LUV My dogs: tricks

LUV My dogs

Everything about your dog!

Showing posts with label tricks. Show all posts
Showing posts with label tricks. Show all posts

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Most Important Commands Your Dog Needs To Learn

Most Important Commands Your Dog Needs To Learn
  When training your dog you're going to be teaching him commands. These are special words that you repeat over and over to condition him to obey. Although there are certain command words that most trainers teach, in theory you could use any word you want to designate a command. 
  We all love to teach our dogs tricks. Some are frivolous like "play dead" and some are important, like going potty only when outdoors. But there are other tricks to teach our furry friends that could save their lives.
  But what is most important is consistency. You must always use the same word for the same command. Mixing command words up will only confuse your dog and make training him more difficult if not outright impossible.
  Some dogs are smart enough to learn 165 words or even more. Just how smart they can be largely depends on the breed and how much time you spend with them.
  No dog, however, is smart enough to realize every single danger he can get himself into. There are poisonous snake bites, open wells, automobiles, medication, antifreeze and getting trapped in places where he cannot get out. 
No- As the word implies, no is used whenever your dog is doing what he should not be doing. For instance if he urinates on the floor instead of going to his crate to pee saying no in a stern tone of voice gives him the message that what he did is not okay.
  The key thing to remember with dogs is that your tone of voice is extremely important. With conditioning commands like “no” it's as if not more important than just the word itself. This is because dogs are very influenced by body language and voice tone.


Sit-  is one of the most basic tricks we can teach our dogs. When a dog is in a "sit" position, he knows he is meant to stay sitting until you say otherwise. If you need your dog to just chill out while you take care of something, you can put him in a sit position, knowing he won't run off and get into trouble while you're distracted. It's a perfect command for situations like standing in a crowded place or if you're loading the car for a trip and need Fido to hang out before getting in. Or on the flip side, telling your dog to "sit" before opening the door of the car to let him out gives you time to open the door, leash him up, and make sure no other cars are coming in the street or parking lot before allowing him to exit the vehicle.Sit is an important command because it puts your dog in a semi-submissive position and helps to calm his brain. A dog that goes from being excited to sitting has had to change gears mentally and refocus. This can be useful when putting on his leash or when someone wants to greet him. Sit can also be a primer for other commands such as stay and lie down. You can also use the sit command after other commands, such as "off" or "quiet", to reinforce the change of focus.


Good Dog- On the flipside saying “good dog” lets your dog know that they're doing what they should be doing. When you say this you should combine it with a physical gesture praising your dog for a job well done. This one should come naturally to most of us but what's important is knowing how to use it in combination with other commands we're going to talk about so you can positively condition your dog so he wants to follow your commands.

Lie down- The "lie down" trick is another way to have your dog stay in one place and out of trouble. Teaching your dog to lie down — especially if you teach him to drop to a down position when you signal from far away — can go a long way in keeping him out of trouble. A down position is one of increased vulnerability, so if your dog is getting too rambunctious around other dogs or is too wound up in a certain situation and simply needs to mellow out, a "lie down" command gives him an opportunity to calm down and remember his human is the one who is in control. Like the "sit" command, this is an active command, meaning your dog isn't just lounging — he should be purposefully staying in one spot, keeping focus on you and waiting for his next command. Both the sit and lie down commands are excellent for bringing a boisterous dog back down to earth before a situation escalates out of control — such as when other dogs are around that might spark a fight, small children might get hurt, or other attention-grabbers pull your dog's focus away from you.
Stay- What dog owner hasn't had a dog that you loved with all your heart but for the life of you could get to stay in one place? That's where this command fits in. 
Sit your dog down and with a stern tone, tell your dog to “stay”. If he doesn't listen, say “no” and start again. The key is repetition and consistency. If you start while he's a puppy it shouldn't take too long.

Come- This trick is rather obvious. After all, knowing that your dog will return to your side without fail in any situation is a big part of ensuring he will be safe. But getting that "rocket recall" can be tough. When a dog is distracted, or knows that you are much more boring than whatever trouble he is getting into, then getting him to come when called is a challenge. There are different ways to approach it, depending on a dog's personality, but the best way to make sure your dog beelines back to you when you call is to give him the most amazing treat he can possibly imagine every time he comes back to your side. Whether it is rotisserie chicken, or liver baby food, or tripe, make sure he only gets that treat when he hears, and obeys, the recall command. Then he knows that when he hears the word "come" he'll get a jackpot of a reward. Here's a great video about getting a rocket recall with an example of exactly why it is so important for your dog to come back to you no matter what else is happening.

