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Showing posts with label working group. Show all posts
Showing posts with label working group. Show all posts

Wednesday, June 27, 2018

Everything about your Anatolian Shepherd

Everything about your Anatolian Shepherd
  The Anatolian Shepherd breed are a Mastiff dog bred originally in Turkey.
This dog was originally used as a guard dog for nomadic farmers and used to extremes of temperatures.
  In both Turkey and Australia, it has been found these dogs work in very well with goats and sheep. Farmers hold them in high regards. Although tough and hardy, they get on well with other dogs, not always good domestic pets, as their independent natures and devotion to their duties as a herder is such that they have been known to attack their owners if the dog thought one of the herd was to be hurt.

Overview
  The Anatolian Shepherd Dog is a hard worker. Amazing guard dogs, you’ll find that this breed is very loyal to its owner. Easygoing and calm, the Anatolian loves kids and will happily spend hours playing with them. It’s been known under many names: Anatolian Karabash Dog, the Kangal Dog, the Turkish Guard Dog, the Turkish Sheepdog and the Karabash Dog. Even though the Anatolian is highly intelligent and obedient when trained, it is not a dog for everyone. Since this breed is powerful and has great endurance, it needs plenty of daily exercise.
  The Anatolian Shepherd Dog needs a large home with lots of space, and loves to be outside. A wonderful companion, this dog has many qualities that make it a great pet. Read on to learn more about this fascinating breed.

Highlights
  • It is critical that the Anatolian Shepherd receive proper socialization and training so that he can learn what is normal and what is a threat. Untrained and unsocialized Anatolian Shepherds can become overprotective, aggressive, and uncontrollable.
  • Anatolian Shepherds are independent and less eager to please than other breeds. They won't not necessarily wait for instructions but will act if they think their "flock" is threatened.
  • As guardians of their territory, some can be barkers, especially at night.
  • Some Anatolians can be dog-aggressive.
  • Expect a challenge for leadership at some point with the Anatolian Shepherd. Owners must be willing to exercise pack authority consistently and kindly.
  • Because they are so large, expect high costs for boarding, medications, and food purchases; you'll also need a large vehicle for them.
Other Quick Facts

  • Once you’ve earned an Anatolian’s loyalty, he will guard you and whatever you have on your property with his life.  
  • In Namibia, Anatolians guard livestock from cheetahs, protecting the livestock from predation and the cheetahs from being shot by angry farmers.
  • The Anatolian’s double coat sheds heavily. Some people have given up the dogs to rescue groups because of it.
  • All color patterns and markings are acceptable, including white, fawn, brindle, or fawn with a black mask. Often, his coloration or markings echo that of the livestock he is guarding to help him blend in.
Breed standards
AKC group: Working dog
UKC group: Guardian Dog
Average lifespan: 13-15 years
Average size:80 to 150 pounds
Coat appearance: short, rough
Coloration: Red, Brown, White, Cream
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles and seniors, houses with yards, farmers, rural/farm areas, guard duty
Temperament: Easygoing, protective, loyal, devoted
Comparable Breeds: Great Pyrenees, Kuvasz

History
  The Anatolian Shepherd Dog is named for his homeland of Anatolia in the central part of Turkey, where he is still a point of pride .
  It's thought that the working ancestors of the breed date back 6,000 years. Wandering tribes from central Asia probably brought the first mastiff-type dogs into the area that is now Turkey, and sight hound breeds from southern regions contributed to the Anatolian's agility, long legs, and aloof character.
  Due to the climate and terrain of the area, the local population developed a nomadic way of life, dependent on flocks of sheep and goats. The protection of those flocks, and of the shepherds themselves, was the job of the large dogs who traveled with them.
The dogs became known as coban kopegi, Turkish for "shepherd dog." The dogs stayed with the animals night and day, and they had to be swift enough to move quickly from one end of a widely scattered flock to the other. They also had to be large and strong enough to stand up to predators.
  Severe culling and breeding of only the best workers resulted in a dog with a uniform type, stable temperament, and excellent working ability. Dogs were often not fed once they were past puppyhood. They lived by killing gophers and other small animals, though never injuring their flock. They were fitted with iron collars with long spikes to protect their throats from assailants. You can still find working dogs wearing these collars in Turkey today.
Anatolian Shepherds got their most enthusiastic introduction in the U.S. in the 1970s, although prior to that the Turkish government had given Anatolians to the U.S. Department of Agriculture as a gift, for experimental work as guardians of flocks.
  In 1970, the Anatolian Shepherd Dog Club of America was formed at the urging of Robert Ballard, a U.S. naval officer who had become fascinated by the dogs while in Turkey, and who began to breed them once back in California. The breed entered the American Kennel Club Miscellaneous Class in 1996. It moved to the Working Group in August 1998.

