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Showing posts with label working. Show all posts
Showing posts with label working. Show all posts

Thursday, December 28, 2017

Everything about your Black Russian Terrier

Everything about your Black Russian Terrier
  These majestic black beauties are highly intelligent, confident guard dogs who aren’t actually true terriers. Relatively new and still a rare dog breed, Black Russian Terriers are working dogs who can protect a home or business, play with the family’s children, and excel in agility and obedience competition. Known as the “Black Pearls of Russia,” Blackies are people-oriented and want to be close to the action at all times. They tend to be a bit aloof around strangers, including dogs they don’t know, but they’re devoted to their families — and they don’t bark or shed much. They have large bones and well-developed muscles, creating a vibrant, flowing impression.

Overview
  Also known as Stalin’s dog or Sobaka Stalina, the Black Russian Terrier is a low-maintenance and hard working dog. Developed by the post World War II Soviet Union, the Black Russian Terrier or BRT, is not a true terrier, and is instead categorized as a working dog.
  The BRT is a fairly large dog and has a powerfully built body. Both its forelegs and hindquarters are well-boned and muscular, and end in large, padded feet. The BRT’s head is fairly large and block shaped and is equipped with a powerful set of teeth that meet in a scissor bite. The BRT’s body is covered in a thick double coat. The outer-coat is coarse and wiry while the thick undercoat is soft to the touch. The BRTs coat is black and sometimes has a few stray grey hairs. 
  Brown or white markings are considered to be a fault.
  BRTs are extremely intelligent and self-assured dogs. Bred primarily as guard dogs, they have extremely strong protective instincts and are devoted to their owners. Their strong personalities do however require owners with a thorough understanding of dog psychology and leadership.

Highlights
  • Blackies need a job. They were bred for it and will be unhappy without one. Their job as your companion could be competing in agility, obedience, Schutzhund, or various canine sports.
  • Black Russian Terriers need at least 30 minutes of exercise a day. They are intelligent and powerful, and exercise provides a needed outlet. A Black Russian can manage in an apartment with sufficient outdoor exercise. A fenced yard is best for the Blackie living in a house.
  • Blackies enjoy the company of their families and prefer to stick close to their human pack. They don't do well stuck in the backyard by themselves.
  • The sometimes stubborn Blackie needs firm training as soon as you get him home so that he won't try to establish himself as the leader of the pack.
  • Blackies are by nature aloof with people they don't know, and unless they have regular exposure to lots of different people — ideally beginning in puppyhood — they can become overly protective of you around strangers. This may lead to biting out of fear and aggression. Give your Blackie lots of contact with friends, family, neighbors, and even strangers to help him polish his social skills.
Other Quick Facts

  • The Black Russian Terrier’s coat is slightly to moderately wavy. The hair on the head falls over the eyes and on the face forms a mustache and beard. The coat is trimmed to achieve the dog’s distinctive look.
  • Basic black is this breed’s fashion statement. His double coat - which can be one and a half to six inches long - comes only in black or black with a few gray hairs scattered throughout.
Breed standards
AKC group: Working
UKC group: Guardian Dog
Average lifespan: 10-14 years
Average size: 80–130 pounds
Coat appearance: Rough and thick, slightly waved
Coloration: black coats, but a sprinkling of gray hair
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, active single, houses with yards, farms and rural areas
Temperament: Energetic, confident, brave, hardy
Comparable Breeds: Bouvier des Flandres, Giant Schnauzer

History 
  This dog is a Cold War creation, developed in Moscow after World War II for military and police work. His breeders started with a Giant Schnauzer and crossed him with other breeds that included the Airedale, Rottweiler, and the Moscow Retriever. The result was a large black dog with a protective temperament and a healthy dose of suspicion toward strangers.
  Less than two decades ago, the BRT was seen only in small numbers at European and Scandinavian dog shows, but in 2004 he was recognized by the American Kennel Club as its 151st breed. Today the Black Russian Terrier ranks 135th among the breeds registered by the AKC.



Personality
  Black Russian Terriers are truly man's best friend. They thrive on human interaction and have such a strong desire to be with their family that they will follow their people from room to room, and when left alone, will wait longingly by doors or windows until they are happily reunited with the ones they love. This breed adores children – especially female Black Russians. They are patient with small children who want to climb on them and are big enough to keep up with bigger kids' outdoor games. They have bee known to sleep in kids' rooms or outside their bedroom doors as a guardian and protector.

