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Showing posts with label toy. Show all posts
Showing posts with label toy. Show all posts

Thursday, November 9, 2017

Everything about your Toy Poodle

Everything about your Toy Poodle
  Size differentiates the Standard, Miniature, and Toy Poodles, who are otherwise similar. These elegant dogs have Einstein-like smarts and they make excellent family dogs. Most of them don’t have the runway styling of a show dog, but they do need professional grooming unless you are prepared to learn to use clippers.

Overview
  The Poodle, also known as the Caniche and the Pudle, is a breed of dog that comes in three sizes. The Standard and Miniature Poodles are in the Non Sporting Group, and the Toy Poodles are in the Toy Group. This is one of the most popular house pet breeds known, and poodles are famous for their companionable temperaments and extremely high degree of intelligence. The Poodle was recognized by the AKC in 1887 and AKC approved in 1984.
  When groomed to show dog standards the body is meant to give off a square appearance. It is approximately the same length as the height at the withers. The skull is moderately rounded with a slight but definite stop. It has a long, straight muzzle. The dark, oval-shaped eyes are set somewhat far apart and are black or brown. The ears hang close to the head and are long and flat. Both the front and back legs are in proportion with the size of the dog.   The topline is level. The tail is set and carried high. It is sometimes docked to half its length or less to make the dog look more balanced. Dewclaws may be removed. The oval-shaped feet are rather small and the toes are arched. The coat is either curly or corded. It comes in all solid colors including black, blue, silver, gray, cream, apricot, red, white, brown or café-au-lait. While it does not make the written show standard, some breeders are breeding parti-colored Poodles. 

Other Quick Facts
  • Poodles are canine scholars. Their intelligence combined with their desire to please makes it easy to train them.
  • The original purpose of the Standard Poodle was to retrieve waterfowl for hunters, and he is still capable of performing that task today.
  • Poodles need regular mental stimulation and physical exercise.
  • Poodles are not prissy and are just as likely as other dogs to enjoy wet or muddy fun.
  • A Poodle’s grooming needs are considerable. Clipping must be done regularly, typically about every 6 to 8 weeks, or that fine curly coat will mat into gnarly knots.
  • Poodles can be one of the best family dogs possible. For the tiny dog’s safety, though, most breeders won’t place Toy Poodles in homes with children younger than 10 years.
Breed standards
AKC group: Toy
UKC group: Companion Dogs
Average lifespan: 14 to 18 years
Average size: 5 to 10 pounds
Coat appearance: Corded, Dense, and Harsh and Rough
Coloration: It comes in all solid colors including black, blue, silver, gray, cream, apricot, red, white, brown or café-au-lait
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Families with children, singles, seniors, houses with yards
Temperament: Intelligent, easy to train, obedient, playful

History 

  Poodles are thought to have originated in Germany, where they were called Pudel, meaning "splash in the water,”  a reference to their work as water retrievers. The exaggerated show cut seen today began as a practical way to keep the dog’s joints and torso warm in cold water.
  The Standard is the oldest of the three Poodle varieties. The Miniature and the Toy were created by selecting for smaller size. They, too, were working dogs. Miniatures are said to have sniffed out truffles, a type of edible mushroom that grows underground, and Toys and Miniatures were popular circus dogs because of their intelligence, love of performing and ability to learn tricks.
  The curly-coated dogs became popular in England and Spain, but in France they were adored. King Louis XVI was besotted with Toy Poodles and the breed became thought of as France’s national dog. It was in France that the breed achieved status as companions, and Poodles still enjoy that status today. They are beloved around the world and are consistently ranked among the most popular breeds. Today the Miniature is the most popular of the three sizes, and the three varieties together are ranked ninth in popularity among the breeds registered by the American Kennel Club.

Personality
  Poodles have a reputation for being “sissies.” They way their hair is cut for shows probably doesn't help that image, but Poodles are by no means fragile, shrinking violets.   They are outgoing, friendly dogs who love to run and romp, and interestingly, they were originally used to assist hunters of water fowl. They are true family dogs who can play hard with children all afternoon, then curl up in the living room for an evening of relaxation. Toy Poodles make excellent watchdogs, they are alert and curious and will sound the alarm that a person or animal is approaching. They make an excellent choice for families of all sizes and ages, and are great for first time dog owners.

Health
  This dog has a lifespan of 12 to 14 years and may suffer from minor diseases like trichiasis, entropion, cataract and lacrimal duct atresia, and major aliments like progressive retinal atrophy (PRA), Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, patellar luxation, and epilepsy. Urolithiasis and intervertebral disk degeneration are sometimes noticed in the breed. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may run hip, knee, and eye exams on the dog.

Care
  The Toy Poodle is not meant for outdoor living, but it enjoys moving to and from the yard. Its coat requires it to be brushed on alternate days. When hair sheds, it does not fall off easily, but gets tangled, thus causing matting. Clipping is recommended four times annually, while the feet and face require monthly clipping. Most Poodles need professional groomers, but owners of the dogs can also learn the grooming procedure. Poodles require plenty of physical and mental exercise - indoor games, short walks, etc. -as well as lots of interaction with humans.

