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Showing posts with label summer. Show all posts
Showing posts with label summer. Show all posts

Tuesday, July 26, 2016

Top 5 Pet-friendly hotels that ensure your dog won't be left out of travel in Britain

Top 5 Pet-friendly hotels that ensure your dog won't be left out of travel in Britain
  Gone are the days of sneaking your dog into your hotel room in the dead of night. With over half of U.S. households claiming a furry family member, the hospitality industry is rolling out the red carpet for dogs, with a wide range of amenities and services from plush beds to canine room service and even spa treatments. 
 The good news is that in many cases, pet-friendly hotels are becoming easier to find as more vacationers include their fur-babies in their travel plans. 

Pet-friendly hotels in Britain

1. Goodwood Hotel, West Sussex
  Dogs gain access to their very own private members' club, The Kennels, at this sporting estate in West Sussex. There are tasty treats available on request, which may include organic pig's ear, and walking maps outlining the estate's most dog-friendly routes. Your four-legged friend will also be granted access to the hotel's dining room and be permitted to sleep in your room. Regular guests may want to consider The Kennels' Dog Membership package, which at £50 per year - 70 per cent of the fee is donated to The Kennels' chosen charity, Canine Partner - ensures that a personalised dog bowl will kept at The Kennels for the personal use of your pampered pooch.
  • On the Goodwood estate, next to the pay and play Park golf course and the Waterbeach health club and spa, both available to hotel guests. The estate’s key elements (motor racing, horse racing, flying, golf, health club) each have their own private membership and hotel guests effectively become members for the duration of their stay, also of The Kennels, a sophisticated, beautifully decorated private members club where the Dukes of Richmond’s fox hounds used to be housed (in great luxury), with show-stopping views across green fields to Goodwood House. There’s also a strange Sculpture Park lost in the woods, and a superbly stocked farm shop, including the estate’s own meat. At the historic ex-RAF wartime aerodrome, two people, for a little over £100, can take a half hour flight in a Cessna.
  • Five of the 93 bedrooms, some of which are in anodyne 1970s annexes, have also been redesigned and are classy, luxurious and full of personal touches. The rest of the serviceable, if dreary Marriottesque bedrooms are to be revamped in waves.
  • Formerly a Marriott hotel, it is now run by the estate. Public rooms and restaurant are already in good, stylish order.
2. Trigony House, Dumfries & Galloway
  Dogs receive a warm welcome at this pet-friendly hotel in Scotland. Fido will receive a welcome pack on arrival, which includes gourmet doggy treats and a welcome note from Kit and Roxy, a miniature dachshund and golden retriever respectively, who live at Trigony House. There's lots of countryside to explore from the hotel's doorstep and in the evening dogs are invited to chow down on dinner with their owners in the bar.
  • The Trigony House Hotel is located just north of Closeburn before the village of Thornhill, in the beautiful Nith Valley, surrounded by the rolling hills & woodland of Dumfriesshire in south west Scotland. The Hotel is situated about 200 yards from the Main Road. Some traffic noise is audible though it is not obtrusive.
  • Because of the age of the house the 9 hotel rooms are all very different from each other in size and layout but all are en-suite with their own bathroom & enjoy their own character, and all have hand sprung mattresses with fine Egyptian linen and are individually furnished providing you with an excellent choice for accommodation in Dumfries.
  • The larger of the hotel rooms have a small comfortable seating area and the Garden suite has it’s own conservatory.  With comfort and relaxation in mind, a butlers tray is supplied with homemade shortbread and real coffee, and the toiletries are made specially for the hotel by the Caurnie Soaperie at the Organic Herb Garden in Kirkintilloch.
  • Most of the rooms have views over the gardens and the Lowther hills to the east while others look over the Kier hills to the West. One of the rooms is at the back of the hotel and looks over the woodland which now covers an old Roman Fort.
3. The Milestone Hotel, London
This Kensington hotel has a dedicated Pet Concierge and on arrival your cute canine will be presented with a hamper of treats, including toys and a Milestone collar tag. Dogs also receive a special welcome letter, with tips for travelling around London and details of places to visit. After a day's sight-seeing, your pooch can bed down on custom-made cushions, duvets or a floor mat and there's a 'Do Not Disturb: Pet Sleeping' sign. There's also a special pet menu and the hotel can arrange a special turndown-treat for your animal.
  • The hotel, opened in the 1920s, takes its name from the old cast iron milestone that stands outside and comprises three tall Victorian townhouses, the first of which, No 1 Kensington Court, has fine original features, including carved window frames and a black-and-white tiled floor. It stands on busy Kensington Road, near where it becomes Kensington High Street, with views of Kensington Park opposite.
