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Showing posts with label toxic. Show all posts
Showing posts with label toxic. Show all posts

Friday, September 15, 2017

Best Fruit and Veggie Treats for Dogs

Best Fruit and Veggie Treats for Dogs
  If you’re on the lookout for new and fun ways to rev up your furry best friend’s diet, adding fruits & vegetables can be a really healthy way to do that. Of course, certain ones are better for your dog than others. 
  Just like we do, dogs love food treats. And just like us, dogs sometimes get too many calories from their treats.
  Dogs Like Veggies, Too!

A few things to keep in mind:
NEVER feed your pet the following foods, which are potentially toxic: Grapes, raisins, garlic, onion, avocado and chocolate.
The 10% Rule: Treats and snacks should only make up 10% of a dog’s daily calories. To get an idea of how many treats that is, ask your vet. They can make a recommendation based on the treats your dog likes, his weight, and how active he is.

But dogs love treats. And people love giving their dog treats. It's a way to bond with your pet, and that's a good thing.

Safe Vegetables
  Here is a list of vegetables that are safe for giving to your dog as treats. I also included a description of the benefits and any other information you may need about preparing the food for safe consumption. Always remember to wash off raw vegetables before giving to your dog because lots of raw vegetables may have dangerous pesticides on them.
  • Asparagus - Asparagus is high in fiber, has a lot of vitamins, and is an excellent source of potassium. Dogs can be at risk of choking on an asparagus stalk, so they should receive bite-sized pieces that have been softened through cooking to allow easier digestion before partaking in the nutritious benefits.  If cats express interest in eating asparagus, there’s no harm in also giving them a small piece.
  • Carrots- Carrots are a great treat for your dog. They contain beta carotene, are high in fiber, and rich in vitamins A, C, and K. That means they are great for the eyes and skin. They are also rich in antioxidants, which can help prevent cancer. They are great for your dogs teeth, and they are known for being delicious! Many dog foods actually have carrots listed right in the ingredients.
  • Sweet potato - Similar to the benefits of pumpkin, sweet potato offers dogs and cats fiber, water, and nutrients that aid with digestive problems. Sweet potato offers even more nutritional value, containing vitamins, thiamine, niacin, and even copper. Because of these nutrients, sweet potatoes are much more beneficial to pets than regular white potatoes.
  • Green Beans- Green beans are high in vitamins such as A, K, and C, and also contain manganese. This treat is great for a dog who is overweight because you can replace some of their food with green beans which will nourish them, but not load them up with calories.
  • Zucchini - Zucchini is a good source of vitamin C, magnesium and potassium. Shredding it on top of their regular food is a good way to incorporate it into their diet and may help protect them from infections, cancer, and cardiovascular diseases.
  • Pumpkin- This can be a great treat for you dog, especially if they happen to have diarrhea, constipation, or simply a sensitive stomach. Pumpkin contains lots of fiber that absorbs water and helps ease stomach upset. It also contains vitamin A and has lots of antioxidants.
  • Spinach - For pets or for people, spinach is widely regarded as a super food for containing almost every vitamin and mineral. It may help in all area of your pet’s health.  Avoid giving in large amounts or if they have kidney disease, as it can be harmful or exasperate problems with their kidneys.
  • Brussels Sprouts- Maybe if your kid sees your dog eating her Brussels sprouts, she’ll hop on board and eat them, too. And your dog should be eating Brussels sprouts for their vitamins K and G, manganese, folate, fiber, potassium and vitamins A, B1 and B6.
  • Peas - Peas offer vitamin B, thiamin, and potassium that can boost energy levels and improve bone health in pets. Frozen, thawed, steamed, or mashed, peas can make a nice snack or compliment to a cat or dog’s normal diet.
  • Lettuce - Lettuce helps add water and fiber to a pet’s diet which helps keep them hydrated and full. The leaf should be cut into very thin slices to make it easy to eat, and can be placed on top of their usual food.
  • Bell peppers (red, green, yellow) - All bell pepper varieties provide beta carotene, fiber, and antioxidants. Make sure to cut peppers up into manageable sized pieces and feed with the stem removed to help boost immune function.
  • Cucumber - Aside from vitamins K, C, and magnesium, cucumbers contain very little carbohydrates or fats, making them a good treat for overweight pets. Cucumber may also help lower cats and dogs blood pressure.  In addition, it may help freshen their breath.
  • Broccoli - Broccoli is high in fiber and vitamin C, but too much can cause stomach irritation in some dogs. Small pieces of broccoli without the large stems can make a good treat for dogs, and cats tempted to chew on broccoli florets are welcome to indulge in small bits.
  • Celery - Celery is low in calories and is packed full of nutrients and antioxidants. It also has high water content that has been shown to help freshen your pet's breath!
  • Cabbage - Eating cabbage can aid in digestion, fight cancer, and improve skin and fur health for cats and dogs. Shredding the cabbage over food is a good way to slowly introduce it into their diets, but give in moderation to avoid harmful effects to your dog’s thyroid gland.  It is best to cook the cabbage before feeding to allow for easier digestion.
  • Cauliflower - Cooked or raw, cauliflower is a treat you can share. The vitamins and antioxidants may help reduce inflammation and help older pets with arthritis. Its fiber can support digestive health, but too much may lead to an upset stomach. Serve plain and in small bites without the stem and leaves.
Steer clear of: Never feed your pet onions or garlic as they are toxic in all forms: cooked, raw, and even onion powder. These cause damage to the red blood cells, ultimately causing them to burst. Rhubarb and wild mushrooms also contain toxins. We suggest avoiding corn as it is a common allergen among pets.

