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Showing posts with label terrier. Show all posts
Showing posts with label terrier. Show all posts

Wednesday, June 27, 2018

Everything about your Skye Terrier

Everything about your Skye Terrier
  The Skye Terrier is a medium-size dog breed who was developed on the Isle of Skye in Scotland. They were originally developed to hunt and kill badger, otter and fox, but these days they’re appreciated as a versatile companion breed.

Overview
  The Skye terrier is a stylish and elegant dog that is, first of all, a working terrier. It is solidly built, with substantial bone, and twice as long as it is tall. The Skye's short legs enable it to go to ground in pursuit of fox and badger, and the long back imparts flexibility within a confined space. Its strong jaws further aid it in dispatching its prey. Its movement is free and effortless. The hard outer coat and close undercoat afford protection from the teeth of its quarry as well as harsh weather. 
  The Skye terrier's soft look belies its tough nature. It is a fearless and a deadly rodent hunter. It is also a mild-mannered house pet, one of the few terriers calm enough to live in the city. It still needs daily exercise in a safe area or on leash, however. It is sensitive yet stubborn. The Skye is affectionate with its family but cautious with strangers. It gets along fairly well with other dogs in the same household but may not mingle well with strange dogs. It is extremely courageous and game and makes a good watchdog.

Highlights
  • Skye Terriers need early socialization to people and other animals. They are naturally reserved, and socialization will help prevent shy, timid, or aggressive behaviors.
  • Skye Terriers can be very destructive if they are bored or are frequently left alone for long periods.
  • A Skye Terrier needs a fenced yard to prevent him from running after other animals or people who pass by his property.
  • Like many of the terrier breeds, Skye Terrier enjoys digging; after all, that's what he was bred to do.
  • The Skye Terrier is a great watchdog.
  • Skye Terriers can be aggressive toward dogs they don't know and will chase and kill smaller pets.
  • Skye Terriers respond best to positive training techniques, a firm tone, and consistent expectations. They have a mind of their own and can make training difficult if they choose to.
Other Quick Facts

  • When you look at a Skye, you see a dog longer than he is tall, with brown eyes and elegantly feathered ears that can be carried up or down, cloaked in long hair that hangs straight down each side, parting in the middle from head to feathered tail. The hair on the head falls over the forehead and eyes like a veil and goes on to form a beard and apron.
  • The Skye’s coat can be varying shades of a single color, which can be black, blue, dark, or light gray, silver platinum, fawn or cream. The points of the ears, muzzle and tail tip should be black.
Breed standards
AKC group: Terrier Group
UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan: 12-14 years
Average size: 35 to 45 pounds
Coat appearance: short, soft, and woolly, covered with an outer coat of straight hair with a hard texture
Coloration: black, blue, dark or light gray, silver platinum, fawn, or cream
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with older children, singles and seniors, apartments, houses with/without yards
Temperament: Courageous, stubborn, tough, affectionate
Comparable Breeds: Cairn Terrier, Norfolk Terrier

History
  Scotland has long been a stronghold of small plucky terriers, and the Skye Terrier is among the oldest of them. They developed along the west coastal area, where they hunted fox and otter.
  The purest of these dogs were found on the Isle of Skye, and the dogs were then named Skye Terriers. Skye Terriers were first described in the sixteenth century, when it was already noteworthy for its long coat. Some confusion exists in tracing its history because, for a certain time, several different breeds had the same name "Skye Terrier". The loyal dog, present under the petticoat of Mary, Queen of Scots at her execution, has been ascribed as a Skye Terrier. In 1840, Queen Victoria made the breed fancy, keeping both drop and prick eared dogs.
  This greatly increased its popularity and the Skye Terrier came to America due to this. The AKC recognized the breed in 1887, and it quickly appeared on the show scene. Its popularity has significantly dropped and now it is one of the least known terriers. There is little awareness of its former popularity.

Personality
  Skye Terriers demand to be the center of attention at all times and will do whatever it requires to maintain that attention, including make mischief around the house. Skyes are laid back when indoors, happy to curl up on the first available lap for an afternoon of rest and relaxation, but they do enjoy getting out and moving several times a day. 
  They are avid chasers and will bolt after anything that moves – no matter how big or how small – as these little dogs are fearless in the face of danger. They have minds of their own and don't like to be told what to do, but are affectionate and loyal dogs who adore their immediate family and make good companion animals.

Health
  The Skye Terrier is a very healthy breed. The only issue that's a potential concern is orthopedic problems that could occur during growth. The Skye is achondroplastic, meaning that he has a large body on small legs. If he's allowed to jump or climb excessively during puppyhood, before the growth plates in his legs have closed, he may limp or develop a condition called premature closure, which occurs when the growth plates don't close properly. Wait until he's 18 to 24 months old before taking him on long walks or letting him do any jumping or stair climbing.

Care
  The Skye Terrier is most comfortable living indoors as a house dog. However, it should be allowed outside to play daily. Also, to maintain its peak physical form, a daily short or moderate walk is required. Coat care involves regular combing, and unlike other terriers, a regular bath is necessary and won’t soften the coat much.

