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Showing posts with label toy dog. Show all posts
Showing posts with label toy dog. Show all posts

Friday, June 30, 2017

Everything about your Biewer Terrier

Everything about your Biewer Terrier
  The Biewer Terrier, also known as the Biewer Yorkshire Terrier a la Pom Pon, the Biewer Yorkie or just the Biewer, is a fairly new toy terrier breed. It has not yet been recognized by the American Kennel Club, but is recognized by the American Rare Breed Association (ARBA) and of course by their own American breed club, the Biewer Terrier Club of America (BTCA).

Overview
  At first glance, the Biewer Terrier looks like a colorful tricolored Yorkie or a hybrid mix between a Maltese and Yorkie . 
  Biewer Terrier is a modern breed in the making right before our very eyes.
Pronounced “Bee-Vair,” the breed was first discovered and developed in Germany by a couple, Werner and Gertrude Biewer, Yorkshire terrier breeders.  They mated two of their dogs together in 1984 and produced a blue, gold, and white dog named Schneeflocken von Friedheck.  The explanation for this unusual “Yorkie” was a rare recessive piebald gene mutation. 
  From there it was introduced into the United States in 2003 and continues to gain in popularity as people learn about this incredibly sweet, happy, even-tempered terrier that is a fiercely loyal companion to all those humans he determines are his family.
  As you known, in USA, most Yorkies have docked tails, but the Biewer keeps his full tail as part of the  standard began in Germany.  As in many European countries, the practice of docking tails and cropping ears is banned and the breed’s founders in the U.S. determined that it was in the best interest to maintain this look. 

Breed standards
Other Names Used: Biewer a la Pom Pon, Biewer Yorkshire Terrier, Biewer Yorkshire, or Biewer Yorkie
Affiliation:  AKC FFS (May 2014); ARBA (American Rare Breed Association)
Group: Toy Dog, Companion Dog
Size: Height: 8 12 inches, Weight:  4-7 pounds
Coat Type: Long and Silky; No undercoat
Colors: Black/Blue with Tan/Gold and White
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Country of Origin:  Hunsruck, Germany
Activity Level:  Moderate
Life Expectancy:  12 to 15 years
Good with Children:  Yes (Older children)
Good with other pets:  Yes
Comparable Breeds: Yorkshire Terrier, Silky Terrier

History
  The Biewer Terrier came to be its own breed as a result of a Yorkshire Terrier puppy born in Germany in January of 1984 that had an extreme amount of white patterning throughout his coat. This unusual puppy, named Scheefloeckchen von Friedheck, caused his breeders, Werner and Gertrud Biewer, to wonder whether their Yorkies carried a recessive piebald gene, which apparently they did. Over the next several years, the Biewers bred for the piebald gene and produced blue, white and gold Yorkshire Terriers that bred true to their color. Mr. Biewer showed two of his unique dogs as “black and white Yorkies” in 1988, and the breed took off from there. Biewer Terriers were first officially recognized by the Allgemeiner Club der Hundefreunde Deutschland e. V., one of Germany’s dog clubs. The Biewers signed off on the Biewer breed standard in the late 1980s. Mr. Biewer died in 1997; thereafter, his widow stopped breeding dogs. The Biewer Terrier Club of America was established in 2007. Today, this is still considered to be a rare breed.


Temperament
Having a friendly and affectionate nature, the Biewer Terrier is quite comfortable enough to mingle.
They also possess a highly loyal and dedicated nature, loving to spend quality time with their masters and other family members.
The Biewer Terriers are at times childlike and whimsical in their behavior, loving to do a lot of amusing things like carrying a toy in his mouth.
In spite of their pleasing nature, they may sometimes be strong willed and yappy just like the Yorkshire Terrier, trying to have the upper hand over their masters.
They are wary and suspicious on seeing an unfamiliar face at the beginning, even going to the extent of warning the owner about the same. However, they gradually get along well with the stranger once they realize that he is not a threat to their household. Inappropriate socialization might make these small breeds little aggressive towards strangers.
These dogs are said to have a greater personality than their size, thus making them a little difficult while dealing with other dogs particularly the bigger ones or even cats.
Besides being perfect companions to all, especially the elderly group, this breed is ideal for homes with older children who can deal with them in a responsible way rather than the little ones who can be restless enough with them.

Health 
  Given the fact that Biewer Terrier was bred from the Yorkshire Terrier, they share the same sort of health problems. Some of the most common genetic disorders seen in this breed include patellar luxation, Legg-Calve-Perthes syndrome, portosystemic shunt, bladder stones, and tracheal collapse. Other conditions these dogs may develop include distichiasis and hypoglycemia.

Care
  As with any other breed, Biewers need to be groomed on a regular basis to make sure their coats and skin are kept in tip-top condition. They also need to be given regular daily exercise to ensure they remain fit and healthy. On top of this, they need to be fed good quality food that meets all their nutritional needs throughout their lives.

Living Conditions
  The Biewer Terrier can live in an apartment if it gets enough exercise. They are fairly active indoors and will do okay without a yard.

Training
  The Biewer Terrier is a smart little dog that generally responds well to a firm and consistent hand in training. Like many toy breeds, the Biewer Terrier is prone to developing small dog syndrome if not properly trained. Biewer Terriers can be somewhat difficult to housebreak and they can be a little overprotective at times. As long as you start training early and remain consistent, you shouldn’t have any trouble training your Biewer Terrier.

Exercise Requirements
  Toy breeds don't need a whole lot of room to run, but even apartment Biewers should be walked regularly, to avoid becoming overweight. In a fenced-in yard they will run and play with children, but should never be left off leash, as they will chase after just about anything that catches their eye – even cars.
  Though Biewers can get along swimingly with larger dogs, they should be socialized as early as possible to learn to accept new people and situations. They can be wary of strangers and once a fearless little Biewer postures, it's difficult to talk them down.
 The Biewer Terrier is a naturally active breed that requires regular daily exercise to work off his excess energy. If a daily walk is not possible, some active playtime will usually fulfill this dog’s needs for exercise. Without enough exercise of some form, however, this breed is likely to develop behavioral problems such as digging and chewing.