Safe Fruits
 There are a number of safe fruits you can give to your dog for treats that are great for them and taste delicious!
  In general fruits are higher in sugar than vegetables, and thus should be limited in overweight pets. However, be sure to wash all fruits and remove rinds, inedible skins, seeds, and pits before feeding to pets.
  • Banana - Bananas are a great source of potassium which can support heart and kidney functions. Bananas are high in carbohydrates and the high sugar content in bananas mean that they should be given to dogs sparingly. When sliced into reasonable sizes this can make a good occasional treat.
  • Cantaloupe- Believe it or not, the same fruit salad staple that humans have come to know and love is just as good for dogs. They’re full of vitamins that will help with your canine’s eyesight, as well as lots of vitamin A and lots of beta carotene, which helps reduce the risk of cancer and prevents cell damage. It’s also a good source of vitamins B-6 and C, fiber, folate, niacin and potassium.
  • Blueberries- Blueberries, with their high levels of resveratrol and their anti-cancer and heart disease fighting qualities, make a great option for your dog’s diet. As an added bonus, the tannins found in blueberries also help prevent urinary tract infections.
  • Apples- Apples are a great source of vitamins A and C. They also are rich in antioxidants. Apples also contain pectin, which is a fiber that creates short­chain fatty acids which help get rid of toxins in the intestinal tract, strengthens intestinal muscles, and ward off dangerous bacteria.
  • Watermelon- If it’s lycopene that you’re looking to add to your dog’s diet, watermelon is your best source for that. The health benefits don’t stop there, though. Give your pooch a piece of this delicious summer treat and you’ll be loading him with up with tons of healthy vitamin A, B-6 and C, as well as thiamin.
  • Cranberries- Besides being high in antioxidants and minerals, and rich in vitamins A, C, B1, and B2, cranberries can also greatly improve your dog’s urinary tract health. They can also help prevent and control urinary tract infections by lowering the pH of your dog’s urine, therefore making it more acidic. They can be fed to them raw, frozen, or cooked. They are also great for you as well!
  • Apricot -The fleshy fruit of apricots can make a good treat for cats and dogs. They are full of potassium and beta-carotene which can help fight against cancer. Just be sure your pet doesn’t eat the poisonous pit, stem, or leaves.
  • Mango - Mangoes are a vitamin-packed treat for cats and dogs. As with all pitted fruits, be sure to remove the hard middle pit which contains poisonous amounts of cyanide. Giving small pieces of mango with the skin removed will allow for easier digestion and as a result lessen the chances that fiber from the fruit will upset your pets’ stomach and digestive tract.
  • Orange - Cats may not be interested in eating oranges, but dogs have been known to enjoy this sweet treat. The nutrients and Vitamin C can help their immune system and flush toxins out of the body. However, the seeds, peel, leaves, or stem of the orange contain oils that are poisonous, so make sure you only feed pets the fleshy part of the fruit.
  • Pear - Pears are full of vitamin C, vitamin A, and fiber, and make a great snack for cats and dogs when served in moderation. As with apples and oranges, pear seeds contain traces of cyanide and should be removed before feeding to your pet. You can give cats or dogs small slices of pear to help promote anti-cancer properties.
  • Strawberries - Fresh or frozen strawberries can help pets stay healthy whether they eat them raw or pureed over their normal pet food. The nutrients in strawberries help strengthen the immune system and slow issues related to aging.
  • Raspberries - Raspberries are low in sugar and contain lots of fiber and vitamin C. Their anti-inflammatory properties make them great for older pets. However, they should be given in moderation as they contain very small amounts of naturally occurring sweetener called xylitol.  In large amounts, such as is found in xylitol containing gum, this sweetener can be fatal to dogs and cats.
  • Pineapple - From folate to zinc, pineapple is bursting with vitamins and minerals that can help your cat or dog’s digestion and immune system. Like any other sugary fruit, it is best to feed pineapple to pets in small quantities. The spiky skin and hard core should be removed before giving to a pet to prevent choking hazards.
Steer clear of: Cherries are toxic to cats and dogs, and grapes and raisins can cause kidney damage. Citrus fruits like lemons, limes, and grapefruit as well as persimmons can cause an upset stomach.