Personality
  The Anatolian Shepherd dog was developed to be independent and forceful, responsible for guarding its master's flocks without human assistance or direction. These traits make it challenging as a pet; owners of dogs of this breed must socialize the dogs to turn them into appropriate companions. They are intelligent and can learn quickly but might choose not to obey.
  According to Turkish shepherds, three Anatolian Shepherd Dogs are capable of overcoming a pack of wolves and injuring one or two of them. These dogs like to roam, as they were bred to travel with their herd and to leave the herd to go hunt for predators before the predators could attack the flock. Therefore, it is recommended to microchip and tag pets.
  The Anatolian Shepherd is not recommended for life in small quarters. They do well with other animals, including cats if they are introduced while still a puppy and have their own space. They mature between 18–30 months. Due to their history, both puppies and adults seem to have little interest in fetching. Rather, they prefer to run and sometimes swim.
Presence of some Anatolian shepherd genes in Alaskan huskies positively correlates with husky work ethic.

Health
The average life span of the Anatolian Shepherd Dog is 10 to 13 years. Breed health concerns may include cancer, ear infections, entropion, hip dysplasia and hypothyroidism. Otherwise, they appear to be healthy, hearty dogs.

Care
  The Anatolian Shepherd requires minimal coat care, comprising of just once a week brushing session to clear the dear hair. A brisk run or long walk is all it requires for a daily exercise regimen. It is also fond of socializing with its family, but can live outdoors in cool and temperate climates.

Living Conditions
Anatolian Shepherds are not recommended for apartment life. They are relatively inactive indoors and will do best with at least a large yard. This breed is very suspicious of strangers, and it is therefore necessary to provide a secure, fenced yard.

Training
  Not for the first-time owner, Anatolian Shepherds need a confident leader. This breed is stubborn and dominant, and once this dog knows who is in charge, training should go smoothly. Trainers need a strong and consistent hand to establish leadership. If not, don’t be surprised if your Anatolian takes over your household.
  When it comes to a dog’s instincts, you can’t train it out of them. This holds true for the Anatolian Shepherd Dog’s innate sense to protect its family, which includes people and other animals in the household. You can train your dog to limit these behaviors, but don’t expect these habits to desist. Instead, you can use these protective instincts to protect your household and everyone in the family. Anatolians will be wary of strangers, so ensure that visitors to your home are introduced to the dog properly.

Activity Requirements
  This large breed should not live in an apartment. Though Anatolian Shepherds need less exercise than other breeds of comparable size, they still need plenty of walks and daily time to run. Organized games of catch or fetch don't interest this breed. If they don't have livestock to work with, their desire to work can be satisfied by pulling a sled or cart, or engaging in tracking activities.
  Farms are the ideal living space, as they have an inborn desire to work and protect flocks, and benefit from the open space to run. Families with small children should think twice about adopting an Anatolian. While they will bond well with members of their own family, they often don't react well to children they do not know.

Grooming
  This is a double-coated breed that sheds heavily. Grooming the Anatolian requires at least weekly brushing -- daily during the twice yearly shedding season -- and dogs with a thick, plush coat may need to be brushed more frequently. That comes as an unpleasant surprise to some people. It’s even one of the reasons owners give up Anatolians to rescue. On the plus side, baths are rarely necessary. Brushing usually keeps the coat clean, and the dog has little odor.
  Anatolians have drop ears, so they can be prone to ear infections. Keep the ears clean and dry to prevent bacterial or yeast infections from taking hold.
The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  The Anatolian Shepherd is loving with his family, including the children, with whom he's calm and protective. But because of his large size, he's probably better suited to families with older children. He's unlikely to respect young children as leaders, so all interactions between the Anatolian and children should be supervised by responsible adults.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  The best chance of the Anatolian Shepherd accepting other dogs and pets is to raise him with them from puppyhood. As he grows, he'll naturally accept them as part of his "flock."

Did You Know?
While his protective nature is attractive, the Anatolian Shepherd is not an appropriate choice for a novice dog owner. He needs someone who can guide him with kind, firm, consistent training, never force or cruelty. He is an independent thinker but responds well to routine.

Famous Anatolian Shepherd Dogs
Butch, from Cats & Dogs 
  • Duke- animal ambassador at the San Diego Zoo.
  • Bart, from Kate and Leopold
  • Butch, from Cats & Dogs and Cats & Dogs: The Revenge of Kitty Galore
  • Corky, from Road Trip
  • Marlowe, from Simon & Simon
  • Sam, from Shooter
  • Haatchi, a three-legged Anatolian Shepherd who has formed a special bond with Owen, a 7-year-old boy suffering from Schwartz-Jampel syndrome. Haatchi and Owen were the winners in the "Friends for Life" category at Crufts in 2013. Haatchi was also awarded The Braveheart Honour in the ceremony of The British Animal Honours in April 2013 (Haatchi the dog), and an Endal Medal.
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Monday, December 11, 2017

Everything about your Chinese Foo

Everything about your Chinese Foo
  Named after the Chinese city Foochow , the Chinese Foo is an extant breed of Spitz-type dogsthat come with a compact, square-shaped body, broad head, pricked ears, deep chest, muscular loin, and a tail that is carried over their back.
  This Chinese breed is a loyal and lively dog that makes a loving companion. Although never confirmed, it is said that the Chinese Foo was a cross between the Chow Chow and European hunting dogs. Let's dig into the Chinese Foo Dog breed information and facts you need to know when determining if this is the dog for you.