Down- This command should be used when requesting your dog to lie down with his belly to the ground. This puts a dog in a submissive position, helps you gain control, and helps his mind relax. It is very useful if he is in an excited or stressful situation such as at the vet's office or if he needs to maintain a "stay" position for a long period of time. Be consistent with how this word is used and do not interchange it with other commands such as "off" or "lie down".

Heel- is the first command that should be taught when training your dog to walk on the lead, and is the first stage towards teaching heelwork and enabling your dog to walk beside you safely even when off the lead. The “heel” command should be used when in close quarters to call your dog to your side, and to indicate to them that they should walk beside you, matching your pace and staying close. “Heel” is an important command to keep your dog safe when walking on the roads, and to safeguard your dog and other people and animals when passing each other in close quarters.
Your name is the most exciting word in the world- To humans, names are really important. It is embedded in us to use someone's name to get their attention. Why bother fighting against that compulsion to say a name when needing your dog's attention? But if it works for us to say the name, we need to make sure it works for the dog to hear his name. Teaching a dog to love his name sets the foundation for everything else in your relationship as it creates a level of trust as well as willingness to learn more tricks. And it can also be a lifesaver when out and about. For instance, if a dog is reactive to other dogs while on leash and his attention begins to zero in on a dog walking toward you on the street, you can say your dog's name to bring his attention back to you. You can give him other commands or treats until the other dog has passed. You avoid conflict, and you etch away at that reactivity since your dog will realize that keeping his attention on you is much more rewarding than getting freaked out by that strange dog ahead. You now have an invaluable tool that can be used in situations from busy streets to chaotic dog parks to finding a dog that has wandered off out of sight.

Drop It-  is one of the most important commands you can teach your dog. You are requesting from your dog that he release something from his mouth, that at least for the moment, he highly values. It can be something as simple as a shoe, as dangerous as a medicine bottle, or as delicate as a bird. It is best to teach this command long before you need to use it. Practice with lures that are just slightly more valuable than the item he currently has and he will naturally want to trade.

Stand- This command requires a dog to stand with all feet on the grand and to distribute his weight evenly. This is especially helpful at the vet's office when a nervous dog would rather sit or lie down. It is also useful when trying to trim your dog's nails or give him a bath. This command will be bring your dog to attention and can be a precursor for the command "come".

Leave It- This is an especially good command for dogs who will not hesitate to grab a snake, a kitten or a dropped pill with their teeth. Some dogs will not discriminate in what they swallow.
Have your dog on a leash and drop a toy onto the ground. Walk your dog past the toy just short of where he could get it. As soon as you notice him pulling toward the toy, sharply say, “Leave it” and pull him away. When he walks away without your having to pull him, reward him with a snack and tell him what a good dog he is. Repeat this with a longer leash and later without a leash, until he listens to you and ignores the toy. Never forget to reward and praise.

Wait- The command “Wait” will help you tremendously when you have to take your dog for a checkup. In the time you open the car door and the crate door, your dog can be out and running into the street before you get the chance to put the leash on him.
  Teaching him to wait lets him know that he has to stand still for a short time until you are finished with some task. Teach him to wait until you give him permission to go through a door, for instance.
  Open your door and give him enough leash that he could walk through the door. When he is at the front of the door, pull the leash tight and say, “Wait.” Have him sit if he already knows that command. If he doesn’t listen, pull the leash and release a little in quick succession. Praise him and give him a snack when he finally gets it. Practice until he waits until you are through the door and then allow him to follow.
  Remember that training is an ongoing endeavour, and not something that takes a few weeks to teach when your dog is a puppy and that then takes care of itself!



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Friday, July 11, 2014

Successful Dog Training Techniques

Successful Dog Training Techniques
   Many people can’t imagine life without dogs. We admire and adore them for their loyalty, unconditional affection, playful exuberance and zest for life. Nevertheless, dogs and people are very different animals. Although officially “man’s best friend,” dogs have some innocent but irksome tendencies-like jumping up to greet, barking, digging and chewing-that can make it downright difficult to live with them! To make the most of your relationship with your dog, you need to teach her some important skills that will help her live harmoniously in a human household.
    When you bring a dog into your home, you must be dedicated to helping him be the best dog he can be.  That is one of the most important jobs you have as the parent of a canine.      Providing him with the essentials for living is one aspect of this job, but teaching him right from wrong should be considered just as important.  As you raise your children, you teach them these lessons to make them happy and successful people.  Your dog deserves this same assistance and consideration.  