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      Friday, December 2, 2016

      Dangerous Winter Holiday Plants for Dogs

      Dangerous Winter Holiday Plants for Dogs
        Winter plants help boost the holiday spirit and cozy up a living space. However, pet owners should be extra careful when choosing plants for decorating. There are plants that are very harmful to pets, especially little ones like kittens and puppies. It doesn’t mean though that you should forget about all of the winter holiday flowers and have an artificial Christmas tree only, which can actually create more hazards for pets. Just don’t let one of these beautiful plants become a deadly enemy to your pet.

        Flowers and plants add beauty to any holiday, and they make great holiday gifts. But if your family includes dogs, you may want to learn which plants are safe and which ones you need to avoid.

        Remember that ingesting bulb plants often cause the most severe illnesses.

      1. Holly
        Holly is one of the most popular holiday plants that are used as Christmas decorations. Its berries are bright, beautiful, and festive. Its plants bring greenery into your home. If you have pets, however, this holiday plant can bring a real disaster into your home. The plants and berries have a high toxicity level. Ingesting any part of the plant, even the dried one, can lead to abdominal pain, diarrhea, vomiting, excessive drooling and even death. Keep your pets away from holly to prevent these symptoms.

        A child can eat 1-2 holly berries  without harm, but around 20 berries can cause death, so eating holly berries is a serious concern for children and pets. Though the berries are the part that is most commonly eaten, the bark, leaves, and seeds are toxic. What is the poison? Interestingly enough, it is theobromine, an alkaloid that is related to caffeine. Theobromine is found in chocolate and is toxic to dogs even at the lower concentration, but there is much more of the compound in holly berries.