Health
  The Black Russian Terrier, which has an average lifespan of 10 to 14 years, is prone to minor health issues such as elbow dysplasia and major problems like canine hip dysplasia (CHD). The breed may also suffer from progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) and dwarfism. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may recommend hip, elbow, and eye exams for the dog

Care
  The Black Russian Terrier, because of its breeding as a working dog, has a very strong "work ethic", and needs a job to do in order to be happy. Early training is a must and they are very responsive to firm, consistent training, excelling at Obedience competitions. They also perform well in other dog sports, such as Agility, and Schutzhund training. They have a low-shedding coat, and need grooming several times a week. Dogs who compete in conformation need to be groomed a minimum of every three weeks to keep the coat in show condition. The Black Russian Terrier needs lots of exercise, and may become hyperactive and destructive if it does not have a chance to burn off its energy..

Living Conditions
  The Black Russian Terrier will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. They are relatively inactive indoors and no matter how big your yard is they will be sitting at your front door waiting to come in. They love to live very close to their owner. They will follow you from one room to the other. Kept in a garden they will follow you from window to window and wait for you at the door. They need very close human contact. This breed does not do well living in a kennel; they must have close human contact to be happy.

Training
  Black Russian Terriers are extremely intelligent and eager to please and are fairly easy to train. They do however have strong personalities and should be handled with a loving but firm hand from an early age. BRT puppies are inquisitive and playful and some adults too display this extreme curiosity. Black Russian Terriers often excel at various obedience competitions and dog sports such as agility and Schutzhund training.

Activity Requirements
  Black Russian Terriers, despite their larger size, can do well living in an apartment. They don't need an excessive amount of vigorous running time per day, but do need several walks. If left alone in a yard, Black Russian will quickly get bored and want to come inside. Outside activities should always involve interaction with kids or people in order to keep this breed interested.

Grooming
  Regular grooming is essential for the Black Russian Terrier’s handsome good looks. Expect to bathe your dog every two to three months. The wiry coat should be brushed twice a week to prevent tangles.
The rest is basic care. Nails should be trimmed once a month and ears checked every week. Regular tooth brushing with a soft toothbrush and doggie toothpaste keeps the teeth and gums healthy.
  Because the Black Russian Terrier is not a common breed, it is likely some professional groomers will not know exactly how to groom him, especially when it comes to hand stripping. An experienced breeder is probably the best resource for learning how to groom the breed.
  It is important to begin grooming the Black Russian Terrier when he is very young. An early introduction teaches this independent dog that grooming is a normal part of his life and to patiently accept the grooming process. 

Children And Other Pets
  Despite their impressive size, Blackies are great with children and will protect them. Females seem more willing to play with children than the males, but both sexes treat children with whom they are raised with gentleness and respect. Don't forget, however, that Blackies are large and active companions, and extremely young children may be accidentally knocked over or injured by a playful and energetic dog of this size. Use caution with very young children.
  Blackies who have not been exposed to children from puppyhood may not be as tolerant-something to consider if you're looking to add an older or rescue dog to your household.
  Either way, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Make sure your Blackie is well socialized as a puppy and adult so that he doesn't become overprotective of his family and property.
  Male Black Russians don't do well with other dominant dogs. Many of them aren't suited to dog parks for this reason. At home, they do best with other canine companions who were already established in the house. They will be fine with nondominant or small dogs, as well as cats, horses, rabbits, and other pets.

Is the Black Russian Terrier the Right Breed for you?
Moderate Maintenance: Regular grooming is required to keep its fur in good shape. Professional trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Moderately Easy Training: The Black Russian Terrier is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Not Good for New Owners: This breed is best for those who have previous experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
Despite the word Terrier in his name, the Black Russian Terrier is a member of the American Kennel Club’s Working Group.
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Wednesday, December 27, 2017

Everything about your Kai Ken

Everything about your Kai Ken
  Indigenous to Japan, Kai Ken is a medium sized rare breed with an athletic body, wedge-shaped head, erect ears, robust and hardy limbs, well-developed hocks, and a curled or sickle-shaped tail. These intelligent and loyal dogs occupy a significant place in Japanese culture, preserved as their natural monument.