Living Conditions
  The Skye Terrier is good for apartment life. It is relatively active indoors and will do okay without a yard.

Training
  Although a rather bright dog, the Skye Terrier is not the easiest dog in the world to train. All training sessions must be made into fun events. Excited praise and special delicacies should be used consistently during the sessions. Never try to manually place the Skye into the correct position, such as sit or down. This type of method will cause the dog to growl or snap. Gently coaxing is the only training method that works for this breed.

Exercise
  The Skye Terrier needs a daily walk. Play will take care of a lot of its exercise needs, however, as with all breeds, play will not fulfill its primal instinct to walk. Dogs that do not get to go on daily walks are more likely to display behavior problems. These dogs will also enjoy a good romp in a safe, open area off lead, such as a large, fenced-in yard.

Grooming 
  The Skye Terrier coat should be brushed at least once per week with a pin brush. The coat should be misted with water before brushing so that the hair does not break. Baths are required every two to three weeks, depending on the dog's activity level.
  Check the ears on a weekly basis for signs of infection, irritation, or wax build up. Cleanse regularly with a veterinarian-approved cleanser and cotton ball. Brush the teeth at least once per week to prevent tartar buildup and fight gum disease. Additionally, nails should be trimmed once per month if the dog does not wear the toenails down naturally.

Children And Other Pets
  A Skye Terrier can make an excellent companion for older children if he's properly socialized. His terrier temperament may make him too feisty to be a playmate for children younger than six years old, however.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how good-natured, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  The Skye Terrier can be aggressive toward dogs he doesn't know, but he should get along well with dogs and cats he's raised with. He's not recommended for homes with smaller pets since he may view them as a tasty snack.

Did You Know?
  One of the best known and best loved Skye Terriers was Greyfriars Bobby, who faithfully watched over the grave of his owner, John Grey, for 14 years after the man’s death. A statue honoring the dog’s loyalty is visited in Edinburgh by dog lovers from around the world.
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Everything about your Norfolk Terrier

Everything about your Norfolk Terrier
  The Norfolk Terrier is one of the smallest working terriers. While on the hunt, it is a little demon, showing versatility in handling small vermin, bolting a fox, or going to ground. The Norfolk is also very capable of working in a pack. 

Overview
  Unlike the Norwich terrier, the Norfolk is slightly longer than it is tall. Like the Norwich, it is a formidable adversary to vermin and fox and can bolt and dispatch its quarry working along or with a pack. It is small, short-legged and compact, with good bone and substance. Its gait is low and driving. Its double coat is weather resistant, with the outer coat consisting of hard, wiry, straight hair about 1½ to 2 inches long, with a longer ruff. It wears a keen, intelligent expression.
  Feisty, bold, inquisitive, game, scrappy, stubborn and independent, the Norfolk is all terrier. It has been called a "demon" in the field, and it loves to hunt, dig and investigate. It must be exercised in a safe area. It is clever and amiable but strong-willed.

Highlights
  • The Norfolk Terrier can be stubborn and difficult to housetrain. Crate training is highly recommended.
  • Norfolks are energetic dogs who like a lot of activity so make sure he's included in the household action as much as possible.
  • Do not allow a Norfolk off leash in unsecured areas because you never know when his instinct to chase will kick in.
  • The Norfolk is not yappy, but he will bark if he thinks something is amiss or if he's bored.
  • The Norfolk is passionate about digging. Fencing should be sunk one foot deep and checked regularly for escape holes.
  • Some Norfolk Terriers become obese if fed too much and exercised too little. Do not indulge his desire for more food.
Other Quick Facts

  • The Norfolk has a rectangular build, small dark eyes that sparkle with anticipation, small drop ears, a wiry coat, and a docked tail.
  • The rough coat of the Norfolk can be any shade of red, wheaten, black and tan, or grizzle . Sometimes a grizzle coat looks bluish gray or iron gray.
  • The Norfolk and Norwich Terriers became separate breeds instead of two varieties of the same breed in 1979.
Breed standards
AKC group: Terriers
UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan:  13-15 years
Average size: 11 to 12 pounds
Coat appearance: wire-haired coat
Coloration: shades of red, wheaten, black and tan, or grizzle
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Families with children, singles, seniors, apartments, houses with/without yards
Temperament: Bold, stubborn, clever, affectionate
Comparable Breeds: Norwich Terrier, Border Terrier

History
  One of the reasons there are so many Terrier breeds is because many were custom-created for a particular area or population. The Norwich hails from England’s East Anglia, home of Cambridge University. Like college students of any era, the Cambridge students of the 1880s thought it was good fun to bet on sporting events, including the ratting abilities of their dogs. Terriers, including Yorkshire and Irish Terriers, were crossed to develop small red or black and tan dogs with a game spirit. 
  They were known as Trumpington Terriers, and they came in several sizes, colors, coat types, and ear shapes. When a breed standard was eventually written for the dogs, it included both prick-eared and drop-eared varieties.
  In 1964, England’s Kennel Club separated the two varieties, calling the drop-eared dogs Norfolk Terriers. The American Kennel Club followed suit in 1979. Today the Norfolk ranks 117th among the breeds registered by the AKC.