  • There are 57 rooms, plus six apartments. Some are dazzling in their lavishness, but only one made me long to stay the night in it, style wise: the striking red and grey Art Deco Mistinguitt suite. Generally, ornate gilt mirrors and old-fashioned carved wooden bedheads predominate an everything is beautifully cared for. In terms of amenities, nothing has been forgotten and there are generous extras.
  • The hotel is small scale: with minimal outside space, cosy public rooms, including a very pretty Victorian style sitting room, and bedrooms on five floors. The decoration, in the style of Red Carnation’s owner and chief designer, Beatrice Tollman, is expansive, generous and elaborate, spilling over into fussiness, especially in such a small space, with flowing fabrics, cushions, patterned carpets, collections of pictures on patterned walls, reproduction Stubbs paintings and a life-size jockey in the Stables Bar. For a hotel that markets itself as one of London’s greats, it feels, to me, overwrought, over the top, not very real and extremely cloying.
4. Cholmondeley Arms, Cheshire
  This former Victorian schoolhouse-turned-inn is as stylish as Beau Brummell inside. The glorious carved oak bar dominates the main hall and apart from the malted charms of Cholmondeley Best Bitter and Merlin’s Gold, there are a staggering 200 varieties of ruinously good gin to discover. Your faithful friend will not go thirsty either, as dog beer (made from meat stock) is readily available. Food is hearty and delicious and rooms in the old headmaster’s house behind the inn are calm, civilised and comfortable. Three of them are dog-friendly, and dog beds are supplied too.
  • Cholmondeley Estate is a sits on the busy A49, surrounded by rolling farmland and prosperous Cheshire villages. Cholmondeley Castle itself has beautiful gardens; there are fabulous views from nearby Beeston Castle; and pootling around the local countryside you’ll find plenty of diversions, from reclamation yards and farm shops to nature trails, fisheries and falconries. Chester is 30 minutes west; Crewe 20 minutes east.
  • The shabby-chic charm continues in the six bedrooms, next door in the old headmaster’s house. This cute Victorian cottage has listed casement windows, steep pitched roofs and a vintage vibe to the rooms, with antique furnishings, Farrow & Ball paints, retro-style fabrics and deep beds topped with Egyptian cotton linens and a hot water bottle. The finishes are a little worn in places, but it just seems in keeping with the homely feel.
  • Anyone who went to a Victorian school will feel instantly nostalgic when they walk into the pub, with its lofty ceilings, huge windows and chunky iron radiators. This, though, is school gone shabby chic, all big log fires, oriental rugs on stripped wooden floors, and giant mirrors reflecting the flames from countless candles.
5. Russell's of Clapton, London
  Be in the thick of edgy, vibrant, multicultural London in this pink Victorian b & b, bang on the high street. Owner Annette gives you imaginative breakfasts, there is a funky guest sitting room with vintage furniture and a resident whippet called Reggie, happy to share his treats. Annette is on hand for advice on dog walks, pubs and places to eat with your dog. The attractive, uncluttered bedrooms have good art on the walls including great Sixties and Seventies pieces. Two of the rooms are suitable for pets. There are very good caf├ęs on the doorstep and nearby Hackney Marshes for walks.
  •   Russell's of Clapton is on Chatsworth Road, a 10-minute walk from Homerton Overground station. The street is definitely more "traditional east London" than "gentrified for tourists": I walked past council estates, kebab shops and a "sauna and massage" shop on my way from the station. But I did not feel unsafe and sensed that visitors wishing to stay here would get a better sense of living like a local than those opting for a more central, tourist-focused area.
  • Russell's has six rooms: two twin/superking rooms, one medium double, and three smaller rooms; four have en-suite shower and the others share facilities. All have covetable vintage furniture and quirky touches: the fireplace in my room held a miniature piano and a spider plant, and I loved the retro plastic-and-leather spherical chair. The essentials were spot-on: a full-throttle power shower, a supremely comfortable Sealy bed, Egyptian cotton towels, and high-thread count linen. There are no toiletries in the bathroom but a hamper on the landing is full of the necessaries, including shower gel, shampoo, shaving gel and earplugs. On the downside, the bathroom was minuscule and there was some traffic noise from the street outside.
  • G-Plan side boards, a red leather sofa, and piles of books on art and travel in the guest living room help create a cool and cosy artist's studio vibe. Thought had also been put into the smaller details, such as the tulips in a jug in the entrance hall, and the b&b immediately felt like somewhere guests would wish to return after a day pounding the streets of central London. Given that the bed was more comfortable, the decor more stylish, and the breakfast better cooked than in my own flat, it felt like more than a home from home.
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Tuesday, July 19, 2016