Overviews
  The Chinese Foo Dog is found in three sizes: toy Chinese Foo Dog (10 inches or less), miniature Chinese Foo Dog (over 10 inches up to and including 15), and standard Chinese Foo Dog (over 15 inches). The Chinese Foo Dog breed can also be classified by weight, with small dogs weighing up to 20 pounds, medium dogs weighing 21 to 50 pounds, and large dogs weighing over 50 pounds. A typical Nordic-type dog, the head is broad, the ears are upright, and the eyes are dark. These dogs often have a dark blue tongue. The tail is set high and curled over the back. Some breeders dock the tail.
  The Chinese Foo Dog coat is double, with a thick, dense undercoat and an outer coat that is hard and stands away from the body. With the heavy coat, grooming is very much a part of life with these dogs. This breed needs brushing at least twice a week, although when the heavy undercoat is shed, daily brushing will help keep the hair in the house somewhat under control.
   Foo Dogs are moderately active. They enjoy a walk morning and evening and can be quite playful. Chinese Foo Dogs are appealing to the sense of humor and continue to be playful on into adulthood. One of the original uses of Chinese Foo Dog is as guard dogs, and the breed continues to be wary of strangers. However, unlike some other watchful breeds, this one does not bark unless there is a reason to do so.
  Early socialization and training is important, and teaching the dog to accept regular grooming should be a part of that. The Chinese Foo Dog is an affectionate, intelligent, playful breed. They are good with well-behaved children but will not tolerate disrespectful behavior. The breed is good with other dogs, although interactions with other pets should be supervised. This is a healthy breed with few problems.

Breed standards
AKC group: Working
UKC group: Hunting
Average lifespan: 10-12 years
Average size: 20 lb
Coat appearance:Thick, hard, weather-resistant, double-coated; straight-haired, coarse outer coat; soft, dense undercoat
Coloration: Blue, black, brown and blue, black and tan, red, orange, gray/silver, sable, cream, fawn
Hypoallergenic: No
Lion’s mane on long-haired version
Courageous nature
Guarding ability
Gentleness with children

History
  The Chinese Foo Dog is thought to be a mix between the ancient Chow Chow and European hunting dogs, or a link between the Chinese Wolf and the Chow. It is an ancient breed, possibly named after the Chinese city of Fuzhou . The Standard Chinese Foo Dog was originally bred to guard Buddhist temples. They were also used for hunting and sledding.
  Until the Chinese Foo Dog’s numbers began to increase in the 19th century, it was rare enough to be thought extinct. Today, the breed is still rare but growing in popularity in the U.S., as seen by the creation of the Chinese Foo Dog Club of America.

Temperament
  The Chinese Foo is an independent and highly intelligent breed, so it is perfect for the owner who does not want an overly attached pet. However, this independence often leads to a proud and even stubborn personality, which can make training challenging. The dog also has a tendency to be dominating, although not aggressive. Even though the Chinese Foo is big, the dog can stay calm when it is indoors, so it can be a good apartment dog.

Health
  They are immune to major health problems. Some members, however, are susceptible to cryptorchidism as well as problems with their bones and joints.

Living Conditions
  The Chinese Foo Dog will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. It is relatively inactive indoors and a small yard is sufficient. Sensitive to heat, can live in or outdoors in cooler weather.

Training
  Since the Chinese Foo can sometimes be stubborn and domineering, training could become a challenge for first-time dog owners.
  The Chinese Foo is not a recommended breed for a person or family getting their first dog. This pup can be domineering and a challenge to train. Even though the crossbreed is not vicious, socialization needs to be taken slowly and carefully, especially with young children and other pets. Although the dog is difficult to train, it does take to the training well once it learns. In many cases, it will make sense to seek out formal dog obedience training with this pup.


Ideal Human Companion
  • Apartment dwellers (Toy and Miniature; the Standard can be kept in a smaller space as well as long as it gets extra exercise)
  • Those looking for a good guard dog
  • Experienced dog owners
  • Those who would love a toy version of their Chow Chow
Activity Level
  The Chinese Foo is athletic and active. It needs a lot of exercise, especially when still young. A daily walk is an absolute must. Sports such as Frisbee, running and fetch are advised as well.


