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Showing posts with label watchdog. Show all posts
Showing posts with label watchdog. Show all posts

Thursday, December 28, 2017

Everything about your Irish Doodle

Everything about your Irish Doodle
  The Irish Doodle is a medium to large hybrid or mixed breed that crosses the Irish Setter with the Standard Poodle. She has a life span of 12 to 15 years and has talents in guarding. She is sometimes also called the Irish Doodle Setter or an Irish Setter/Poodle hybrid. She is known for being very lighthearted and is also a devoted dog.

Overview
  Also known as the Irish Doodle Setter, Irish Poo Setter, Irish Setterdoodle, and Irish Setterpoo, the Irish Doodle is a super cute, friendly, and light-hearted medium-sized crossbreed. A mix of Irish Setter and Poodle, it’s ideal for anyone seeking a dog who won’t shed a lot and who will be loyal, social, and intelligent. This dog rarely barks and will even get along great with children and pets.
  If the Irish Doodle sounds too good to be true, rest assured that it isn’t. Combing adorable looks and an equally loveable attitude, this crossbreed is becoming hugely popular. To find out if this dog would be the right fit for your family, check out some quick facts below.

Breed standards
Breed Type: Crossbreed
Breed Group: Watchdog, Sporting Dog, Guard Dog
Average lifespan: 10 to 13 years
Average size: 40-70 pounds
Coat appearance: Long, soft, wavy
Coloration: Apricot, black, white, black and tan, brown
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Singles, families with children and other pets, seniors, and those living in apartments or houses with or without yards
Temperament: Loyal, devoted, quiet, social, intelligent, friendly
Comparable Breeds: Irish Setter, Poodle

History
  The Irish Doodle is a hybrid canine, a cross between two very different breeds of hunting dog; a German retrieving dog, the Poodle, and an elegant red field hunting dog called the Irish Setter. The Poodle is often associated with France but it was actually developed in Germany, where it was known as a Pudlehund; Pudle meaning to splash around, and hund meaning dog.
  Poodles today are still sometimes employed to retrieve waterfowl, although the modern hunter is more likely to clip them short all over to prevent tangling in the brush and weeds. The Irish Setter was developed in Ireland, at some point in the 1700s as a field hunting dog and by the early 1800s, the breed was popular not just in Ireland, but also throughout the British Isles. Most experts believe that the Irish Setter is an ancestor of breeds such as the Irish Water Spaniel, the Gordon Setter, and the Irish Terrier, but written records from the time are nonexistent. The earliest Irish Setters were bred to be able to search out birds then hold their position, preventing them from entering the line of fire and they often came in either red and white or yellow and white, but in the mid-1800s their characteristic deep red color became the ideal. 
  They were imported into the United States as gun dogs and retrievers that specialized in retrieving gamebirds during the mid-1800s as well and were recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1878. Although the Irish Setter could be crossed with a Miniature or Toy Poodle, the most commonly included Poodle for this hybrid is the Standard Poodle.


Temperament
  These dogs are loving and affectionate, and are characterized by loyalty and devotion. They are eager to please and have significant native intelligence inherited from their parents. It is their intelligent mind and careful disposition that have made them equally good with kids and other family pets. This makes them an excellent family dog ideal for apartment life. Not do they just love the members of their families, but they are also comfortable meeting strangers.
  These dogs, especially the puppies, love attention until they’re well along in years. Though, it is alert and attentive. If it happens to come across anything suspicious, it would immediately alert its family.

Health
  She is generally a healthy dog and whether or not you believe in the idea of hybrid vigor there is still the possibility a puppy might inherit conditions one or both its parents are at risk of. For the Irish Doodle these include Addison's Disease, Bloat, Cushing's disease, epilepsy, Hypothyroidism, Legg-Perthes, Patellar Luxation, SA , Von Willebrand's Disease, OCD, CAD, HOD, Joint dysplasia, eye problems and Panosteitis. To avoid getting a dog with health problems you can improve the odds by only buying after seeing health clearances for both parents.

Care
  Bathing need not be a frequent occurrence with these canines, usually just a few times a year, but thorough brushing and styling will generally be needed on a regular basis. They type of grooming implements that will be required for this animal can vary a bit, depending on which parent breed they most resemble, although most will need clipping or trimming of some sort on a regular basis. 
  Crossbreeds that inherit the single-layer Poodle coat are less likely to shed and in some cases, may even be low shedding enough to be considered hypoallergenic, however, the coat of the Irish Setter is decidedly not hypoallergenic, and the full composition of the coat may not reveal itself until your Irish Doodle has reached maturity. It is also quite important to check and clean this dog’s ears on a regular basis as they can be prone to internal and external infections.

Training
  The trainability of the Irish doodle is unpredictable. The standard poodle is a happy-go-lucky and easily trainable dog. But the Irish setters are not always so, but would rather get bored easily. Those Irish doodles that take after their setter parents sometimes demand commitment and patience from their trainers. But once the training process is successfully over, your Irish doodle will be the best trained dog in the neighborhood.
  Begin obedience and pack leader trainings from an early age. Train them to socialize and get accustomed to meeting new faces. Like their parents, the Irish doodles are naturally clean, and hence, are easy to be housetrained.

Exercise Requirements
  The Irish Doodle doesn’t need a lot of exercise. Instead, a moderate amount of daily activity, through games like fetch and a walk or jog, will help keep your dog happy and in great shape. If you do have an enclosed, safe yard, you can even let your pooch play freely outside when the weather permits.