Grooming Needs
  The long, silky coat may appear to be intimidating to groom, but it is easy to care for. Daily brushing is required to keep the coat free from dirt and tangles. Biewers should not be brushed when they are completely dry, as it will damage the hair. A spray bottle with water or a mix of water and dog conditioner will do the trick. Weekly baths are necessary to keep the coat in good condition, and some keep bath wipes on hand to clean the underside of the dog on a daily basis. While some owners elect to trim the dog all over, the only trimming that is absolutely necessary is around the ears (so they don't get weighed down), the rectum (for hygienic reasons) and under the pads of the feet.
  Regular tooth brushing and ear cleaning sessions should also be part of the grooming routine, as these practices promote good health and keep harmful bacteria from growing in the mouth or ear.

Children and Other Pets
  Biewer Terriers are not the best choice for people with toddlers and young children because these little dogs can be a little snappy if they feel threatened in any way. They are a good choice in households where the children are older and therefore know how to behave around dogs and more especially when they are interacting with such small dogs.
  They are known to be a little aggressive around other animals and this includes cats which is why they need to be well socialised from a young age although it would be a mistake to trust a Biewer around other smaller pets because of their "terrier" traits. They can be aggressive towards other dogs too, bearing in mind that Biewers have no idea of how small they really are. As such care has to be taken when out on a walk in a public place where other dogs are commonly being walked too.

Is the Biewer the Right Breed for you?
High Maintenance: Grooming should be performed often to keep the dog's coat in good shape. Professional trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Easy Training: The Biewer is known to listen to commands and obey its owner. Expect fewer repetitions when training this breed.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.


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Tuesday, December 6, 2016

Everything about your Silky Terrier

Everything about your Silky Terrier
  Bred in Australia from the Yorkshire Terrier and Blue and Tan Australian Terrier, the Silky Terrier was singled out as her own breed. Originally referred to as the Sydney Terrier, the vermin hunter was brought to America by servicemen in the 1950s. Small but fierce, the Silky Terrier makes an excellent watchdog.

Overview
  Some people think they're large Yorkshire Terriers, and others think they're tiny Australian Terriers. But even though those dogs are in his ancestry, the Silky Terrier has his own identity – and isn't likely to let you forget it. Sure, he's a charmer and, at 10 pounds or so, highly portable. But he's also a smart, sassy demanding little dog with a great gift for getting his humans to do exactly what he wants them to, and being a pretty big pain in the neck  when they don't.
  Make no mistake: He might be tiny and he might lack the usual scruffy-rough coat of his terrier cousins, but the Silky is no lap dog. Or he is, but mostly on his own terms. He's endlessly curious, full of energy and loves to play. And like most terriers, he has a great fondness for that sub-genre of gardening known as "digging huge holes in the yard" along with a well-developed interest in barking loudly and chasing cats.
  Train him gently but consistently from a young age to channel his cleverness and independence into activities that won’t involve noise or destructiveness. The American Kennel Club's Earthdog events offer one such possibility; agility or other active sports are others. He's also a bit difficult to housetrain, so careful training from the day he comes home is essential as well.
  Bigger than the Yorkshire Terrier, the Silky is a better choice for families with children, but is still much too small to be played with roughly or unsupervised. In fact, he can be a bit nippy and possessive of his toys, food, and favorite humans. And while the Silky Terrier is not a big shedder, his coat is long and – yes, you guessed it – silky, and it requires frequent brushing to prevent matting.

Highlights
  • Silky Terriers are active dogs who need exercise and mental stimulation. This doesn't mean strenuous hikes or hours of retrieving, but it does mean you'll need to provide more activity than tummy rubs on the couch.
  • Although they need exercise, they can make good apartment or condo dogs.
  • Silkies have a strong prey drive and will chase cats, squirrels, rodents, and sometimes other dogs. A Silky may not be the best choice if you've got other small pets. Also, keep your Silky leashed when you're in unsecured areas to avoid having him disappear into the wild blue yonder when something small and furry streaks by.
  • Silkies like to be with their families and are happiest when they can spend the whole day in your company.
  • Despite the long coat, Silkies are fairly easy keepers. But they do require some grooming: thorough brushing two to three times a week and a monthly bath.
  • Like all terriers, the Silky enjoys digging. To save your flowerbeds, either consider another breed, or train your Silky to dig in a specific area. It's much easier to channel the instinct than to suppress it.
  • Barking, another terrier trait, is a much-enjoyed pastime for Silkies. Although you can teach your Silky a "Quiet" command, he'll still bark when he thinks it's necessary. The upside is, Silkies are excellent watchdogs.
  • Silky Terriers can be good family dogs, but because of their scrappy personality, children should be about 10 years old and up.
  • Although they're generally friendly, Silkies can be territorial and aggressive toward other dogs if they're not socialized properly.
  • A Silky shouldn't be left unattended in a yard. He's small enough to be considered prey by larger wild animals, terrier enough to dig his way out, and Silky enough to get into mischief.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts

  • Silky Terriers are active in many events. They have earned titles or participated in obedience, rally, agility, herding, tracking, flyball, and earthdog tests. Some Silkys are therapy dogs.
  • The Silky stands low to the ground and is slightly longer than he is tall. His silky blue and tan coat parts to each side, all the way down his back to his tail. It’s not so long that it falls all the way to the floor. He has a moderately long wedge-shaped head; small dark almond-shaped eyes; small V-shaped ears carried erect; and a black nose. The docked tail is carried between the twelve o’clock and two o’clock position. He moves with a lively and light-footed step.
Breed standards
AKC group: Toy
UKC group: Companion
Average lifespan: 12 - 15 years
Average size: 8 - 10 pounds
Coat appearance: Long, silky and parted down the middle.
Coloration: Born black; grows to have a blue coat with red or tan markings
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Other identifiers: Small with fine bones and cat-like feet; body is longer than breed is tall; black nose; black almond-shaped eyes with black rims; erect ears and high-set tail
Possible alterations: Hair is matted if not properly groomed
Comparable Breeds: Cairn Terrier, Yorkshire Terrier

