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Showing posts with label strong. Show all posts
Showing posts with label strong. Show all posts

Thursday, June 28, 2018

Everything about your Swedish Elkhound

Everything about your Swedish Elkhound
  Also known as the Jämthund and Moosehound, the Swedish Elkhound has a wolf-like appearance with a long tapered snout and a dark gray-and-white body. In fact, this breed of dog was developed to hunt moose so they may share more than just their looks with wild wolves. The Swedish Elkhound is an active and intelligent breed that requires a lot of exercise and attention but, if you are able to dedicate the time, they are a unique and wonderful breed.

Overview
  The Swedish Elkhound is a large, rectangular spitz breed, clean cut, strong, substantial and agile. It must not give the impression of having a long body or of being overly heavy in body, as it is a breed known for great endurance. Courageous and energetic, but also stoically calm.
  As with most breeds developed for hunting, the Swedish Elkhound requires a lot of regular exercise to stay fit, both physically and mentally. It quickly becomes bored if kept indoors for too long and can become destructive.

Breed standards
UKC group: Northern Breed
Average lifespan: 12-13 years
Average size: 55-77 lbs
Coat appearance: Close lying (not flat); smooth on head and front of legs
Coloration: Grey (light or dark); light markings on sides of the muzzle, cheeks, throat, chest, belly, legs and under the tail
Hypoallergenic: Unknown
Best Suited For: active singles, house with a yard, single dog family, experienced dog owners
Temperament: active, independent, affectionate, dominant
Comparable Breeds: Swedish Vallhund, Norwegian Elkhound

History
  The Jämthund received official recognition as a breed in 1946, due to intensive work by Aksel Lindström and others. Before that, the Jämthund and the Norwegian Elkhound were seen as the same breed. They are used for moose hunting and sled pulling. In the local dialect, it used to be referred to as bear dog. It is one of very few dogs that will not back off from a bear.


Personality
  The Swedish Elkhound is an intelligent and brave breed of hunting dog. They are hardy and courageous enough to face down a bear but gentle enough to make a wonderful family pet. Although calm and affectionate with its family, the Swedish Elkhound can be slightly dominant with other dogs and has a strong prey drive. 
  A truly all-around canine, it can go from a hunting trip and back to the family hearth with great aplomb. It takes things in stride and doesn't get ruffled easily, making it a steady partner in the field or at home.
  The Swedish Elkhound is a happy learner who loves to please its owner. It should be socialized early to prevent dominance issues later.

Health 
  As an ancient breed, the Swedish Elkhound is fairly health and hardy. Still, all dogs are prone to developing certain health conditions. Some of the conditions known to affect the Swedish Elkhound include hip dysplasia, skin allergies, elbow dysplasia, liver disease, and hearing problems. This breed is also prone to obesity which can increase the risk for other health problems like diabetes and heart disease.

Care
  The coat of this breed would need extensive grooming. The longish coat would need to be thoroughly brushed everyday to remove mats and tangles. These are hunting dogs and as such they need to be carefully cleaned and checked for burrs, thorns and foreign bodies on the ears and eyes after the dog has been hunting. The dog should be bathed only when necessary so as not to remove the weather proofing of the coat.

Living Conditions
  Best known for its curious and adventurous behaviour, the Swedish Elkhound is full of character. These dogs thrive on strong and dependable relationships with humans, and they often look to their owner for guidance and support. They are very bright, yet stubborn and overly confident, creating difficulty in training.
  As a pet, the Swedish Elkhound is loyal, loving, and affectionate, adores its family, loves and tolerates the children. These are probably the reasons why this breed makes wonderful family dogs.
  Swedish Elkhound's are active dogs; they would need large spaces to burn their excess energies. For this reason, an apartment or a home in the city would not be a suitable living arrangement for this breed. With the dense weather resistant coat, the dog is well equipped to withstand extreme weather conditions. These dogs would appreciate to be allowed to roam vast open spaces in the rural area.

Training
  The training of the Swedish Elkhound is a relatively challenging task. Because of its propensity to independent thinking and sharp mind it’s highly advisable to avoid dull or repetitive assignments during training sessions. Nonetheless this dog is always glad to please its master if he demonstrates qualities of a true leader.
  Consistency and adequately firm treatment are obligatory requirements of the breeds’ successful training. Reward your pet’s obedience with delicious treats and your Swedish Elkhound will readily follow your command. Housebreaking may be difficult for this breed and its puppy should be provided with lots of chances to roam around outdoor.

Exercise
  The Swedish Elkhound was developed as an all-around working dog and it still retains much of its industriousness. It won’t make the best four-legged companion for an apartment dweller, which will be off his feet trying to satisfy the dog’s need for exercises.
  Daily playtime in a safely enclosed area is essential for good mental and physical health of this breed. It also loves having some important job to perform and stands out for unbelievable endurance. Remember that your Swedish Elkhound will inevitably pick up habits to destructiveness and unreasonable barking if you don’t devote enough attention to walking and playing with your pet.