Grooming 
  She does not shed much and is hypoallergenic so is good for those with allergies. She should be brushed at least twice a week still to remove mats and tangles and keep the coat looking bright and healthy. Use a solid bristle brush and you should find her coat easy to brush. She will need to have a bath as and when she gets dirty enough to need one! Check her ears once a week and wipe them clean and clip her nails if they grow too long.

Children and other animals
  When training and early socialization is completed she is very good with children and other pets. They will be happy to play and affectionate towards them. Children should be taught how to play nicely with any dog, and that things like ear or tail pulling or messing around with their food at feeding time is not acceptable.

Is the Irish Doodle the Right Breed for you?
Moderate Maintenance: Regular grooming is required to keep its fur in good shape.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Difficult Training: The Irish Doodle isn't deal for a first time dog owner. Patience and perseverance are required to adequately train it.
Slightly Active: Not much exercise is required to keep this dog in shape. Owners who are frequently away or busy might find this breed suitable for their lifestyle.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.
The Irish Setter is a more energetic dog, but when combined with the Poodle, the puppies settle down a great deal. However, I recommend these pups for more active people and families with more energetic children. They will be perfect for the person wanting a devoted running companion, as well as a therapy dog
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Thursday, November 9, 2017

Everything about your German Pinscher

Everything about your German Pinscher
  The German Pinscher dog breed is muscular and agile, powerful yet graceful. A medium-sized dog with an elegant appearance, he’s admired as much for his beauty as for his intelligence. He’s a working breed and guard dog, and a devoted and loving family dog.
  In need of a strong leader, the assertive and determined German Pinscher is easy to train and intelligent. He's a strong watchdog, has lots of energy, and he's devoted to his family as long as small mammals aren't included. The German Pinscher remains playful well into adulthood and his smooth coat is easy to groom.

Overview
  The German Pinscher, also known at various times as the Deutscher Pinscher, the Reh Pinscher, the Medium Pinscher and the Standard Pinscher, is a medium-sized, energetic and watchful dog that makes an excellent guardian and family companion. The breed originated in Germany, where it was first recognized as a distinct breed in 1879. The first formal breed standard for the German Pinscher was written in 1884. Its name derives from the Germanic form of the French word “pincer,” which means “to seize” or “to nip”. The German Pinscher is an intense and proficient vermin-controller and rodent-killer. It was admitted into the American Kennel Club as a member of the Working Group in 2001.

Highlights
  • The German Pinscher is not recommended for homes with children under the age of nine.
  • A working breed, he needs daily exercise and cannot be left untrained or unexercised. Expect a healthy amount of exercise each day to curb negative behaviors.
  • The German Pinscher can fare all right in an apartment as long as he's walked at least twice a day. However, he's better suited to a home that has a fenced yard.
  • He has a strong prey drive and will chase anything that he deems worth chasing. He should be kept on lead while not in a secured area, and fences should be secure enough that he can't slip through them.
  • The German Pinscher is a strong-willed breed that needs a consistent and firm owner. He has been known to take over a home if rules are not set when he's young. With training and consistency, however, the German Pinscher will learn quickly and well.
  • Naturally suspicious of strangers, the German Pinschers makes an excellent guard dog. By the same token, he needs to be socialized from a young age to prevent the development of aggressive behavior.
  • The German Pinscher enjoys jumping up to greet loved ones, but proper training can correct this trait.
  • He will alert bark and he has a strong, loud voice, but he won't bark unnecessarily.
  • He thrives when he's part of a family and can participate in family activities. He isn't a breed who can live outside, and he's unhappy being forgotten while life is busy.
  • The German Pinscher can become destructive when he's bored. He's also known for his ability to gut toys at an alarming rate.

Other Quick Facts
  • When you look at a German Pinscher, you see a medium-size dog with a strong, square build; a powerful, elongated head that resembles a blunt wedge; medium-size dark oval eyes with a sharp and alert expression; and ears that are erect if cropped or V-shaped with a folding pleat if uncropped. The tail is docked.
  • The German Pinscher’s short, smooth coat lies close to the body and comes in several colors: Isabella (fawn); various shades of red, including stag, which is red intermingled with black hairs; and black or blue with red or tan markings.
Breed standards
AKC group: Working
UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan: 12 to 14 years
Average size: 25 to 45 pounds
Coat appearance: Dense and Short
Coloration: They come in a variety of colors including red, stag red – red with black hairs intermingled in the coat – and Isabella, which is a bay or fawn color; black or blue with red or tan markings. 
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: experienced dog owners, active singles, active families, house with a yard
Comparable Breeds: Doberman Pinscher, Miniature Pinscher

History
  Originally developed to eradicate vermin, the German Pinscher originated in Germany somewhere between the late 1700s and late 1800s. There is no clear evidence of when he was developed, but a painting that dates from about 1780 portrays a dog similar in appearance to the German Pinscher.
  He was a foundation dog for many breeds, including the Doberman Pinscher and the Miniature Pinscher. The breed was founded by the Rat Pinscher, also known as the Rat Catcher or the Great Ratter, a breed that became extinct in the early 1800s. The German Pinscher was recognized as a breed in 1895.
  During the World Wars, the German Pinscher came close to extinction. Two breed colors did in fact die out: the pure black and the salt-and-pepper. After World War II, a West German named Werner Jung began breeding German Pinschers and saved the breed. German Pinschers were first imported into the United States in the late 1970s.
  In 2004, the German Pinscher competed at its first Westminster Kennel Club. The Best of Breed winner was Ch. Windamir Hunter des Charmettes with the Best of Opposite Sex to Best of Breed won by Ch. Windamir's Chosen One.