Parasite Prevention and Removal Remedies That Don't Work

Parasite Prevention and Removal Remedies That Don't Work
  Many dog owners and animal lovers who wouldn't hurt a fly, are happy to make an exception for fleas and ticks.
  And while flea and tick medications are the most effective preventative strategies that a pet parent can employ during tick and flea season, some people are likely tempted to try home remedies and alternative methods for tick and flea removal.

Putting Garlic in Pet Food


  Even though a lot of people think this a safe and effective way to prevent fleas, there’s no scientific evidence that garlic — whether it’s fresh from the bulb, powdered or in a supplement — can keep the parasites at bay. Even worse, garlic can be toxic to pets. Garlic contains substances that damage red blood cells in dogs in cats, potentially leading to life-threatening anemia if ingested in large quantities.

Dish Detergent
  Dousing your dog in dish detergent might make his fur a little cleaner, and you may get rid of some of the fleas and ticks, but dogs' skin have a different pH level than humans, and using dishwater detergent can actually be dry and irritating to their skin.
Even if the dish soap does help kill a few fleas, the tenacious parasites that are left behind are guaranteed to breed and repopulate your home and dog.

People forget that there are four stages to a flea. The egg, the larva, pupa and adult. You need a medication that controls the entire life cycle. Even if what you use kills the adult fleas, that isn't control.

Burning a Tick off with Lit Match

  Holding a lit match next to fur to remove a tiny parasite should set off alarm bells in your head. If anything, this tick-removal technique could set your poor pet on fire. You should also avoid freezing off a tick with an aerosol-based freezing gel, as you’re more likely to hurt your pet than help him.

Alcohol

  Rubbing alcohol will kill fleas and ticks, but if you're going to use alcohol, be careful about it. Generally, experts recommend dropping fleas or ticks into a glass or jar of rubbing alcohol.
  Don't pour alcohol on a tick that's on your dog. The tick is attached to your dog, and the alcohol will make the tick spit out its toxin.
  Instead, put on gloves—to protect yourself from possible tick toxins—and remove the nasty little parasite with tweezers. Grab the tick right where its mouthparts are attached to your dog’s skin and slowly pull straight back.

Dipping Pet in Motor Oil, Bleach, Vinegar or Turpentine

  Bathing your dog or cat in motor oil, bleach or turpentine is dangerous way to attempt to get rid of fleas or ticks. Depending on the substance, it could cause serious health problems, chemical burns, even death. Vinegar, while it may seem like the safer bet, also has its problems. According to the ASPCA Poison Control Center, ingesting undiluted vinegar can lead to vomiting, diarrhea, mouth irritation and pain.

   While it may be tempting to try and treat fleas and ticks on your own, it’s important to consult with your veterinarian to find the best—and safest—option for you and your pets.

   An honest attempt by some well meaning pet owners sometimes ends up causing some untoward side effects in their pets.


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Tuesday, June 21, 2016

7 summer safety tips to keep your dog happy and healthy all season long

7 summer safety tips to keep your dog happy and healthy all season long
  The warm summer months are the perfect time to take your dog with you for outdoor, family fun. But with the rising temperatures, dogs can easily get overheated in the summer, causing them to become dehydrated and sick.  Not only is it important to keep dogs safe in hot weather, it’s also important to keep them clear from hazardous chemicals and certain foods. 

1. Watch out for heat stroke
  A dog panting in the afternoon heat isn't necessarily a good thing. Some of the most common signs of heat stroke and hyperthermia include excessive panting and drooling, increased body temperature, reddened tongue and gums, lethargy, low urine production and rapid heart rate. Make a mental note to bring extra water for your pup anywhere you go and keep a water bowl stocked in your beach or pool bag, too. Since dogs are not able to cool off as efficiently as people by sweating, heat stroke on a warm summer day is a major risk. Staying hydrated can help a dog maintain their metabolism and lower temperature, though an indoor break may be needed after a hot afternoon of exercise at the park.

2.Never leave your dog in the car on a hot day
  Temperatures in cars can rise quickly so make sure to take your dog with you when you get out of the car. If you must leave your dog in the car, be sure to leave the windows down, which will allow the air to circulate and keep your dog safe.
  More about this subject: Things you must know about car travel

3. Beat the Sun
  Pets are smarter than we give them credit for, and prefer staying at home and laying on cool surfaces in the heat of the day. Save your outdoor time with your pet for early in the morning or in the evening once the sun has set. By taking your daily walk, run or visit to the park either before or after the sun is at its hottest, the air will be easier for your pet to breathe and the ground will be cooler on the pads of their paws.

4. Keep an eye out for antifreeze
  Antifreeze is something to watch out for all year 'round, as all cats and dogs find it delicious, but even in small amounts it is poisonous. In the summer, cars tend to overheat and leak antifreeze, so be on the watch when walking your dog.

5. Brush your dog regularly. 
  A clean, untangled coat can help ward off summer skin problems and help your dog stay cool. If you want to give your dog a haircut, and your vet thinks it will help him cope with the heat, keep his fur at least one inch long to protect him from the sun.Shaving down to the skin is not recommended.

6. Apply Sunscreen
  That’s right, you should apply sunscreen on your if he or she spends more than just a few minutes outside everyday in the hot summer sun. Pets with light skin and short or thin hair coat are particularly prone to sunburn or skin cancer. The sunscreen should be fragrance free, non-staining, and contain UVA and UVB barriers similar to sunscreens made for humans. Consult your veterinarian, but there are some sunscreens available made specifically for pets.

7. Flea and tick safety
  Fleas and other bugs can carry infections and cause your dog to get sick. Avoid bug bites by giving your dog a vet-recommended regimen. Whether its drops, special shampoo, or a simple brush-through you’ll ensure your dog’s safety no matter what insects may be around this summer.

