LUV My dogs: vaccinations

LUV My dogs

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Showing posts with label vaccinations. Show all posts
Showing posts with label vaccinations. Show all posts

Wednesday, May 21, 2014

Dog Adoption Checklist

Dog Adoption Checklist
  Congratulations on deciding to adopt a dog! You are embarking on a wonderful and rewarding relationship. When you adopt a dog there are many responsibilities and lifestyle adjustments to consider.

Questions for All Adopters:
  • Do you have any other dogs and how will they react to a new dog?
  • Is your current residence suited to the dog you’re considering?
  • How will your social life or work obligations affect your ability to care for a dog?
  • Do you have a plan for your new dog during vacations and/or work travel?
  • How do the people you live with feel about having a dog in the house?
  • Are you  intolerant of hair, dirt and other realities of sharing your home with a dog, such as allergies?
  • Do you or any of your household/family members have health issues that may be affected by a dog?
  • What breed of dog is the best fit with your current lifestyle?
  • Is there tension in the home? Dogs quickly pick up on stress in the home, and it can exacerbate their health and behavior problems.
  • Is there an adult in the family who has agreed to be ultimately responsible for the dog’s care?
Your dog is more likely to get loose from you and lost in the first few weeks they are home than any other time.  Be sure to provide them a secure collar and ID tag as soon as possible.  Actually, its a great thing to bring with you when you pick up your newly adopted pet.  And make sure they wear their collar at all times.  Often people make the mistake of removing the collar when their dog is in the house thinking they will never get out of the house without it.  Sadly, too often owners forget to put the collar back on or the dog slips out the door unexpectedly and is now lost without any identification.  Get a collar and tag as soon as possible!

  All dogs require a veterinary exam, a series of vaccinations and regular grooming.  While we will given them their Parvo Distemper (DHLPP) vaccination, Bordatella (INB - kennel cough) and worming, puppies may require additional vaccinations and worming after adoption, so make sure and follow up with your vet for these if needed.  Also all dogs will need their Rabies vaccination if they have not had it already.

  Your home and yard should provide proper confinement and reasonable space for the size of your dog.  When outside, your new dog or puppy should always be on a leash if you don’t have a safe enclosure.

   New house pets should be closely supervised when with other pets and children while they become familiar with their new home.

  Housebreaking your new dog should be done with encouraging words. They should be taken outside after meals and right before and after sleeping. Crate training is an effective training method. There is lots of useful training information on the Web and specifically crate training.

  All dogs need exercise, so allow your dog to play outside everyday. Young dogs and puppies may have extra energy, causing them to chew. Try not to leave them alone for long periods of time and consider crate training to housebreak and curb bad habits.  Organized training is also beneficial and there are several obedience training schools in our area.  Ask friends or other dog owners for the name of someone you can trust. If you cannot find a trainer, HSOP will recommend someone for you.

 In addition to a collar and tag, we also encourage microchipping which we also can do for you here at the Shelter for a small fee.

New Dog Supplies Check List
  • Dog collar, leash, and identification tags
  • Nutritious dog food
  • Dog crate or carrier
  • Dog bed
  • Food and water bowls
  • Dog grooming tools (shampoo, brush and nail clippers)
  • Dog toys
  • Treats & chews  
Other Considerations:
  • What do you expect your dog to contribute to your life? For example, do you want a running and hiking buddy, or is your idea of exercise watching it on TV?
  • If you are thinking of adopting a young dog, do you have the time and patience to work with the dog through its adolescence, taking house-breaking, chewing and energy-level into account? 
  • Have you considered your lifestyle carefully and determined whether a younger or older dog would be a better match for you?
  • Can you train and handle a dog with behavior issues or are you looking for an easy-going friend?
  • Do you need a dog who will be reliable with children or one you can take with you when you travel?
  • Do you want a dog who follows you all around the house or would you prefer a less clingy, more independent character?
Size Considerations:
  • What size dog can your home accommodate?
  • Will you have enough room if your dog grows to be bigger than expected?
  • What size dog would suit the other people who live in or visit your home regularly?
  • Do you have another dog to consider when choosing the size of your next dog?
  • How big a dog can you travel comfortably with?
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Wednesday, April 2, 2014

Spring tips for dogs

Spring tips for dogs
  Spring is here!! And that means it’s time to get off the couch, grab the leash and get outside with your dog. I cannot think of a more exciting time of year for us humans or our canine friends when everything is blooming and hope springs eternal . And speaking of Spring, we’ve got lots of new articles to spring on ya that will also hopefully help you out as you dive into warmer weather.
  Dogs tend to love spring because they get to spend more time outdoors. After being cooped up during the winter it is a joy for them to be able to take advantage of the lengthening and warming days to release all of their pent up winter energy. It is equally joyful for us watching our dogs have a good time. However the warmer days bring about certain health concerns so take a moment and make sure your dog is fully prepared for spring.