Old Dog, New Tricks?
  Many people are under the mistaken impression that if you adopt an adult or older dog, that he is past the age to be trained. Nothing can be further from the truth.  Dogs are extremely intelligent creatures, and their intelligence does not decrease over the years.  If anything, they get smarter as they get older.  Yes, they may be a little more set in their ways and a little less eager to jump on the training bandwagon, but with the love, support, and consistency of a good parent, any dog can learn better behavior.


Be Consistent
  Give clear and consistent commands for the desired behavior. For example, a "down" command should not be used interchangeably with an "off" command. Technically, these are two different behaviors. Always use commands and avoid vague words such as "no" or simply calling their name. For best results, replace "no" with the exact behavior you want him or her to do.


Too Young To Learn

   Alternatively, another myth with dog training is that if you begin training too early, your dog

will not be able to learn because she is too young.  This is not true, either.  No matter how

young your puppy is when you bring her home, start your training immediately. They are
essentially babes in the woods and do not know how to interact with the world around them.
      You are responsible for showing them what to do and what not to do.  Without this guidance, she will run amuck and get into things and damage your belongings, as well as injuring themselves or others.  

Be a Good Leader
   Some people believe that the only way to transform a disobedient dog into a well-behaved one is to dominate her and show her who’s boss. However, the “alpha dog” concept in dog training is based more on myth than on animal science. More importantly, it leads misguided pet parents to use training techniques that aren’t safe, like the “alpha roll.” Dogs who are forcibly rolled onto their backs and held down can become frightened and confused, and they’re sometimes driven to bite in self defense.

Positive and/or Negative Reinforcement
   Whether you are raising a human child or a canine one, you will hear a lot about positive and negative reinforcement.  Positive reinforcement is when you see that your child is doing the right thing so you pat him and speak to him in an approving voice and tell him what a good job he did. 
This is a very key part to almost any type of successful training activity.  When a puppy or dog is told that she is doing good things and getting positive attention based on her actions, she will want to continue doing these things.  She wants your love and approval, so she will do what she can to get it.  Your dog is extremely smart and will make the connection between her actions and your reactions.  Many owners choose to use a higher pitched voice when conveying approval. Dogs do respond well to this. 
   Negative reinforcement is basically the same process, but it is something you do when she has done something she should not.  Based on the rules of negative reinforcement, when your dog does something bad or dangerous, your reaction should be negative.  You should speak to her in a low and unhappy tone, telling her that his action was bad.  This does work, but should be used sparingly.  If your pooch is always getting negative reactions to her behaviors, she will go through life an unhappy, maladjusted dog.  She will become nervous and worried about pleasing you and could even develop anxiety problems.
When teaching new skills, keep training sessions short and sweet
 Like kids, dogs don’t have long attention spans. There’s no hard-and-fast rule, but an ideal average training session should last 15 minutes or less. Within that session, you can work on one skill or switch between a few different skills. To keep things interesting, try doing 5 to 15 repetitions of one behavior and then doing 5 to 15 repetitions of another behavior. You can also practice new skills and keep old ones polished by doing single repetitions at convenient times throughout the day. For example, before giving your dog a tasty new chew bone, ask her to sit or lie down to earn it.

Positive Reinforcement Only
  This tact has been used very successfully for many people, including various types of law enforcement personnel when training their dogs.  Using only positive reinforcement to help your dog understand what she is doing right and completely ignoring any bad action is a mainly passive type of training.  This can often take longer, but has been proven to work long term much better than other training methods.  Using this method, the only time you give your dog any attention for doing something negative is if what she is doing will endanger he in any way. 
   No matter what type of training you use with your dog, make sure that you reassure her of your love and acceptance.  You are doing what is best for her, which makes you the best parent you could ever be.

Help him Focus
  Some training sessions may be impromptu, and those are great if you can keep your dog's attention. If your dog is having difficulty focusing, he may need to drain some energy before hand with a walk, a game of fetch, time on the treadmill, or a play date. Focusing is as much of a skill as the command you are trying to teach. If your dog is having difficulty loose leash walking outside, practice inside where there are fewer distractions. Gradually increase diversions as he masters the skill.