History
  The Silky Terrier originated in Australia in the 1890s, when breeders crossed imported Yorkshire Terriers with their native Australian Terriers. Some of the offspring looked like Yorkies, some looked like Australian Terriers, and others looked like the Silky of today, with a size and coat length that was between the two parent breeds. The Silky-looking dogs were interbred until the puppies predictably had Silky traits.
  In 1906, Australian fanciers developed a breed standard — written guidelines for what the breed should look, move, and act like — in Sydney, New South Wales. In 1909, another standard was drawn up in Victoria. The two standards didn't completely match up, mostly on the preferred weight and ear type. The two camps compromised and a new breed standard came out in 1926.
  The breed has had several names: initially, he was called the Sydney Silky Terrier. In 1955, he became the Australian Silky Terrier (still the official name for the breed in Australia). In the U.S., the name was changed to Silky Terrier.



Personality
  A better name for the Silky Terrier might be the Spunky Terrier. These little dogs pack a lot of personality into a small package. Like other terriers, they believe they are the center of the universe and expect everyone to bow to their needs. Silkies make (harmless) mischief whenever possible, especially if they realize it gets them extra attention. This is an intelligent breed who knows how to manipulate a situation in his favor, and can sometimes even be considered bossy, but most owners don't mind because they are just too darn cute to stay mad at. Silkies are great family dogs for those with older children, as they enjoy the company of people and prefer to have plenty of laps to choose from when it is naptime.

Health
  The Silky Terrier, which has a lifespan of about 11 to 14 years, may suffer from minor problems like patellar luxation and Legg-Perthes disease. Diabetes, epilepsy, allergies, tracheal collapse, and Cushing's disease may sometimes be seen in this breed as well. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may run knee and elbow exams on the dog.

Care
  The Silky Terrier may look like a toy, but he's a real dog who needs exercise and training. He enjoys daily walks, romping with you in the yard, or trips to a dog park with a special area for small breeds. In a pinch, the Silky is happy to take his workout indoors with a rousing game of fetch in the hallway.
  These are not outdoor dogs. The Silky craves the companionship of his people, and he's also small enough to be considered prey by wild animals. And despite his size, another risk is that he may fight with another dog who wanders onto his turf.
When it comes to training, Silky Terriers make willing and able students. Because they're so smart, however, you need to be consistent; otherwise they'll be inclined to make up their own rules. The best way to win your Silky's cooperation is with fun lessons that use positive reinforcement.
  Crate training is the easiest way to housetrain your Silky, and crates are also a good way to keep your Silky safe and out of trouble when you're away from home. Silky Terriers are mischievous by nature and can be destructive when left unsupervised. A crate is also a place where he can retreat for a nap. Crate training at a young age will help your dog accept confinement if he ever needs to be boarded or hospitalized.
  Never stick your Silky in a crate all day long, however. It's not a jail, and he shouldn't spend more than a few hours at a time in it except when he's sleeping at night. Silkys are people dogs, and they aren't meant to spend their lives locked up in a crate or kennel.

Living Conditions
  The Silky Terrier is good for apartment life. These dogs are very active indoors and will do okay without a yard if sufficiently exercised.

Trainability
  Like other terrier breeds, Silkies can be a handful to train. They are willful and stubborn and most definitely have minds of their own. Training should begin early and be conducted with calm-assertive leadership and never a harsh hand. Small terriers are prone to defensive reactions and if you physically correct your Silky – even to push his bottom down in a “sit” position – he may bite. Treats and excited praise should be enough to motivate a   Silky Terrier, but sessions should be kept short so that he doesn't lose interest.
  When basic obedience has been mastered, your Silky can move on to advanced obedience, trick training or agility classes. These are smart dogs who, despite their stubbornness excel in these activities.

Exercise Requirements
  Silky Terriers are full of energy, have plenty of stamina and love going on daily walks or runs. This breed has a hunting background, so Silky Terriers like to chase small animals. Along with daily walks, your dog will enjoy time spent in an outside fenced yard or a trip to the dog park. If you can’t get outside, an energetic game of fetch, tug-of-war, or chase indoors will keep your dog exercised and active. 

Grooming
  It is difficult to improve on the Silky Terrier’s natural good looks, but you can maintain his long, silky coat by brushing and combing it several times a week with a pin or soft slicker brush and metal comb. Spray-on detangler can make this easier and help prevent breakage. Regular brushing prevents tangles, removes dirt and distributes oils, making for a healthy shine. Periodic bathing, every four weeks or so, and light trimming around his ears, eyes and feet, is also necessary. For extra easy care, some owners opt to have their Silkys trimmed short like a Schnauzer.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every one to two weeks. Keep the ears clean and dry to help prevent infections. Check them weekly for redness or a bad odor that might indicate infection. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball moistened with a mild pH-balanced cleanser recommended by your veterinarian. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath. Introduce your puppy to grooming from an early age so that he learns to accept it with little fuss.

Children And Other Pets 
  The Silky can be a wonderful family pet, so long as he's raised with kids and grows up around their noise and commotion. Given his strong personality, though, he's usually best for families with children older than 10 who know how to handle a dog. He may not tolerate pokes and prods from younger kids.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  The Silky gets along with other dogs very well so long as he's been raised to be dog-friendly, though there may be occasional bossiness and rivalry for attention or treats. Like all terriers, the Silky loves to chase small animals, so he may not be suited for homes with cats, rabbits, or other small pets.

Is this breed right for you?
  Fun-loving and active, the Silky Terrier is a small breed that enjoys activity. Having strong affection for its owner, the breed is smart and can do well with apartment living, although she prefers her own space to play and investigate by nose or digging. An inside dog, the Silky Terrier can develop small dog syndrome if not given the right amount of training or guidance. Doing well with children if she has a good leader, the Silky Terrier can learn to adapt to other animals if socialized correctly.