Living Conditions
  Toy Poodles are good for city life as well as country living. Given enough exercise, they are not active indoors. They will lie right next to you and are more sedate when indoors, although they love to play outdoors and are a highly intelligent breed, so they do like lots of thoughtful activities to stimulate their mentality. They will do okay without a yard.

Trainability
  Poodles are highly trainable dogs. They catch on very quickly to patterns and don't require much motivation beyond praise and a couple of treats. Poodles should never be treated harshly as they will simply stop listening to you. They are natural learners, however, so they shouldn't test your patience too far during training sessions.
  Once basic obedience has been mastered, Poodles should graduate on to advanced obedience, trick training, or the agility course. They are thinking dogs and will appreciate the opportunity to learn new things.

Activity Requirements
  Toy Poodles can live as happily in and apartment as they can in a large home with a yard. Wherever they dwell, they do need daily walks and several chances to run every week. Poodles who aren't exercised enough can become high strung and bark excessively.
  They are a smart breed who need to use their minds as much as their bodies, so it is important to give your Poodle lots of interesting activities to do during the day.

Grooming
  Grooming is a significant consideration in Poodles. The fine, curly coat that works well in the water needs to be clipped regularly, typically about every six to eight weeks, depending on your preferences. It mats easily, and requires regular brushing at home, even with professional grooming care. Left untrimmed, the coat will naturally curl into cords. Some people want the coat to cord because they prefer the look.
  Dental care is an issue, particularly for the Toy and Miniature Poodle. Those small mouths full of teeth can cause problems. Keep on top of it by brushing the teeth regularly with a vet-approved pet toothpaste and having regular dental checks when you go to the veterinarian.
  Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Don’t let them get so long that you can hear them clicking on the floor.

Is the Toy Poodle the Right Breed for you?
High Maintenance: Grooming should be performed often to keep the dog's coat in good shape. Professional trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Difficult Training: The Toy Poodle isn't deal for a first time dog owner. Patience and perseverance are required to adequately train it.
Slightly Active: Not much exercise is required to keep this dog in shape. Owners who are frequently away or busy might find this breed suitable for their lifestyle.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  Toy Poodles have been popular pets for centuries, including in the court of Louis XVI. Poodles didn’t originate in France, but they are often referred to as French Poodles because they were so popular in that country.



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Thursday, April 20, 2017

Everything about your Manchester Terrier

Everything about your Manchester Terrier
   The Manchester Terrier is quite an old breed that was developed for the purpose of hunting and killing rats, rabbits and other rodents in urban Great Britain. Named after the city of Manchester in northwestern England, this breed has also been referred to as the English Gentleman’s Terrier and the Gentleman’s Terrier. The Manchester Terrier is a direct descendant and very close relative of the old Black and Tan Terrier and shares many of its physical and mental attributes, although the Black and Tan was a heavier, coarser dog with shorter legs. The Manchester is a leaner, more athletic animal, due to outcrosses with Whippets during the early development of the breed. 

Overview
  The oldest-known terrier, the Manchester Terrier was bred in England to hunt rats. The best vermin-hunting breed, the Manchester Terrier is extremely fast. Available in both standard and toy varieties, both are considered companion dogs with the same personality traits. Unfortunately, the popularity of the Manchester Terrier has gone down in recent years.

Highlights
  • Life expectancy can be up to 15 years.
  • Manchesters can become obese if overfed and under-exercised.
  • You can find them in two sizes: small and smaller.
  • They excel at sports such as agility, obedience, and rally.
  • They are great watchdogs and will bark enthusiastically if not trained to be quiet on command.
  • Manchester Terriers can be stubborn and difficult to housebreak. Crate training is recommended.
  • Manchesters are energetic dogs and like to go for walks. Be care in off-leash or unsecured areas; when their hunting instincts kick in, training is out the window. It's all about the chase.
  • They bark, dig, and kill vermin and small critters, including pocket pets.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.

Other Quick Facts

  • The Manchester Terrier is a small dog, slightly longer than he is tall, with a short coat in jet black with rich mahogany markings. He has a wedge-shaped head with a keen, bright expression shining out of black, almond-shaped eyes. This is a breed with curves. The neck is slightly arched; the topline (back) is slightly arched over the loins; and the abdomen is tucked up with an arched line. The tail tapers to a point and is carried in a slight upward curve.
  • With the exception of size, the only difference between the Standard and Toy Manchester is ear shape. The Standard Manchester has a naturally erect ear, a cropped ear or a button ear. Cropped ears are long and pointed. A Toy Manchester has a naturally erect ear, never one that has been cropped.
Breed standards
AKC group: Toy
UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan: 15 - 18 years
Average size: 6 - 8 pounds
Coat appearance: Smooth-haired, shiny
Coloration: Black and tan
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Muscular, long tapered head, V-shaped erect ears, dark almond-shaped eyes, black nose, pointed and erect tail.
Possible alterations: Standard versions are larger in size. Ears are known to naturally flop over.
Comparable Breeds: Italian Greyhound, Whippet

History of the Manchester Terrier
  The sleek and handsome Manchester Terrier is thought to have been created by crossing Britain’s black and tan terrier with the Whippet and possibly other breeds such as the Italian Greyhound. He originated in Manchester, where popular sports included rat killing and rabbit coursing. The Manchester was designed to excel at both and became popular throughout Britain.
  The dogs were eventually imported into the United States. The American Kennel Club recognized the Toy variety in 1886 and the Standard in 1887. The Manchester Terrier Club of America was formed in 1923. Today the breed ranks 121 st among the dogs registered by the AKC.