  A training session can last as little as a minute or long as you have your dog's attention. Training and learning can be a way of life for your dog when he is guided to live within your rules and boundaries. Having your dog sit before you feed him, or wait at the door before you exit, or slowly walk down the stairs with you, these are all examples of daily training in action. Think of training as simply communicating with your dog and not something that requires special treats, experts, or lots of time. By communicating clearly, consistently, and with affection, your dog can always be learning.

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Friday, April 4, 2014

Best Dog Names

Best Dog Names
  Bringing home a new member of the family is always a fun and exciting time. Many families already have a name picked out for their new dog when it arrives but some prefer to wait to see what characteristics the dog has before picking that perfect name. There are a number of ways to pick the perfect name for a dog, picking favorite literary characters, picking more predictable dog names and naming the dog after certain characteristics. For some dogs and dog owners only the cute names appeal and there are certainly plenty of these to choose from. Cute dog names can originate from a wide variety of places and depending upon the dog’s origin you may find that the originating country has as much to do with selecting a name as the meaning of the name itself!
  Names are used during introductions, and they color what others think of our dog. A dog named Killer, will invite a very different type of reaction, than a dog named SweetiePie.
  Therefore, take your time in naming your dog. Observe his energy level, most loved activities, and wait until his true personality comes through. When it does, you will know what is the right name for him.

How to Name Your New Puppy or Dog

Fast Tricks for Naming a Pup
  1.Stick with shorter names. Dogs have an easier time recognizing names that are either one or two syllables long, compared to names that are more complex. Instead of naming your dog something like Sir Merlin of Mangovia, you should shorten the name to Merlin, or Mango.
  If you do want to give your pup a longer, more formal name, know that you will ultimately end up shortening it no matter what (it will just be easier to call for him to come that way) so go with a name that shortens into something cute.

  2.Try out names sharp consonants. Dogs hear high frequency sounds very well, so names starting with s, sh, ch, k, etc. work well when catching a dog's attention. Dogs will respond more quickly to these relatively sharp sounds. At the same time, consider names that end with a vowel, particularly a short ‘a’ or a long ‘e’ sound.
Some example names that follow these rules include Simba, Chico, Kassie, Sweetie, Delilah, etc.

  3. Do not pick a name that sounds similar to a command. Because dogs do not particularly recognize the actual word, but instead understand the frequency of the word, they can get confused by words that sound too similar--particularly when one of those words is a command that they are suppose to follow.
  For example, the name "Kit" can easily be confused with the command "sit". The name “Bo” could be confused with “no”.

4. Stick with similar sounds if you are renaming an older dog. Be careful when changing an older dog's name. Stick with similar sounds, such as changing "Barney" to "Farley." It's more important to keep the vowel sounds the same than the consonants, since vowels are easier for the dog to pick up on and what the dog is actually listening for. So "Pinky" will accept "Mikey" but not "Porky."

  5. Remember that you’ll be using your dog’s name in public. Some names have a family meaning, but it may not go over well at the vet or dog park. Also, choosing a name that's too common will mean your dog might run to someone else (or you might get someone elses dog jumping on you).
Names like “Fido” or “Rover” should probably be avoided, as they are some of the more traditional, and therefore more popular, dog names.
You should also consider the sort of reaction that the name you give your dog might inspire. For instance, people will probably be a little more wary of a dog named “Murder” than a dog named “Honey”.

  6. Ask before using a family member or friend's name. You may think it’s an honor to name your pup after your favorite Aunt Matilda, but she may not take it as a compliment. She might think of it as disrespect.

  7.Try the name out for a couple of days before you make it permanent. Once you’ve chosen a new name, try it out for a day or so. See if it grows on you. You’ll know really soon whether it’s a keeper or not. If not, try something else. There are always many more puppy names to explore and try out. Don't forget to reward your puppy or dog when they respond to their new name. The more treats, love and hugs they receive now, the sooner they'll come running when you call later.
  Pay attention to how it feels to say your pup’s potential name. Could you see yourself using that name over and over again? If your answer is no, you may want to consider choosing a different name.

  8. Explore many names. If you are really struggling on what you should name your dog, and need a little help being creative, you can always run an internet search for a list of cool dog names. There are quite a few websites that specialize in this topic and may help you to get your creative juices flowing.