Exercise
  Foo Dogs need a moderate amount of daily activity including regular walking and jogging. Recreational sports such as fetching a ball and catching the Frisbee will give them a great workout. Since they are easily exhausted during warm weather, make sure that they are not overly exercised.

Grooming
  The Chinese Foo has an amazingly beautiful, thick coat of fur. In fact, the coat is so thick you can just throw that dog brush in the trash. You are going to need a long tooth comb to get at this hair. The dog should be brushed once or twice a week. Baths can be a battle with all the hair, so once a month is usually good enough and using a professional groomer is usually more than worth the cost. 

What They Are Like to Live With Chinese Foo Dog
  The Chinese Foo Dog lives up to its leonine appearance. They are bold, courageous, and king of the castle. They can also make friendly family dogs as long as they are socialized early.
  Chinese Foo Dogs are known for their gentleness with children and make quiet and dignified companions. The Chinese Foo Dog can be overly independent, so consider a different breed if you’re looking for a constant, interactive pet.
  The Chinese Foo Dog needs regular daily exercise and brushing. Be prepared to have fur everywhere in your living space.


Things You Should Know
  The Chinese Foo Dog is also known as the Chinese Celestial Dog, the Chinese Dragon Dog, and the Happiness Dog. Its ancient skill as a guard dog is still prevalent. This means you will have a well-guarded home, but it also means a dog who may be averse to strangers. This is a stubborn breed, so early obedience training is a must for all three versions.

  The Chinese Foo Dog has no known health issues.




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Thursday, November 9, 2017

Everything about your German Pinscher

Everything about your German Pinscher
  The German Pinscher dog breed is muscular and agile, powerful yet graceful. A medium-sized dog with an elegant appearance, he’s admired as much for his beauty as for his intelligence. He’s a working breed and guard dog, and a devoted and loving family dog.
  In need of a strong leader, the assertive and determined German Pinscher is easy to train and intelligent. He's a strong watchdog, has lots of energy, and he's devoted to his family as long as small mammals aren't included. The German Pinscher remains playful well into adulthood and his smooth coat is easy to groom.

Overview
  The German Pinscher, also known at various times as the Deutscher Pinscher, the Reh Pinscher, the Medium Pinscher and the Standard Pinscher, is a medium-sized, energetic and watchful dog that makes an excellent guardian and family companion. The breed originated in Germany, where it was first recognized as a distinct breed in 1879. The first formal breed standard for the German Pinscher was written in 1884. Its name derives from the Germanic form of the French word “pincer,” which means “to seize” or “to nip”. The German Pinscher is an intense and proficient vermin-controller and rodent-killer. It was admitted into the American Kennel Club as a member of the Working Group in 2001.

Highlights
  • The German Pinscher is not recommended for homes with children under the age of nine.
  • A working breed, he needs daily exercise and cannot be left untrained or unexercised. Expect a healthy amount of exercise each day to curb negative behaviors.
  • The German Pinscher can fare all right in an apartment as long as he's walked at least twice a day. However, he's better suited to a home that has a fenced yard.
  • He has a strong prey drive and will chase anything that he deems worth chasing. He should be kept on lead while not in a secured area, and fences should be secure enough that he can't slip through them.
  • The German Pinscher is a strong-willed breed that needs a consistent and firm owner. He has been known to take over a home if rules are not set when he's young. With training and consistency, however, the German Pinscher will learn quickly and well.
  • Naturally suspicious of strangers, the German Pinschers makes an excellent guard dog. By the same token, he needs to be socialized from a young age to prevent the development of aggressive behavior.
  • The German Pinscher enjoys jumping up to greet loved ones, but proper training can correct this trait.
  • He will alert bark and he has a strong, loud voice, but he won't bark unnecessarily.
  • He thrives when he's part of a family and can participate in family activities. He isn't a breed who can live outside, and he's unhappy being forgotten while life is busy.
  • The German Pinscher can become destructive when he's bored. He's also known for his ability to gut toys at an alarming rate.

Other Quick Facts
  • When you look at a German Pinscher, you see a medium-size dog with a strong, square build; a powerful, elongated head that resembles a blunt wedge; medium-size dark oval eyes with a sharp and alert expression; and ears that are erect if cropped or V-shaped with a folding pleat if uncropped. The tail is docked.
  • The German Pinscher’s short, smooth coat lies close to the body and comes in several colors: Isabella (fawn); various shades of red, including stag, which is red intermingled with black hairs; and black or blue with red or tan markings.
Breed standards
AKC group: Working
UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan: 12 to 14 years
Average size: 25 to 45 pounds
Coat appearance: Dense and Short
Coloration: They come in a variety of colors including red, stag red – red with black hairs intermingled in the coat – and Isabella, which is a bay or fawn color; black or blue with red or tan markings. 
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: experienced dog owners, active singles, active families, house with a yard
Comparable Breeds: Doberman Pinscher, Miniature Pinscher