Other articles here :
Traveling With Your Dog
Things You MUST Know About Car Travel with Your Dog
The Secrets To A Happy Dog
Summer Safety for Dogs


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Thursday, July 31, 2014

Things You MUST Know About Car Travel with Your Dog

Things You MUST Know About Car Travel with Your Dog
  Vacations are a lot more fun if you share them with your best friend! If you plan to take your dog with you, careful planning and safety precautions will make travel more enjoyable for both of you.
   With the summer around the corner, you may have the face the choice between boarding your dog at a kennel or taking him along. If you are traveling by car, bringing your dog with you may be an option. Rest assured that given the choice, if your dog enjoys car travel, he would much prefer coming with you than being left behind. The great news is that nowadays, there are more and more pet friendly hotels along the way that accept dogs. To make your car travel with Fido a breeze, you want to make sure that you bring along some essentials and that you plan your trip in advance so to prevent any major hassles along the way.

Bring Your Doggy Documents
  It’s always a good idea to bring along some dog documents with you just in case. Your dog’s medical records are always good to take with you just in case your dog would have a medical emergency. Make sure you also bring your dog’s vaccination records. Depending on where you travel, your dog’s vaccination status and a recent health certificate may be required across State lines and international borders. Make sure your dog is always wearing his updated ID tags and that you have his microchip information.


Safety First!
  It’s a lot safer for everyone if your dog is securely fastened or confined during car trips. A large dog in your lap or a small one bouncing around the accelerator pedal can be distracting and dangerous—and should you have an accident, your unrestrained dog might be thrown about the cab. Popular options for safe dog travel include dog seat belts, crates and car barriers. If you use a seat belt, be sure to put your dog in the backseat. When riding in the front, dogs can be injured or even killed if you have an accident and an airbag deploys.
Don’t forget to microchip your dog before leaving home, and attach an ID tag with your cell phone number to his collar. If you’re traveling to multiple places during your trip and you don’t have a cell phone, you can buy inexpensive temporary ID tags to use along the way.
  Never leave your dog in a hot or cold car unattended. Doing so isn’t just uncomfortable for your dog—it can be life threatening.
  Identify emergency animal clinics close to locations you plan to visit during your trip. This is an especially important precaution if your dog is enjoying his golden years.

Always Book in Advance
  Hotels that accept pets are growing greatly in numbers, but it’s always a good practice to book your room in advance. Better be safe than sorry. While there are more and more pet friendly hotels, consider that many have restrictions on size, therefore, you don’t want to be stuck on the road with no hotels accepting your pooch just because he’s a big fellow. Also, don’t forget to check the hotel’s policies on leaving your dog alone in the room.


Crating your dog for travel
  It’s natural to feel bad about crating your dog. After all, you wouldn’t want to be crated. But don’t project your feelings onto your dog. They don’t mind the crate and some even feel safer in one.
  The most important thing you can do is make sure your dog has been well exercised before he goes in the crate. If he’s burned off his excess energy, he’ll be more inclined to rest.
  Make sure there’s nothing in the crate that can harm your dog. Leashes and loose collars are especially dangerous items that could present a strangling hazard.
  Keep your energy positive. Don’t present the crate like it’s a prison. Show the dog the crate and open the door. Don’t shove the dog in the crate. Let him go into the crate on his own. When he’s inside and comfortable, you can close the door. Walk away with good energy and body language. If you affect a sad voice and say things like “Don’t be sad. Mommy and Daddy will be back soon,” your dog is going to think something’s wrong and get anxious.
  Come back in 15 minutes. This will ease the dog’s separation anxiety next time you crate him. But don’t take him out of the crate. Remember that you’re not projecting that the crate is a bad thing. Just open the door and he can come out when he’s ready.


Take Along Doggy Essentials
  On travel day, it’s easy to feel rushed and overwhelmed and you risk forgetting some important essentials. Prepare a checklist of the important things that your dog needs and check them off the list as you get ready on travel date. Food, treats, toys, food bowl, a spill-proof water bowl, leash, brushes, a doggy first aid kit, your dog’s crate, bed, blanket, medications and your dog’s documents are some important doggy essentials you definitively do not want to leave behind.

Driving with your dog
  It’s usually a good idea to crate your dog when riding in the car. You’ll be less distracted while driving which is safer for both of you. It also prevents your dog from becoming a projectile if you have to stop fast, also reducing the chance of injury for both of you. Speaking of projectiles, don’t feed your dog a lot before the trip as they are prone to motion sickness. Don’t feed your dog while you’re moving either. Wait until there’s a break and you can give her a small snack, preferably high in protein. It’s also good to spend a little time playing or walking during the break to get rid of some pent-up energy. And of course, don’t leave your dog in a parked car, especially when it’s warm out. Even with the window cracked open, the car can quickly turn into an oven, and your dog will get dehydrated.


Plan Frequent Stops
  It’s a good idea to have a planned itinerary so you can make frequent stops as you travel. Your dog will need to stop every few hours to relieve himself and stretch his legs. Many highways are equipped with rest areas and some of them have a relief zone just for dogs. It’s a good idea to be aware of how many of these areas are on your route. Sometimes, there may be several miles in between a rest area and another and you do not want to miss one if the next won’ be available for the next several hours of travel.


