LUV My dogs: weather

LUV My dogs

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Showing posts with label weather. Show all posts
Showing posts with label weather. Show all posts

Wednesday, November 12, 2014

Top Dogs for Cold Weather

Top Dogs for Cold Weather
  Breeds with very short coats and little or no undercoat or body fat, such as Greyhounds, are vulnerable to the cold. Those with thicker coats and more body fat fare much better when temperatures drop. Dogs with a low cold tolerance need to live inside in cool climates and should have a jacket or sweater for chilly walks.
  
1. SAMOYED
Origin: Siberia
Fun Facts: This ancient breed was originally developed by the indigenous people of northwestern Siberia to herd reindeer, pull sleds and keep their owners warm. Early polar explorers used these dogs to traverse the harsh landscapes of the North Pole and South Pole. Because of their remote origins, Samoyeds developed independently of any other breeds, and are considered one of only four dog breeds in the world descended directly from wolves.

2. AKITA
  An Akita is truly a royal pup—hailing from Japan, this breed was once only owned by the Imperial family. Statues of the Akita were also given as gifts to new parents to bring health, happiness, and a long life. This dog, originally bred as a cold-weather hunting companion with a dense undercoat and harsh outer coat, can often be independent and stubborn, but will remain protective and loyal to its family.

3. BERNESE MOUNTAIN DOG
Origin: Switzerland
Fun Facts: The hardy, long-coated Bernese Mountain Dog is most at home in cold weather. It's mainly used for hauling and driving herds of cattle in the mountainous region of Canton of Berne in Switzerland. Ancestors of the modern-day Bernese are believe to have been brought to Switzerland 2,000 years ago by Roman soldiers. 

4. ALASKAN MALAMUTES
Thanks to its dense, double fur coat with a rough outer layer and a thick and woolly, oily undercoat, the Alaskan malamute is able to survive extremely cold temperatures. The breed was famously used as a utility dog during the Klondike Gold Rush in the late 1800’s; members of the breed also accompanied Admiral Richard Byrd on his expedition to the South Pole in 1928 and the breed also served primarily as search and rescue dogs in Greenland during World War II.


5. GERMAN SHEPHERD
The breed's popularity grew with Rin Tin Tin, the abandoned German Shepherd pup found during WWI who went on to star in TV shows and movies. Known for their herding, guarding, and police work, German Shepherds are strong, agile, hard workers that have a lot of energy and learn quickly. This breed commonly suffers from hip dysplasia, which can likely be avoided by buying from a credible breeder.


6. GREAT PYRENEES
Origin: Central Asia and France/Spain
Fun Facts: This large, gentle breed is named after the Pyrenees mountain range in southwestern Europe where these dogs were used to guard herds of sheep. The breed has a weather-resistant double coat to protect it from the elements out on the slopes. The Great Pyrenees were first brought to the U.S. in 1824.

7.  KUVASZ
To be considered a true Kuvasz, this dog must always sport white fur, according to the American Kennel Club. Originating in Tibet, the Kuvasz—which means "armed guard of nobility" in Turkish—was later owned by the royal family in Hungary before finding a more "common" lifestyle as a light-footed hunter and herder. The Kuvasz's double coat makes it a perfect mountain dog, and its trainability and fearless protective instincts provide a perfect four-legged companion. A fenced-in, open yard works best for this energetic, yet possibly destructive, breed.

8. NEWFOUNDLAND
Origin: Canada/England
Fun Facts: The Newfoundland's thick, dense coat makes it the perfect dog for the snowy winters on the Canadian island for which it's named. The breed is also strong enough to haul drowning victims ashore, with the additional ability to swim long distances. A Newfoundland was the chosen pet of numerous United States presidents, including Grant, Buchanan and Hayes.

9. SIBERIAN HUSKY
Origin: Siberia
Fun Facts: The quintessential sled dog, Siberian Huskies have a thick, layered coat made up of a dense undercoat for insulation and a coarse top coat. They're an ancient breed, believed to have been bred by the Chukchi tribe of northeast Asia. With strong hunting instincts, it is advised to keep Huskies away from small animals.