History
  Originally developed to eradicate vermin, the German Pinscher originated in Germany somewhere between the late 1700s and late 1800s. There is no clear evidence of when he was developed, but a painting that dates from about 1780 portrays a dog similar in appearance to the German Pinscher.
  He was a foundation dog for many breeds, including the Doberman Pinscher and the Miniature Pinscher. The breed was founded by the Rat Pinscher, also known as the Rat Catcher or the Great Ratter, a breed that became extinct in the early 1800s. The German Pinscher was recognized as a breed in 1895.
  During the World Wars, the German Pinscher came close to extinction. Two breed colors did in fact die out: the pure black and the salt-and-pepper. After World War II, a West German named Werner Jung began breeding German Pinschers and saved the breed. German Pinschers were first imported into the United States in the late 1970s.
  In 2004, the German Pinscher competed at its first Westminster Kennel Club. The Best of Breed winner was Ch. Windamir Hunter des Charmettes with the Best of Opposite Sex to Best of Breed won by Ch. Windamir's Chosen One.


Extinct varieties
  There are several now-extinct varieties of the German Pinscher:
  • Schweizer Pinscher (also called the Jonataler Pinscher, Pfisterlinge, Silberpinsch, Swiss Salt and Pepper Pinscher, Swiss Shorthair Pinscher)
  • Seidenpinscher (also called the German Silky Pinscher, Silky Pinscher)
  Some of these may have recently been re-formed from the German Pinscher and marketed as rare breeds for those seeking unique pets.

Personality
  Halfway in size between a Miniature Pinscher and a Doberman Pinscher, the German Pinscher is a medium-sized powerhouse – fearless, imposing, and completely devoted to the family he loves. German Pinschers have big personalities and tend to believe the world revolves around them. They are fiercely protective of their territory and family, and despite their medium size make excellent guard dogs and can be counted on to take down an intruder with shocking efficiency. 
 This breed is quite dependent upon human companionship and will want to be included in every aspect of home life, from work to play to sharing the bed. German Pinschers are an excellent choice for experienced dog owners and for people who lead an active lifestyle.

Health Problems
  Because the German Pinscher has a fairly small gene pool there are risks for a number of inherited conditions. Some of the health problems to which this breed is prone include hip and elbow dysplasia, cataracts, thyroid disorders, cardiac disease, and von Willebrand disease. Responsible breeding practices are the best way to prevent the passing of these conditions.

Care
  The grooming requirements for the German Pinscher is fairly simple: the occasional brushing and wash. German Pinschers love to be involved in family activities and hate to be left in the kennel or alone. They are very dedicated to their family, their devotion going to the extent of supervising housework, providing entertainment in the evenings, guiding gardening, and sharing their master’s bed.
  As the dog is full of energy it should be given good mental and physical exercises or it can get bored and frustrated.

Living Conditions
  The German Pinscher will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. It should have a tightly fenced-in yard. This breed will run off chasing anything that moves quickly.

Trainability
  Pinschers have an independent streak in them, but are generally easy to train. They possess a strong desire to please and pick up on new tasks quickly when rewarded with affection and treats. Consistency is important, as their independent side makes them prone to testing boundaries. Pinschers can be incredibly manipulative, their faces often look like they are smiling, and their eyes are quite expressive. The soft at heart can be easily walked all over by a Pinscher. But once leadership is established and basic obedience is mastered, however, German Pinschers can excel in advanced obedience, tracking and agility activities.
  German Pinschers, despite their imposing look, make excellent service and therapy dogs. Individual dogs with steady temperaments enjoy working with the elderly and infirm, especially if it involves having lots of attention and treats lavished upon them.

Exercise 
  The German Pinscher requires a lot of exercise. This breed needs to be taken on a daily, brisk, long walk or jog where the dog is made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as instinct tells a dog the leader leads the way and that leader needs to be the human. They will enjoy running alongside you when you bicycle, playing in the yard, or a walk around the block.

Grooming Needs
  The German Pinscher is low-maintenance when it comes to grooming. Weekly brushing with a mitt will remove dead hair, and they only need to be bathed when they start giving off a doggie odor. Active Pinscher will wear their toenails down naturally, but they do not, monthly trimmings will be in order. If the nails click on hard floors, it's time for a trim.
  Check the ears on a weekly basis for signs of redness, irritation, or wax buildup. Cleanse with a veterinarian-approved solution and a cotton ball. Brush the dog's teeth at least once per week to help keep bad breath in check, and keep teeth and gums healthy.

Children And Other Pets
  The German Pinscher usually does well with children if he's brought up with them from puppyhood. But because of his assertive nature, he does best with older children, preferably those over the age of nine. An older Pinscher who's unfamiliar with children will probably do best in a home with kids who are mature enough to interact with him properly.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should be left unsupervised with a child.
  The same holds true for the German Pinscher's attitude toward some kinds of pets; he does best if he's been raised with them, or at least socialized to them when he's still young. But remember that he was developed to hunt and kill vermin. He's got a high prey drive that's hardwired, and no amount of training will keep him from going after a pet rat. He's not a good match with small mammals.