      2. Poinsettia

        The beautiful poinsettia is not something you want on a salad, but this Euphorbia is not particularly dangerous. If you eat a few leaves, you may feel ill or vomit. Rubbing the sap from the plant into your skin can give you an itchy rash. Beyond that, this plant is unlikely to cause a problem for either humans or pets.
        The poinsettia plant’s brightly colored leaves contain a sap that is irritating to the tissues of the mouth and esophagus. If the leaves are ingested, they will often cause nausea and vomiting, but it would take a large amount of the plant’s material to cause poisoning, and most animals and children will not eat such a large enough amount because of the irritating taste and feel from the sap.
        However, if the plant has been treated with a pesticide, your pet could be at risk of becoming ill from ingesting the pesticide. The size of your pet and the amount of ingested plant material will be the determining factors for the severity of the poisoning. Young animals - puppies and kittens - are at the highest risk. Severe reactions to the plant or to the pesticide it has been treated with include seizures, coma, and in some cases, death.

      3. Amaryllis
        Despite being incredibly beautiful, amaryllis is also extremely toxic. 
      The beauty of the flowering Amaryllis is matched by its toxicity. The Amaryllis contains Lycorine and other noxious substances, which cause salivation, gastrointestinal abnormalities like vomiting, diarrhea, decreased appetite, and abdominal pain, lethargy, and tremors in both cats and dogs. The bulb of the plant is reputed to be even more dangerous than the flowers and stalk.

        The Amaryllis also goes by other names, including Belladonna, Saint Joseph Lily, Cape Belladonna, and Naked Lady.

      4. Christmas cactus

        Christmas cactus is a great gift and a beautiful holiday decoration. Many people grow Christmas cacti as house plants.
        Fortunately, the Christmas Cactus (or its relative, the Easter Cactus) plant is not toxic to dogs in either its parts or flowers. The same lack of toxicity applies for cats. However, fibrous plant material can cause irritation to the stomach and intestine, leading to vomiting or diarrhea.

        When you have a pet, it’s better to hide this plant as far as possible. Even though ingesting any part of the holiday cactus won’t lead to death, vomiting and diarrhea are unavoidable.

      5. Mistletoe
        Mistletoe contains toxic substances like pharatoxin viscumin and toxalbumin that are extremely dangerous to cats and dogs. The plant and its berries can cause breathing problems, a sudden drop in blood pressure, vomiting, diarrhea, hallucinations, seizures and sometimes death.
        Be it fresh or dried, make sure your pet doesn’t have access to this plant.

      Mistletoe contains multiple substances that are toxic to both dogs and cats, including toxalbumin and pharatoxin viscumin . Mistletoe is well known for causing severe intestinal upset, as well as a sudden and severe drop in blood pressure, breathing problems, and even hallucinations . If a large enough amount of these plants are ingested, seizures and death may follow. The leaves and berries of holly and mistletoe plants, even the dried plants, should be kept well out of your pet's reach, or kept out of the home altogether.

      6. Lilies and Daffodils
        Both popular gift items at this time of year, plants in the lily and daffodil can be toxic to pets. In cats, Lilium and Hemerocallis genera lilies are the most dangerous. Eating even a small amount of the plant will have a severe impact on a cat's system, causing severe symptoms such as gastrointestinal issues, arrhythmia, and convulsions. Daffodils are also toxic to both dogs and cats, especially the bulbs.

      7. The Christmas Tree

        This isn’t a plant, but fresh Christmas trees like fir trees are dangerous to pets too. 
      There are other dangers to consider with the good ol' Yule tree other than lights and ornaments. The oils produced by fir trees can be irritating to a pet's mouth and stomach, causing excessive vomiting or drooling. The tree needles, meanwhile, may cause gastrointestinal irritation, obstruction and puncture.
        Additionally, the water used to nourish Christmas trees can be noxious. Bacteria, molds, and fertilizers can cause your pet to become extremely sick with only a few laps.
      The needles cause obstruction and puncture and in many cases gastrointestinal irritation.   Sure, it doesn’t mean you shouldn’t have a Christmas tree or opt for a fake one. Just don’t let your curious pet spend time around your Christmas tree alone.
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      Wednesday, May 21, 2014

      Are Human Pain Meds Safe for Dogs?