Did You Know?
  When he was first developed in Australia, this breed was known as the Sydney Silky Terrier. The name was changed in Australia to Australian Silky Terrier in 1955. The same year, in the United States, the name was changed to Silky Terrier.

A dream day in the life of a Silky Terrier
  A playful pup, the Silky Terrier will enjoy waking up and immediately investigating her backyard. With a quick run, she'll sniff out the perimeter to ensure everything is safe. Returning inside, she'll greet her owner with a small amount of affection before requesting a bit of quality playtime. After a game of fetch in the yard, she'll be ready for breakfast. Keeping up on her primary duty of watchdog, she'll be happy in the constant company of her family. After her evening walk, she'll be ready for her daily grooming session of a bath and blow-dry. Once she's brushed and pampered, the Silky Terrier will be ready for a snooze.
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Thursday, August 4, 2016

Everything about your Japanese Chin

Everything about your Japanese Chin
  The Japanese Chin dog breed hails from Asia, where he has been prized as a companion for more than a thousand years. He was a popular member of Chinese and Japanese imperial courts, and it was in Japan that his distinctive look was developed. This breed is elegant and dainty, mild-mannered and playful.
  The Japanese Chin is a sensitive and intelligent breed whose only purpose is to serve man as a companion. Agile and playful, they can be taught to perform tricks and like to show off to an audience of friends. They are extremely cat-like in nature, smart when they want to be and coy when it suits them. Very loyal and loving, treat them right and you have a best friend for life; treat them wrong and you have lost your best friend forever!

Overview
  Despite his name, the Japanese Chin originates from China. Bred for the sole purpose of becoming a companion dog, the breed was originally referred to as the Japanese Spaniel. Eventually moving to Japan and other parts of Europe, the dog was given as a royal and meaningful gift. Playful and intelligent, the Japanese Chin is a good fit for any person or family.

Highlights
  • The Japanese Chin is catlike in many ways. The breed is commonly seen grooming itself by licking its paws and wiping its head. Also, they enjoy being up high and will perch on the back of couches and on tables.
  • Considered to be an average shedder, the Japanese Chin requires a few minutes of brushing each day to remove loose hair and to keep the coat from tangling.
  • Japanese Chin do not handle heat very well and need to be monitored on hot days to ensure that they don't overexert themselves.
  • Due to the breed's flat face, Japanese Chin will often snort, sniffle, or reverse sneeze. Generally, a Japanese Chin is still able to breathe through this, but if the attack becomes severe, you can try gently stroke his neck.
  • Japanese Chin do well in apartments.
  • Although Japanese Chin are intelligent and eager to please, they require interesting, fun-filled training sessions. Otherwise, they get bored and will turn their attention to something more entertaining.
  • Japanese Chin do very well with older children but are not recommended for homes with smaller children due to their small size. They can be seriously injured with minimal force.
  • Japanese Chin are companion dogs who thrive when they are with the people they love. They should not live outside or in a kennel away from their family.
  • Japanese Chin require a lower amount of exercise compared to other breeds but they do enjoy a daily walk or play in the yard.
  • Japanese Chin don't like being parted from their people, and separation anxiety is a common problem in the breed.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts

  • In Japan, the Chin is considered a higher being than other dogs.
  • Chin love to go for walks, but they’re not fond of inclement weather. It’s a good idea to papertrain a Chin if you live in an area with a lot of rain or snow.
  • When the Chin isn’t playing, he’s perching on a high point, observing everything going on around him.
  • The Chin’s happy, cheerful nature, adaptability and range of sizes make him suited to almost any home. Chin who weigh eight or nine pounds are best for families with children, but they must still be handled carefully.
  • The Chin’s abundant silky coat comes in black and white, red and white, or black and white with tan points (tricolor).
  • Because of his acrobatic nature, climbing ability, and tendency to clean himself, the Chin has been described as a cat in a dog suit.
Breed standards
AKC group: Toy
UKC group: Companion/Spaniel
Average lifespan: 12 - 14 years
Average size: 4 - 7 pounds
Coat appearance: Silky, straight and luxurious
Coloration: White with black patches, ruby and white
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Body is same length as height; wide-set, large eyes; small V-shaped ears covered with hair; typical black nose with like-colored markings; straight legs; tail set high with feathering
Possible alterations: Patches of color may be red, brindle, orange and other similar colors; markings will match the coloration of the nose
Comparable Breeds: Pekingese, Shih Tzu, Pug

History
  The Japanese Chin is an ancient breed that probably originated in the Chinese imperial court. Highly prized, he was often given as a gift to emissaries from other lands, and it was probably as a gift to the emperor of Japan that he made his way to that island nation which gave him his name. In Japan, the Chin was regarded not as a dog (inu) but as a separate being (chin). There, he was probably crossed with small spaniel-type dogs and eventually achieved the look he has today.
  The Japanese Chin remained unknown to the outside world until 1853 when Commodore Matthew Perry sailed into Uraga Harbor near Edo — now modern-day Tokyo — and introduced Japan to international trade. The Japanese Chin became a popular commodity and many were imported into Britain and the United States.
  Among the first American owners of the breed were President Franklin Pierce, then-Secretary-of-War Jefferson Davis, and Perry's daughter, Caroline Perry Belmont. They became popular with people of wealth and nobility. In the United States, the Japanese Chin was known as the Japanese Spaniel and he kept that name until 1977.