Is the German Pinscher the Right Breed for you?
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep. Little to no trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Easy Training: The German Pinscher is known to listen to commands and obey its owner. Expect fewer repetitions when training this breed.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Good for New Owners: This breed is well suited for those who have little experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  The German Pinscher played a role in the ancestry of the Doberman and other Pinscher breeds and is closely associated with the Standard Schnauzer. He is smaller than the Doberman but bigger than the Miniature Pinscher.



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Wednesday, September 3, 2014

Everything about your Newfoundland

 Everything about your Newfoundland
  The Newfoundland is a large, strong dog breed from — wait for it — Newfoundland. He was originally used as a working dog to pull nets for fishermen and haul wood from the forest. He is a capable and hardworking dog, well suited to work on land or water. He is a strong swimmer and equally strong "pack horse." Sweet-natured and responsive, he makes a wonderful family companion as well.
  Roundly considered to be one of the most intelligent dog breeds in the world, the Newfoundlander is an ideal companion. In addition to being an excellent pack carrier and guardian for children and families, the Newfie is unmatched at water rescues. In modern times, it is brought along for hiking and camping expeditions, but is also still held in high esteem by rural families in need of a working dog.

Overview
  Surely you remember Nana, the fictional Newfoundland employed as a nanny by the Darling family in Peter Pan? Sweet-natured Nana was first introduced to the public by Scottish novelist and playwright J. M. Barrie in his 1904 play, Peter Pan, which later became the well-loved kids' story we know today.
  It's true that Barrie's fictional account of Nana as a round-the-clock babysitter stretches reality a bit. However, there is truth in the author's characterization of the dog.
  The Newfoundland really is a sweet dog who loves children. He's naturally gentle and friendly with them, as well as protective. Fans of this breed say the Newfoundland really is a natural-born babysitter.
  Originating in Newfoundland, Canada, located on the northeastern shore of that country, the Newfoundland, affectionately nicknamed "Newfie," shares a birthplace with the popular Labrador Retriever. The breeds are similar in character, sharing a desire to please, intelligence, a strong work ethic, friendliness, adaptability and versatility.
  The Newfoundland is a giant breed (about 100 pounds). Though relatively placid, he still needs daily exercise to keep fit.
  Neat freaks need not consider the Newfoundland because his long, heavy coat is a mud-burr-dirt magnet. He is especially skilled at tracking dirt and debris throughout the house. You'll need to keep up with quite a bit of grooming to minimize the damage. And he drools — a lot.
But when it comes to training, you'll find the Newfoundland is an A student. He learns quickly and there is little this dog can't do. Training should begin early because the breed gets big quickly and it can be tough to haul a 100-pound pooch off the couch.
  All dogs have the potential for heroism, but it seems to be a hardwired into this naturally strong swimmer. There are many accounts of Newfoundlands rescuing people from the cold waters of the Atlantic following a shipwreck or plucking children from icy deep water — just in time.
  Regardless of the purpose of the Newfoundland in your life, be it worker or companion, he will no doubt capture your heart.