Temperament
  Manchester Terriers are lively, spirited, sharp-witted dogs. Although they look like small Dobermans, Manchesters are true terriers, through and through. They are extremely smart, somewhat independent and devoted to the people in their close circle. This is neither a cuddly nor a clingy breed. In fact, Manchester Terriers can be stubborn and, like most other terriers, they have a tendency to test boundaries. Manchesters can become destructive and noisy if left unattended for long periods of time. They typically get along well with children, as long as they are well-socialized with kids from an early age. Manchester Terriers are not particularly suspicious of strangers, although they can be a bit aloof and stand-offish. All in all, this is an alert, attentive breed that makes an ideal companion for city-dwellers.

Health 
  Manchester Terriers have an average life span of about 15 years. Breed health concerns may include von Willebrand disease, Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, pattern baldness (mainly in females), Ehler-Danlos syndrome (cutaneous asthenia), lens luxation, cataracts and generalized progressive retinal atrophy (GPRA). These short-haired dogs become easily chilled and should wear a sweater or coat when outside in icy weather for any length of time.

Care
  Minimal coat care is required for the Manchester Terrier. It is an active and alert breed that should be led on moderate on-leash walks, off-lead outings in safe areas, or fun romp in the garden. Although it likes to spend the day in the yard, it should not be allowed to live outdoors and it needs a soft, warm bed.

Living Conditions
  The Manchester Terrier is a good dog for apartment living. They are very active indoors and will do okay without a yard. Manchester Terriers prefer warm climates.

Training
  Not the easiest breed in the world when it comes to training, the Manchester Terrier needs a patient and calm trainer. His stubborn streak means that the trainer must always have loads of cookies to keep him interested in the session. Harsh methods and yelling will cause this breed to shut down.
  Many owners have found that their Manchester Terriers can be great therapy dogs. They are easy to put in the car and actually like going for rides, which makes visiting hospitals and nursing homes easy. Providing they were socialized properly and had basic obedience training, Manchesters can do good things for those in less than ideal health.

Activity Requirements
  Manchester Terriers are active, athletic dogs, but unlike some little breeds they typically are not neurotic or excessively busy. A healthy dose of moderate exercise should suffice to keep them happy, healthy and fit. Manchesters love to accompany their human family members on all sorts of outings, from a simple stroll around the neighborhood to a trip to the grocery store. They absolutely adore playing fetch.

Grooming
  When it comes to grooming, the Manchester Terrier is an easy keeper. Though the breed is naturally clean with little doggie odor, a bath every three months (or when he gets dirty) in a mild shampoo is a good idea. Brush his sleek coat with a natural bristle brush or mitt. Use coat conditioner/polish to brighten the sheen.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually once every few weeks. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.   Check the ears weekly for dirt, redness or a bad odor that can indicate an infection. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball dampened with a gentle, pH-balanced ear cleaner recommended by your veterinarian. Introduce the ManchesterTerrier to grooming when he is very young so he learns to accept it, particularly nail trimming, patiently.

Children And Other Pets
  Typically, a Manchester is devoted to his family and likes children but his small size makes him vulnerable to youngsters who aren't old enough to know it hurts when you yank his ears. Some breeders prefer homes without very young children. It helps to expose him to a lot of children, small and not so small, when he's young.
  Show your children how to approach and touch dogs, and supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should be left unsupervised with a child.
  Manchesters and other pets depends on... the other pets. They are less scrappy than many terriers, but don't lose sight of why they were bred: to kill vermin. They have a strong prey drive. So while they generally do well with other dogs, cats might be pretty nervous around them, and small critters like rats, hamsters, and guinea pigs would be in permanent danger around this terrier.

Is this breed right for you?
  A completely devoted breed, the Manchester Terrier is very loyal, loving and faithful. Active and full of life, it needs a lot of mental and physical stimulation to avoid behavioral problems. Not capable of being left alone for long periods of time, it is in constant need of human companionship. With a natural instinct to hunt, it does not do well with cats but can get along with other dogs if raised with them. Enjoying walks, games of fetch and other forms of activity, it does best with a large yard. A good family pet, it does best with children if introduced to them as a puppy.

Did You Know?
  The Manchester Terrier and Toy Manchester were registered as separate breeds until 1959. They are now treated as one breed — the Manchester Terrier — with two varieties: Toy and Standard.