Overview
  Kai Ken is a very old hunting breed from the Japanese island of Honshu. Although not very large, these dogs hunted a variety of game, even wild boar. The Japanese people designated the Kai Ken as a national treasure in 1934 and, as such, all dogs are protected by law.
  The Kai Ken dog breed stands from 17 to 22 inches tall and weighs 30 to 40 pounds. The head is wedge-shaped, with small, dark eyes and upright ears. The body is sturdy, and the tail curls up over the hips. The coat is double and does shed. All Kai Ken are brindle, although the colors can vary from red brindle to brown and even black brindle. The coat needs brushing twice a week; make sure to get through the thick coat to the skin. During the worst shedding, usually in spring and fall, the coat may need to be brushed daily.
  The Kai Ken needs daily exercise; however, since the breed retains its hunting instincts, all exercise should be within a fenced-in yard or on leash. The fence should be away from any overhanging trees, as this breed is known to climb trees capably. Socialization should begin early in puppyhood and continue on into adulthood. Training, preferably in a group class, is helpful for socialization as well as behavior. Training should be structured yet fun.
  The Kai Ken is intelligent, loyal to owners yet aloof with strangers, and very easy to housetrain. This is not a city dog; he rarely does well in the hustle and bustle of an urban environment. The Kai Ken needs an owner who understands northern and spitz-type breeds. A Kai Ken is devoted and loyal to his family and watchful of strangers. He will thrive with attention and will do best when he can spend time with his owner. The breed is good with children who treat the dog with respect. Although Kai Ken may be good with smaller pets, owners should keep in mind that this breed was bred to hunt and retains those hunting instincts. Kai Ken is a healthy dog breed.

Breed standards
AKC group: AKC Foundation Stock Service
Group: Rare Dog, Working Dog, Hunting Dog
Average lifespan: 14-16 years
Average size: 30 - 50 pounds
Coat appearance: Harsh, medium-length with a striped appearance
Coloration:  Black brindle, Red brindle and Brindle
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: apartments, houses with yards, active singles, families with older children
Temperament: friendly, intelligent, loyal, athletic

Comparable Breeds: Japanese Spitz, Shiba Inu

History
  Being one of the six native breeds of Japan to be maintained and protected by Nippo or Nihon Ken Hozonkai, it was developed as a hunting breed in the steep mountainous terrain of the Yamanashi region to track down deer, wild boar, bear and the Japanese serow (Kamoshika). This was possibly because of its great climbing ability as mentioned in traditional writings. With the creation of Nippo in 1928, the Kai Ken became Japan’s natural monument in the year 1933.  Recognized by the Japanese Kennel Club in 1934, there is little information regarding the breed due to language constraints.
  It came to the United States in the 1950s, though it is unknown whether the original ones survived or not. When male and female puppies started being imported to the United States, the foundation of the American Kai Ken began.


Temperament
  The Kai Kens are bold, fearless, intelligent, alert, agile and loyal having natural hunting instinct, it makes a tremendous watchdog. Kai Ken is wonderful and loyal with its family, but reserved and distant with the strangers. Though, the breed was bred and developed to be an outstanding hunting dog; however, these dogs are very friendly and good with children as well as nice behaving with other dogs without any aggression. Most of them not only like to swim, but also know how to cross a river, and can climb up trees when chasing the quarry. Being highly intelligent breed needs a firm training by gentle and endearing hands. 
  As an enthusiastically devoted and dedicated to the family it will require a lot of care, attention and appreciation from their owner in order to stay happy and cheerful. With a considerable attention, love and care it will do well while staying inside the houses. For such a strong hunting dog early socialization and introductions are very necessary. They would have adequate amount of daily exercise in order to stay happy and healthy; however, never trust it while off lead in an unsafe place, it has a chasing instinct so keep it in a fenced yard.

Health Problems
  Given the genetic purity of the breed, the Kai Ken is not known to have many congenital health problems. Like all dogs, however, the breed is prone to several minor health issues.

Care
  The Kai Ken requires only minimal coat care. He needs brushing only occasionally; the most important thing is making sure that there is no matting in his undercoat. It is recommended that he be bathed only occasionally as well. He may benefit from a dry shampoo along with occasional brushing. Their double coat sheds at least twice a year; you may need to strip his coat in order to help remove the old coat so that he will remain looking healthy. 
  The Kai Ken is highly energetic, so it is a good idea to give him as much exercise as possible. The Kai Ken enjoys long walks with his master; he also loves play time of any sort. Owners should focus on playing games that give this inquisitive dog the mental stimulation he craves. It is important that your dog be kept on a leash; he will run if he is not kept restrained beside you. This canine can be happy in an apartment if he has a huge wooded area provided to run in so that he gets adequate exercise every day; however, most experts do not recommend that the Kai Ken live in an apartment unless the owner is prepared to devote at least an hour daily to free play. This breed is known to be very clean and virtually odor-free.