Keep Fido Busy
  A long car drive may get boring for your dog and he may become restless. Boredom can transform into nuisance behaviors such as barking, pacing and whining. Stock on some durable chew toys or strategically stuff a Kong or some hollow bones with some goodies. This should keep your dog entertained enough for a while. It’s always a good idea walking your dog for some time or taking him for a romp in the dog park before traveling. A tired dog is a good dog.


To medicate or not to medicate your dog

  With almost as large a selection of pharmaceuticals as humans, it may be tempting to medicate your dog with a sedative or calmative for the trip. I don’t recommend medicating your dog. You don’t want to start a pattern that ends with a reliance on pills for you or your pet. You possess all the tools to keep your pet calm with your voice, attitude, and body language.

Have your Car Inspected
  As if breaking down during car travel isn’t annoying enough, it can be substantially problematic when you have Fido along for the ride. What if your car will need to be towed? Where are you going to keep him while they fix the car? You’re better off doing everything you can to keep your car in good working order before you leave. A thorough inspection is a must and don’t forget to have the mechanics ensure that your AC is in good working order.

Protect your Car
  A long trip in the car with Fido may cause some damage to your backseats. His long nails may scratch the surface, or he may drool or get car sick. Not to mention muddy paws, if you happen to stop in an area when it’s raining. It’s helpful to protect your car’s backseats with a well-fitting cover that you can utilize for the entire length of the trip.

Dogs Who Dislike Car Rides
  Although some dogs gleefully bound into the car, others seem to hate car rides. If you have a dog who seems afraid, anxious or uncomfortable during car trips, you’ll need to help him get over his fear or discomfort long before you take a road trip.
  The first thing to do is speak with your dog’s veterinarian. Your dog may suffer from carsickness. Even if he doesn’t vomit in the car, he might still feel nauseated. Watch for drooling, trembling or a hunched posture. A vet can tell you about medications that may remedy this problem.
  If your dog is fearful of car rides, you’ll have to do some exercises to change the way he feels. The key is to start small. Feed at least one meal a day in the car. At first, keep the car turned off for the whole meal. Over a period of a few weeks, work up to short rides. If the rides end at a fun destination, like a hiking trail or dog park, your dog may get over his fear quickly! 

Nights on the Road
  Make sure the hotel, bed-and-breakfast or campsite where you plan to stay allows dogs. You can search for places that allow dogs online.  When making reservations, ask about specific pet policies. Some hotels don’t allow guests to leave their dogs in hotel rooms, even if they’re kept in crates. Others ask for a pet deposit or charge a non-refundable pet fee.
  At the end of a long day, it’s great to relax with a calm dog in your hotel room or at your campsite. If you and your dog have been hiking all day, he should quiet down naturally. If you’ve been driving, take time to let your dog stretch his legs before settling in for the night. A nice jog, game of fetch or a visit to a local dog park will help expend pent-up energy.
If your dog barks at sounds outside your hotel room, he may disturb other guests—and you may be asked to leave. Try some white noise. Leaving a fan on may help muffle the sounds of footsteps in the hallway.
  Give your dog something to chew before bedtime. Offer him a bully stick or a Kong toy stuffed with something delicious. Chewing and licking are very soothing to dogs and may help yours get to sleep.

Traveling with a dog can be a fun experience for both of you. Just remember to be as prepared as possible wherever you go. The more homework you do on dog travel, the fewer surprises there will be. Don’t forget to make sure your dog gets plenty of exercise and above all, of course, be calm and assertive. A balanced dog makes the best travel companion.
Happy travels!



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Thursday, July 17, 2014

Why Water Is Key?

Why Water Is Key?
  When it comes to your dog's nutrition, water is even more important than protein, fat, carbohydrates, and vitamins.
  Your dog's body will naturally lose water all day. He loses water as he sweats through his paws and when he pants. And he loses water when he pees and poops.
  A dog that loses too much water - just 10% to 15% of the water in his body - can get very sick and even die. So that water he's losing needs to be replaced.

Have you replenished your dog’s water bowl today?
  A good rule of thumb: Make sure your dog gets at least 1 ounce of water daily for each pound he weighs. That means a 20-pound dog needs at least 20 ounces of water every day. That's more than 2 cups, or as much as in some bottles of water or soda.
  To help you keep track of how much water your dog drinks, make a note of how high you fill his water bowl and how far the level has dropped the next day.

Why Does My Dog Drink a Lot of Water?
  A balanced diet is not the only necessary part  of keeping your dog healthy. Water for drinking is also a very important part of your dog’s daily requirements and overall nutrition. Water is the main component of healthy, living cells of the body. Without water, your dog’s body will not be able to function properly. More specifically, your dog will dehydrate. In order for your dog to get enough water daily, you need to provide water along with a healthy, balanced diet .