Extinct varieties
  There are several now-extinct varieties of the German Pinscher:
  • Schweizer Pinscher (also called the Jonataler Pinscher, Pfisterlinge, Silberpinsch, Swiss Salt and Pepper Pinscher, Swiss Shorthair Pinscher)
  • Seidenpinscher (also called the German Silky Pinscher, Silky Pinscher)
  Some of these may have recently been re-formed from the German Pinscher and marketed as rare breeds for those seeking unique pets.

Personality
  Halfway in size between a Miniature Pinscher and a Doberman Pinscher, the German Pinscher is a medium-sized powerhouse – fearless, imposing, and completely devoted to the family he loves. German Pinschers have big personalities and tend to believe the world revolves around them. They are fiercely protective of their territory and family, and despite their medium size make excellent guard dogs and can be counted on to take down an intruder with shocking efficiency. 
 This breed is quite dependent upon human companionship and will want to be included in every aspect of home life, from work to play to sharing the bed. German Pinschers are an excellent choice for experienced dog owners and for people who lead an active lifestyle.

Health Problems
  Because the German Pinscher has a fairly small gene pool there are risks for a number of inherited conditions. Some of the health problems to which this breed is prone include hip and elbow dysplasia, cataracts, thyroid disorders, cardiac disease, and von Willebrand disease. Responsible breeding practices are the best way to prevent the passing of these conditions.

Care
  The grooming requirements for the German Pinscher is fairly simple: the occasional brushing and wash. German Pinschers love to be involved in family activities and hate to be left in the kennel or alone. They are very dedicated to their family, their devotion going to the extent of supervising housework, providing entertainment in the evenings, guiding gardening, and sharing their master’s bed.
  As the dog is full of energy it should be given good mental and physical exercises or it can get bored and frustrated.

Living Conditions
  The German Pinscher will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. It should have a tightly fenced-in yard. This breed will run off chasing anything that moves quickly.

Trainability
  Pinschers have an independent streak in them, but are generally easy to train. They possess a strong desire to please and pick up on new tasks quickly when rewarded with affection and treats. Consistency is important, as their independent side makes them prone to testing boundaries. Pinschers can be incredibly manipulative, their faces often look like they are smiling, and their eyes are quite expressive. The soft at heart can be easily walked all over by a Pinscher. But once leadership is established and basic obedience is mastered, however, German Pinschers can excel in advanced obedience, tracking and agility activities.
  German Pinschers, despite their imposing look, make excellent service and therapy dogs. Individual dogs with steady temperaments enjoy working with the elderly and infirm, especially if it involves having lots of attention and treats lavished upon them.

Exercise 
  The German Pinscher requires a lot of exercise. This breed needs to be taken on a daily, brisk, long walk or jog where the dog is made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as instinct tells a dog the leader leads the way and that leader needs to be the human. They will enjoy running alongside you when you bicycle, playing in the yard, or a walk around the block.

Grooming Needs
  The German Pinscher is low-maintenance when it comes to grooming. Weekly brushing with a mitt will remove dead hair, and they only need to be bathed when they start giving off a doggie odor. Active Pinscher will wear their toenails down naturally, but they do not, monthly trimmings will be in order. If the nails click on hard floors, it's time for a trim.
  Check the ears on a weekly basis for signs of redness, irritation, or wax buildup. Cleanse with a veterinarian-approved solution and a cotton ball. Brush the dog's teeth at least once per week to help keep bad breath in check, and keep teeth and gums healthy.

Children And Other Pets
  The German Pinscher usually does well with children if he's brought up with them from puppyhood. But because of his assertive nature, he does best with older children, preferably those over the age of nine. An older Pinscher who's unfamiliar with children will probably do best in a home with kids who are mature enough to interact with him properly.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should be left unsupervised with a child.
  The same holds true for the German Pinscher's attitude toward some kinds of pets; he does best if he's been raised with them, or at least socialized to them when he's still young. But remember that he was developed to hunt and kill vermin. He's got a high prey drive that's hardwired, and no amount of training will keep him from going after a pet rat. He's not a good match with small mammals.

Is the German Pinscher the Right Breed for you?
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep. Little to no trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Easy Training: The German Pinscher is known to listen to commands and obey its owner. Expect fewer repetitions when training this breed.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Good for New Owners: This breed is well suited for those who have little experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  The German Pinscher played a role in the ancestry of the Doberman and other Pinscher breeds and is closely associated with the Standard Schnauzer. He is smaller than the Doberman but bigger than the Miniature Pinscher.



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Wednesday, November 8, 2017

Everything about your Bedlington Terrier

Everything about your Bedlington Terrier
  If you saw this dog walking down the street, you may do a double take. Was that a lamb or a dog? The Bedlington Terrier is most certainly a dog, even if it’s unusual looking. A true terrier in every sense of the word, this breed makes a wonderful family addition. He loves playing with the kids and enjoys a good cuddle session at the end of the day. He’ll also keep an eye out for people he thinks are unsavory and let you know if they’re getting a little too close for comfort.
  When he’s not vying to be the center of attention, the Bedlington Terrier is active and athletic, and does well in agility competitions, Earthdog trials and in the show ring. He gets along well with other dogs when raised with them and will give smaller outdoor animals a run for their money. Read on to learn more about this interesting dog.