Highlights
  • The Newfoundland is a big dog when full grown. Though mellow, he's not your basic one-bedroom apartment dog and would probably be happier in a more spacious setting.
  • He has has a strong work ethic, needs exercise, and mental stimulation. Ongoing training and dog sports are a perfect outlet for his working abilities.
  • If you can't stand dog slobber, the Newfoundland is not for you. This breed drools. A lot.
  • To keep the Newfoundland's thick coat looking great, he needs regular grooming. You can do it yourself, which is time consuming, or you can hire a professional groomer, which can be expensive.
  • The Newfoundland thrives in cool climates, though he can adapt to living in warmer climates. To protect him from heat stroke, keep him near air conditioning or fans when it's really hot.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a shelter dog, a rescue group, or a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • Newfoundlands make excellent lifeguards and can bring a drowning adult ashore.
  • When living with a Newfie, drool is a part of life. Don’t believe breeders who claim to breed for “dry-mouthed” dogs.
Breed standards
  • AKC group: Working
  • UKC group: Guardian Dog
  • Average lifespan:  8 - 10 years
  • Average size:  99 - 155 pounds
  • Coat appearance: Thick, long, coarse
  • Coloration: Black, gray, brown and white
  • Hypoallergenic: No
  • Other identifiers: Broad-bodied; muscular, webbed feet; drooping jowls
  • Possible alterations: No
  • Comparable Breeds: Labrador Retriever, Great Pyrenees
History
  The Newfoundland comes from the Canadian province of the same name and worked alongside the fishermen of the area. Although originating in Canada, the details are sketchy.
There are three theories of how the Newfoundland came to be, though as is the case with most breeds, it's hard to validate. The first is that the Newfoundland is a cross between the Tibetan Mastiff and the now-extinct American Black Wolf. Through the pairings of those two animals, the Newfoundland eventually evolved.
  Another school of thought is that Vikings left the dogs when they visited the New World in 1000 A.D. and these dogs interbred and were eventually bred with wolves native to Eastern Canada.
  The third theory is that the Newfoundland is the result of many European breeds cross bred around the 15th and 16th centuries, among them the Pyrenean Sheep Dogs, Mastiffs, and Portuguese Water Dogs
  What is known is that sometime in the late 18th century, Sir Joseph Banks, an English botanist, acquired several Newfoundlands and in 1775 George Cartwright named them. In the late 1800s, another fan, Professor Albert Heim of Switzerland identified and described the breed.
  But the existence of the Newfie, as the breed is sometimes called, was in jeopardy until then. In the 1780s, the breed was almost wiped out because of government-imposed restrictions mandating that Canadian families had to pay taxes on the one dog they were allowed to keep.
One person who contributed to the Newfoundland's resurgence was Sir Edwin Landseer (1802-1873), who liked to include the Newfoundland in his paintings. The white and black variety of the Newfoundland was named Landseer in his honor.
  But the future of the breed was truly solidified when the Honorable Harold MacPherson (1884-1963), governor of Newfoundland, made the dog his breed of choice.
  In 1860, the first Newfoundland was shown in England. The breed was first registered with the American Kennel Club in 1879 and the first American Newfoundland champion was titled in 1883.

Personality
  The Newfoundland is known for his sweet disposition. He's like a big, loveable Teddy Bear. He loves children, is intelligent, and aims to please. He's happiest when he is with his family, and should not be left alone for long periods of time or be banished to the backyard or a kennel.
  Like every dog, the Newfoundland needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences when young. Socialization helps ensure that your Newfoundland puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.
  Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.

Health
  The Newfoundland, which has an average lifespan of 8 to 10 years, is prone to serious health conditions such as gastric torsion, Sub-Aortic Stenosis (SAS), cystinuria, canine hip dysplasia (CHD), epilepsy, and elbow dysplasia, and minor issues like von Willebrand's Disease (vWD), cataract, Osteochondrosis Dissecans (OCD), entropion, ectropion, cruciate ligament rupture. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may recommend cardiac, eye, hip, and elbow tests for this breed of dog. Additionally, some Newfoundlands are extremely sensitive to anesthesia, and most do not tolerate heat well.

Care
  Because of its heavy coat, the Newfie does not fare well in hot weather. It should be kept outdoors only in cold or temperate weather, and in summer, the coat may be trimmed for neatness and comfort, and brushed daily to manage excess shedding and prevent the coat from matting. The dog is at its best when it can move freely between the yard and the house, but still needs plenty of space indoors to stretch properly. Daily exercise is essential, as is typical with all work dogs.
  Although its relaxed appearance might indicate that this breed would prefer to lounge around, the Newfie has an abundance of energy that needs to be spent in order for the dog to be at its top shape. Regular walks and romps in the park or in a large yard will keep the Newfie fit and content. Being large dogs, they do have larger appetites, but care must be taken not to overfeed them, as they can easily become overweight, stressing the organs extremities and shortening their lifespans.
  In the summer, the Newfoundlander is more likely to drool, since it must pant more to keep its body temperature down, owing to its size and coat. Summertime water activities are ideal, since the Newfie excels at swimming, but keep in mind that even in the winter this breed benefits from a brisk swim. Cold water swimming is what they are built for, after all. According to some breeders, the Landseers are more active, thus requiring more exercise. In fact, it is ideal for families who enjoy camping, fishing, or hiking with an enthusiastic participant and helpful furry companion.

Living Conditions
  Will do okay in an apartment if sufficiently exercised. They are relatively inactive indoors and a small yard is sufficient. Newfies prefer colder climates and do not do well in the heat. Make sure there is always cool water and a shaded place for them to lie.

Exercise
  This gentle giant is quite content to laze around the house, but still needs to be taken on a daily walk. While out on the walk the dog must be made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as in a dog's mind the leader leads the way, and that leader needs to be the human. It will enjoy frequent opportunities to swim and frolic.

Grooming
  The Newfoundland has a water-resistant double coat of black, brown, gray or Landseer (white with black markings). Using a steel comb and wire slicker brush, groom the coat at least a couple times a week to prevent mats and remove dead hair.
  Newfies shed, and regular brushing will help reduce the amount of hair floating around your house. Twice a year, in spring and fall, they shed heavily, called “blowing coat.”  Plan to spend additional time brushing to keep all the hair under control.
Newfies also drool, so get in the habit of carrying around a hand towel so you can wipe your dog’s mouth as needed, especially after he eats or drinks. Bathe the Newfoundland when he’s dirty.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath. Most important, keep this water-loving dog’s ears clean and dry to help prevent ear infections.