Training
  Originally bred to hunt boar and deer, the Kai Ken makes a great hunting dog. These dogs are highly intelligent and respond very well to training, especially if it is started at an early age. This breed learns very quickly so, if you provide firm and consistent training you may be amazed at how much this dog can learn and retain. 
  The Kai Ken is not as independent or strong-willed as some highly intelligent breeds – they have a natural desire to please their human companions.

Exercise Requirements
  As a hunting breed, the Kai Ken is fairly active but the breed only has moderate needs for exercise. You will not need to take your dog out for hours every day – a long 30-minute walk or a brisk jog will be adequate. This breed is adaptable to apartment life and can get along without a yard as long as its daily exercise needs are met. Because this breed is so intelligent, it requires frequent mental exercise as well as physical exercise – plan to engage your dog in games often and consider agility training to keep him sharp and active.

Grooming 
  They should be brushed weekly to keep their fur mat free and clean. Bathe them as necessary, depending on how dirty they are. Their ears should be checked routinely for wax build up, infection or dirt. Their nails should also be trimmed regularly. Kai Kens shed once or twice a year, making grooming at these times needed. Kai Kens should be trained from puppyhood, as they are very willful.

Children and other pets
  If early socialized, the Kai Ken is wonderful and loyal with its family, but reserved and distant with the strangers. Though, the breed was bred and developed to be an outstanding hunting dog; however, these dogs are very friendly and good with children as well as nice behaving with other dogs without any aggression. Children should be taught how to treat and interact with such kind of dogs.

Is the Kai Ken the Right Breed for you?
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep.
Difficult Training: The Kai Ken isn't deal for a first time dog owner. Patience and perseverance are required to adequately train it.
The box art of the video game Ōkami. 
Slightly reserved with strangers, the Kai Ken has very strong protective instincts. It makes an excellent watchdog. In fact, the Kai Ken often prefers to keep watch from a spot with a good vantage point, like a porch, a balcony or a hilltop.

In popular culture
  • Many Kai Kens play important roles in the Yoshihiro Takahashi's series Ginga: Nagareboshi Gin and its sequel, Ginga Densetsu Weed, including the brothers Kurotora, Chūtora, and Akatora. In the sequel, Ginga Densetsu Weed, Kurotora's son, Kagetora, stars as an important character, with his less prominently featured brothers, Harutora and Nobutora, and cousins Dodo, Buru, Shōji, and Shigure.
  • Another Yoshihiro Takahashi's manga, Kacchū no Senshi Gamu featured a villainous Kai Ken named Gama.
  • Chu, a Canine Warrior from the 2006 video game Ōkami, is also a Kai Ken.

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Friday, December 22, 2017

Everything about your Doberman Shepherd

Everything about your Doberman Shepherd
  The Doberman Shepherd is a hybrid breed where the Doberman Pinscher is crossed with the German Shepherd. The hybrid will be a large dog, with an average weight of 90 to 110 pounds. Very intelligent and having a lot of energy, this dog will need a family that can give him a significant amount of daily activity. The Doberman Shepherd can be stubborn, making it important that his owner be clear that he, not the dog, is in charge.

Overview
  The Doberman Shepherd is not a purebred dog. It is a cross between the Doberman Pinscher and the German Shepherd. The best way to determine the temperament of a mixed breed is to look up all breeds in the cross and know you can get any combination of any of the characteristics found in either breed. Not all of these designer hybrid dogs being bred are 50% purebred to 50% purebred. It is very common for breeders to breed multi-generation crosses.

Breed standards
Breed Type: Crossbreed
Group (of Breed): Designer; Working
Other Names: German Shepherd Doberman Mix
Average lifespan: 10 to 13 years
Average size: 90 to 110 pounds
Coat appearance: Short-haired, Silky
Coloration: Tan, brown, black
Hypoallergenic: No

History
  Like all other designer breeds, this one too had evolved during the 1990s. Though not much is known about the history of its origination, breeders may probably have wanted to develop a kind of dog that would possess the intelligence, guarding instincts and hardy nature of both its parents, at the same time being attractive to look at.

Temperament
  The Doberman Shepherd will inherit the loyalty, intelligence and observation skills of both of his parents, making him an excellent guard dog. He may be strong-willed and stubborn, though at the same time loving and affectionate. He is the kind of dog who prefers to be with his family and will suffer separation anxiety if left alone for too long. Early socialization and training will be helpful for the Doberman Shepherd so that he will not try to dominate members of his family. The Doberman Shepherd tends to do poorly in cold weather and should be kept indoors in when temperatures are low.

Health 
  To avoid having health issues with your dog try to buy from a reputable breeder and avoid places like puppy mills and pet stores. You are more likely to get a dog with potential health issues from those kind of places. The kind of health problems he might inherit from his parents includes bloat, EPI, heart problems, joint dysplasia, allergies and eye problems.