Personality
  The Norfolk has personality plus. Though small, he makes up for it with a buoyant, lively approach to life. He is active, alert, good natured, and always ready to play.
  The Norfolk is tireless in his pursuit of fun-which can be exhausting for you. Don't expect the Norfolk to sit around when there's something to investigate. This dog thrives on action so be prepared to provide it for him--or he'll be bored and unhappy.
  The Norfolk is a typical terrier, meaning he's independent and always ready to give chase. He's prone to dig and bark, too-behaviors that come naturally to breeds bred to chase vermin that live in dens.
  These traits can be frustrating to owners who are either unprepared for the terrier personality, or just don't enjoy it. If you're okay with terriers, you'll be delighted with the Norfolk's lively, plucky attitude, and his devotion to family.

Health
The average life span of the Norfolk Terrier is 12 to 15 years. Breed health concerns may include mitral valve disease, luxating patellas, lens luxation, cataracts and glaucoma.

Care
  This terrier can live outdoors in warm and temperate climates, but as it is more of a family-oriented dog, it is suited for indoor living. Daily exercise, in the form of a boisterous game session or short leash-led walk, is necessary to keep the dog calm and fit. If you do allow it to remain outdoors, be wary that it does not escape to hunt an animal.
  The dog’s wire coat requires combing every week, in addition to stripping the dead hair at least three times a year.

Living Conditions
  Norfolks will do okay in an apartment if they are sufficiently exercised. They are fairly active indoors and will do okay without a yard.

Training
  Even though this is a terrier, Norfolks are easier to train. This is an intelligent dog, so be sure to keep training sessions up-beat and interesting – repetition can bore them. As with most breeds, you need to use positive reinforcement to train the Norfolk Terrier. If you are harsh with this breed, you’ll only get defensive behavior in return.
  You’ll find that your Norfolk Terrier will fly through basic obedience. At this point, it’s time to move to something more challenging. Consider advanced training, agility or Earthdog activities. All of these activities will keep your dog on his toes. They will be able to exercise their minds and bodies. Earthdog competitions allow these dogs to put their ratting instincts to the test. They hunt and dig for vermin, which are kept out of reach of the dogs.

Activity Requirements
  Norfolk Terriers need moderate exercise to maintain health and happiness. Daily walks and some active ball-chasing will meet his activity requirements. The Norfolk's compact size makes them fine apartment dogs, and they are generally easier to handle than other noisy terrier breeds. These little dogs are not couch potatoes. 
  Even indoors they are eager to engage in activity that works both mind and body, so make sure that your Norfolk has lots of toys to keep him occupied, especially when you are gone for the day. If left alone too long with nothing to do, they will occupy themselves by barking, chewing and digging.
  Norfolks should never be left off leash or in an unfenced area for exercise. They still maintain a strong desire to chase, and will take off like a shot after small animals and they aren't likely to respond to calls home.

Grooming
  The Norfolk Terrier has a hard, wiry, straight coat with a heavier amount of hair on the neck and shoulders forming a protective mane. Trimming isn’t necessary, but the coat does need to be hand-stripped twice a year, a time-consuming process of pulling out loose hair with a tool called a stripping knife. In the meantime, brush or comb the coat weekly.
  If you choose not to strip the coat, the Norfolk will have a scruffy appearance, which some people like. The drawback to this is that the coat will shed more, especially as the dog matures. Stripping the coat has other benefits as well. A stripped coat sheds dirt and is water resistant. Terriers whose coats are stripped need fewer baths.
  For a neater look, you can have your Norfolk clipped by a professional groomer, but it’s not the perfect solution. When you cut a Norfolk’s hair, it lightens the color because part of the pigment is removed, and it softens the texture, making the coat less protective.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children and Other Pets
  Norfolk Terriers are known to be very good around children of all ages although playtime might get a bit boisterous. As such any interaction between toddlers and a dog should always be well supervised by an adult to make sure playtime does not get too rough and tumble which could end up with someone being knocked over and hurt.
  When dogs have been well socialised from a young enough age, they generally get on well with other dogs they meet and if they have grown up with a family cat in a household, they usually get on well together. However, a Norfolk Terrier would think nothing of chasing off any other cats they encounter because they would see them as fair game. Care should be taken when they are around any smaller animals and pets because of their high prey drive as such any contact is best avoided.

Did You Know?
The main differences between the Norfolk and Norwich Terriers are that the Norfolk has drop ears and a slightly longer back.
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Everything about your West Highland White Terrier

Everything about your West Highland White Terrier
  The best way to describe this wee white Terrier dog breed from Scotland is simply to say that he’s so full of self-esteem that he knows he’s the best thing around. Always on the lookout for a good time, he’ll make you laugh while he entertains himself. He’s friendly and happy, with a lively nature that endears him to everyone , especially when he cocks his head to the side and looks at you quizzically.