Temperament
  This breed is considered one of the most cat-like of the dog breeds in attitude: it is alert, intelligent, and independent, and it uses its paws to wash and wipe its face. Other cat-like traits include their preference for resting on high surfaces, their good sense of balance, and their tendency to hide in unexpected places. Japanese Chin are loyal to their owners and are typically a friendly breed. While Japanese Chin prefer familiar surroundings, they also do well in new situations. This, alongside their friendly demeanor, makes them good therapy dogs. Early socialization of Japanese Chin puppies leads to a more emotionally well-balanced Chin that is more accepting of different situations and people.
  Japanese Chin are defensive animals and thus although they are usually quiet, they will bark to alert the arrival of a visitor or to draw attention to something out of the ordinary.
  Japanese Chin were also bred for the purpose of entertaining their owners. While typically calm, they are well known for performing many tricks such as the "Chin Spin", in which they turn around in rapid circles; dancing on their hind legs while pawing their front feet, clasped together, in the air; and some even "sing", a noise that can range from a low trill to a higher, almost operatic noise.

Health
  The Japanese Chin, with an average lifespan of 10 to 12 years, is prone to minor ailments like patellar luxation, cataract, heart murmur, Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca (KCS), and entropion. Achondroplasia, portacaval shunt, and epilepsy are sometimes seen in this breed. The Japanese Chin is also susceptible to corneal abrasions and cannot tolerate anesthesia or heat. Knee and eye tests are recommended for this breed.

Care
  Japanese Chin require very little exercise. They are happy with a daily walk or a nice play session but they tend to require little else. Training can be slightly difficult since they have a mind of their own and become bored with repetitious training. When they like you, however, they'll work hard to please you. When they do wrong, a firm tone of voice is all you need to set them straight. Stronger corrections will only backfire and cause your Chin to stubbornly stand his ground.
  They can be difficult to housetrain but with patience and consistency, you can generally expect them to be housetrained by 4 months of age.
  Japanese Chin are companion dogs and should not live outdoors or in kennels. They become very attached to their people, and many suffer from separation anxiety. With their low exercise needs, Japanese Chin make wonderful apartment residents.
  The neck of the Japanese Chin is very delicate and it is strongly suggested that you use a harness instead of a collar when walking him.

Living Conditions
  The Japanese Chin is a good dog for apartment life. They are moderately active indoors and will do okay without a yard. This breed is somewhat sensitive to temperature extremes.

Trainability
  Japanese Chins have spaniel roots, making them easier to train than other small breeds. Training should be done with nothing but positive reinforcement, as harsh treatment will bruise their sensitive egos and they will simply stop listening. The daily training routine should be mixed up to keep the Chin interested, as he is easily bored with repetitive activities. Once basic obedience is mastered, teaching your Chin do to parlor tricks is a breeze, and he'll love the attention that gets lavished upon him when guests see him perform.

Exercise
  Chins do not require a great deal of exercise, however they do need to be taken on a daily walk. They will enjoy the opportunity to play in an open yard.

Grooming
  The Chin might look like he needs a lot of grooming, but he’s a wash-and-go dog. His silky, abundant coat is easy to care for and rarely mats, with the occasional exception of the ear fringes. Brush him weekly with a pin brush to keep the hair from flying around the house (yes, the Chin sheds), and bathe him once a month to keep him smelling nice. After a bath, towel him off until he’s almost dry, brush the coat upward and outward with the pin brush, then smooth it down. You’re done!
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Toy breeds are especially prone to periodontal disease, so brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Although the Japanese Chin is a gentle dog, he is not recommended for homes where there are young children. He can be easily hurt by an overexuberant child. The breed does well with older children who understand how to properly handle a dog.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Japanese Chin get along well with other dogs and cats, but they must be protected from larger dogs who could accidentally injure them in play. A cat's claws can injure their large eyes, so it's important to make sure everyone plays nicely together.

Is this breed right for you?
  Very friendly, the Japanese Chin fits in well with any family. Due to his delicate nature, it is best that children are taught how to handle the small breed. Good with other animals, he's an indoor dog that can live well in an apartment. Needing only moderate exercise, he'll be content with short walks around the neighborhood. The Japanese Chin is easily trained, enjoys playtime and is best kept out of the heat for a prolonged period of time. His luxurious coat will need to be groomed twice a week and it's best to socialize and train him to know that you are master to avoid any potential behavioral problems.

Did You Know?
  A Japanese Chin makes a cameo appearance in the 1984 Woody Allen film "Broadway Danny Rose."


A dream day in the life of a Japanese Chin
The Japanese Chin will ideally wake up in the bed of his master. Following the family wherever they may go, he may stop for a trick or two while awaiting his meal. After a bit of TV time with his master, the dog will enjoy a quick stroll around the neighborhood. Upon returning home, he'll be happy to hang out with the little ones of the house until bedtime, where he'll contentedly snuggle up to his humans.

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Everything about your Affenpinscher

Everything about your Affenpinscher
   The Affenpinscher’s apish look has been described many ways. They’ve been called “monkey dogs” and “ape terriers.” The French say “diablotin moustachu” (mustached little devil), and "Star Wars" fans argue whether they look more like Wookies or Ewoks. But Affens are more than just a pretty face. Though standing less than a foot tall, these sturdy terrier-like dogs approach life with great confidence. As with all great comedians, it’s their apparent seriousness of purpose that makes Affen antics all the more amusing.

Overview
  Affenpinscher comes from the German word meaning "monkey dog/terrier." Living up to its name, the breed enjoys playing and monkeying around. With a Terrier-like personality, the Affenpinscher is bold, curious and very loving with people and other dogs. Requiring training, the dog will do well in apartment life and with children if handled properly.