Care
  Maintenance of the Doberman Shepherd is minimal as they are low to moderate shedders. It is recommended that you brush your Doberman Shepherd three to four times each week with the slicker brush and bathe him when he gets dirty. It is a good idea to train your Doberman Shepherd to get in and out of the tub from a young age, so that you will have an easier time bathing him when he is full grown. Getting him used to having his nails clipped as a puppy will be advantageous, as will having his teeth brushed. The ears of the Doberman Shepherd should be cleaned each week, wiping off any parts that you are able to reach.

Training
  He is easy to train for the most part as he is super bright, but he does have an obstinate streak and requires you to make it clear you are pack leader. Use a firm tone, be positive, reward with praise and treats. Make sure you train and socialize him from a young age so that you get a better behaved dog and one with his best traits enhanced, and is his worse ones dampened. He will probably train a little quicker than most dogs as he will need less repetition before he grasps one stage and you move on to the next. He will enjoy the training as it will keep him mentally stimulated.


 Activity Requirements 

  The Doberman Shepherd is a very active dog with a lot of energy. Keeping him busy is important not only for his health but to ensure that he does not become destructive in the home. This hybrid is clever and was bred for work, so still likes to have a job to do or a mission to accomplish. Activities can include several long walks per day, accompanying you on runs and hikes, playing games, and visits to the dog park. He may enjoy obedience trials which serve to keep the mind stimulated. Not suited for apartment living, this large dog needs space. A rural environment or an urban home with a large yard are best for him.


Grooming 
  He does not need a lot of grooming really somewhere between low and moderate. He does not shed a lot usually but the Doberman Pinscher is a moderate shedder and it is possible he will shed a bit like that. He needs brushing at least three times a week but you may find once a day works better. Bath time is going to be tricky unless you have trained him from a young age how to get in and out of the tub. Just bathe when he needs it, go to a groomers parlor if it is a struggle to do it at home or use the garden hose! Since his nails need clipping occasionally you could ask the groomer to do that for you unless you know the correct way to cut a dog's nails. You should clean his ears weekly wiping just the parts you can reach, and brush his teeth each day too.

Children and other animals
  It helps if he has been raised with the children and the other pets, as well as being socialized and trained. But that is true of any dog. He should not be left alone with children if he has not been socialized certainly. If you have him and then have children he will be very good with them, and see them as part of his family because he will have grown as they grow together. The same for other pets and other dogs.

Is the Doberman Shepherd the Right Breed for you?
Moderate Maintenance: Regular grooming is required to keep its fur in good shape.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Easy Training: The Doberman Shepherd is known to listen to commands and obey its owner. Expect fewer repetitions when training this breed.
Very Active: It will need daily exercise to maintain its shape. Committed and active owners will enjoy performing fitness activities with this breed.
Not Good with Kids: In isolation, this dog breed might not be the best option for kids. However, to mitigate the risks, have the puppy grow up with kids and provide it with plenty of pleasant and relaxed experiences with them.



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Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Everything about your Swedish Vallhund

Everything about your Swedish Vallhund
  The Swedish Vallhund is a member of the Spitz family, so you might recognize its thick double coat and curled tail. Unlike many Spitz-type breeds, however, the Vallhund has a short, stout stature that is more like that of the Corgi than the Siberian Husky. These little dogs are energetic and playful, eager to make friends and to spend time with family. As well, this breed comes with one of three different types of tail: no tail (bobtail), a stub tail or a full curl tail. If you are looking for a friendly dog with a loving personality, the Swedish Vallhund may be right for you.

Overview
  True to his heritage as a working farm dog breed, the Swedish Vallhund is an intelligent and alert companion. He is an active dog who needs an equally active owner. Train him for dog sports or give him a job to do around the house, and you’ll get along fine with him. The Swedish Vallhund is generally healthy, although he can fall victim to a hereditary eye disease called retinopathy. His medium-length coat comes in many different colors and combinations.