Overview
  The Westie is compact and short-coupled. It must be small enough to fit between rocks in a narrow passageway that was the typical fox den in its area of origin. These passages were often so narrow that the dog could not turn around. Short legs aided in maneuverability in the cramped passages. It had to have formidable teeth and jaws in order to face a fox in closed quarters. The harsh double coat, especially the hard, straight outer coat, provided protection from the fox's teeth, especially around the head, as well as from the elements. The tail needed to be sufficiently long to provide a handhold by which the dog could be pulled from shallow holes.
  The busy Westie is happy, curious and always in the thick of things. It is affectionate and demanding, one of the friendliest terriers. It is not friendly, however, toward small animals. It enjoys a daily romp in a safe area or a walk on lead, as well as playtime at home. It is independent and somewhat stubborn. It barks and digs.

Highlights
  • A Westie can have terrier traits. He will dig, bark, and go after vermin. But with proper training, he can be trained to only bark once and to not dig at all, although some dogs are less easily discouraged than others. The vermin chasing, however, is hardwired, and no amount of training will alter it.
  • A Westie does well in multidog homes, unless there is more than one intact male . He can get used to cats. He cannot adapt to small pets, such as rabbits and birds, because of his strong prey drive.
  • He's generally easy to train if it's done in a positive and consistent way. Bear in mind that a Westie has a strong will and great self-esteem, which can cause some training difficulties if training becomes boring or is too harsh.
  • His coat is easy to groom and only requires regular brushing. If he's not clipped, his coat requires stripping about twice a year.
  • A Westie is adaptable and will do well in any type of dwelling, including apartments .
  • He's a social dog who gets along well with everyone. He likes children of every age, but he's better suited to homes with older children.
  • A Westie can be left for long periods of time when his people are working. Turning on a radio, providing toys and kongs, and crating him are the key strategies to use.
  • If you are a fastidious gardener, the Westie is not your best choice, since he may become fond of digging up plants and be just a tad too enthusiastic about helping you garden.
Other Quick Facts

  • Westies are busy little dogs who always need something to occupy idle time.
  • Thanks to the texture of the Westie’s coat, mud brushes out easily and falls off when it’s dry.
  • If a Westie is raised with cats, he can learn to get along with them, but strange cats and other furry critters who venture onto his property may not fare as well.
Breed standards
AKC group: Terrier
UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan: 12-14 years
Average size: 13 to 22 pounds
Coat appearance: Double
Coloration: White
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Families with children, singles, seniors, apartment, houses with/without yards
Temperament: Friendly, affectionate, intelligent, independent
Comparable Breeds: Cairn Terrier, Scottish Terrier

History 
  The short-legged terriers of Scotland are now recognized as the Scottish, Skye, Cairn, Dandie Dinmont, and West Highland White Terriers. They all undoubtedly descend from the same roots — and were all once valued for their small-game hunting skills.
  Originally, their coats came in a bevy of colors, including black, red, and cream. Colonel Edward Donald Malcolm of Poltalloch, Argyllshire, Scotland, is generally credited with breeding the white dogs true. The story goes that, in 1860, one of his reddish dogs was mistaken for a fox and shot. Malcolm decided, on the spot, to breed only for white dogs that could be readily identified in the field.
  Today, the West Highland White Terrier ranks 34th among the breeds registered by the American Kennel Club, down from 30th in 2000.



Temperament
  The Westie is not only one of the cutest terriers around, but they boast having wonderful personalities too. They are the perfect choice for first time owners because these little white dogs like nothing more than to please. This paired to their intelligence means they are easy to train.
  Westies are known to be outgoing, affectionate albeit "naughty" characters, but they form incredibly strong bonds with their owners which in short, means they are wonderful watch dogs and soon let their owners know when they are any strangers about. They are totally unaware of their small size which means they will take on the world if they feel they have to and this includes larger dogs.
  With this said, they can at times have a little bit of a stubborn streak in them which is why their training and education must start as early as possible or a dog might grow up to be a more dominant character which is something that needs to be avoided at all costs. Westie puppies need to be well socialised from a young age which means introducing them to as many new people, situations and other animals as soon as they have been fully vaccinated for them to grow up to be well-rounded mature dogs.
  Once a West Highland White Terrier has formed a strong bond with an owner they remain totally devoted and loyal to their masters for the rest of their lives which is why they have consistently been such a popular choice as companion dogs and family pets for such a very long time not only here in the UK but elsewhere in the world too.

Health
  The average life span of the West Highland White Terrier is 12 to 14 years. Breed health concerns may include copper toxicosis, globoid cell leukodystrophy, Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, pulmonary fibrosis, pulmonic stenosis, generalized demodicosis, hepatitis, pyruvate kinase deficiency, congenital deafness, keratoconjunctivitis sicca (dry eye), corneal ulceration, cataracts, ectopic ureters, epidermal dysplasia (Armadillo Westie syndrome; Malassezia dermatitis) and white shaker dog syndrome.

Care
  The Westie should be allowed to sleep inside in everything except very mild weather. The wire coat of this terrier needs occasional combing every week, plus shaping once every three months. Clipping is preferred for shaping pets and stripping is meant for show dogs. It is not easy to keep the color of the coat white in all areas.
  Even though the Westie breed loves the outdoors, it can also become a proper indoor dog if it is given regular exercise outside. A moderate or short on-leash walk or a good game outdoors every day can meet the dog’s exercise needs.