      Are Human Pain Meds Safe for Dogs?
        As dog owners, naturally, when our pets appear to be suffering, we want to do anything and everything in our power to help. In the case of aspirin and ibuprofen, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (or NSAIDs) for humans may be easily attainable and ready to hand, but they are almost universally toxic to dogs. There are veterinarian-approved and prescribed NSAIDs specifically formulated for dogs - always consult with a veterinary health care professional before attempting to treat your dog at home. 
        
      Analgesics are drugs used to relieve pain. There are many classes of painkillers. Demerol, morphine, codeine, and other narcotics are subject to federal regulation and cannot be purchased without a prescription.
        Buffered or enteric-coated aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) is an over-the-counter analgesic that is reasonably safe for a short time for home veterinary care in the recommended dosage for dogs. Buffered or enteric-coated aspirin is much safer than regular aspirin because it is less likely to cause stomach and duodenal ulcers.
        
      Is Aspirin Effective?
      Aspirin is one of the most common medicines used for relieving pain in dogs. However, enteric coated aspirin is safer than the usual aspirin. Aspirin can be given to dogs in case of a musculoskeletal injury, bleeding or clotting. Dosage of aspirin clearly depends on the body weight of the dog. 5 to 10 mg of aspirin per pound is sufficient. Repeat the dose after every 12 hours. However, it should not be used if the dog is pregnant.


      Can you give a dog ibuprofen?
        When it comes to ibuprofen for dogs, all of the same terms and conditions for over-the-counter NSAIDs like aspirin apply. While buffered aspirin and buffered baby aspirin may be given to dogs - only with great care, and preferably after a veterinary consultation - ibuprofen has an even narrower margin of safety. In point of fact, ibuprofen for dogs is even worse and more dangerous than aspirin, and should be avoided at all costs. The same issues caused by aspirin can be caused by ibuprofen, including stomach ulcers and kidney failure. If a possible side effect of a medication is death, it's probably not worth the risk when there are canine-specific NSAIDs that your vet can prescribe.

      Symptoms of accidental aspirin or ibuprofen ingestion
        What if the circumstances are different? What if you didn't give aspirin or ibuprofen to your dog, but have come home to find your bottle of Motrin or Advil open on the floor? How do you spot accidental ingestion of these NSAIDs? Since the primary ill-effects dogs suffer from these medications are related to digestion and filtration, the symptoms of poisoning are reliably related to those systems. Things to look out for if you suspect your dog has gotten hold of human pain meds include vomiting. If the dog has enough aspirin or ibuprofen in its system, that vomit may contain blood, as may the dog's feces, which may express itself as bloody diarrhea.
        Seemingly innocuous symptoms include lack or loss of appetite, which can lead to fatigue and lethargy. In large enough amounts or given enough time, the dog may experience abdominal pain, which can lead the dog to hunch over or struggle to find a comfortable resting position. The dog may also seem confused or disoriented. In more advanced cases, a dog who has ingested aspirin or ibuprofen not meant for them can have seizures and even lapse into a coma. Basically, it's bad news all the way around.

      What is Glucosamine?
        Glucosamine is a herbal medication that gives immediate relief from pain to dogs. It is also effective in humans. These can be easily found in drug stores. You can also get it from your veterinarian. Taking it from a veterinarian would be a better idea since he/she will know the safest brand to take.

      Use of Acetaminophen as a Pain Reliever for Dogs
        Always consult with your veterinarian before giving your dog acetaminophen. The medication is easy to overuse if you don't know the exact safe dosage. Overuse of this pain killer can cause liver and kidney damage.
        If your veterinarian does advise you to use acetaminophen over drugs approved for use in dogs, the dosage should never be more than 10 milligrams per pound. In addition, you'll never give more than two or three doses per day or serious side effects could occur.