Highlights
  • Like many toy dog breeds, the Affenpinscher can be difficult to housetrain. Crate training is recommended.
  • While the fur of an Affenpinscher is wiry and is often considered hypoallergenic, this is not to be mistaken with "non-shedding." All dogs shed or produce dander.
  • Because of their heritage as ratters, Affenpinschers tend to not do well with rodent pets such as hamsters, ferrets, gerbils, etc. They do, however, tend to get along with fellow dogs in the household and can learn to get along with cats, especially if they're raised with them.
  • Affenpinschers are generally not recommended for households with toddlers or small children--it is not a breed that is naturally inclined to like children. The Affenpinscher is loyal to his adult family members and can be a great companion for a family with older children.
  • The Affenpinscher is a rare breed. Be prepared to spend time on a waiting list if you're interested in acquiring one.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The German word Affenpinscher means “monkeylike terrier,” not necessarily because they resembled monkeys but because they often performed with organ grinders in much the same way as an organ grinder’s monkey might have done.
  • The Affenpinscher is distinguished by a beard and mustache, bushy eyebrows, a stiff wiry coat, ears that can be cropped or natural, and a tail that can be docked or natural.
  • The preferred color in Affenpinschers is black, but the dogs can also be black and tan, silver-gray, red, and mixtures of these colors.
Breed standards
AKC group: Toy
UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan: 12 - 14 years
Average size: 7 - 8 pounds
Coat appearance: Shaggy and wiry
Coloration: Black, gray, silver, red, tan and black
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Other identifiers: Square body; deep chest; longer hair on face than rest of the body; round, black eyes; short, small nose; undershot jaw; tail is carried high at 2/3 length and ears are pointed upward; slightly curly undercoat
Possible alterations: Ears and tail may point down depending on breeder
Comparable Breeds: Brussels Griffon, Pomeranian

History
  The breed is German in origin and dates back to the seventeenth century. The name is derived from the German Affe (ape, monkey). The breed predates and is ancestral to the Brussels Griffon and Miniature Schnauzer.
  Dogs of the Affenpinscher type have been known since about 1600, but these were somewhat larger, about 12 to 13 inches, and came in colors of gray, fawn, black and tan and also red. White feet and chest were also common. The breed was created to be a ratter, working to remove rodents from kitchens, granaries, and stables.
  Banana Joe V Tani Kazari (AKA Joe), a five-year-old Affenpinscher, was named Best in Show at the 2013 Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show in New York City. This win is notable since it is the first time this breed has won Best in Show at Westminster.

Personality
  Affenpinschers are tiny, but they have large personalities. They take themselves very seriously, and require everyone else to take them seriously as well, resulting in humorous interactions with people. Their terrier blood makes them spunky and sassy, and many owners wonder if these tiny toy dogs know just how small they really are. Mostly seen as “purse dogs” by ladies around the world, the Affen is a lovely travel companion, easy-going and accepting of new situations. Just keep an eye on the Affenpinscher about town, this breed can be mischievous.

Health
  The Affenpinscher, which has an average lifespan of 12 to 14 years, has a tendency to suffer from minor diseases like patellar luxation and corneal ulcers. Respiratory difficulties, patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), and open fontanel are sometimes seen in this breed as well. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may run knee and cardiac tests on the dog.

Care
  The Affenpinscher is an ideal dog for apartment living, especially if you have neighbors who don't mind occasional barking. Short, brisk walks or a suitable length of time in the backyard is enough exercise for this sturdy but only moderately active dog.
  Because he's so small, the Affenpinscher should be a full-time housedog, with access only to a fully fenced backyard when not supervised. These dogs won't hesitate to confront animals much larger than themselves, an encounter that could result in tragedy.
  Like many toy breeds, the Affenpinscher can be difficult to housetrain. Be patient and consistent. Crate training is recommended.
  The key to training an Affenpinscher is to always keep training fun. Use lots of praise and motivation!

Living Conditions
  The Affenpinscher is good for apartment life. They are very active indoors and will do okay without a yard. These dogs are sensitive to temperature extremes. Overly warm living conditions are damaging to the coat.

Trainability
  Affens are generally people-pleasers but can be stubborn, so early training is key to having an obedient dog. They respond best to positive reinforcement, with lots of treats and affection. Consistency and a gentle hand are required to prevent the Affen from becoming distrusting of people.
  This tiny dog, with a penchant for mischief makes a good therapy dog. They travel well, adapt well in new environments and make people laugh, making them an ideal visitor for lifting the spirits of the elderly or the sick.

Exercise
  The Affenpinscher needs a daily walk. While out on the walk the dog must be made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as in a dog's mind the leader leads the way, and that leader needs to be the human. Play will take care of a lot of their exercise needs, however, as with all breeds, play will not fulfill their primal instinct to walk. Dogs that do not get to go on daily walks are more likely to display behavior problems. They will also enjoy a good romp in a safe open area off lead, such as a large fenced-in yard. Teach them to enter and exit door and gateways after the humans.

Grooming
  The Affen has a wiry coat that can be rough or smooth, but the words “smooth” and “rough” can be misleading. A smooth Affen has some feathering on the legs and a ruff on the neck. Dogs with a rough coat have hair with a slightly softer texture and heavier feathering. Some Affens have a coat that falls somewhere in between. Whatever type of coat he has, the typical Affen looks neat but a bit shaggy. You can be sure he’ll have leaves and twigs stuck in his coat after he’s been outdoors, so he does need regular grooming to maintain his appearance.
   Tools you’ll need are a slicker brush, a stainless steel Greyhound comb, a stripping knife, blunt-tipped scissors and thinning shears. Plucking dead hairs, called “stripping” the coat, is part of the package when living with an Affen. The Affenpinscher Club of America has an illustrated guide to grooming the dog to get the look just right.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Small breeds are prone to periodontal disease, so brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Affenpinschers don't like aggressive behavior such as hitting, unwanted squeezing or hugging, or chasing to catch them or cornering them to hold in a lap. If they can't escape, they will defend themselves by growling or snapping. For these reasons, they are not good choices for homes with young children. Often young children don't understand that a cute little Affenpinscher might not want "love and kisses."
  It's a good idea to socialize any puppy to young children, even if he won't be living with them, but you should always supervise their interactions. Never let young children pick up a puppy or small dog. Instead, make them sit on the floor with the dog in their lap. Pay attention to the dog's body language, and put him safely in his crate if he appears to be unhappy or uncomfortable with the child's attention.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Affenpinschers usually get along well with other dogs and cats in the family, but like most toy breeds they are completely unaware of their size and will take on dogs much bigger than themselves. Be prepared to protect them from themselves.