Is this breed right for you?
  Although Newfoundlands are huge in size, they do make wonderful apartment pets. They are a low-energy breed and require just enough exercise to keep them at a healthy weight. Due to their coarse coat, Newfoundlands don’t do well in warm climates. This is a lovable breed that thrives on companionship and a family atmosphere. Gentle and caring, Newfoundlands rank among the best breeds for children of all ages.

Children and other pets
  This cuddly giant is highly tolerant of children, which is important because he's a kid magnet thanks to his size and wealth of soft fur. But he can also accidentally knock over a toddler or small child, and can appear intimidating to children who don't know him.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  The Newfoundland is also easygoing and friendly with other pets, including cats and small mammals, as long as he is properly socialized and trained.


Famous Newfoundlands
  • Adam: Seaward's Blackbeard: 1984 Best in Show winner at the Westminster Dog Show
  • Ava Marie : 2004 Best In Show aka "Josh" Granddaughter is a lifeguard in Goshen, NY
  • Bashaw (Matthew Cotes Wyatt): The Earl of Dudley's favourite dog, a sculpture by Matthew Cotes Wyatt can be seen at the Victoria and Albert museum in London
  • Boatswain: pet of English poet Lord Byron and the subject of his poem "Epitaph to a Dog"
  • Bilbo: lifeguard at Sennon cove beach in Cornwall
  • Boo: saved a man both deaf and mute at ten months of age without any previous training
  • Brumus: Robert F. Kennedy's dog
  • Brutus: first dog to complete the Appalachian Mountain Club's "Winter 48", climbing all 48 peaks in one calendar winter
  • Bucky. Mascot of Columbia, MO-based rock band, "The Diet"
  • Carlo: Emily Dickinson's dog
  • Charlie Erhart: Lyndon B. Johnson's dog
  • Darbydale's All Rise Pouchcove (AKA Josh): 2004 Best in Show winner at the Westminster Dog Show
  • Faithful: First dog of President Ulysses S. Grant
  • Frank: Unofficial mascot of the Orphan Brigade during the American Civil War
  • Gander: the Mascot of the Royal Rifles of Canada who was killed in action at the Battle of Hong Kong when he carried a grenade away from wounded soldiers. For this he was awarded the PDSA Dickin Medal retroactively in 2000.
  • Hairy Man: The dog who helped Ann Harvey and her father and brother rescue 163 people from a shipwreck.
  • Jeff: Wonderful gorilla-loving friend of Flagstaff, AZ; mascot of dream pop band the Sea Section 
  • Luath: Landseer Newfoundland pet of J. M. Barrie and the inspiration for "Nana", the Darling children's nurse in Peter Pan.
  • Mas: first Newfoundland dog to jump out of a helicopter Ecurel B-350 in 1992 during a joint training exercise between Scuola Italiana Cani Salvataggio, SICS, and Aeronautica Militare.
  • Morse: A Newfoundland/Saint Bernard cross breed, Morse was a popular contestant on Channel 4's Superstar Dogs.
  • Smokey: Lion-styled mascot of the East Coast Bays Barracudas.
  • Plato: pet of John James Audubon.
  • Pluto: pet of the Croatian operatic soprano Ilma de Murska, which used to dine at table with her and was trained to eat a cooked fowl from a place setting without dripping gravy on the tablecloth. Pluto lived in the 1860s.
  • Robber: dog of Richard Wagner who accompanied him on his flight from his creditors from Riga on a fishing boat, which inspired the opera The Flying Dutchman.
  • Russ: last dog of Richard Wagner, buried at the feet of his master in the composer's tomb in the park of Villa Wahnfried in Bayreuth, under his own plaque: "Here rests and watches Wagner's Russ."
  • Sable Chief: mascot of Royal Newfoundland Regiment
  • Swansea Jack: Famous Welsh rescue dog identified as a Newfoundland, but had an appearance more like a modern Flat-Coated Retriever
  • Seaman: companion of explorer Meriwether Lewis
  • Yogi: John Madden's Newfoundland
Did You Know?
  A Newfoundland made an impressive appearance in the 2005 romantic comedy “Must Love Dogs,” starring Diane Lane and John Cusack. The dog, named Mother Theresa, was actually played by two Newfie puppies; director Gary David Goldberg adopted both dogs when the filming ended.

A dream day in the life of a Newfoundland
  Newfoundlands have been nicknamed "nature's nanny" for a reason: they're simply wonderful with kids and have a knack for caregiving. An ideal day would be spent swimming and playing with kids of all ages and sizes. Their large size makes this breed an excellent furry pillow and their sweet disposition means they are more than happy to nap by your side.

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