Grooming
  The coat of this breed would need extensive grooming. The longish coat would need to be thoroughly brushed everyday to remove mats and tangles. These are hunting dogs and as such they need to be carefully cleaned and checked for burrs, thorns and foreign bodies on the ears and eyes after the dog has been hunting. The dog should be bathed only when necessary so as not to remove the weather proofing of the coat.

Benefits and Disadvantages
  There are many benefits to owning a Swedish Elkhound. This active breed is always on the go, and often quite amusing and entertaining to watch while at play. When properly socialized from a young age, the Swedish Elkhound gets along well with small children and other pets, often making friends quickly due to its need to belong to a pack. 
  These dogs are alert and aware of their surroundings, making effective watch dogs by announcing the arrival of guests and unwanted visitors, and serving as a deterrent to would-be intruders. The Swedish Elkhound is loyal, loving, and affectionate, making an excellent hunting dog, family pet, and companion alike.
  There are also disadvantages to owning a Swedish Elkhound. These active and adventurous dogs require large amounts of daily exercise and room to run and play outdoors. Anyone wishing to purchase this breed lacking the adequate amount of time and space to dedicate to the dog is strongly advised against doing so. A Swedish Elkhound not receiving the proper amount of exercise and space will often act out by destroying property, chewing, barking, whining, and ignoring basic training such as housebreaking.
  The Swedish Elkhound has a strong instinct to hunt and will occasionally indulge in a good chase. When on the run, these dogs are surprisingly quick, and may pose a threat to other animals, neighbourhood pets, and small woodland creatures. The Swedish Elkhound must be leashed or properly secured at all times when outdoors.
  As previously mentioned the Swedish Elkhound remains rather rare outside of its native Sweden and can prove difficult to obtain. Individuals seeking to purchase this breed often encounter such challenges as inability to locate a breeder, high prices, and being placed on long waiting lists.
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Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Everything about your American Bulldog

Everything about your American Bulldog
  It may have its roots in fighting and working, but the American Bulldog is a big old softie at heart. Now, you’ll find him as a much-loved companion in many households in North American and around the world. He’ll keep a watchful eye over the family and work his tail off all day, but he’s just as content to curl up at your feet on the couch.

Overview
  The American Bulldog, also known as the Old Country Bulldog, the Old Country White, the Old Time Bulldog, the Old English White, the English White, the White English, the Alabama and the Southern Bulldog, is known for its superb strength and fine character. It does not closely resemble the more familiar English Bulldog and is not yet recognized by the American Kennel Club. This breed is similar to the old, seventeenth-century bull-baiting dogs used to fight bulls for entertainment and supposedly to tenderize the meat for human consumption in Great Britain. The predecessors of this breed came to America in early colonial times, before the English Bulldog went through its transformations to become what that breed is today. This is a friendly, versatile dog that can do almost anything well. It is cherished as a hunting dog of large and small game, a guard dog, a guide dog and a beloved family companion. American Bulldogs form strong bonds with their people but if not properly socialized can be aggressive towards strangers and other animals.
  The American Bulldog is on average between 20 and 28 inches at the withers, with the females being on the smaller side of the range. They weigh between 60 and 125 pounds, again with females being lighter. Their short, shiny coat is low-maintenance. As these are working dogs, there is a wide variation in height and weight more so than in other breeds.

Other Quick Facts
  • American Bulldogs can vary in size, appearance and energy level, according to the line or strain from which they were bred. For instance, Scott-type American Bulldogs tend to be smaller than those from the Johnson line and larger than those from the Painter line.
  • The American Bulldog is usually white or white with patches of brindle, black or red/fawn. For showing purposes, it can be any color, pattern or combination of colors except for solid black, solid blue, merle or white with patches of black and tan (tricolor), according to the United Kennel Club.
  • An American Bulldog can have a docked tail, but a natural tail is preferred. The natural tail is thick at the base and tapers to a point. It’s sometimes described as resembling a pump handle. 
  • Comparable Breeds: Bulldog, Pitbull
History
  The Old English Bulldog was preserved by working class immigrants who brought their working dogs with them to the American South. Small farmers and ranchers used this all-around working dog for many tasks including farm guardians, stock dogs and catch dog. These dogs were not an actual breed as considered by today's standards but were a generic bulldog type. There were no recorded pedigrees or records and breeding decisions were dependent on the best working farm dogs despite breed or background. Several separate strains of the "bulldog" type dogs were kept by ranchers as utilitarian working dogs.
  Perhaps the most important role of the bulldog and the reason for its survival, and in fact why it thrived throughout the South, was because of the presence of feral pigs, introduced to the New World and without predators. The bulldogs were the settlers' only means of sufficiently dealing with the vermin. By World War II, the breed was near extinction until John D. Johnson and his father scoured the back roads of the South looking for the best specimens to revive the breed. During this time a young Alan Scott grew an interest in Johnson's dogs and began to work with him on the revitalization process. At some point, Alan Scott began infusing non-Johnson catch bulldogs from working Southern farms with John D. Johnson's line, creating the now Standard American Bulldog. At another point, Johnson began crossing his line with an atavistic English bulldog from the North that had maintained its genetic athletic vigor.
  American bulldogs are now safe from extinction and are enjoying a healthy increase in popularity, either as a working/protector dog or as a family pet. All over the world, they are used variously as "hog dogs" , as cattle drovers and as working or sport K-9s. American Bulldogs also successfully compete in several dog sports and in conformation dogs shows .