A dream day in the life of a Manchester Terrier
  A breed that enjoys snuggling with its favorite humans, it will enjoy waking up to the alarm in its owner's bed. Known for cuddling, it will wait to get out of bed until its master does. Once up for the day, it'll greet the kids with affection before going for a romp in the yard. After a good breakfast, it will enjoy engaging in a game of fetch. After a nap with the smaller humans, the Manchester Terrier will follow them outside to sniff out the perimeter for any unwelcome visitors. Ending its day exactly as it started, it'll be keen for a nightly snuggle session.


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Monday, April 10, 2017

Everything about your Toy Fox Terrier

Everything about your Toy Fox Terrier
   A wonderful combination of both a toy breed and a terrier breed, the Toy Fox Terrier can be a bit like the Napoleon of the dog world: small in stature, but full of confidence. Able to complete a number of tasks just like the Toy Fox Terrier, but coming in a little package, it’s hard to deny that this dog can be one of the most endearing breeds around. After all, it’s rare to find a toy breed so durable, sturdy, and generally outgoing. These qualities are a mark of the Toy Fox Terrier’s unique pedigree, which we’ll detail in this overview of the breed.

Overview
  Bred as a means to make the Fox Terrier smaller, the Toy Fox Terrier was created by breeding a standard-sized Fox Terrier with a Chihuahua, Miniature Pinscher, Manchester Terrier and Italian Greyhound. A natural-born hunter, the Toy Fox Terrier enjoys chasing and playing around the yard. Extremely intelligent, this dog can be trained to assist the physically handicapped and as a hearing dog for the deaf.
  His intense loyalty to his family can make him aloof with strangers, but socialization and training to accept strangers should help your dog to realize there is no danger from visitors you allow in your home.

Highlights
  • The Toy Fox Terrier is not a suitable companion for all children. While a sturdy little dog, they cannot tolerate excessive rough handling, especially as they are prone to broken legs.
  • Terrier instinct may cause it to chase small animals, and thereby will need close supervision if outdoors off-leash with out a fence. Your dog should never be off-leash in an area where you cannot contain him should the need arise.
  • Being terriers they may not do well with smaller pets in the household such as hamsters, mice and gerbils.
  • They are a small dog but do not realize this; they sometimes challenge other dogs much larger than themselves. Supervised interaction with larger dogs is advisable.
  • Beneath the cute exterior of your TFT puppy can reside the heart of a tyrant. Be sure to train your puppy early to be a responsible and well-behaved member of your family.
  • Most Toy Fox Terriers would prefer to share your bed with you. However, jumping from such heights, especially when a puppy, can cause broken bones. Teaching your TFT to sleep in his own bed on the floor is a safer route.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • With their thin skin, Toy Fox Terriers like their comforts. Besides cuddling in a lap or snuggling under bedding, they’ll want a sweater to keep them warm whenever they’re exposed to prolonged cool or cold temperatures.
  • A Toy Fox Terrier’s worst qualities are his love of barking and his belief that he’s capable of taking on dogs many times his size. You have to protect him from himself.
  • A TFT’s best quality is his loving nature. He bonds strongly to his family and loves being a lap dog and companion.
  • Toy Fox Terriers don’t like getting wet.
Breed standards
AKC group: Toy
UKC group: Companion
Average lifespan: 13 - 15 years
Average size: 4 - 10 pounds
Coat appearance: Short, smooth and thick.
Coloration: White, tan, chocolate, tricolored, white and black, white and tan
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Healthy, athletic body; small muzzle; small black eyes; black nose; erect V-shaped ears and docked tail
Possible alterations: Chocolate-colored dogs have like-colored noses; tail may not be docked
Comparable Breeds: Chihuahua, Rat Terrier

History of the Toy Fox Terrier
  This small American-bred dog has been around for the better part of a century. He was first known as a little farm dog, whose job it was to clear rats and other small vermin from barns and granaries.
  The Toy Fox Terrier was developed by breeding small Smooth Fox Terriers with several toy breeds, including the Chihuahua and Manchester Terrier. Some of the Chihuahua and Manchester Terrier traits did not fit with the type that the developers of the breed were trying to achieve, so after the initial crosses to set the size for the new breed, later breedings involved only smaller Smooth Fox Terriers.
   The United Kennel Club registered its first Toy Fox Terrier in 1936, but the breed didn’t gain American Kennel Club recognition until 2003. The TFT ranks 99th among the breeds registered by the AKC, and his size and temperament are sure to bring him greater popularity in the future.



Temperament 
  Intelligent, obedient, willing to work, this is the kind of toy dog that people who really love “working” dogs can still enjoy. It’s small but with the personality of a regular terrier, in many ways, and will even show these instincts by hunting small rodents and pests around the house. Given good discipline, it will be a good companion and willing to obey commands. Because it’s a small dog, be sure to teach children how to handle it and not to be aggressive with it.


Health
  The average life span of the Toy Fox Terrier is 12 to 14 years. Breed health concerns may include Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, patellar luxation and Von Willebrand disease.

Care
  The Toy Fox Terrier loves a soft warm bed or a lap. Because it is not an outdoor breed, coat care remains simple. It should, however, be provided with a daily exercise routine and sufficient playmates. Fortunately, a small area and some toys make for an excellent playground. The dog tends to bark and dig when it does not get sufficient training, attention, and exercise.