Overview
  The Bedlington Terrier, also known as the Rodberry or Rothbury Terrier, the Northumberland Fox Terrier, the North Counties Terrier, the Gypsy Dog or simply the Bedlington, comes from a small mining village in the county of Northumberland, England. This lamb-like dog, with its pear-shaped head and arched back, looks like nothing else in the canine world. While the Bedlington’s body type and coat do not resemble that of the typical terrier, their personalities do. Bedlingtons have boundless energy and are intelligent, tenacious, friendly and bold. They are terrific family dogs and form strong bonds with their human companions. Despite its wooly cuteness, this is a tough breed with a strong work ethic – a terrier through and through. The Bedlington Terrier was accepted by the American Kennel Club in 1886 and is a member of the Terrier Group.

Highlights
  • Bedlingtons can be stubborn at times.
  • Early socialization with other pets is a must to prevent problems.
  • Bedlington Terriers need exercise and mental stimulation or they will get bored, which leads to trouble.
  • Males can be fierce fighters if challenged by another dog.
  • Bedlingtons are highly intelligent and moderately easy to train. They don't respond to harsh training methods.
  • Bedlingtons require grooming once or twice weekly to maintain the coat and prevent matting.
  • Bedlingtons can be one-person dogs.
  • Bedlingtons are terriers and like to dig.
  • Bedlingtons require a fenced yard. They will chase other animals and they are very fast.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Bedlington has a very different look than other terriers, with his unusual coat, roached back, arched loin, hare feet and distinctive, springy gait. The tail, shaped like a scimitar, tapers to a point.
  • The Bedlington has a narrow head covered with a topknot that is lighter than the body color, dark, small, almond-shaped eyes, triangular ears with rounded tips and a thin, velvety texture, and a mild, gentle expression, belying the fact that he is a terrier at heart.
  • In addition to backing off animals as wily as foxes and badgers, the Bedlington Terrier is an excellent water dog.
  • Bedlington Terriers often live for upwards of 17 years.
  • Borrowing form the dog's simultaneous pluck and likability, non-league UK soccer club the Bedlington Terriers have recently brought the breed's name to prominence in Hollywood.   
Breed standards
AKC group: Terriers
UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan: 11-16 years
Average size: 17 to 23 pounds
Coat appearance: Corded, Harsh and Rough, and Short
Coloration: white, blue, liver, sandy, blue and tan, sandy and tan or liver and tan
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles and seniors, apartments, houses with/without yards, watchdog
Temperament: Playful, loyal, gentle, friendly
Comparable Breeds: Whippet, Dandie Dinmont Terrier


History
  The Bedlington Terrier was developed in the north of England, but where he came from is anybody's guess. One theory has it that he traveled with Rom, or gypsies, who used him to poach game on the estates they passed by. His talents in ridding the land of rats, badgers, and other vermin drew the attention of the local squires, who acquired some of the dogs for themselves.
An image of a Bedlington Terrier, circa 1889.
  One of their noble fans was Lord Rothbury, whose estate was located in Bedlington in the county of Northumberland. For a time, they were known as Rothbury terriers, but eventually the name Bedlington stuck. The first dog to actually be called a Bedlington Terrier, in 1825, was Ainsley's Piper, owned by Joseph Ainsley of Bedlington. Piper went up against his first badger when he was only 8 months old, and he was still showing other dogs how it was done when he was old, toothless, and nearly blind.
  There is speculation that the Whippet was added to the breed at some point to increase the dog's speed and agility. He also has similarities to the Dandie Dinmont, Soft Coated Wheaten, and Kerry Blue Terriers, so he may share common ancestors with them.
  The popularity of Bedlingtons crossed all social boundaries. They were favorites of factory and mine workers, who used them to rid the premises of rats and then raced them in their off hours, against each other and against Whippets.
  Bedlingtons joined other dogs in the show ring in the mid-1800s, and the National Bedlington Terrier Club was formed in England in 1877. The first Bedlington Terrier to be registered by the American Kennel Club was Ananias in 1886. Today the Bedlington ranks 128th among the 155 breeds and varieties recognized by the AKC.

Personality

  Alert, energetic, and intelligent, the Bedlington is an excellent companion and watchdog. He enjoys being the center of attention and likes to entertain his people. He can be aggressive toward other dogs of the same sex and will chase small furry animals.
  Temperament is affected by a number of factors, including heredity, training, and socialization. Puppies with nice temperaments are curious and playful, willing to approach people and be held by them. Choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one who's beating up his littermates or the one who's hiding in the corner. Always meet at least one of the parents — usually the mother is the one who's available — to ensure that they have nice temperaments that you're comfortable with. Meeting siblings or other relatives of the parents is also helpful for evaluating what a puppy will be like when he grows up.
  Like every dog, Bedlingtons need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Bedlington puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog. Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.

Health 
  This is a healthy breed, but the Bedlington Terrier has a few health problems owners should be aware of. One of the most common issues in the breed is copper toxicosis, a hereditary disease where the liver can’t expel dietary copper, which leads to a buildup in the body that result in illness and death. Be sure to have your Bedlington tested. Other issues include renal cortical hypoplasia, retinal dysplasia, patellar luxation and distichiasis.

Care
  Bedlington Terriers are a hardy breed with moderate activity levels. They are capable of running at high speeds, so a safely fenced area is important. They are not suited to living outdoors. They are small enough to be appropriate for an apartment as long as they have a safe place to exercise.
  Exercise for the Bedlington can mean a nice walk or a vigorous game of fetch. He can jog with you or go on a hike. You can also train him for agility, obedience, or tracking. He's quiet in the home, happy to relax on the sofa with you.
  The Bedlington is intelligent, and that intelligence makes him only moderately easy to train. He does best when you can persuade him that doing what you want is really his idea or benefits him in some way. Use positive reinforcement techniques such as praise, play, and food rewards. Harsh words and physical force will not work with this breed, as they will only bring out his stubborn streak and begin a battle of wills that you will probably lose.
  Like all dogs, Bedlington puppies can be destructive. Crate them to prevent them from getting into trouble if you're not around to supervise.