Living Conditions
  West Highland White Terriers are suitable for people in towns and cities as well as in the country. They are very active indoors and will do okay without a yard.

Trainability
  West Highland White Terriers have a stubborn and independent streak and generally don't like being told what to do. They approach everything with a “What's in it for me” attitude, and training is no exception. Be prepared with lots of treats to motivate your Westie and keep sessions short and activities varied, as they can be easily distracted. Never treat your Westie with a heavy hand because they will snap and bite if they feel threatened, and once they lose trust in you, it can be nearly impossible to gain that trust back.
  Socialization around people and other animals should begin early and often. Westies are more tolerant of other dogs than many of their terrier cousins, but if not socialized, they can become dog aggressive. Westies are naturally wary of strangers, but are not aggressive towards people. Overly sheltered Westies, however can become a handful if they do not spend enough time around new people.

Exercise
  Westies are energetic little dogs that like nothing better than to be kept busy both physically and mentally. This means giving a dog a good hour's exercise every day and ideally this should be a shorter walk in the morning followed by a much longer and more interesting one in the afternoon.
  These little dogs like to run free off the lead as often as possible providing it is in a safe environment. Westies love nothing more than to be run around a back garden so they can really let off steam. However, the fencing must be very secure to keep these little terriers in because if they find any weakness in a fence, they will get out and go off exploring the surrounding area which is just what terriers enjoy doing.
   With this said, young Westie puppies should not be given too much exercise because their joints and bones are still growing and too much pressure on them could result in causing a dog a few problems later in their lives.

Grooming
  Westies are high maintenance when it comes to keeping their coats tidy and their skin in good condition. They boast thick double coats with a lot of feathering around their legs and on their bellies which if not groomed on a regular basis tends to matt up very quickly because the hair grows so long. As such, these adorable white dogs should be brushed every day and trimmed when necessary.
  It is worth noting that not all Westies need to be hand stripped because not all dogs have the same coat textures which can typically be put down to "bad breeding".
  Westies with harsh coats can be hand stripped, but other dogs with silky coats and no undercoat or dogs with fluffy, wavy coats cannot be hand stripped as the process would be very painful for them to undergo being hand stripped.

Children And Other Pets
  The West Highland White Terrier is a loving dog who is good with older children. But he must have adult supervision around children, particularly younger ones. Some breed books have overemphasized how well the Westie gets along with kids, so breed clubs recommend that all children in a Westie's home be older than seven years of age. This dog can snap if annoyed — but if child and dog are properly supervised, the Westie can do well with children of all ages. 
  A West Highland White Terrier is good with other dogs and is suited for multidog homes. However, an intact male generally dislikes other intact male dogs, Westie or otherwise. He can adjust to cats, but that's easier if he's been raised with them rather than adjusting to a late-life introduction; he has a strong prey drive and will chase cats who decide to run from him. 
  A Westie should not be trusted with small animals because of his prey drive. Bred to go to ground after little varmints, and he can't differentiate between the caged pet mouse in your child's bedroom and a wild mouse that found its way indoors. If you want any small pet, including rabbits or birds, this isn't the breed for you.

Did You Know?
Legend has it that the West Highland White Terrier was bred for his distinctive snowy fur so he could be spotted while hunting fox and other brown- and red-coated creatures.

In popular culture
  • Muhammad Ali Jinnah, founder of Pakistan, owned a Westie.
  • John Green, novelist, co-founder of the VlogBrothers, is known to own a Westie, called Willie (or Fireball Wilson Roberts).
    The label of Black & White,
     featuring a Scottie and a Westie.
  • J. K. Rowling, author of the Harry Potter series, has a Westie named Brontë.
  • Black & White whisky have used both Scottish Terriers and Westies in their advertisements.
  • The breed is used as the mascot of the "Cesar" brand of dog food.
  • The film The Adventures of Greyfriars Bobby, released in the UK in February 2006, cast a West Highland White Terrier as Bobby. The appearance of a Westie caused protests from the Skye Terrier breed club, which complained about the filmmaker's use of an incorrect dog breed for the part.
  • In the film Lethal Weapon 3, Carrie Murtaugh, played by Ebonie Smith, carried a Westie early in the movie when Martin Riggs brings his laundry to the Murtaugh home.
  • The 2018 film Game Night prominently features a West Highland Terrier.
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Everything about your Dandie Dinmont Terrier

Everything about your Dandie Dinmont Terrier
  Dandie Dinmont Terriers originally were bred to hunt otter and badger. Nicknamed the gentleman of the terrier family, he is calm and reserved, yet retains his terrier tenacity and love of the hunt. His small size and moderate exercise needs make him well suited to both city and country homes.

Overview
  The Dandie Dinmont is a native breed that hails from the Scottish Borders where they were once used as highly prized hunting dogs. They are short-legged and boast long bodies with an abundant amount of hair on their heads which adds to their endearing, unique looks and appeal. Dandies are a rare breed even though they such adorable dogs that are known to be devoted to children.
  They are intelligent, although they do boast being a little wilful when it pleases them, but with this said the Dandie Dinmont makes for a wonderful companion and family pet. The breed is on The Kennel Club’s vulnerable native breed list and sadly, the future of the Dandie Dinmont is now a big concern with few puppies being bred and registered every year. As such, anyone wanting to share a home a with a Dandie Dinmont Terrier would need to register their interest with breeders for the pleasure of doing so.