Living Conditions
  The Toy Fox Terrier is good for apartment life. It is very active indoors and will do okay without a yard. It cannot tolerate cold weather. It should wear a coat in the winter to help keep it warm.

Trainability
  Toy Fox Terriers are highly trainable and catch on to new behaviors quickly and easily. All you need to train a Toy Fox are treats and lots of excited praise. These tiny dogs don't take kindly to being treated harshly and will mistrust you if you use physical corrections. Luckily, training them is a joy and they are naturally well-behaved, so they hardly ever test a person's patience.
  Toy Fox Terriers are a snap to house train, unlike almost every other terrier and toy breed. They are small enough to use pads of canine litter boxes in the house, which is an added benefit for elderly owners or for people who live in apartments or condos.

Exercise Requirements
  Play is important; a daily walk is, as well, and they love a good yard. Just make sure the yard or area is fenced in, as these little dogs can escape through cracks and holes fairly easily. As they are small dogs, remember that their small strides can mean extra work to keep up with you.

Grooming
  All it takes to groom a Toy Fox Terrier is a lick and a promise. Give his short coat a quick brushing once a week and you’re done. Baths are needed only rarely, maybe after he’s rolled in something stinky. He sheds a little, but he’s so small that the amount of hair floating around is manageable.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Small breeds are prone to periodontal disease, so brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  They can be active, fun loving companions for older children, but like most toy breeds, they are not recommended playmates for very young children. Their small size, tendency to break bones easily, and terrier tenacity can make a bad combination with very young children.
  They get along well with other dogs and cats in their home, although they may be territorial toward strange dogs passing or approaching their property.

Is this breed right for you?
  A friendly and playful breed, the active Toy Fox Terrier requires a lot of physical and mental stimulation. OK for apartment living, he'll need regular exercise and toys to play with. Doing well with a fenced-in yard of his own, he'll constantly be at the side of his owner. Trained easily and well, he can be taught to learn many new tricks. This dog does better with older children; he may lose patience with younger children who don't know how to handle him. Getting along with cats if raised with them, he's likely to chase smaller animals and vermin. Not a fan of cold weather, he'll need a sweater when venturing outdoors in cooler climates.

Did You Know?
  Toy Fox Terriers are active and agile. They have even been known to climb trees in pursuit of squirrels.



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Saturday, April 8, 2017

Everything about your Tibetan Spaniel

Everything about your Tibetan Spaniel
   A prized pet and watchdog for the Tibetan monasteries, the Tibetan Spaniel is lovingly referred to as a "little lion dog." Thought of highly, the breed was gifted to royals throughout Asia. Given to other countries, the popularity of the Tibetan Spaniel grew. A devoted human companion, the breed is immediately loved by all families that own it.

Overview
  The Tibetan Spaniel, also known as the Tibbie, is a dog breed in the Non-Sporting Group. This little Spaniel is not only an excellent companion, but they are highly valued watch dogs that were once called ‘little lions’ by the Buddhist monks of Tibet. The Tibetan Spaniel was approved by the AKC in 1983.
  The average Tibetan Spaniel stands 10 inches high at the shoulders and weighs between 9 and 15 pounds. Their coat requires frequent brushing to help prevent mats and control shedding, and their ears should be cleaned regularly and frequently checked for any signs of infections.

Highlights
  • Although Tibetan Spaniels can learn quickly, they may be stubborn when it comes to obeying commands.
  • Tibetan Spaniels shed small amounts year-round and need weekly brushing to get rid of dead hair.
  • Although Tibetan Spaniels are affectionate toward and protective of children, they're better suited for homes with older children because they can be injured during rough play.
  • Tibetan Spaniels generally get along well with other dogs and pets. They do well in homes with multiple dogs.
  • Tibetan Spaniels thrive when they're with their families. They're not recommended for homes where they'll receive little attention or will be left alone for long periods.
  • Barking can become a favorite pastime of Tibetan Spaniels if they're bored. They'll also bark when people come to the door or when they hear something suspicious. The upside is, they make great watchdogs.
  • Tibetan Spaniels only need moderate exercise and are quite happy with a daily walk or free play in a fenced yard.
  • Tibetan Spaniels must be walked on leash to prevent them from running off to explore. Yards should be fenced.
  • The Tibetan Spaniel is fairly rare, so if you're buying a puppy, it may take a while to find a good breeder, and once you do, there may be a wait for puppies to be available.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from a puppy mill, a pet store, or a breeder who doesn't provide health clearances or guarantees. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies and who breeds for sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts:
  • When you look at a Tibetan Spaniel, you should see a dog with a rectangular body covered in a silky double coat, dark-brown oval-shaped eyes, medium-size ears that hang down and are well feathered, and a plumed tail that curls over the back, falling to one side.
  • The Tibetan Spaniel’s coat can be any color or mixture of colors.
Breed standards