Keep Plenty of Water Available
  Leave the water bowl where your dog can get to it easily. Since dogs can knock over the bowl while they're drinking, use one that's made to not tip and spill.
  Clean the bowl daily. Refill often so the water supply stays fresh.
Whenever you and your dog are playing outdoors - especially when it's hot - bring cool water with you for him to drink. If your dog stays outside on hot days, add ice to the water bowl.

  Some dogs are happy to drink from the toilet. But that isn't a clean source of water! Keep the toilet lid closed so your dog stays out.

Signs of Dehydration
  Hot summer days, play, exercise, illness, infection - all of these can lead to dehydration in dogs and trigger them to seek water. Along with increased thirst, signs that your pet may be dehydrated include: lethargy; dry gums and tongue; and thick rope-like saliva.
  Dehydration can turn life threatening fast, so if you suspect your dog is very dehydrated, seek veterinary care right away. If your dog seems mildly dehydrated but is not vomiting, give your pet small amounts of water - one teaspoon for a little dog, 1-2 tablespoons for larger dogs - every ten minutes for a few hours.
   Don't let your dog have free access to a lot of liquids when he is dehydrated, as drinking too much too fast could cause vomiting.


Illness
  Many conditions can lead to excessive thirst or dehydration in your dog, including liver disease, diabetes, Cushing's disease, cancer, diarrhea, fever, infection, and kidney disease.
Sometimes, however, it may not be the condition itself causing your dog's excessive thirst, but the medication used to treat it. Talk to a vet about your dog's medication and its side effects; if drugs are behind your dog's thirst, the vet may be able to lower the dosage.


Medication
  Just as with people, some drugs can lead to excessive thirst in your dog, including:
  • Anti-inflammatory drugs like prednisone, which may be used to treat many conditions in dogs, including asthma, allergies, and inflammatory bowel disease.
  •   Heart failure drugs, such as furosemide, lead to increased urine production and a compensatory increase in thirst.
  •   Seizure medications like phenobarbital may have side effects that include excessive thirst and urination, as well as excessive appetite.
Diet
  A dry food diet - which may be as little as 5%-10% water - can also lead to noticeable thirst in your dog. High sodium foods will also cause your dog to drink more.
  Large amounts of salt can be poisonous to your pet, so avoid sharing highly salty "people" food with your dog. Signs your dog may have eaten too many sodium-rich treats include tremors, diarrhea, depression, and vomiting.


Water is so important because:
  • Water Helps Dogs Function
  • Water Flushes Toxins
  • Water Regulates Body Temperature
  • Water Helps Dogs Scent and Compete
Clean Water For All!
  To help insure that the water supply for both humans and canines is protected, you can do one simple action - clean up after your dog. And by providing a healthy diet and the right amount of clean water to your pooch, you can prevent illness and promote health. For as Mark Twain says, "Water, taken in moderation, cannot hurt anybody."


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Saturday, July 12, 2014

Summer Safety for Dogs

Summer Safety for Dogs
  The summer months can be uncomfortable—even dangerous—for pets and people. It's difficult enough simply to cope with rising temperatures, let alone thick humidity, but things really get tough in areas that are hit with the double blow of intense heat and storm-caused power outages, sometimes with tragic results.
  Summer is a terrific time to be a dog owner. It lets you run, swim, and play with your dog in nicer weather than any other time of the year. However, summer also brings unique risks to your dog's health that you should keep in mind throughout the season. 
  The warm summer months are the perfect time to take your dog with you for outdoor, family fun. But with the rising temperatures, dogs can easily get overheated in the summer, causing them to become dehydrated and sick.  Not only is it important to keep dogs safe in hot weather, it’s also important to keep them clear from hazardous chemicals and certain foods. 


1. Never, ever, EVER leave your pet in a hot car.
  It can take minutes – yes, MINUTES – for a pet to develop heat stroke and suffocate in a car.
  Temperatures in cars can rise quickly so make sure to take your dog with you when you get out of the car. If you must leave your dog in the car, be sure to leave the windows down, which will allow the air to circulate and keep your dog safe.
  Most people don’t realize how hot it gets in parked cars. On a 78 degree day, for instance, temperatures in a car can reach 90 degrees in the shade and top 160 degrees if parked directly in the sun! Your best bet is to leave your pet home on warm days. If you’re driving around with your dog or cat in the car, bring water and a water dish and take your pet with you when you leave the car.


2. Outdoor Play
  Steer clear of long walks and strenuous exercise on hot, sunny days. Avoid prolonged sun exposure. Not only is there a risk of heat stroke - dogs can get sunburns, too. Consider sunscreen for your dog. If you are planning to spend time outdoors with your dog, find a shady spot and provide plenty of fresh, cool water. Try to take leisurely walks during the cooler times of the day, like the morning or evening hours. Remember to protect your dog's feet from getting scorched by hot pavement. Sunscreen for dogs can help protect your dog as well.

3. Make sure your pet is protected from parasites like fleas, ticks, and mosquitoes.
  If not protected, your pet is at risk for heartworm, Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, and a host of other nasty and dangerous conditions. And don’t forget, many of these diseases can be caught by people, too!