Highlights
  • If your Dandie Dinmont Terrier becomes overweight, he can have back problems. Be sure to monitor his food intake and give him regular exercise to keep him in shape.
  • Dandie Dinmonts are independent and can be stubborn when it comes to housetraining. Crate training is recommended.
  • Dandies are reserved with strangers and make good watchdogs. Their bark is surprisingly loud and deep, but being a typically reserved breed, they can be trained to be quiet on command.
  • Because they are terriers, they are prone to chasing rabbits, birds, and even other dogs and cats. Be sure to keep your Dandie on leash when he's not in a secure area.
  • While Dandies typically aren't aggressive dogs, they will not back down from a challenge from other dogs, no matter what their size. Be sure to keep your Dandie under control until you know that both he and the other dog are friendly to each other.
  • Because of their unusual looks and small size, they could be targets for dog thieves. Although Dandies do well outdoors, they should be kept in your house when you can't supervise them.
  • Dandie Dinmonts are a rare breed. It may be difficult to locate a reputable breeder, and even when you locate one, you may have to wait several months for a litter to be born.
Other Quick Facts:

  • The Dandie Dinmont coat sheds little and must be combed twice a week to prevent or remove mats and tangles. 
  • A people-loving dog like the Dandie Dinmont Terrier needs to live in the house. 
Breed standards
AKC group: Terrier
UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan: 12 to 15 years
Average size: 18 to 24 pounds
Coat appearance: Rough coated
Coloration: Pepper or mustard
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Families with older children, singles, seniors, apartments, houses with/without yards
Temperament: Loyal, affectionate, intelligent, independent
Comparable Breeds: Skye Terrier, Scottish Terrier

History
  The majority of Terriers are native to England and were often developed to work a specific type of terrain or quarry. The dogs that became the Dandie Dinmont originated in the Cheviot Hills border area between England and Scotland, where they hunted otter and badger. They have been known for some 300 years.
  Throughout his existence, the Dandie has been appreciated by all classes, from the nomadic Rom to farmers to nobility and even royalty. Queen Victoria no doubt encountered the unusual Terriers on one of her trips to Scotland — perhaps after reading Sir Walter Scott’s “Guy Mannering" — and kept one herself.
  The American Kennel Club recognized the Dandie in 1886. He has never been excessively popular but remains a well-kept secret among people who appreciate his looks and personality. The Dandie ranks 164th among the breeds registered by the AKC.



Temperament
  The Dandie Dinmont Terrier is a small dog with a big personality being a typical terrier at heart. They do not know their size and would happily take on a bigger dog if they feel they have to. With that said, they are known to be very affectionate, friendly and placid dogs by nature. They are not the best choice for first time owners because these little terriers can prove rather challenging to train thanks to their stubborn streak. However, in the right hands and with the right amount of socialisation and training, the Dandie does make for a great family pet.
  Like most terriers, the Dandie likes to be kept busy and does not do well if they are left on their own for longer periods of time, much preferring the company of people. As such they are good choice for people where one person usually stays at home when everyone else is out of the house. It these little terriers are not given enough exercise and mental stimulation on a daily basis, they quickly learn to amuse themselves which typically involves them developing some unwanted and often destructive behaviours. This includes separation anxiety and being destructive around the house and excessive barking. Dandies are known to like the sound of their own voices which is something that needs to be gently nipped in the bud when dogs are still young or it could become a real issue.

Health
  Dandies have an average life span of 12 to 15 years. Breeed health concerns may include intervertebral disc disease, epilepsy, glaucoma, refractory corneal ulceration, hypothyroidism, primary lens luxation and hypochondroplasia, which causes short, bowed legs, accepted in this breed standard.

Care
  The dog’s coat needs to be combed twice a week, in addition to regular shaping and trimming. For show dogs, continuous shaping is required. But clipping and stripping just four times a year is sufficient for pet Dandie Dinmonts.
  The Dandie loves to explore and hunt, so make sure it does this in a secure area. To remain fit, the Dandie should be walked regularly. Additionally, Dandies should be allowed to sleep inside, but may be kept outdoors during the day.

Trainability
  Training a Dandie Dinmont can be a challenge. These little dogs think they are the center and rulers of the universe, and until they are proven wrong, they act as such. Trainers must prove they are able to lead, or the Dandie will not listen. Consistency is key – give these little guys an inch, and they'll take a mile and a half. Positive reinforcement and lots of delicious treats are the best recipe for training a Dandie. Harsh treatment and discipline will result in a dog that simply refuses to listen. They have also been known to snap or bite when they have been pushed too hard.

Exercise Requirements
  This little dog needs a moderate amount of exercise to keep him healthy and happy. A daily walk or vigorous play session is all they need. Because of their flexible exercise requirements, a Dandie can live an apartment or condominium, as well as in the suburbs.