Where Do the Best Dog Names Come From?
  When looking for dog names, there are several places to get good ideas:


Fictional characters – We can find some great names from our favorite movies, books, or games. Pick the best fictional hero or villain, depending on the personality and/or look of our dog.

Famous people – Another interesting set of names are from famous and inspirational people, or historical figures. We can pick rulers such as Alexander the Great, Charlemagne, or Napoleon Bonaparte. We can pick innovators such as Edison or daVinci. We can pick poets, writers, musicians, movie stars, or sports heroes.

Country of dog breed – Different dog breeds emerge from different locations. We can select a favorite name or word from our dog’s country of origin.


Stars and heavenly bodies – Finally, a great source of dog names come from stars and other heavenly bodies. For example, if our dog loves to hunt, we may name him Rigel, which is the brightest star in The Hunter constellation.

Cute Dog Names by Personality Traits
Puck – The name Puck has American origins and can be used to refer to a dog that bounces similar to a hockey puck or a dog that is mischievous like the character Puck from A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare.

Shep – The name Shep comes from the word shepherd and is generally used for dogs that show sheep herding traits. This name is English in origin.

Happy – This name is American in origin and is obviously used for dogs who appear to be smiling or who have happy and joyful dispositions.

Fidelity – The name Fidelity is American in origin and is perhaps best known for being the name of one of Theodore Roosevelt’s horses. Just as the English word “fidelity” relates to loyalty and faithfulness so too does the name when used for a dog.

 Jet – Jet is an American name and while it has a number of meanings it is most commonly used to describe dogs that are both jet black in color or who are constantly speeding or jetting around. This name can also be used by fans of the NFL team the New York Jets or by those with a love for aircraft. Rutherford B Hayes had a dog that he named Jet.

General – General is an American name in origin and is best used for a dog who is commanding and a leader by nature. The term general is used to refer to an army general whose responsibility it is to command his army.

Killer – American in origin, this name is fairly self explanatory. The name Killer has been used both as a name for a dog who shows aggressive tendencies as well as for a dog that shows not an ounce of aggression.

Popular Dog Names
To help you on your way, here are the most popular 5 male and female dog names. There are a variety of lists, but these names appear at the top of almost all of them.
Most popular male dog namesMax, Buddy,Jake, Charlie, Bailey.
Most popular female dog namesBella, Daisy, Molly, Lucy ,Maggie.

Top male dog names: Top female dog names:

1. Max (2*)                        1. Bella (1*)
2. Bailey (3*)                     2. Lucy (4*)
3. Charlie (7*)                   3. Molly (5*)
4. Buddy (8*)                     4. Daisy (6*)
5. Rocky                             5. Maggie (9*)
6. Jake                               6. Sophie (10*)
7. Jack                               7. Sadie
8. Toby                               8. Chloe
9. Cody                              9. Bailey
10. Buster                         10. Lola
11. Duke                           11. Zoe
12. Cooper                       12. Abby
13. Riley                            13. Ginger
14. Harley                          14. Roxy
15. Bear                             15. Gracie
16. Tucker                          16. Coco
17. Murphy                         17. Sasha
18. Lucky                           18. Lily
19. Oliver                           19. Angel
20. Sam                             20. Princess
21. Oscar                           21. Emma
22. Teddy                          22. Annie
23. Winston                       23. Rosie
24. Sammy                        24. Ruby
25. Rusty                            25. Lady
26. Shadow                       26. Missy
27. Gizmo                          27. Lilly
28. Bentley                         28. Mia
29. Zeus                             29.Katie
30. Jackson                      30. Zoey
31. Baxter                         31. Madison
32. Bandit                         32. Stella
33. Gus                              33. Penny
34. Samson                      34. Belle
35. Milo                              35. Casey
36. Rudy                            36. Samantha
37. Louie                           37. Holly
38. Hunter                         38. Lexi
39. Casey                         39. Lulu
40. Rocco                         40. Brandy
41. Sparky                        41. Jasmine
42. Joey                            42. Shelby
43. Bruno                         43. Sandy
44. Beau                          44. Roxie
45. Dakota                       45. Pepper
46. Maximus                    46. Heidi
47. Romeo                       47. Luna
48. Boomer                     48. Dixie
49. Luke                          49. Honey
50. Henry                        50. Dakota



One of the best advices to take when naming your dog is to adopt a wait-and-see attitude. Getting to know your puppy for a few days will let you see a part of his personality or behavior that you will not see while the puppy was still in the kennel or on the day you brought him home.
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