Highlights
  • The Swedish Vallhund bears a strong resemblance to the Cardigan and Pembroke Welsh Corgis, but genetically they do not appear to be all that closely related.
  • A Swedish Vallhund’s tail may be long, stubby or bobbed. All tail types, natural or docked, are equally acceptable.
  • The Vallhund has wedge-shaped head with medium-size ears that stand erect.
  • Swedish Vallhunds do not respond well to harsh verbal or physical corrections.
  • The Vallhund can become a nuisance barker, especially if he is frequently left alone.
  • The Vallhund is a herding breed and may nip at children’s ankles as they run by.
  • The Vallhund is not necessarily a good “first dog.” He requires plenty of socialization, training, and exercise to be a good companion.
Other Quick Facts:
  • The Swedish Vallhund’s coat has harness markings, bands of light color running down the sides from the shoulders. Some nicely marked Vallhunds have a mask of lighter hair around the eyes, on the muzzle, and under the throat, contrasting with the head color.
  • Within a single Swedish Vallhund litter, puppies can have natural bobtails or the traditional long Spitz tail.
Breed standards
AKC group: Working Dogs
UKC group: Herding Dogs
Average lifespan: 12 to 15 years
Average size: 22 to 35 pounds
Coat appearance: Dense, Harsh and Rough, and Thick
Coloration:  sable pattern of gray to red or combinations of colors in various shades.
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles and seniors, houses with yards
Temperament: Even-tempered, friendly, energetic, intelligent
Comparable Breeds: Cardigan Welsh Corgi, Pembroke Welsh Corgi

History
  The Swedish Vallhund is an ancient, national dog breed of Sweden and may date back to the 8th or 9th century. Swedish Vallhunds originated in the county of Västergötland, which lies just south of Vänern. Here the small dog proved to be excellent for watching, guarding and herding. The breed dates to the Viking settlement of England and is thought to have played a part in the development of the modern Welsh Corgi and the Lancashire Heeler.   According to the American Kennel Club, another theory of the breed's origin is that during the eighth or ninth century "either the Swedish Vallhund was brought to Wales or the Corgi was taken to Sweden, hence the similarities between the two breeds".
  The Swedish Vallhund is related to larger spitz dogs and moose hunting dogs of Scandinavia. Large dogs of this spitz-type have been found buried with their masters in stone-age settlements in Scandinavia. The skeleton of a Swedish Vallhund is remarkably similar to that of the modern Norwegian Elkhound, another breed of spitz dog.
  The Swedish Kennel Club recognized the breed in 1943, making the Valhund a popular pet in both Sweden and Britain. The dogs were first brought to the United States in 1983, and the American Kennel Club recognized the Vallhund in 2007. Today he ranks 142nd among the breeds registered by the AKC.



Personality
  The Swedish Vallhund dates back to the Vikings who used these short, sturdy animals to herd cattle. Like their Viking friends, Vallhunds are strong and fearless, and their owners believe these dogs have no idea they are so small. They are friendly, spirited and eager to please, they get along well with children and can be trusted around other household pets, though they won't hesitate to chase strange dogs and cats. 
  Vallhunds can be used as farm dogs and are truly in their element around livestock. Vallhunds individual personalities vary from dog to dog – some are more outgoing while others are more introverted, but all Vallhunds are loyal companions who make an excellent addition to families with active lifestyles.

Health
  The Swedish Vallhund lives an average lifespan of 12 to 15 years. The health issue most associated with this dog breed is progressive retinal atrophy, a genetic disease that causes blindness in both eyes.

Care
  The Vallhund’s short legs belie his agility and speed. He corners like a race car and is an excellent agility competitor. He is sturdy and muscular and packs a big punch for his size.As a herding breed, he is bred to move flocks long distances. Even if he doesn’t do that for a living anymore, he still needs daily exercise in the form of a long walk or hike or training for a dog sport such as agility. If he gets the activity he needs, the Vallhund is happy in any environment, from city condo to country estate.
 With his short legs and long back, the Vallhund can be prone to back injuries if mishandled. Because their skeletal development is not yet complete, avoid letting puppies jump on and off furniture. Don’t pick them up without supporting both the front legs and the rear end. The Vallhund has a weather-resistant coat designed to withstand the harsh elements of Sweden, but that doesn’t mean he’s an outside dog. He is highly people-oriented and should never be shunted off to the backyard with little human interaction.

Living Conditions
  The Swedish Vallhund will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. This breed is very active indoors and will do okay without a yard.

Trainability
  As herding dogs, Swedish Vallhunds are independent thinkers and can be a tad bossy. They prefer to do things on their own time, so a lot of patience is required when training this breed. Positive reinforcement and lots of treats will ensure a responsive Vallhund. Once consistent leadership is established, they take well to training and enjoy learning new tasks.
  After beginning obedience training is complete, Swedish Vallhunds should graduate to advanced training and if possible, involved in tracking and agility classes. This is one “old dog” that likes to learn new tricks, and training should continue throughout their lives.