4. Events
  It might be best to leave your dog at home when going to large outdoor festivals or parties. A large crowd can be overwhelming and it increases the chances of injury, dehydration and exhaustion. Plus, there's bound to be a lot of unhealthy or even toxic food and trash on the ground that your dog might try to eat. Also remember that fireworks and other loud noises can frighten dogs into running away or otherwise injuring themselves. If you do bring your dog to events, keep her close by and watch out for potential hazards.

5. Keep the paws in mind.
  When the sun is cooking, surfaces like asphalt or metal can get really hot! Try to keep your pet off of hot asphalt; not only can it burn paws, but it can also increase body temperature and lead to overheating. Also, it’s not a good idea to drive around with your dog in the bed of a truck – the hot metal can burn paws quickly (and they can fall out or be injured or killed in an accident). 

6. Limit exercise on hot days
  Take care when exercising your pet. Adjust intensity and duration of exercise in accordance with the temperature. On very hot days, limit exercise to early morning or evening hours, and be especially careful with pets with white-colored ears, who are more susceptible to skin cancer, and short-nosed pets, who typically have difficulty breathing. Asphalt gets very hot and can burn your pet's paws, so walk your dog on the grass if possible. Always carry water with you to keep your dog from dehydrating.

7. Bring extra water
  Bring a bowl and plenty of water to keep your dog well hydrated while away from home. Bring double the amount that you think you may need to ensure that your dog has continual access to fresh water to cool off.

8. Keep up grooming
  Make sure to keep your dog’s fur and nails trimmed during the summer months. Too much fur can make it easier for dogs to overheat, for fur to become matted, and for bugs to stake a claim in the furry confines of your dog’s coat. Keeping your dog’s nails trimmed will help limit torn nails, which can easily become infected.


9. If your dog loves to swim, give him his very own "kiddy pool."
  Dogs who love the water love it even more in the hot months and getting wet keeps them cool. Providing a small, kid-sized pool will also keep them safe.

10. Just because dogs instinctively know how to swim doesn’t mean they’re good swimmers.
  And if they jump in your swimming pool, they might not be able to get out without help and could easily drown. Make sure your dog can’t get into your swimming pool without you around. And if that’s not possible, make sure he can get out on his own.

11. Leave pets at home for firework displays
  If you’re headed out to watch the fireworks display it’s best to leave your dog at home. The loud noises mixed with the nighttime away from home can cause your dog to become disorientated.

12. Steer clear of fertilizers
  Some fertilizers and lawn care products can cause an allergic reaction in dogs. Speak with your vet about what types of lawn care products are best to use.  Always keep chemical bottles off the ground to keep dogs from accidentally ingesting them and becoming sick.


13. Believe it or not, dogs can sunburn, especially those with short or light-colored coats.
  And just like for people, sunburns can be painful for a dog and overexposure to the sun can lead to skin cancer. Talk to your veterinarian about sunscreens for your pet (don’t assume a sunscreen for people is appropriate for your dog).

14. If you can’t trust your dog 100% to come when called, keep him on a leash. Summertime means all sorts of exciting sights, scents, critters running around, and new and exciting places to explore. You never want to lose your pet because he she became distracted in an unfamiliar environment and was lost or harmed in an accident. And remember, not every dog is meant to be off-leash; some dogs just can never be fully trusted to come when called. Make sure you understand your dog’s tendencies and err on the side of being overly-cautious.

15. After a long winter, many dogs put on a few extra pounds
  Summer is the perfect time to increase his level of exercise and get in tip-top shape. A pet that maintains a healthy weight throughout his lifetime will live, on average, 2-3 years longer than an overweight pet! Just make sure not to over-exert your dog – give him or her adequate rest and if  your dog is especially overweight, make sure you ease him or her into physical activity.

  However, summer also brings unique risks to your dog's health that you should keep in mind throughout the season. These summer dangers include:
  Heat stroke occurs when your dog’s body temperature rises dangerously high. It is most common when dogs are left in a car for too long, or when they exercise in the heat. Never leave your dog in the car in hot weather, and always remember that a cracked window is not enough to cool a car. Your dog always needs access to shade outside. Muzzling interferes with a dog's ability to cool itself by panting and should be avoided.
  Sunburn. Dogs can burn in the sun just like people can. White, light-colored, and thinly coated dogs have an increased risk of sunburn. Sunburn causes pain, itching, peeling, and other problems. To prevent sunburn, apply a waterproof sunscreen formulated for babies or pets. Be sure to cover the tips of your dog’s ears and nose, the skin around its mouth, and its back.
  Burned Foot Pads. Sidewalk, patio, street, sand. and other surfaces can burn your dog’s footpads. Walk your dog in the morning and at night when outdoor surfaces are coolest. Press your hand onto surfaces for 30 seconds to test them before allowing your dog to walk on them. If it is painful for you, it will be painful for your dog.
  Dehydration. Prevent dehydration by providing your dog with unrestricted access to fresh and cool water both indoors and outside. Ice cubes and frozen chicken or beef broth encourage your dog to take in more fluids and help keep it cool. You can also feed your dog wet dog food during the summer to increase its fluid intake.