Personality
  With roots in the violent sport of bullbaiting, the American Bulldog was later developed as a farm dog and hunter's assistant, herding and protecting livestock and hunting everything from squirrels to bear. Today, the breed is a sturdy companion for families or farmers, keeping a watchful eye over his people and property. Active and playful, the American Bulldog loves people and craves constant attention, (though he may not be fond of other dogs and should be kept away from cats). He can work or play all day long, and will happily curl up at your feet for a nice belly rub at the end of the day.

Health
  The American Bulldog generally lives about 10 to 16 years and is considered a healthy breed. Some genetic issues common to the breed include neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (a nervous system disorders with swelling and/or changes in some retinal cells), disorders of the kidney and thyroid, ACL tears, hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia (another common form of dysplasia in larger breed dogs), cherry eye (or a mass that protrudes from the eyelid of a dog), entropion (a condition in which a portion of the eyelid is inverted or folded inward) and bone cancer.

Care
  The short, fine coat of the American Bulldog requires minimal grooming and care, however, similarly to the English Bulldog, the American Bulldog has been known to drool and slobber. With a history as an all-purpose working dog and fearless guard dog, the American Bulldog is a good indoor/outdoor dog but does require sufficient outdoor exercise and activity, especially if it lives in an apartment setting. 

Living Conditions
  The American Bulldog will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. They are relatively inactive indoors and will do best with at least an average-sized yard.

Trainability
  American Bulldogs are strong willed and can be a challenge to train until leadership is established. Not the best choice for a first-time dog owner, this breed will make his trainer prove who is in charge. Training requires absolute consistency – give an American Bulldog an inch and you'll find he's taken about six miles. A calm-assertive approach is best, with lots of positive reinforcement and treats for extra incentive.
  Once the initial hurdles are crossed, however, American Bulldogs can excel in advanced obedience and agility training.

Exercise Requirements
  If you have an active family, the American Bulldog will fit right in. Expect to give you dog about an hour or two of outside exercise per day. If you don’t deliver these exercise requirements, the American Bulldog will take it out on your home.    Activities can include walking, jogging, chasing balls, agility, farm work, and advanced obedience training.
  Unless you can fulfill the outdoor activity requirements, apartments and condo dwellers should stay away from this breed. Houses with fenced-in yards or farms/rural areas are best suited for the American Bulldog.

Grooming
  The American Bulldog has a short coat that may feel either soft or stiff. The breed sheds moderately year-round. Brush or comb the coat weekly to remove dead hair and distribute skin oils.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails every three to four weeks or as needed. Brush the teeth often — with a vet-approved pet toothpaste — for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  His amiable temperament and bulk make the American Bulldog an excellent companion for children, even young ones. A American Bulldog will put up with a lot from a child, although he shouldn't have to, and he'll walk away if he gets tired of being tormented.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  With their pacific nature, American Bulldogs also get along well with other pets, dogs and cats. They may be less sociable toward strange dogs, however.

Did You Know?
  The American Bulldog was bred to be what’s known as a “catch dog.” His job is to chase, catch and bring down free-ranging livestock.