Living Conditions
  This breed will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. They are fairly active indoors and will do okay without a yard.

Training
  Even though this is an intelligent breed, he’s still a terrier. You may have a challenge on your hands, especially if you haven’t had much dog-training practice. Bedlington Terriers tend to have a mind of their own, so they may not take kindly to your commands. For the best results, treats and positive reinforcement will garner what you want. If you let him think that the training benefits him, he’ll be more likely to pick up good behaviors.
  Once basic obedience has been taught, you may want to enroll your Bedlington Terrier in agility or Earthdog training. He loves to dig, so Earthdog will help him tap into these instincts. And with his lithe body, he’s a natural for agility courses.

Activity Requirements
  This breed requires moderate exercise and has been known to tailor their activity level to that of their owner. Older people can raise an active, happy Bedlington just by taking daily walks just as a young person who brings their Bedlington on jogs can, too. Apartment living is OK for the Bedlington, so long as daily walks are part of his schedule.
  Bedlington Terriers enjoy playing with children, however they can be counted on to set their own boundaries. Children should be cautioned not to play too roughly with this breed, as they won't hesitate to nip or bite when pushed too far.

Grooming
  The Bedlington coat is a mixture of hard and soft hair with a texture that is crisp but not wiry. It tends to curl, especially on the head and face.
  The distinctive look of the Bedlington, with the Mohawk-type head style and shaved ears, doesn’t come naturally. It is achieved through regular grooming, including bathing, brushing and styling. The Bedlington’s coat must be trimmed every six to eight weeks to maintain its look. Brush it once or twice a week. Frequent bathing and heavy conditioners are not recommended because they will soften the coarse coat.
  The Bedlington’s unique hairstyle may look simple, but it is not for beginners. It is best to take him to a professional groomer who is familiar with the breed unless you are extremely ambitious and skilled. If you want to learn how to create it, apprentice yourself to a Bedlington breeder or show dog handler. The Bedlington Terrier Club of America gives a detailed explanation on its website of how the dog should be groomed for the show ring.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually once a month. Brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath. Check the ears weekly for dirt, redness or a bad odor that can indicate an infection. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball dampened with a gentle ear cleaner recommended by your veterinarian. Watery eyes and tear stains are not uncommon with the light-colored Bedlington. Wipe around the eyes with a soft, damp cloth to minimize staining. Introduce your Bedlington to grooming at an early age so he will become accustomed to it and accept it willingly.

Children And Other Pets
  When he's raised with children, the Bedlington can be an energetic playmate. He's probably best suited to homes with older children. While a Bedlington will tolerate a certain amount of rough handling, he will set limits when things get too rough, and he doesn't understand that a child's skin isn't as tough as another dog's.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Bedlingtons can get along with other dogs, especially if they're raised with them, but they may be aggressive toward dogs of the same sex. And like most terriers, they might not start a fight, but they won't back down from one. Bedlingtons can be fierce fighters if aroused, so be cautious when introducing them to new canine companions, especially other adults of the same sex. Male Bedlingtons especially will persist in a fight until major damage is done. A Bedlington might learn to get along with your indoor cat if he's raised with him, but outdoor cats and other animals will be fair game for him to chase.

Is the Bedlington Terrier the Right Breed for you?
High Maintenance: Grooming should be performed often to keep the dog's coat in good shape. Occasional trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Moderately Easy Training: The Bedlington Terrier is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Good for New Owners: This breed is well suited for those who have little experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  Bedlington Terrier puppies are born black or brown. As they mature, the coat lightens to blue, sandy, liver, blue and tan, sandy and tan, or liver and tan. The tan markings are found over the eyes, inside the ears, under the tail, and in traces on the inside of the legs.

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Monday, April 10, 2017

Everything about your Sealyham Terrier

Everything about your Sealyham Terrier
   The Sealyham Terrier dog breed was originally bred to hunt otters, foxes, and badgers. Today these clowns of the terrier family are primarily companion dogs and a good choice for the novice terrier owner.

Overview
  The Sealy peers out at the world from beneath bushy eyebrows, ever curious about the goings-on around him. Although he certainly has the look of a feisty terrier, the Sealyham Terrier doesn't have the typical attitude. He's a very mellow, laid-back dog, with modest exercise requirements and a clownish spirit. He even gets along well with other dogs. All these traits serve to make him a good pet for someone who loves the high-style look of a terrier but isn’t enamored with or capable of handling that in-your-face kind of dog.
  The Sealyham Terrier is all terrier on the outside, with the scruffy charm of his cousins and the white color of his ancestor, the West Highland White Terrier. But on the inside he's a very different dog.
  Originally bred to hunt badger, he's better described as a lover, not a fighter. He's a playful dog with a big sense of humor, and while he has a tendency to bark a bit more than most people might like, at only 20 to 25 pounds he is the perfect size for an apartment. He's a light shedder, inclined to be child-friendly and dog-friendly, and doesn't even have an overwhelming desire to chase cats.