AKC group: Non-sporting
UKC group: Herding
Average lifespan: 14 - 16 years
Average size: 9 - 15 pounds
Coat appearance: Silky
Coloration: Gold, cream, red and sable with white markings on paws
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Small body, short to the ground and longer than it is tall; dark brown, oval eyes and black nose; feathering between the toes; plump and fluffy feathered tail
Possible alterations: May be multicolored
Comparable Breeds: Japanese Chin, Pekingese

History
  Tibetan Spaniels were bred by Buddhist monks to resemble little lions, which are symbolic of Buddha. Like their cousins the Lhasa Apsos, they served as alarm dogs in Tibetan monasteries. Tibetan Spaniels were highly valued and often presented as gifts to great nobles or rulers. The many exchanges of dogs between Tibet and China mean that the Tibetan Spaniel likely shares a common ancestry with breeds such as the Pekingese, the Japanese Chin, and the Shih Tzu.
  British travelers and missionaries brought some of the dogs to the West in the late 19th century and early 20th century. They include Mrs. McLaren Morris, who brought the first Tibetan Spaniel to England; Sir Edward and Lady Wakefield, who bred several litters; and Colonel and Mrs. Hawkins, who brought a pair of the Wakefields’ dogs to England in 1941. Agnes R. H. Greig, who is also associated with the Tibetan Terrier, sent several to her mother in Britain, but only one from the breeding program survived World War II.
  The dogs didn’t get much attention in the United States until the 1960s when a litter was bred from a pair imported from Tibet. Trinity Lutheran Church sexton Leo Kearns is credited with popularizing the dogs after his litter was snatched up by his parishioners in New Haven, Conn. He imported more Tibetan Spaniels from Britain, and others became interested in the dogs. The Tibetan Spaniel Club of America was formed in 1971, and the American Kennel Club recognized the breed in 1984. Tibbies rank 104th among the dogs registered by the AKC.

Personality
  Trusting and affectionate toward family members, Tibetan Spaniels may be aloof toward strangers, although never aggressive. True to their heritage, they make excellent watchdogs and will bark to alert you of anything that seems unusual.
  Tibbies seem to be especially responsive to their people's moods and feelings. As loving as they are, however, they're independent thinkers and won't always obey, especially if they think they know better or don't see any good reason to do as you ask.
Maud Earl Tibetan Spaniels 1898
  As with all dogs, Tibetan Spaniels need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Tibetan Spaniel puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.

Health Problems
  The Tibetan Spaniel is a generally healthy breed. However, this dog may suffer from the following conditions: progressive retinal atrophy, cherry eye, patellar luxation, allergies, and portosystemic shunt (a liver condition).

Care
  The Tibetan Spaniel breed is meant for apartment life and should not be allowed to live outdoors. The daily exercise needs of the Tibbie are minimal and can be met by indoor and outdoor games or a short on-leash walk. Its coat requires combing and brushing twice weekly.

Living Conditions
  The Tibetan Spaniel is good for apartment life. It is relatively inactive indoors and will do okay without a yard.

Training
  Because of his stubborn streak, the Tibetan Spaniel can be difficult to train. For the best results, start early and establish yourself as the Alfa of the household. If your dog gets the upper hand, this will be difficult to train them out of. For the best results, use positive training reinforcements, such as praise and treats. And keep training sessions short and interesting to hold your dog’s attention. You’ll be happy to learn that Tibetan Spaniels are pretty easy to house train and it is recommended that you crate train your dog.
  Tibetan Spaniels are known to be vocal, alerting you to a stranger’s presence. With patience and consistency, it is possible to train them to stop barking once they’ve alerted you to the possible threat.

Exercise Requirements
  Because of his size, Tibetan Spaniels can live pretty much anywhere. They do as well in an apartment as they would in a large estate. They make wonderful companions for seniors as they don’t need a lot of daily exercise. A daily walk and some play time will cover all his exercise needs. If you have a back yard, do not leave your Tibbie unattended. This dog needs to be with you and will be happiest when playing with you.

Grooming Needs
  Tibetan Spaniels shed lightly year round, and brushing two to three times per week will keep loose hair under control and keep the coat free from tangles or mats. They typically require a bath every six to eight weeks.
  Check the Tibetan Spaniel's ears on a weekly basis for signs of infection, irritation, or wax build up. Cleanse regularly with a veterinarian-approved cleanser and cotton ball. Brush the teeth at least once per week to prevent tartar buildup and fight gum disease. Additionally, nails should be trimmed once per month if the dog does not wear the toenails down naturally.

Children And Other Pets
  Tibetan Spaniels are affectionate and protective of children, but because they're small, they can be injured easily by rough handling, so they're best suited to homes with children who are at least 6 years old and know to be gentle and not to tease.
  As with any dog, always teach children how to approach and touch your Tibetan Spaniel, and supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear pulling from either party.
  Tibetan Spaniels usually get along well with other dogs and cats. Most enjoy having another dog as a companion.