Exercise 
  The Swedish Vallhund was bred to be a herding dog so they are a fairly active and energetic breed. These dogs tend to thrive when given a job to do and they are excellent at a number of dog sports including obedience, agility trials, herding, flyball, and tracking. This dog requires a long walk every day to meet his exercise requirements.

Activity Requirements
  Despite their high energy level, Swedish Vallhunds only need a moderate amount of exercise to maintain health and happiness. They are adaptable dogs who can thrive on a ranch, in a home with a yard, in an apartment or condominium. They should be walked daily, and if they don't have a yard to play in at home, should be allowed to run in a park at least once a week.
  Vallhunds need a lot of mental stimulation so that they don't get bored. As with other breeds who have roots as farm dogs, they like to stay busy. They excel in agility training and advanced obedience. If not properly exercised physically and mentally, Vallhunds can become anxious and destructive when left alone.

Grooming
  The Vallhund has a medium-length double coat. Double-coated dogs shed, so expect to find hair on your clothing and furniture. Brush the coat once or twice a week to remove dead hair and reduce the amount of loose hair floating around your house. The only other kind of grooming you need to do is to trim the hair on the footpads.
  The rest is basic care: Trim his nails as needed, usually every week or two, and brush his teeth regularly with a vet-approved pet toothpastefor good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Vallhunds usually love children, but their herding instincts can motivate them to nip at a youngster’s feet or ankles. They can learn quickly, however, that this behavior is not permitted. As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. 
  Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child. Vallhunds are usually friendly toward other pets in the household, including cats, so long as they have been socialized with them from an early age. They enjoy having a second or third dog in the family to play with, especially another Vallhund.

Is the Swedish Vallhund the Right Breed for you?
Moderate Maintenance: Regular grooming is required to keep its fur in good shape. No trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Easy Training: The Swedish Vallhund is known to listen to commands and obey its owner. Expect fewer repetitions when training this breed.
Very Active: It will need daily exercise to maintain its shape. Committed and active owners will enjoy performing fitness activities with this breed.
Not Good for New Owners: This breed is best for those who have previous experience with dog ownership.
Not Good with Kids: In isolation, this dog breed might not be the best option for kids. However, to mitigate the risks, have the puppy grow up with kids and provide it with plenty of pleasant and relaxed experiences with them.

Did You Know?
  Though the Swedish Vallhund resembles a Corgi, you can see differences in the head and coat pattern.




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Friday, July 7, 2017

Everything about your Dogo Argentino

Everything about your Dogo Argentino
  The Dogo Argentino, also known as the Argentine Mastiff, is a large, white, muscular dog that was developed in Argentina primarily for the purpose of big-game hunting, including wild boar; the breeder, Antonio Nores Martínez, also wanted a dog that would exhibit steadfast bravery and willingly protect its human companion. It was first bred in 1928, from the Cordoba Fighting Dog along with a wide array of other breeds including the Great Dane.

Overview
  Dogo Argentinos have powerfully built well-muscled bodies. Their large heads are equipped with extremely powerful jaws designed to bite and hold on to large prey. Their necks have an abundance of skin designed to protect their necks when hunting dangerous game. The Dogo’s coat is pure white and any colored markings are considered a fault.
  Despite their imposing appearance, Dogos are in fact extremely gentle and loving. They are highly devoted to their masters and will willingly risk their lives to protect their human owners. Unfortunately, they are banned in certain countries like Ukraine, Iceland, Australia and Singapore.

Other Quick Facts:
  • The Dogo Argentino can weight upwards of 80 pounds
  • This breed was traditionally used to hunt big game in Argentina. 
Breed standards
AKC group: Working

UKC group: Guardian Dog

Average lifespan: 10 to 12 years
Coat appearance: Short
Coloration: White
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, houses with yards, farms/rural areas houses
Temperament: Intelligent, loyal, protective, friendly
Comparable Breeds: American Bulldog, Boxer

History
  In 1928, Antonio Nores Martinez, a medical doctor, professor and surgeon, set out to breed a big game hunting dog that was also capable of being a loyal pet and guard dog. Antonio Martinez picked the Cordoba Fighting Dog to be the base for the breed. 
  This breed is extinct today, but it was said that as a large and ferocious dog, it was a great hunter. Martinez crossed it with the Great Dane, Boxer, Spanish Mastiff, Old English Bulldog, Bull Terrier, Great Pyrenees, Pointer, Irish Wolfhound and Dogue de Bordeaux. Nores Martinez continued to develop the breed via selective breeding to introduce the desired traits.