Grooming
  The Dandie Dinmont Terrier has a unique look that requires regular grooming. His coat must be scissored and shaped every four to six weeks to maintain its distinctive appearance. A professional groomer familiar with the breed can do that for you, or you can learn to trim the coat yourself.
  At home, he need to be brushing several times a week with a soft slicker brush to prevent or remove mats and tangles. The good news is that the coat doesn’t shed much.
  The rest is basic care. Trim his nails as needed, usually once a month. Brush his teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath. Check his ears weekly for dirt, redness, or bad odor, which can indicate an infection. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball dampened with a gentle ear cleaner recommended by your veterinarian. It is important to begin grooming the Dandie when he is very young - this early introduction teaches him to accept the handling and fuss of grooming patiently. 

Children and Other Pets
  The Dandie does make a great family pet, but for families where the children are older and therefore know how to behave around dogs. Care should be taken when there are toddlers around and any interaction between them and a dog has to be supervised by an adult to make sure things stay friendly and playtime does not get too boisterous.
  Care has to be taken when Dandies are around other animals and smaller pets which includes cats because being terriers they might just see them as "fair game". With this said, if they have grown up with a cat in the house, they generally accept them being around, but would think nothing of chasing a neighbour's cat if they ever ventured into a back garden. These little terriers are known to be good around other dogs especially if they have been well socialised from a young age.

Did You Know?
Sir Walter Scott was so entertained by the breed that he included it in his novel “Guy Mannering,” published in 1814. His character Dandie Dinmont, after whom the breed takes its name, is thought to have been based on a farmer named James Davidson, whose dogs, known as “the immortal six,” were Auld Pepper, Auld Mustard, Young Pepper, Young Mustard, Little Pepper, and Little Mustard, which is how the breed came by its coat color names.


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Tuesday, June 26, 2018

Everything about your Rat Terrier

Everything about your Rat Terrier
  Rat Terriers are extraordinary pets. While it is interesting to learn about the breeding purpose of Rat Terriers, their genetics actually influence health, outward appearance and behavior. Some behaviors make the Rat Terrier and some can be quite irritating! Understanding her unique needs will help you keep her healthy and will create a stronger bond between the two of you. 

Overview
  The Rat Terrier, also known as the American Rat Terrier, the Decker Giant, the Squirrel Terrier and the Feist, was developed in England to control vermin. Rat Terriers became so adept at killing rats both above and below ground that breed enthusiasts in England entered them in rat-baiting contests, where bets were wagered on how many rats a particular dog could kill. One Rat Terrier reportedly killed 2,501 rats in a seven-hour period. Today’s Rat Terriers retain their strong hunting instinct and also make terrific family companions.

Highlights
  • Lots of visitors to your home? Though devoted to his family, the Rat Terrier takes time to warm up to strangers.
  • A propensity for digging combined with a high prey drive means your Rat Terrier will leap over — or dig under — any fence he can.
  • A Rat Terrier has lots of energy; you should be able to spend at least 40 minutes a day exercising your dog. If you do not, the Rat Terrier can become destructive as a way to release pent up energy.
  • They need plenty of mental stimulation too. A bored Rat Terrier will resort to barking and chewing if he doesn't receive it.
  • The Rat Terrier's compulsion to chase doesn't make him the best choice for an off-leash dog. Even the most well-behaved are likely to "forget" their training in the face of tantalizing prey.
Other Quick Facts

  • A Rat Terrier’s ears can be erect or dropped, and both types can be seen in the same litter. In either case, they are always natural, never cropped.
  • The amount of white on a Rat Terrier can range from a small patch of white about the size of a quarter to as much as 90 percent of the body.
  • A Rat Terrier with blue eyes, wall eyes, or China eyes  may be more prone to deafness than those with dark or hazel eyes.
  • Rat Terriers come in what’s called a “pied” pattern: large patches of one or more colors with white. Colors you’ll see are black, chocolate, red, apricot, blue, fawn, tan, lemon or white, with or without tan markings.
Breed standards
AKC group: Terrier
UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan: 13 to 18 years
Average size: 8 to 25 pounds
Coat appearance: Single, smooth
Coloration: Black, tan, chocolate, blue, grey Isabella (pearl), lemon and apricot. May be tri-color or bi-color, with at least one color being white.
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles and seniors, apartments, houses with/without yards, farms/rural areas
Temperament: Loyal, active, playful, intelligent

History 
  One of the breeds that can proudly claim to be made in the USA, the Rat Terrier was bred to be an all-purpose farm dog whose job it was to kill rats and other vermin and hunt small game. In the early 20th century, this was one of the dogs you were most likely to see on a farm.
  Like so many Americans, the Rat Terrier has a highly diverse background. His ancestors include Fox Terriers and various other types of terriers, Beagles, Whippets, Italian Greyhounds, and dogs known as feists. The Whippet and Italian Greyhound blood added speed, while the Beagle brought in scenting ability and a pack mentality. The result was a dog with speed, versatility, “nose,” and a great disposition. President Theodore Roosevelt was a fan of Rat Terriers, and they were among the many pets he and his family brought to the White House.
  For many years, Rat Terriers were simply farm dogs and pets. They faded in popularity as more people moved to cities and fewer lived in rural areas. Fortunately, they weren’t completely forgotten and  in 1999 the United Kennel Club recognized Rat Terriers as a distinct breed. In the American Kennel Club, the Rat Terrier belongs to the Miscellaneous Class, the final step before AKC recognition.