Is this breed right for you?
  A smaller breed that enjoys being around his family, the Affenpinscher will need consistent training in the home. Getting along well with other dogs and cats when raised with them, he'll become loving and affectionate with children if both the dog and children are raised together. Spunky and confident, he loves to play outside and will need a yard or daily walks if living in smaller spaces. Because of his wiry coat, he doesn't shed and will only require special grooming once or twice a year.

Did You Know?
  At some point in the 18th or early 19th century, someone had the bright idea of breeding the Affenpinscher down in size, allowing them to move up in the world by becoming companions to ladies.

A dream day in the life of an Affenpinscher
  Waking up to a quick cuddle session with his family, the Affenpinscher loves to start his morning with a nice walk around the neighborhood. Giving in to his curious nature, he'll smell every nook and cranny the lovely street has to offer him. On returning home, he'll take a quick nap before retreating to his toy area to play with the other animals and family members of the home. He'll end his day just as it started, by cozying up with his favorite humans.
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Everything about your Brussels Griffon

Everything about your Brussels Griffon
  The intelligent and cheerful Brussels Griffon has a terrier-like disposition and is known for his almost human expression. This affectionate breed comes in a variety of colors, including red, belge , black and tan, or black. This breed makes a good watchdog and can be taught to perform a variety of tricks. A Brussels Griffon was featured in 1997's hit, "As Good As It Gets", starring Jack Nicholson and Helen Hunt.

Overview
  Often referred to as monkey-faced due to their unique look, the Brussels Griffon is a rare yet popular breed, known for being affectionate, curious and very loving to both humans and other animals. Somewhat difficult to housebreak, the dog will need training, walking and attention to keep him from getting into trouble. Good with small spaces, the Brussels Griffon is well-suited for apartment life and makes an excellent companion or family dog.

Highlights
  • Some Brussels Griffons can be gluttonous, and others are picky eaters. It's best to measure out their food and give them regular meals, instead of leaving out food for them all the time.
  • Griffons can be stubborn and difficult to housetrain — stay patient, consistent, and definitely use a crate.
  • They'll bark enthusiastically at every sound, making them good watchdogs but sometimes noisy housemates. Teaching your dog the "quiet" command is recommended.
  • Griffons are sensitive dogs and when treated roughly, they may become fear biters — dogs who bite out of fear, rather than aggression.
  • Griffons can snap and growl at rambunctious kids who handle them roughly or give them unwanted hugs and kisses, so they're not a good match for homes with young children. Some Griffons aren't fond of children of any age.
  • It's difficult to breed Griffons. They often need Caesarean sections, the litters are typically small, and puppy mortality is high.
  • Griffons are not backyard dogs. Like other dogs with short noses, they're vulnerable to heat stroke, and their short hair makes them vulnerable to the cold as well. They need to live inside with the family.
  • The demand for Griffon puppies surged after a Griffon dog was featured in the movie As Good As It Gets. With the increased market for puppies came careless breeding. To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments. Griffons can be either shy or aggressive, especially if they come from low-quality breeders who don't test the parent dogs for temperament problems.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Brussels Griffon comes in a rough or smooth coat that can be red, belge (a mixture of black and reddish brown), black and tan, or black.
  • This breed has a wide range of sizes. In the same litter of Brussels Griffons, one puppy can grow to only six pounds, while another reaches 20 pounds.
  • Like many toy breeds, Brussels Griffons can be difficult to housetrain and may never be completely reliable.
Breed standards
AKC group: Toy Group
UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan: 10 -15 years
Average size: 8 - 10 pounds
Coat appearance: Either smooth or rough
Coloration: Tan, tan and black, black, red
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Other identifiers: Short muzzle; short black nose; straight-boned legs; overbite with over-sized tongue; black eyes with long eyelashes; high-set ears and erect tail.
Possible alterations: Occasionally groomed to have a beard.
Comparable Breeds: Affenpinscher, Pomeranian

History
  Created in Belgium about 200 years ago from a blend of English Toy Spaniel, Pug, and an Affenpinscher type of German stable ratter, the Brussels Griffon was popular in farm and peasant homes for his ratting abilities. He lived in stables and on the streets, a tough little Belgian urchin who survived by his wits. He was such a part of daily life that he was portrayed in artwork as early as the 16th century in paintings by Du Empoli and Van Dyck and later in Renoir’s “Bather With Griffon.”
  Eventually the Griffon became popular as a companion dog.

Personality
  The Brussels Griffon is a toy breed that developed in the streets of Brussels where they hunted rats. Small, with highly expressive faces, the Brussels Griffon looks like a fragile little “purse dog,” but even though they fit nicely in a hand bag, they are sturdy and fearless, boasting the ability to climb like a cat. They enjoy being the center of attention and are often described by owners as hams and clowns. They get along fine with kids and other household pets, as long as they are raised together.
  Griffons love attention and affection and dislike being left alone. They tend to thrive in the homes of empty-nesters or the elderly because these families have the time to devote solely to these attention-hungry dogs.