Personality
  The Dogo Argentino is an amiable, outgoing, powerful breed that should never be aggressive towards people. It was bred to be gentle and protective of family members, especially children. However, it also was bred to be a strong, tenacious, fearless hunter of large, dangerous prey. These qualities are sometimes in conflict, although this breed has a remarkable instinctive ability to separate its ferociousness from its friendliness. Dogos can make excellent companions for active, experienced dog owners. Some Dogos – especially intact males – are assertive, overbearing and territorial around other dogs.   However, the breed generally has a kind and loving disposition and is gentle at home, easily making the transition from hunter to companion. Dogos are terrific watchdogs, being protective and loyal to their family without showing overly-aggressive behavior. A properly-socialized Dogo Argentino makes friends easily but reacts instantly to threatening or challenging behavior from friend or foe. This breed will usually try to assert itself as Alpha over other animals and people. It is important that a clear hierarchy be established within the household so that all people and pets can coexist harmoniously.

Health
  As in the Dalmatian, white Boxer, and the white Bull Terrier, the dogo may experience pigment-related deafness. There is possibility of an approximate 10% deafness rate overall with some dogos afflicted uniaurally (one deaf ear) and some binaurally (deaf in both ears). Studies have shown that the incidence of deafness is drastically reduced when the only breeding stock used is that with bilaterally normal hearing.

Hunting and legality
  While the Dogo Argentino was bred primarily from the extinct Cordoba Fighting Dog, it was bred to be a cooperative hunter, i.e. to accompany other catch dogs and bay dogs on the hunt without fighting with the other dogs. Aggressive traits inherent in the Cordoban Dog were specifically bred out to enable a stable cooperative nature in a pack. However, in areas where illegal dog fighting continues, the Dogo Argentino has been used for fighting due to its fearless nature and great stamina. Dogos of these lines are not suited for big game hunting, unlike the original Dogo Argentino.
  The Dogo Argentino is banned in certain countries including Ukraine, Denmark, Iceland, Fiji,Australia, Singapore and the Cayman Islands. In the United Kingdom, under the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991, it is illegal to own a Dogo Argentino without lawful authority.

Living Conditions
  This breed will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised and does best with at least an average-sized yard. Be sure to bring the Dogo inside when temperatures drop below freezing.

Training
  Dogos are incredibly intelligent and are quick learners. They respond well to training when it is done consistently, gently and with positive reinforcement. When given praise, rewards and affection for proper behavior, Dogos quickly learn what is expected of them. When scolded, yelled at or punished harshly, Dogos tend to withdraw and become stubborn or unresponsive. They can also become unruly with rough treatment, and sometimes turn dangerous. Basic obedience training and socialization must start at an early age for this breed. Delaying socialization can create a fearful, aggressive dog instead of the friendly yet imposing watchdog that the Dogo Argentino was bred to be. Dogos are competitive in dog sports such as obstacle coursing and disc-catching. Obedience training is fun for these dogs. They are natural heelers and want to please their owners. If bred and raised properly, they have a steady temperament and seem to adjust themselves quickly to different situations.

Exercise Requirements
  Dogo Argentinos are highly energetic dogs and are unsuitable for owners that cannot provide them with daily, rigorous exercise. They are able to navigate various types of terrain and make excellent jogging partners. As a working breed of dog, they are also at their happiest when given a ‘meaningful’ task which they can devote themselves to.

Grooming
  Grooming the Dogo is easy because of his short coat, though his large size means it’s a big job. A bath every three months  in a mild dog shampoo is a good idea. Brush his sleek coat with a natural bristle brush or mitt once a week. Use coat conditioner/polish to brighten the sheen.
  The rest is basic care. His ears need to be checked every week and cleaned if needed and toenails trimmed once a month. Regular brushing with a soft toothbrush and vet-approved doggie toothpaste keep the teeth and gums healthy. It is essential to introduce grooming to the Dogo when he is very young so he learns to accept the handling and fuss peacefully.

Is the Dogo Argentino the Right Breed for you?
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep. No trimming or stripping needed.
Moderate Shedding: Routine brushing will help. Be prepared to vacuum often!
Moderately Easy Training: The Dogo Argentino is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  You may have heard that the Dogo Argentino is hypoallergenic. That is not true. No breed is. Allergies are not caused by a particular dog coat type but by dander, the dead skin cells that are shed by all dogs.

In popular culture
  • Bombon (film) Carlos Sorín's, a 2005 film starring a Dogo Argentino named Gregorio
  • On Animal Planet's Pit Boss episode "Shorty's Top Dog", Shorty Rossi and Hercules adopted a Dogo Argentino puppy named Mario.

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