Campfires and Barbecues. Your dog may try to take burning sticks from the fire, which are hard to retrieve since they think that you are playing when you chase them. Food that is stuck to barbecues after cooking can tempt your dog to lick the barbecue and burn its tongue or mouth. Lighter fluid is a poison and should not be left where your dog can reach it. Keep your dog away from barbecues and campfires unless it is on a very short leash.

  Chemicals in the Water. It is no secret that most dogs love to swim. Swimming can be fun for you and your dog and helps prevent heat stroke. However, chlorine can irritate a dog's skin and upset its stomach. Rinse your dog with fresh water after swimming in a pool and do not let it drink more than a small amount of pool water. Standing water, such as puddles, can also be dangerous for dogs to drink due to the presence of antifreeze or other chemicals. Provide your dog with fresh water to drink whenever possible.
  Seasonal Allergies. Fleas, mold, flowers, and other potential allergens are common during summer. Allergies cause itching (and with it, excessive scratching), coughing, sneezing, discomfort, and other problems for your dog. Keep your dog away from allergy triggers when possible, especially if you know it has a particular allergy. Ask your veterinarian about whether your pet would benefit from a canine antihistamine or other medication.
  Keeping Your Dog Safe! Bottom line: keep an eye on your dog. Don't leave her unattended. It's important to always exercise common sense and proceed with caution to help keep your dog safe, regardless of the season. Summertime comes with its own set of hazards, so make sure you are familiar with the risks. Learn what warning signs mean trouble. When in doubt, call your vet right away. When all is said and done, it will be much easier for you and your dog to enjoy the summer.

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Thursday, June 5, 2014

Dogs that love summer

Dogs that love summer
  It's essential to keep pets safe as temperatures leap up, whether via a cool kiddie pool or chilly spray bottle!
  Dogs with thick, double coats are more vulnerable to overheating. So are breeds with short noses, like Bulldogs or Pugs, since they can't pant as well to cool themselves off. If you want a heat-sensitive breed, the dog will need to stay indoors with you on warm or humid days, and you'll need to be extra cautious about exercising your dog in the heat.
  Although most breeds can live in hot climates with the proper care, some breeds do much better in hot weather. Dogs living in areas known for hot temperates need special care because they cannot handle the temperature extremes the way people can. When you adopt a dog, consider his outdoor environment and how much time he will be spending outdoors. When selecting a breed for hot climates, consider the following:
  • Size
  • Hair coat 
  • Facial conformation
  Panting is one method that dogs use to cool off. Breeds with pushed in noses and short faces such as English Bulldogs, pugs, Pekingese and boxers, tend to have a more difficult time in a hot climate.
  Giant dog breeds such as Newfoundlands and St. Bernard’s cannot handle exercise in hot weather as well as smaller dogs can. They are prone to sluggishness and obesity.


  If you’re looking for a dog that enjoys hot weather, consider dogs that come from high-temp locales. Dogs originating from warmer, drier climates, like the Basenji, are best suited for summer weather. This hard-working dog originated in central Africa and has hot-weather hunting in its blood, and even today it is used by Pygmy tribes to take down lions. As a bonus, the Basenji naturally does not bark and sheds little.



  That small, short-haired dogs, such as the Mini Pin, can handle the heat better than their large, heavily furred counterparts. Miniature Pinschers have a short, smooth coat and no undercoat, which helps them dissipate heat.



  Long, lean and known for speed, the Greyhound is another ancient breed with history in Egypt. The dog’s smooth, low-maintenance coat helps in keeping it from overheating. Greyhounds are slim and capable of exercise when the weather is hot.

  Smaller dogs can tolerate heat well. If you’re into small dogs, Chihuahuas have a short coat and are typically pretty resilient. Of note, small dogs with flat faces, such as Pugs or Bulldogs, do not do well in the heat.

  The Pharaoh Hound happily soaks up the sun rays. This slender, athletic canine has a fuss-free short coat and loves to play outdoors. One of the oldest dog breeds, the Pharaoh Hound originated in Egypt but is now the national dog for Malta, bred for hunting rabbits.

  The terriers can do well in the heat. The Cairn Terrier is a rugged pup with a weather-resistant coat that protects it in hot- and cold-weather conditions. This spunky canine lives for outdoor activity and craves physical and mental stimulation, particularly hunting-type games.

Also other dogs that  do well in hot weather are:
Hot-weather tips for dogs
  Though some dog breeds tolerate or even thrive in higher temperatures, it's important to providing ample opportunity for your pawed pal to cool off. During hot summer months, dogs should have multiple clean-water sources and plenty of shade. This is particularly true if you have a pet that doesn’t do well in the heat, especially flat-nosed dog breeds, such as the Pug and Bulldog. These breeds can easily overheat due to their facial structure, which impedes efficient panting and cooling off. Regardless of breed, keep a close eye out for signs of heat exhaustion.
 Always make sure that his dog water bowl is filled at all times, especially during hot weather.

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