an air of distinction and dignity peculiar to himself.
  • The Poodle is supposed to have originated in Germany, where it is known as the Pudel or Canis Familiaris Aquatius.
  • However, for years it has been regarded as the national dog of France, where is was commonly used as a retriever as well as, the Caniche, which is derived from chien canard or duck dog. Doubtless the English word "poodle" comes from the German pudel or pudelin, meaning to splash in the water.
  • There’s the old stereotype of Poodles as a foofy velvet-pillow dogs looking down their long noses at us. Not true. Poodles are eager-to-please, highly trainable “real dogs.” They like to work closely with their humans and can master all kinds of tricks and dog sports. The Standard, with his greater size and strength, is the best athlete of the Poodle family, but all Poodles can be trained with great success. The Miniature can be shy around strangers; the Standard tends to be more outgoing.
  • More : Everything about your Poodle.

   Small dogs come from a variety of AKC groups, so there is a perfect breed for every lover of little dogs with regards to personality, activity level and coat type. Keep in mind, small dogs are not just lapdogs – many of them are tough as nails. Smaller dogs don’t necessarily need to work off loads of energy, so they are quite suitable for apartment life. But not all small dogs live to be lap warmers! Certain breeds like Dachshunds or small terriers would also love country life and the opportunity to run around on a farm. If your family includes very young children, ensure that your small dog has a space to get away from the kids, or reconsider your choice of breed. Many Toy breeds are too delicate to compete with a boisterous family of young children and need to live in a quieter environment.
Read More