Highlights
  • If your Sealyham Terrier becomes overweight, he can develop back problems. Be sure to monitor his food intake and give him regular exercise to keep him in shape.
  • Sealies are independent and can be stubborn when it comes to housetraining. Crate training is recommended.
  • They are reserved with strangers and make good watchdogs. Their bark is surprisingly loud and deep, but they can be trained to be quiet on command.
  • Sealies are fond of chasing rabbits, birds, and even other dogs and cats. Be sure to keep your Sealyham Terrier on leash when he's not in a secure area.
  • Because of their unusual looks and small size, they could be targets for dog thieves. Although Sealyham Terriers do well outdoors when it's cool (they don't like heat), they should be kept in your house when you can't supervise them.
  • Sealyham Terriers are a rare breed. It may be difficult to locate a reputable breeder, and even when you locate one, you may have to wait several months for a litter to be born.
  • Sealyham Terriers can be aggressive toward dogs they don't know, even dogs much larger than they are. Keep your Sealyham Terrier under control until you know that both he and the other dog are friendly to each other.
  • Although loyal and affectionate with their families, Sealyham Terriers can be a bit reserved around strangers.
  • Sealyham Terriers are happy little dogs, but they can have a dominant personality if not kept in check by a firm, consistent master.
  • Sealyham Terriers have an independent, stubborn streak. Successfully training them requires firm, consistent handling. They respond well to positive reinforcement techniques such as food rewards, praise, and play.
  • Never buy a Sealyham Terrier from a puppy mill, a pet store, or a breeder who doesn't provide health clearances or guarantees. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies and who breeds for sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts

  • The Sealyham’s long, broad head and rectangular body are two of the features that differentiate him from other terriers.
  • The Sealyham’s double coat can be all white or white with lemon, tan or badger markings on the head and ears. “Badger” is a mixture of white, gray, brown and black hairs.
  • Comparable Breeds: Dandie Dinmont Terrier, West Highland White Terrier

History
  The Sealyham Terrier derives his name from Sealyham, the estate of Captain John Tucker Edwards, in Haverfordwest, Wales. Captain Edwards developed the breed in the mid-1800s to hunt for small but tough game such as badgers, otters, and foxes. He crossed various breeds and tested the offspring for gameness and hunting ability.
  As word got out about the little white terriers, they became popular in England. In 1903, the breed made an appearance in the show ring, and the first Sealyham Terrier club was formed in 1908. In 1910, the breed was officially recognized by England's Kennel Club. The breed's first champion in England was a dog named St. Brides Demon. He achieved his championship in 1911.
  Sealies were especially popular in the early 1900s. They stood out in the show ring, and show entries often were in the hundreds. At the Pembrokeshire Hunt Hound Puppy and Sealyham Terrier show in Slade, Pembrokeshire, in 1914, , there were 600 Sealyham   Terriers entered, with 71 in the Open Dog Class and 64 in the Open Bitch Class, numbers that have never been equalled since.
  Sealyham Terriers were also recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1911, shortly after the first Sealies were imported into the U.S. The American Sealyham Terrier Club was formed in 1913.
  Since their show debut in San Mateo, California, in 1911, they have remained a popular show dog. Among the breed's many honors, a Sealyham Terrier has won Best in Show at Westminster four times.
  They have not, however, ever become a very popular dog with the general public. Despite his excellent companion dog credentials, the Sealy today is a rare breed, ranking 149th among the 155 breeds and varieties recognized by the AKC.



Temperament
  An independent dog, the Sealy is perfectly fine with being left alone while his humans work but he is also thrilled to snuggle up on their laps when they get home. This breed does tend to be relentless barkers however; they are not quite as bad as other terrier breeds. Their personalities and clown-like antics will keep the family laughing for hours.
  The Sealy might be small but he doesn’t understand the concept of this. Because he can be food and toy aggressive, this breed is not appropriate for families with young children. Considering his strong instinct to chase, he should not live with cats or other small animals. If raised with another dog in the home, the Sealy will get along famously with it, but can be aggressive toward strange dogs.

Health
  This is a hardy breed with few breed specific health problems. The main hereditary problem highlighted by the American Sealyham Terrier Club is an eye condition called lens luxation, for which there are DNA tests. Lens luxation is a condition in which the lens slips out of position in the eyeball due to the weakening of the fibers that holds it in place.
  This in turn blocks the flow of fluids in the eye, leading to a painful increase in intra-ocular pressure glaucoma and often irreparable optic nerve damage, leading to visual field loss and eventual blindness.
  As of November 2011, the Kennel Club has not highlighted any specific concerns regarding the breed's health to conformation show judges. Due to the low numbers of the breed, two of the most prevalent problems facing the breed today is the popular sire effect and the general problem of genetic diversity within the breed.

Care
  The Sealyham Terrier's small size and robust build make him a good choice for city or country dwellers. He's relatively inactive indoors and can adapt to life without a yard as long as he's walked daily. If he does have a yard, it should be fenced to prevent him from chasing other animals or wandering off to go hunting.
  Sealyhams are rather low-key, not "busy" like most terriers. Due to their size, their loyalty to their families, and their preference for cool temperatures, they do best as housedogs.
Like most terriers, Sealies likes to dig and bark. This dog is an independent thinker and requires firm and consistent handling, but he responds well to training with positive reinforcement techniques such as food rewards, praise, and play.
  Sometimes Sealies can be difficult to housetrain, but patience and a regular schedule usually brings success. Crate-training is recommended.

Living Conditions
  Good for apartment living. They are relatively inactive indoors and will do okay without a yard. Prefer cool weather.