10. TIBETAN MASTIFFS
 DNA studies have revealed that the Tibetan mastiff—which isn’t technically a “mastiff” by breed—genetically descended from the wolf more than 58,000 years ago, as compared to common dog breeds who trace back to wolves 42,000 years ago. Used maily as a guard dog for nomadic cultures in Central Asia to protect herds, flocks, tents, villages, monasteries, and even palaces, the Tibetan mastiff can have one of two “looks”: Lion head or tiger head. One resembles an oversized chow while the other looks like a super-sized Bernese mountain dog. The breed has a thick double coat which requires routine care in order to maintain good health.
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Thursday, June 5, 2014

Dogs that love summer

Dogs that love summer
  It's essential to keep pets safe as temperatures leap up, whether via a cool kiddie pool or chilly spray bottle!
  Dogs with thick, double coats are more vulnerable to overheating. So are breeds with short noses, like Bulldogs or Pugs, since they can't pant as well to cool themselves off. If you want a heat-sensitive breed, the dog will need to stay indoors with you on warm or humid days, and you'll need to be extra cautious about exercising your dog in the heat.
  Although most breeds can live in hot climates with the proper care, some breeds do much better in hot weather. Dogs living in areas known for hot temperates need special care because they cannot handle the temperature extremes the way people can. When you adopt a dog, consider his outdoor environment and how much time he will be spending outdoors. When selecting a breed for hot climates, consider the following:
  • Size
  • Hair coat 
  • Facial conformation
  Panting is one method that dogs use to cool off. Breeds with pushed in noses and short faces such as English Bulldogs, pugs, Pekingese and boxers, tend to have a more difficult time in a hot climate.
  Giant dog breeds such as Newfoundlands and St. Bernard’s cannot handle exercise in hot weather as well as smaller dogs can. They are prone to sluggishness and obesity.


  If you’re looking for a dog that enjoys hot weather, consider dogs that come from high-temp locales. Dogs originating from warmer, drier climates, like the Basenji, are best suited for summer weather. This hard-working dog originated in central Africa and has hot-weather hunting in its blood, and even today it is used by Pygmy tribes to take down lions. As a bonus, the Basenji naturally does not bark and sheds little.



  That small, short-haired dogs, such as the Mini Pin, can handle the heat better than their large, heavily furred counterparts. Miniature Pinschers have a short, smooth coat and no undercoat, which helps them dissipate heat.



  Long, lean and known for speed, the Greyhound is another ancient breed with history in Egypt. The dog’s smooth, low-maintenance coat helps in keeping it from overheating. Greyhounds are slim and capable of exercise when the weather is hot.

  Smaller dogs can tolerate heat well. If you’re into small dogs, Chihuahuas have a short coat and are typically pretty resilient. Of note, small dogs with flat faces, such as Pugs or Bulldogs, do not do well in the heat.

  The Pharaoh Hound happily soaks up the sun rays. This slender, athletic canine has a fuss-free short coat and loves to play outdoors. One of the oldest dog breeds, the Pharaoh Hound originated in Egypt but is now the national dog for Malta, bred for hunting rabbits.

  The terriers can do well in the heat. The Cairn Terrier is a rugged pup with a weather-resistant coat that protects it in hot- and cold-weather conditions. This spunky canine lives for outdoor activity and craves physical and mental stimulation, particularly hunting-type games.

Also other dogs that  do well in hot weather are:
Hot-weather tips for dogs
  Though some dog breeds tolerate or even thrive in higher temperatures, it's important to providing ample opportunity for your pawed pal to cool off. During hot summer months, dogs should have multiple clean-water sources and plenty of shade. This is particularly true if you have a pet that doesn’t do well in the heat, especially flat-nosed dog breeds, such as the Pug and Bulldog. These breeds can easily overheat due to their facial structure, which impedes efficient panting and cooling off. Regardless of breed, keep a close eye out for signs of heat exhaustion.
 Always make sure that his dog water bowl is filled at all times, especially during hot weather.

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