      What is Tramadol?
        Tramadol is an analgesic. These can be given in place of NSAIDs or along with them. Tramadol do not have side effects to the extent of NSAIDs or aspirin. They are great for chronic pain in both dogs and humans. Tramadol are given to arthritis patients also. The dosage should be limited to what is prescribed by the veterinarian. Overdose can lead to damage to the liver, nervous system or kidney.
      What is Adequan?
        Adequan is meant to heal the pain caused by joint injuries and arthritis. They are also known to repair the areas of problems. It does not have any side effects and can be given to dogs safely. However, you will need the assistance of a specialist, since this medicine can only be given through injections.

      Are Narcotics Safe?
        Narcotics are considered as an unpleasant aspect. However, it is one of the best pain relievers known. If narcotics are given in a controlled manner and under expert supervision, they can be the best way you can help your dog escape the pain. Narcotics is usually used in serious health conditions, post-surgical conditions, to fight cancer, or to treat large amount of pain. Some of the examples of narcotics that veterinarian are allowed to use are Fentanyl Patches, Amantadine, and Neurontin etcetera.

      Is your dog in pain? Consult a vet!
        Can you give a dog aspirin? Technically yes, but only under certain conditions and doses.   Can you give a dog ibuprofen? Best not. The rule of thumb to follow is that if it's human pain medication, think twice before offering it to your dog, even with the purest motives and the best of intentions. After you think twice, put the bottle of ibuprofen or aspirin back in the medicine cabinet. If you cannot get to a vet, then at least give one a call - in the long run, it's possible you'll spare your dog further and completely unnecessary pain.
        If you have dogs, especially if they have free reign of the house, make certain that all human medications are safely and securely bottled. Then see to it that your cache of aspirin, ibuprofen, and all your other medications for that matter, are stored in cabinets, boxes, cupboards, or other home-storage facilities well out of reach. As we all know, dogs can get into mischief around the house; knock the wrong thing over, or the wrong thing open, and trouble can follow.

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      Sunday, March 30, 2014

      Dangerous Foods That Dogs Should Never Eat

      Dangerous Foods That Dogs Should Never Eat
        Who can resist those big brown eyes and cute doggie grin? Can a little reward from the table really hurt your dog? Well, that depends on what it is and what's in it. A chip with guacamole can cause your dog some real problems. In fact, there's a lot of people food your dog should never eat. And, it's not just because of weight. Some foods are downright dangerous for dogs - and some of these common foods may surprise you.

      Photo by freestocks.org from Pexels
      Just because humans like it, doesn't mean dogs will
        Foods that are perfectly suitable for human consumption, as well as other animals, may be toxic and even poisonous to your dog, posing a serious threat to it’s health and well-being. Why? Because all animals have very different rates of metabolism. Metabolism is basically the process of breaking down food and turning it into energy.
        Please note that while we’re attempting to add every food we can find that is potentially unsafe for dogs, there are certain foods that we may miss, so don’t consider a food safe to feed to our dog just because it’s not on this list. Do your research if you are uncertain and let us know by adding a comment below with your new information so that we can keep this list updated. If you are worried about something your pet consumed, please call your vet promptly.


      List of Foods Not to Feed Your Dog
      Avocado
      No matter how good you think the guacamole is, you shouldn't give it to your dog. Avocados contain a substance called persin. It's harmless for humans who aren't allergic. But large amounts might be toxic to dogs. If you happen to be growing avocados at home, keep your dog away from the plants. Persin is in the leaves, seed, and bark, as well as in the fruit.

      Alcohol
      Beer, liquor, wine, foods containing alcohol - none of it's good for your dog. That's because alcohol has the same effect on a dog's liver and brain that it has on humans. But it takes far less to do its damage. Just a little can cause vomiting, diarrhea, central nervous system depression, problems with coordination, difficulty breathing, coma, even death. And the smaller the dog, the greater the effect.