Training
  Sealyham Terriers are feisty and strong-willed dogs. They require an assertive but kind family that won’t let the dog walk all over them. The Sealy needs regular training sessions to keep him from misbehaving. Consistency, along with loads of praise and treats, is best when working with a Sealy. Training should begin from the time you get the new puppy. This should go on throughout the dog’s life to ensure that he never forgets his place within the family.
  Sealies were bred to hunt small animals so they do remarkably well at Earthdog competitions. Being the mellowest of the terriers, this breed can be wonderful therapy dogs as well as family companions. Of course, with a lot of hard work, the Sealy can do well in obedience trials as well as in the breed ring.

Exercise
  This breed needs a daily walk. Play will take care of a lot of their exercise needs, however, as with all breeds, play will not fulfill their primal instinct to walk. Dogs that do not get to go on daily walks are more likely to display behavior problems. They will also enjoy a good romp in a safe, open area off lead, such as a large, fenced-in yard. The breed is a low-energy dog that makes a good walking companion. The overriding characteristic about Sealyhams is that they are low energy, couch potatoes. They are not "busy," not "active" and therefore make a low-key companion.

Grooming
  The Sealy has a long, weather-resistant double coat that doesn’t shed much but requires stripping or clipping in addition to regular brushing or combing with a slicker brush, pin brush, or stainless steel Greyhound comb. Be sure you brush or comb all the way down to the skin. The beard requires daily combing to keep it clean.
  The Sealy doesn’t shed much at all, but his hard terrier coat may need special care. If the show ring is in his future, the Sealyham's coat will have to be “hand-stripped,” a labor-intensive task that involves pulling out dead coat a little bit at a time, using a special tool.   Dogs whose career involves your sofa and garden will simply need to be kept brushed and occasionally clipped for neatness and to minimize shedding and matting of the coat. Clipping will soften the texture of the coat, so think about whether that’s important to you before you have it done.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  All Terriers are rambunctious, even the laidback Sealyham. This breed is best suited to families with older children who understand how to handle and interact with dogs.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how good-natured, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Sealies are generally good with other pets, including cats, especially if they're raised with them. They can be aggressive toward dogs they don't know.

Did You Know?
  The Sealyham is named after the estate of the man who developed the breed, Captain John Edwardes, who lived in Wales.



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Tuesday, January 17, 2017

Everything about your Keeshond

Everything about your Keeshond
  The Keeshond is an old dog breed, once a companion and watchdog on the barges and boats that traveled the canals and rivers of Holland in the 17th and 18th centuries. He’s almost exclusively a companion dog today. He’s a people-lover; willing to participate in all family activities, he thrives with people who expect this of their dog. He is lively, alert, and intelligent — qualities that won him status as the most beloved dog in Holland.

Overview
  Originating from the Arctic region, the Keeshond is believed to be related to the Chow Chow, Finnish Spitz and more. Especially popular with the Dutch, the breed is known for protecting farms, riverboats and barges. Extremely friendly, the dog still makes for a great watchdog due to his bark, but will be nice to strangers. A great companion, the Keeshond makes a great family pet and is very quick to learn.
  While the Keeshond will issue a stern bark when someone approaches his property, he's such a love that he'll readily accept anyone his owner brings into the household. In truth, he isn't a very effective guard dog.
  The Keeshond is a fan of cool weather. He likes spending time outside when the weather is crisp. However, he isn't a backyard dog; he's too people-oriented for that. He needs to live inside with his family and participate in all their activities.

Highlights
  • The Keeshond is never reluctant to issue a warning bark to alert his family to strangers. His propensity to bark can be a problem if he's left alone too much and becomes bored.
  • The best way to make a Keeshond miserable is to keep him separated from his family. He was bred to be a companion, and he needs to be part of family life. If you don't want a dog joining in family barbeques, card games, or movie time, consider a more independent breed.
  • Keeping the Keeshond coat in good condition isn't terribly difficult, but the breed does shed like crazy once or twice or year. Luckily, frequent bathing isn't usually needed — the Keeshond scores low on doggie odor.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts

  • The Keeshond is a member of the Spitz, or Nordic, family of dogs. He has a wedge-shaped head with a foxy expression, dark-brown eyes that are almond-shaped, and a lionlike mane around his neck.
  • Early Keeshonden were known by such names as “fox dog,” “overweight Pomeranians” and “Dutch barge dogs.”
Breed standards
AKC group: Non-sporting
UKC group: Northern Breed
Average lifespan: 13 - 15 years
Average size: 35 - 45 pounds
Coat appearance: Harsh outer coat, downy undercoat
Coloration: Gray, black and cream
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Medium-sized, sturdy body with a striking resemblance to the Samoyed; dark eyes with black markings on the face; fluffy coat and exterior, erect ears and thick tail that curls over the back
Possible alterations: None

Comparable Breeds: Samoyed, Schipperke

History 
  If you were to travel back to the Amsterdam of in the early 1800s, you'd see a familiar face on the barges passing by: the Keeshond. Paintings by Dutch artists such as Jan Steen portray a dog that is not much different than the Keeshond we see today. This handsome dog is related to other Spitz breeds such as the Chow Chow, Norwegian Elkhound, Finnish Spitz, and Pomeranian. The little Pom is one of his closest relatives.
  The Dutch barge dog rode on small vessels that traveled the Rhine River, acting as both watchdogs and companions to barge captains. Their travels made them known well beyond   The Netherlands, but they really gained a name during the political turmoil that gripped Holland in the late 18th century. The leader of the Patriot party, Kees de Gyselaer, was accompanied by one of the personable dogs, also named Kees, and he came to symbolize the Patriot movement. Unfortunately, when the Patriots were defeated the dogs’ popularity plummeted and eventually only a few remained.
  The Keeshond’s fortunes turned around in 1920 when Baroness van Hardenbroek took an interest in the breed and helped bring it back into favor. A decade later, the American Kennel Club recognized the breed.
  The Keeshond is now considered the national dog of The Netherlands. In the United States, he ranks 87 th among the breeds registered by the AKC.