Is this breed right for you?
  A human lover to the bone, the Tibetan Spaniel goes well with young children and other pets. A great family dog, the breed also makes for an excellent watchdog. Suited for apartment life, he is a true-blue inside dog. Enjoying a daily walk and time out in the yard, he is a bit difficult to train. Requiring moderate grooming, the Tibetan Spaniel is a moderate shedder, but does lose a large amount once a year. In need of a master with good leadership skills, the breed is likely to show behavioral problems if allowed to develop small dog syndrome.

Did You Know?
  The Tibbie is not a true Spaniel. He was referred to as an “epagneul,” a French word used in the Middle Ages to refer to small comforter dogs.

A dream day in the life of a Tibetan Spaniel
   The Tibetan Spaniel is likely to wake up with a smile. Happily wagging his tail at his owner, he will gladly follow his master wherever she may go. Running outside for a romp in the yard, he'll bark at any possible intruders. A lover, he'll play with and lick the children at any available opportunity. Kindhearted, he'll be at your feet until the end of the day, where he'll cuddle close for bedtime.



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Friday, December 9, 2016

Everything about your Miniature Pinscher

Everything about your Miniature Pinscher
  The Miniature Pinscher is not a scaled-down Doberman, although he is fearless and makes a terrific watchdog. Known as the “King of the Toys,” this little fireball is best suited to an experienced owner who can manage his willful nature. On the plus side, his antics are pure entertainment, and he is simple to groom.

Overview
  Originating in Germany, the Miniature Pinscher was bred as a way to control the rodent population in stables. Developed from the Italian Greyhound and Dachshund, the Miniature Pinscher is small but fast. Often referred to as the "king of toys," the breed enjoys living a very active life that is stimulating both physically and mentally.
  The diminutive Min Pin is a bundle of energy, full of vigor. He's highly curious and tends to investigate — and possibly eat — everything. He must be watched closely so he doesn't get into something he shouldn't. He's a skilled escape artist and should never be outside off-leash — in fact, you'll have to make sure he doesn't dart out whenever you answer the front door.
  For these reasons, the Min Pin is not the dog for everyone, especially first-time dog owners. His energy and intelligence can catch his owner off guard. Without proper training and supervision, he can quickly become a tyrant in the household.

Highlights
  • Miniature Pinschers are hardy little dogs, but they can be easily injured by roughhousing. Because of this, they're better suited as pets for older children who have learned how to care for a dog properly.
  • The Min Pin is sensitive to cold. Be sure to put a sweater or coat on him when you take him outside in really cold weather.
  • Because they were originally bred to hunt vermin, Min Pins may attack small objects , which can be a choking hazard. He may also take off after small pets that he perceives as prey.
  • Min Pins have a lot of energy — probably more than you have. They're also very curious. You must supervise your Min Pin constantly, and if you can't, put him in a crate.
  • You must be willing to take the position of "alpha" in your household. If you don't, the Min Pin will gladly assume the role.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Min Pin is strong-willed and not for novices. He can be possessive of toys and food.
  • The Min Pin can have either cropped or uncropped ears and a docked tail. Coat colors include red, stag red (red with black hairs), black with rust markings, or chocolate with tan.
  • The Min Pin likes to play both indoors and out. He doesn’t need a lot of exercise, but a daily walk is important to give him the mental stimulation he needs.
Breed standards
AKC group: Toy
UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan: 14 - 15 years
Average size: 8 - 12 pounds
Coat appearance: Smooth, short-haired
Coloration: Black and rust, red, stag red, chocolate and tan
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Compact, small, squarish body, with head proportional to the body; dark black eyes; scissor-bite teeth; strong, straight legs, cat-like feet, and cropped tail
Possible alterations: Tail may not be cropped and dewclaws may be removed.
Comparable Breeds: Cairn Terrier, Chihuahua


History
  The Miniature Pinscher is thought to be an old breed, but documentation can only trace it reliably back several hundred years. It was developed in Germany to kill rats in homes and stables.
Drawing of a pinscher and a miniature pinscher
by Jean Bungartz
   There it was first called the Reh Pinscher because of its supposed similarity to the reh, or small deer, that used to inhabit Germany's forests. Many people think that the Miniature Pinscher was developed as a mini Doberman, but though he looks similar, he's a distinct and much older breed.
  Development of the Miniature Pinscher took off in 1895 when German breeders formed the Pinscher Klub, later renamed the Pinscher-Schnauzer Klub. It was then that the first breed standard was written. Miniature Pinschers were first shown at the Stuttgart Dog Show in Germany in 1900, at which time they were virtually unknown outside of their homeland.
  From 1905 until World War I, the Miniature Pinscher rapidly grew in popularity in Germany. After World War I, breeders in Germany and also in the Scandinavian countries worked to improve the line. Around 1919, the first Miniature Pinschers were imported in the United States. Only a few were shown in American Kennel Club dog shows at first. But by 1929, the Miniature Pinscher Club of America, Inc., was formed.
  Also in 1929, the AKC recognized the breed. At that time Min Pins were shown in the Terrier group. In 1930, they were reclassified as Toys and called Pinscher (Miniature). They were renamed Miniature Pinscher in 1972.