      Onions and Garlic
      Onions and garlic in all forms - powdered, raw, cooked, or dehydrated - can destroy a dog's red blood cells, leading to anemia. That can happen even with the onion powder found in some baby food. An occasional small dose is probably OK. But just eating a large quantity once or eating smaller amounts regularly can cause poisoning. Symptoms of anemia include weakness, vomiting, little interest in food, dullness, and breathlessness.


      Cat food 
      Not that they would want this anyway, but cat food contains proteins and fats that are targeted at the diet of a cat, not a dog. The protein and fat levels in cat food are too high for your dog, and not healthy.

      Cooked Bones 
      When it comes to bones, he danger that cooked bones can easily splinter when chewed by your dog. Raw (uncooked) bones, however, are appropriate and good for both your dog’s nutritional and teeth.

      Coffee, Tea, and Other Caffeine
      Caffeine in large enough quantities can be fatal for a dog. And, there is no antidote. Symptoms of caffeine poisoning include restlessness, rapid breathing, heart palpitations, muscle tremors, fits, and bleeding. In addition to tea and coffee - including beans and grounds -- caffeine can be found in cocoa, chocolate, colas, and stimulant drinks such as Red Bull. It's also in some cold medicines and pain killers.

      Chocolate 
      You’ve probably heard this before, but chocolate is a definite no no for your pup. And it’s not just about caffeine, which is enough to harm your dog by itself, but theobromine and theophylline, which can be toxic, cause panting, vomiting, and diarrhea, and damage your dog’s heart and nervous systems

      Grapes and Raisins
      Grapes and raisins have often been used as treats for dogs. But it's not a good idea. Although it isn't clear why, grapes and raisins can cause kidney failure in dogs. And just a small amount can make a dog ill. Repeated vomiting is an early sign. Within a day, the dog will become lethargic and depressed. The best prevention is to keep grapes and raisins off counters and other places your dog can reach..

      Milk and Other Dairy Products
      On a hot day, it may be tempting to share your ice cream cone with your dog. But if your dog could, it would thank you for not doing so. Milk and milk-based products can cause diarrhea and other digestive upset as well as set up food allergies (which often manifest as itchiness).

      Baby food 
      Baby food by itself isn’t terrible, just make sure it doesn’t contain any onion powder. Baby food also doesn’t contain all the nutrients a dog relies on for a healthy, well maintained diet.

      Candy and chewing gum 
      Not only does candy contain sugar, but it often contains Xylitol, which can lead to the over-release of insulin, kidney failure, and worse.

      Macadamia Nuts
      Dogs should not eat macadamia nuts or foods containing macadamia nuts because they can be fatal. As few as six raw or roasted macadamia nuts can make a dog ill. Symptoms of poisoning include muscle tremors, weakness or paralysis of the hindquarters, vomiting, elevated body temperature, and rapid heart rate. Eating chocolate with the nuts will make symptoms worse, possibly leading to death.

      Citrus oil extracts – Can cause vomiting.

      Fat Trimmings and Bones
      Table scraps often contain meat fat that a human didn't eat and bones. Both are dangerous for dogs. Fat trimmed from meat, both cooked and uncooked, can cause pancreatitis in dogs. And, although it seems natural to give a dog a bone, a dog can choke on it. Bones can also splinter and cause an obstruction or lacerations of your dog's digestive system. It's best to just forget about the doggie bag.

      Corn on the cob
      This is a sure way to get your dog’s intestine blocked. The corn is digested, but the cob gets lodged in the small intestine, and if it’s not removed surgically, can prove fatal to your dog. Additionally, too much corn kernels can upset the digestive tract as well so be cautious to not feed to much.