Depending on where you live mosquitoes start becoming more active. 

  Generally heartworm preventative medication should be given year round to prevent infection because mosquitoes thrive year round in many parts of the country and as our climate continues to warm mosquitoes tend to stay active longer each year. Despite this some pet owners do not give heartworm preventatives in the winter so spring is a good time of year to make sure your dog has been checked for heartworm and is current on his heartworm preventative medication. The cost of heartworm preventative medication is a bargain when compared to how much it costs to treat heartworm disease

Ticks and fleas become more prevalent .
  There are a variety of products available to combat these nuisances, so ask your veterinarian which one is best for your dog. Start early as preventing ticks and fleas from becoming a problem is far easier than dealing with a major flea infestation and get into the habit of regularly checking your dog for ticks. Ticks are typically found around the head, on the ears, neck, chest and forelegs although they can be found anywhere. Usually it is easier to find them by feeling for them instead of looking depending on how long your dog’s coat is.

Save the Sticks
  Sticks — now readily available after the winter thaw — can cause choking and severe injuries in dog’s mouths and throats. (Read the Daily Mail article: “How throwing Fido a stick could kill him.”) So if your dog likes to chew and chase, pack a Frisbee, tennis ball or other toy instead.

Keep Fido Away from New Plants
  Many dogs like to eat grass, but if your dog likes to chew on other plants, now’s the time to get out your plant guide. Some native plants can cause vomiting, diarrhea or even death, so before you let your pooch chomp down on those leafy greens, check out this guide to toxic and non-toxic plants.

Achoo! Does Your Dog Have Allergies?
Does your dog have itchy skin all of a sudden? Is she sneezing more than usual? Here are some tips to help you look for allergy symptoms in your dog and also some remedies to help you get your pet feeling better in no time.
April fools is right around the corner but no reason to fool around when it comes to your dog. Go ahead and enjoy the warmer weather with your dog on a walk tonight – he will be so thankful. In fact, he might even jump for joy!


Spring is a good time to check and make sure your dog’s vaccinations are up to date.
 Dog to dog contact increases in the spring and continues on into the Summer months. Your dog is exposed to more infectious diseases during this time of year. For example many veterinary clinics start to see increased incidence of kennel cough in the spring because of increasing dog-to-dog contact.

Use Pet-Friendly Products for Spring Cleaning
Spring cleaning is the perfect occasion to review your cleaning product’s pet-friendliness. If the bottles do not say their contents is dog-safe, it’s best to keep these products where your dog can’t get them. If your dog does ingest a household cleaner, the Chicago Veterinary Medical Association recommends you, “do not call a human poison control center; they do not have any information on pets. Instead, contact your veterinarian and/or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center Hotline (888-426-4435) for accurate information.”

Hide the Antifreeze
 Cars use antifreeze year-round, so you always need to stay vigilant to keep your pup safe. Many dogs like the taste of antifreeze because it’s sweet, but it’s also deadly. Learn more about preventing antifreeze poisoning here and contact your vet immediately if you suspect your dog’s been exposed.

Prevent Dog-Park Bullying By Knowing the Signs
  As the weather gets warmer, you may be bringing your dog to the dog park more often. Make sure it’s a safe and fun time for all by knowing the symptoms of bullying and how to deal with them. Learn these simple tips for spotting and preventing dog-park bullying and know how to stop a dog fight before it starts.

Keep Artificial Sweeteners Away from Your Dog
  Easter’s right around the corner and that means plenty of chocolate and other dangerous dog treats. Keep your pup safe as you celebrate spring by keeping all sweets, candies and gum away from your dog. While many people know about the dangers of chocolate, only a small amount of the common artificial sweetener xylitol can be deadly.

With spring rains come spring mud, keep your dog’s feet dry and your house clean by keeping a towel near the door and perhaps in your car as well.

Spring means fun times for dogs  so pick up the leash and go for a walk or hit the dog park. You are bound to notice a little spring in your dog’s steps.


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