Personality
  Contrary to popular belief, the Miniature Pinscher was not developed by breeding Doberman Pinschers down to size. In fact, Min Pins are actually a much olde breed than the Doberman. Nicknamed the “King of the Toys,” your Min Pin will also rule as King or Queen of your house. Breeders and owners agree, these little dogs believe they are the center of the universe and expect everyone to cater to their whims. They have a unique high-step manner of walking which has been likened to a prance, and they ooze confidence wherever they may go. Min Pins are cuddle bugs who will find their way to your lap the instant you sit on the couch. They do love to run, however, and will sometimes tear through the house for no apparent reason. Min Pins make excellent watchdogs, sizing up everyone who approaches his kingdom, and requiring all guests earn his trust.

Health
  The Miniature Pischer, which has an average lifespan of 12 to 14 years, may be prone to some minor problems like Legg-Perthes Disease, patellar luxation, hypothyroidism, Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) VI, and heart defects. Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) may also be seen in some Min Pins. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may recommend knee, eye, and hip tests for the dog, as well as DNA to confirm MPS.

Care
  Grooming is easy, as the smooth, short-haired coat requires little attention, needing only occasional brushing and shampooing. Care must be taken in cold weather. Sweaters or baby blankets for a Miniature Pinscher keep it from getting too cold. Miniature Pinschers are an active breed and need access to a fenced yard, or be given a daily walk.
  The Min Pin requires plenty of activity, but as it is small, its exercise requirements can be fulfilled either indoors or outdoors. It needs many good game sessions daily to keep it active. Even though it loves outdoor romps in a secure place, it is not fond of the cold.

Living Conditions
  The Miniature Pinscher is good for apartment life. It is very active indoors and will do okay without a yard. The Miniature Pinscher should be protected from the cold.

Training
  The Miniature Pinscher should not really be treated like a toy dog – it’s not a great socializer and will have a high tolerance for work and exercise. Consequently, if you want to make sure that your dog is properly raised according to the breed’s characteristics, it’s a good idea to make sure that your Miniature Pinscher has plenty of outdoor exercise on a regular basis. Miniature Pinschers aren’t ideal for large families and are generally regarded as a dog for one or two people.

Activity Requirements
  Min Pins are tiny, which makes them excellent for apartment and condo life, but they should be taken for daily walks and allowed to run once or twice per week. Min Pins are often high-strung to begin with, so allowing them to burn off as much energy as possible can keep their temperaments in check.
  A good activity to engage in with a Min Pin is agility. Once leadership is established, Min Pins are highly trainable, and take well to the agility course. He will enjoy the exercise, appreciate the opportunity to use his mental prowess, and more importantly, he will eat up the time spent with his favorite person.

Grooming
  Min Pins are really easy to groom — there’s almost nothing to it because of their short, smooth coat. Just use a bristle brush once or twice a week. They shed an average amount, but their small size means that there is less fur shed than from a larger dog with the same kind of short coat.
  Bathe the Min Pin as you desire or only when he gets dirty. With the gentle dog shampoos available now, you can bathe a Min Pin weekly if you want without harming his coat.
  As with all Toy breeds, dental issues are common. Brush your Min Pin’s teeth daily with a vet-approved pet toothpaste and have your veterinarian check them regularly. Nails should be clipped about every two weeks; you should not be able to hear the toenails click when the dog walks.

Children And Other Pets
  If a Miniature Pinscher is raised with children who treat him carefully and kindly, he will adore them and be a trustworthy companion. However, if children are allowed to grab or treat him roughly, even accidentally, he may develop a bad attitude toward kids, or at least want to avoid them as much as possible. The Min Pin is best suited for children age 10 and older.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Many owners have more than one Min Pin; properly socialized and trained, these dogs get along with other dogs just fine . As far as other pets are concerned, the Min Pin's instinct is to chase, so he isn't well suited to homes with small mammals.

Is this breed right for you?
  Although suited for apartment life due to his small size, the Miniature Pinscher requires a lot of activity to satisfy him. He enjoys running, playing and needs a daily walk to fulfill his physical needs. The Miniature Pinscher will partake of regular romps in the yard, but will require a large fence to avoid attempting an escape. In need of proper training, the dog can easily develop behavioral problems if allowed to form small-dog syndrome. OK with older children, it's advised that they are taught how to behave around dogs, as he may nip or bite. In addition, he doesn't care too much for strangers and may bark or attack them unless taught otherwise.

Did You Know?
  It’s thought that the Min Pin was created by crossing breeds as diverse as the Dachshund, the old German Pinscher, the Manchester Terrier, and the Italian Greyhound.

A dream day in the life of a Miniature Pinscher
  It's likely that your Miniature Pinscher will wake at the crack of dawn, before his owners. Ensuring the home is safe, he'll make his way outside to sniff out any vermin and engage in games by himself. Once he hears the family awaken, he'll greet you in the kitchen, patiently awaiting his meal. After a quick walk, he may have a quick nap, but will then spend the day guarding his home and playing with his toys. Not keen on too much affection, he'll end the day with a quick pat on the head for his excellent behavior.


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