Personality
  The Keeshond was bred more to be a companion than a watchdog. He's not a hunter, nor does he have an innate desire for any special job. He is, first and foremost, a devoted friend.
  He's also intelligent and highly trainable. He's so smart, in fact, that he can be a little mischievous. Expect the unexpected with these fellows. Despite this, the breed easily learns proper canine manners and can do well in the obedience ring.
  A Keeshond is a lively, alert dog, full of personality. When he's excited or happy, he likes to share his joy with everyone, often spinning in circles. His outgoing personality, as well as his love of adults and children alike, endears him to all.
  As with every dog, the Keeshond needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences. Socialization helps ensure that your Keeshond puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.
  Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.

Care
  Although the Keeshond can survive outdoors in cool or temperate climates, it is a very sociable dog that prefers to live indoors with its human family. As it is a lively breed, moderate exercise, such as a brisk on-leash walk or a vigorous game session, is sufficient for meeting its needs. The dog's double coat, meanwhile, requires brushing occasionally every week and more during the shedding seasons.

Health 
  Keeshonden are not without health issues. They are generally healthy animals however; predisposed problems can prove to be detrimental. These diseases/disorders include Addison’s disease, Hip Dysplasia, Diabetes Mellitus, Progressive Retinal Atrophy, Cataracts, Hypothyroidism, Von Willebrand’s Disease, Allergies and Epilepsy. If left untreated, some of these issues can jeopardize the life of a Keeshond. Other ailment might be problematic but with proper care, medication and treatment, a dog can live a long, fulfilling and comfortable life.

Living conditions
  Will be okay in an apartment, although they should at least have an average-sized yard. Keeshonden prefer cool climates; they cannot withstand the heat well due to their thick coats.

Training
  The Keeshond is a fast learner that seems to be able to read his owner’s mind. Although they do have an independent streak, with patience and kindness, the Keeshond can be an incredibly obedient yet still fun-loving companion. He needs an owner who is caring and gentle. Repetitive training sessions that are calm and result in the dog getting some kind of yummy reward are most successful. Harsh words and treatment will get you nowhere with a Keeshond. They require love, kindness and easy instruction during all training sessions. Positive reinforcement will have your Keeshond the picture perfect companion.
  Keeshonden can go from the home to the breed ring to the obedience in zero to sixty seconds. They also make great therapy dogs. Their adorable appearance coupled with their caring nature make them perfect for visiting ailing kids and adults in hospitals, rehabilitation facilities and nursing bills.

Exercise Requirements
  Keeshonden do not need a boatload of exercise daily. Inside of a fenced backyard, coupled with a family member who loves to play fetch will provide the average Keeshond with all the running time he needs to stay healthy, happy and out of trouble. Without appropriate exercise, Keeshonden can become unruly and rip things apart inside of the house. Nobody wants their home destroyed so at the very least, a few brisk walks daily will keep your Keeshond content.  Exercise shouldn’t be boring and repetitive. It should be spontaneous at times.

Grooming
  The Keeshond has a long, abundant double coat with a harsh texture. There’s a lot of it, and the dogs shed heavily. The adult coat comes in when the dog is 18 months to 2 years old.
  Although the Keeshond’s coat looks like it might take a lot of work to maintain, it can be kept up with brushing once or twice a week — more often when he’s shedding. You’ll spend about an hour caring for the coat each week. Grooming tools to have on hand are a soft slicker brush for the cottony puppy coat, a pin brush, a stainless steel Greyhound comb, and a good pair of shears or scissors for trimming the hair on the feet. Ask your puppy’s breeder for advice on how to groom the dog or visit this breeder’s website for detailed grooming tips.
If you do a good job of keeping the Keeshond brushed, he shouldn’t need a bath more than two or three times a year. Whatever you do, don’t shave the coat. It serves as insulation from heat and cold.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  The Keeshond is a great pet for families with children. He's a playful, good-natured companion for kids of all ages. And as long as he is well socialized and well trained, the Keeshond gets along well with other dogs and pets.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.

Is this breed right for you?
  A family-friendly breed, the Keeshond gets along great with children and other animals of the house. Playful and adventurous, the dog loves to romp outside and will do best with a decent-sized yard that he can have access to. Not exactly a guard dog due to his friendly and outgoing nature, the Keeshond does make for a wonderful watchdog. Barking at anything he's unsure of, he does his best to protect his loved ones. With a double coat, the dog requires brushing every other week and sheds twice a year.

Did You Know?
  The Keeshond is a Dutch breed who served as a watchdog on barges and is named for an 18th century political figure — Kees de Gyselaer — who owned one of the dogs. The name is pronounced “kayz hund,” not “keesh hound,” and the plural is “Keeshonden.”

A dream day in the life of a Keeshond
  A family dog through and through, the Keeshond will be happiest when waking up surrounded by his loved ones. Running outside to check the perimeter of the house, he'll play and romp around a bit before returning inside. Affectionate, he loves getting petted and praised. Playing around with the little members of the family, he'll enjoy an evening stroll before having a bit of family time and will then doze off with the rest of the gang.

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