Health
  The Brussels Griffon has a relatively long life expectancy, with ten to fifteen years being usual. However, it has developed significant reproductive problems. Bitches in this breed often do not conceive, and when they do they tend to have difficulty giving birth. Caesarean deliveries are common, litters are unusually small and newborn puppies are often delicate.   Often there is only one puppy, with an average mortality rate of 60 percent in the first few weeks. They also may have a breed predisposition to refractory corneal ulceration, cataracts, hip dysplasia and patellar luxation.
Care
  Without a doubt, Griffons are housedogs. But so long as they're inside with the family, their small size makes them suited to any household, from city highrises to country estates. In either place they can impress you with their inborn rat-hunting skill.
  They have a lot of energy and need regular exercise to stay in shape, but they'll do okay without a yard so long as they get walks or some other exercise every day. Because they're short-nosed dogs, they can't cool the air they breathe in, and can overheat on hot, humid days. Heat stroke is dangerous, so keep your Griffon someplace cool on a hot day. If you do take him out in the sun, watch for the signs of heat exhaustion — deep, rapid panting and sluggishness. More serious signs include vomiting or diarrhea and seizures. Don't let him play hard on a hot day, and be sure he has access to plenty of fresh, cool water.
  His intelligence and athletic ability make the Griffon a contender in dog sports such as agility, obedience, and even tracking, as long as you persuade him that it's worthwhile. Training must be fun, and positive reinforcement — rewarding your dog for getting it right, rather than punishing him for mistakes — is the only way to get cooperation from a Griffon.   You can't force a Griffon to do anything, but you can make him believe it's his idea.
  Like so many small breeds, Brussels Griffons can be hard to housetrain. Use crate training and be consistent and persistent, and your dog may eventually be reliable in the house. Or not.

Living Conditions
  Griffons are good dogs for apartment life and will do okay without a yard.

Trainability
  Training a Griffon can be challenging. They are stubborn and like to do thing on their own time. Putting a leash on a Griffon can be exasperating, they have been known to leap and flip around, trying to remove themselves from the tether. Patience and an even, confident tone are needed when training this breed.
  Though the initial training stages can be challenging, once leadership is established and a reward system put in place, Griffons excel in advanced obedience and agility training. Competitive activists are great for this breed because they love the attention and the opportunity to perform for a crowd.

Exercise Requirements
  Another great reason why the Brussels Griffon breed is good for seniors is that it doesn’t require a lot of exercise. If you live in an apartment or a small home, this breed can get enough exercise indoors, no matter how small the space.
  If you’re feeling up to it, the Brussels Griffon likes to run obstacle courses, which highlights its natural ability as ratters.

Grooming
  Owners of this breed can choose between the smooth or rough coat, neither of which sheds heavily. The rough coat is wiry and dense and should never feel woolly or silky. The smooth coat is straight, short and shiny.
  Smooths are easier to groom, needing only a weekly brushing to keep their coats clean and shiny. Rough coats require hand stripping every three to four months to maintain the correct hard, wiry texture. The down side is that hand stripping can be time consuming if you do it yourself and expensive if you have a professional groomer do it. Pet dogs can be kept in a schnauzer clip, minus the eyebrows, but the trademark rough texture will disappear if the coat is clipped.
  There’s no such thing as a hypoallergenic dog, but some people who are allergic to dogs react less strongly to a Brussels Griffon with a rough coat. In those cases, it’s worthwhile to learn to strip the coat or to pay to have it done.
The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Small dogs are prone to periodontal disease so brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Griffons don't enjoy hitting, unwanted hugs, being chased, or being forced to sit in someone's lap. If they're cornered or can't escape someone's grasp, they'll growl or snap. For these reasons, they're not a good match for homes with young children, who often don't understand that a cute little Griffon might not want their "love and kisses."
  It's fine to let your Griffon be around young kids — in fact, it's important to get him used to children, especially during puppyhood, when his temperament is still taking shape. But always supervise your Griffon when children are around, and never let young kids pick him up; instead, make the child sit on the floor with the dog in his lap. Pay attention to the dog's body language, and put him safely in his crate if he looks unhappy or uncomfortable with the child's attention.
  Griffons usually get along well with other pets, but like most small breeds they're completely unaware of their size and will take on dogs much bigger than themselves. Be prepared to protect them from themselves.

Is this breed right for you?
  If you're looking for a breed that doesn't shed and requires little grooming, the Brussels Griffon is right for you. A comedic dog, he's sure to entertain any member of the family. Due to his knack for climbing, he'll need a properly fenced-in yard to avoid attempting escape. Requiring both mental and physical stimulation, he'll need to be with a family that can provide him both daily activity and time to engage in play. Best for children older than 5, the Brussels Griffon believes himself to be the baby of the family.

Did You Know?
  In the 1997 film “As Good as it Gets,” the part of Jack Nicholson’s dog, Verdell, was played by six Brussels Griffons. The breed also appeared in the films “First Wives Club” and “Gosford Park,” as well as on the sitcom “Spin City.

Griffon Bruxellois in popular culture
  • The American impressionist painter Mary Cassatt kept Brussels Griffons and frequently portrayed them in her paintings.
  • In the film As Good as It Gets (1997), as Verdell, played by six Brussels Griffons, named Timer, Sprout, Debbie, Billy, Parfait, and Jill the star.
  • In the film Gosford Park, as Rolf Liechti's dog Kiki.
  • In the film Sweet November, as Sara's dog Ernie.
  • In the sitcom Spin City, as Carter's suicidal dog Rags, played by a smooth-coated Petit Brabançon named Wesley.
  • In the film Teaching Mrs. Tingle, as Mrs. Tingle's dog.
  • Monkey, owned by record label owner and deejay Sarah Lewitinn and named "Best Dog Owned by a Club Personality" by The Village Voice.
  • Tazzie owned by Stanley Dangerfield, appearing on the television show The Good Companions.
  • In the film First Wives Club owned by Diane Keaton's character.
  • In the sitcom "Mike and Molly" Mikes mom's dog, Jim is a Brussels Griffon mixed with a Chihuahua.
  • The Southern California craft brewery "The Bruery" brewed a sour brown ale called Griffon Bruxellois.
  • The makeup for the Ewok characters in the film Return of the Jedi (1983) in the Star Wars universe was developed by make-up artist Stuart Freeborn, who built them from designs by visual effects director Joe Johnston using the image of the Griffon Bruxellois, a dog breed which George Lucas owned.

A dream day in the life of a Brussels Griffon
  A dog truly meant for the indoors due to health and mental reasons, the Brussels Griffon loves to wake up on the bed of his master. After taking a quick stroll around the neighborhood, he'll need a well-balanced meal of dog chow. Once he plays a nice game of catch, he'll be completely content with sniffing out his home turf and ending his day with cuddles.
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