Personality
  Intelligent, wary, and stubborn, this breed is a dynamo. Understand their general dislike of strangers and know that most warm up to visitors (although chances of that happening are slimmer if you're not there). If they're not properly socialized they will be fine with their family but they could become aggressive to strangers and other animals. They are also absolutely fearless, which can be a wonderful trait, though not if they are aggressive. 
  A good family pet, Rat Terriers are amazingly perceptive and intuitively respond to your moods. They have a great desire to please, love praise, and will follow you around the house. Bred to work all day on the farm, these guys need a lot of exercise and if they don't get it, their sharp little minds can turn devious to amuse themselves. Their people live with the mantra that a tired dog is a good dog. As with every dog, the Rat Terrier needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. 
  Socialization helps ensure that your Rat Terrier puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog. Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.

Health
This is an extremely long-lived and healthy breed, with an average life span of 13 to 16 years. Breed health concerns may include food and contact allergies, elbow and hip dysplasia, malocclusion (bad bites), demodicosis (demodectic mange) and patellar luxation.

Care
The Rat Terrier requires a good amount of daily outdoor exercise such as a long walk or jog. It will do fine as an apartment dog so long as it is provided with an adequate amount of exercise. The Rat Terrier sheds lightly and requires occasional brushing.

Living Conditions
Rat Terriers will do okay in an apartment so long as they get at least 20-30 minutes of exercise a day. They are fairly active indoors and should have at least a small to medium-sized yard. Rat Terriers love to dig, and they can get out of a fenced yard relatively easily. Provided they have the proper protection, they are able to spend a good amount of time outdoors. They love to be inside the house and outside to play.

Training
  The Rat Terrier is quite intelligent, but is also stubborn. They aren’t eager to please you – they’re in it for their own fun! That’s why you should either have some experience training dogs or be prepared to enlist the services of a professional. A good way to get the upper hand when it comes to training is to start early. Keep training sessions short and interesting in order to keep your dog focused.
  After you’ve conquered the basics, your Rat Terrier will be ready to take training to the next level. This breed excels at agility training and Earthdog activities. Anything you can do to keep these dogs occupied is helpful, as it keeps both their minds and bodies active and engaged.

Exercise 
  Don’t let its size fool you – the Rat Terrier as plenty of energy to spare. It needs at least 40 minutes of exercise a day in order to keep healthy and happy. If you live on a farm, this breed will go to work keeping the rodent population in check. If not, take your Rat Terrier for walks a few times a day, or take him to the dog park to work off all that excess energy. And there’s nothing that the Rat Terrier likes more than to play catch for hours on end.
  Because of its small size, this breed can live in an apartment, but you have to be committed to making sure they get outside for daily exercise. Once they get tuckered out, your Rat Terrier will happily curl up on the couch by your feet.

Grooming
  Rat Terriers have short, easy-care coats. Brush them weekly or more often with a soft bristle brush or rubber curry brush. The more often you brush, the less loose hair you’ll have floating around your house. Rat Terriers shed moderately year-round and they have a heavier shedding season in the spring and fall. An occasional bath is all he needs to stay clean.
  Be sure you don’t trim your Rattie’s whiskers, and don’t let a groomer do so. Whiskers are an important tactile aid for the Rattie.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Small dogs are prone to periodontal disease so brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
Although Rats who aren't used to children should be supervised, most Rats are wonderfully patient with kids, even kids who aren't part of the family. They are extremely fond of their family kids. Parents who don't like the idea of the family dog sleeping under the covers with the kids might be in for trouble. 
As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child. Although there may be a few disagreements regarding food and sleeping arrangements, the Rat Terrier likes other dogs. 
He doesn't spar with them and generally is not aggressive towards them. As a matter of fact, many Rats want to play with other dogs, so you need to be on your lookout for dog-reactive or aggressive dogs. Once an aggressive dog provokes a fight, these terriers return the emotion. Unfortunately, they are size-blind and don't care if the aggressor outweighs them five times over. Rats are prey-driven so any small, quick moving animal, including a hamster, mouse, chinchilla, and of course, a rat, is seen as prey, and may be chased. If a Rat is raised with a cat, bird, chicken, or other animal in a household, they will generally get along as family members.

Is the Rat Terrier the Right Dog for You?
If you are looking for an active, energetic, family-friendly dog, the rat terrier should be one of your considerations. Exercise needs are high, but grooming and health problems are substantially lower than with other breeds. If you have small animals or rodents, you will need to take extreme care around a rat terrier because of their high prey drive. If it sounds like these requirements are what you are looking for, the rat terrier might be a good fit for your household.

Did You Know?
One of the breeds that can proudly claim to be made in the USA, the Rat Terrier was bred to be an all-purpose farm dog whose job it was to kill rats and other vermin and hunt small game.



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