      Fish 
      The primary fish that you need to be careful about are salmon and trout. Raw salmon can be fatal to dogs if the fish is infected with a certain parasite, Nanophyetus salmincola. The parasite itself isn’t dangerous to dogs, but is often infected with a bacteria called Neorickettsia helminthoeca, which in many cases is fatal to dogs if not treated properly. If diagnosis occurs early on, the dog has a great chance of recovering. Cooked salmon is fine as it kills the parasite.

      Persimmons, Peaches, and Plums
      The problem with these fruits is the seeds or pits. The seeds from persimmons can cause inflammation of the small intestine in dogs. They can also cause intestinal obstruction. Obstruction is also a possibility if a dog eats the pit from a peach or plum. Plus, peach and plum pits contain cyanide, which is poisonous to both humans and dogs. The difference is humans know not to eat them. Dogs don't.

      Hops 
      An ingredient in beer that can be toxic to your dog. The consumption of hops by your dog can cause panting, an increased heart rate, fever, seizures, and even death.

      Marijuana
      Not that you would pass the bong to your dog, but if you do, you should know that it can adversely affect your pup’s nervous system and heart rate, and induce vomiting.

      Raw Eggs
      There are two problems with giving your dog raw eggs. The first is the possibility of food poisoning from bacteria like Salmonella or E. coli. The second is that an enzyme in raw eggs interferes with the absorption of a particular B vitamin. This can cause skin problems as well as problems with your dog's coat if raw eggs are fed for a long time.

      Salt
      It's not a good idea to share salty foods like chips or pretzels with your dog. Eating too much salt can cause excessive thirst and urination and lead to sodium ion poisoning. Symptoms of too much salt include vomiting, diarrhea, depression, tremors, elevated body temperature, and seizures. It may even cause death.

      Yeast Dough
      Before it's baked, bread dough needs to rise. And, that's exactly what it would do in your dog's stomach if your dog ate it. As it swells inside, the dough can stretch the dog's abdomen and cause severe pain. In addition, when the yeast ferments the dough to make it rise, it produces alcohol that can lead to alcohol poisoning.

      Your Medicine
      Reaction to a drug commonly prescribed for humans is the most common cause of poisoning in dogs. Just as you would do for your children, keep all medicines out of your dog's reach. And, never give your dog any over-the-counter medicine unless told to do so by your vet. Ingredients such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen are common in pain relievers and cold medicine. And, they can be deadly for your dog.

      Liver 
      In small amounts, liver is great but avoid feeding too much liver to your dog. Liver contains quite a bit of Vitamin A, which can adversely affect your pup’s muscles and bones.

      Mushrooms
      Just as the wrong mushroom can be fatal to humans, the same applies to dogs. Don't mess with them.

      Old food 
      You don’t like old and moldy food, so what makes you think your dog will? The bacteria in spoiled food contains all sorts of toxins that can be damaging to your dog’s health. Feed them the freshest and best, dog-approved food only!

      Kitchen Pantry: No Dogs Allowed
      Many other items commonly found on kitchen shelves can harm your dog. For instance, baking powder and baking soda are both highly toxic. So are nutmeg and other spices. Keeping food items high enough to be out of your dog's reach and keeping pantry doors closed will help protect your dog from serious food-related illness.

      Tobacco 
      A major toxic hazard for dogs (and humans). The effects nicotine has on dogs are far worse than on humans. Nicotine can damage your pup’s digestive and nervous systems, increase their heart rate, make them pass out, and ultimately result in death.


        While there are certainly some human foods that are safe to feed your dog there are many which are unsafe and potentially poisonous when ingested by your dog. As a general rule of thumb, it is far better to be safe than sorry so avoid feeding your dog any human food unless recommended by your vet. Dogs that are not given human food or table scraps are generally better behaved than dogs who do receive people food anyway, they do not beg because they know they won’t receive any scraps and they also tend to drool less and bother visitors to your home less because they understand that human food is for humans and not for them.
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