American Bulldogs in popular culture
  • Spike and Tyke from the Tom and Jerry franchise.
  • The Deftones' video Bloody Cape featured a model walking an American Bulldog down the street. The American Bulldog was actually played by two separate dogs from the Norcal's American Bulldog Kennel. The names of the dogs were Big Trouble and Tory Hesta.
  • In Return to Me (2000), David Duchovny’s character’s dog, Mel, is played by an American Bulldog named Peetey.
  • In the 2001 film Kevin of the North, one of Kevin Manley's sled dogs is an American Bulldog named Snowflake.
  • Nedd ("Nasty Evil Dead Dog") in The Number 23 (2007)
  • In Tucker and Dale vs Evil (2010), Jangers, Tyler Labine's character’s dog, is played by an American Bulldog named Weezer.
  • An American Bulldog features prominently as the titular character's companion in the 2013 film Joe.
  • Since the 1990s, American Bulldogs have become more frequently used in films as family pets, replacing the previously popular Pit Bulls and Bull Terriers




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Thursday, December 8, 2016

Everything about your Bouvier des Flandres

Everything about your Bouvier des Flandres
  Always an adventurer, the Bouvier des Flandres has rugged good looks and is generally ready and raring to do almost anything. His rough and tumble looks are a mere reflection of his incredible personality. With an inherent work ethic, the Bouvier des Flandres will herd livestock or children. It is essential that he has a job to do or he can become unhappy, bored and destructive.

Overview
  Meaning "cow herd from Flanders," the Bouvier des Flandres was bred in Belgium to assist farmers, cattle merchants and butchers with herding. Nicknamed "cow dog," "dirty beard" and "cattle driver," the breed still enjoys being a working dog. Often used for police work, as a farm hand, as a watchdog, for military work, as an assistant to the blind and more, the Bouvier des Flandres does best on land with a lot of exercise and training.
  Like most dogs with a working background, the intelligent Bouvier is an independent thinker, so he must be taught from an early age that you are his leader. It’s also important to assign him daily “work,” such as helping to pull garden tools around the yard or participating in dog sports, like agility, carting, herding, and tracking. Bouviers are active and athletic, so they enjoy jogging, hiking, and long walks  twice a day. If you’re the outdoorsy type, look into search-and-rescue training for you and your Bouvier.

Highlights
  • The Bouvier is not recommended for fastidious people who can't stand a mess. Although he can be tidied up with a significant amount of elbow grease, his coat tends to collect dirt and debris, which in turn is deposited throughout your house.
  • Not surprisingly, the Bouvier requires a lot of grooming — which can be time-intensive and/or expensive.
  • Because of his assertive personality, this breed is not recommended for first-time dog owners.
  • The Bouvier's size, herding instinct, and strong personality make leash training highly advisable.
  • The Bouvier is happiest when he is with his family.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Bouvier’s coat comes in several colors, ranging from fawn to black. You may also see brindle and salt-and-pepper coats. A small star on the chest is the only white allowed.
  • Bouviers have had roles in movies, including Town and Country and A Dog of Flanders, a film about a boy and his beloved Bouvier.
Breed standards
AKC group: Herding Group
UKC group: Herding
Average lifespan: 10 - 12 years
Average size: 65 - 110 pounds
Coat appearance: Double coat with rough and harsh outercoat that is shaggy in appearance; soft and thick undercoat
Coloration: Black, salt and pepper, gray, fawn and brindle
Hypoallergenic: Yes 
Other identifiers: Powerful body with a rugged exterior; rectangular ears; black nose; bushy eyebrows; dark-brown eyes with black rims; muscular legs; high-set, docked tail
Possible alterations: Blond, white markings
Comparable Breeds: Airedale Terrier, Kerry Blue Terrier

History
  The monks at the Ter Duinen monastery in Flanders were among the earliest known breeders of Flanders. The bouviers bred by them are recorded as having been bred from imports such as Irish wolfhounds and Scottish deerhounds with local farm dogs, until a breed considered to be the predecessor of the modern Bouvier des Flandres was obtained.
  This became a working dog able to perform tirelessly, herding and guarding cattle and even pulling cargo carts, thanks to its strength and temperament, and to withstand the local weather conditions due to its thick coat.
  Historically, the ear cropping and tail docking could have been done for practical reasons, avoiding accidental amputations in the course of work, or to indicate the dog was working stock and not a pet subject to taxation.
  Up until the early 20th century, the breed was not completely defined, with three variants: Paret, Moerman or Roeselare, and Briard. Conflict between the proponents of these three variants held the breed's development back. In 1912 and 1913, several local kennel clubs recognized standards for Bouviers; however they usually had different standards for the Roeselare and other variants.
  World War I nearly caused the breed to disappear, due to the devastation that came over its region of origin and the fact that the dogs were used for military purposes. Indeed, Nic, a male trained as a trench dog who served during the war and was a perennial winner at dog shows after the war, is considered to be the founder of the early Bouvier des Flandres breed.
  A unified Bouvier des Flandres standard was created in 1936 by a joint French-Belgian committee. However, World War II again endangered the breed's existence. Due to these setbacks, progress was slowed, and it was not until 1965 that the Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI) breed standard, as agreed to by several minor kennel clubs, was adopted.



Personality
  Serious and thoughtful, The Bouvier Des Flanders is a dignified family companion who is built for athletics, but would much rather nap indoors by the fireplace. Rowdy and rambunctious as puppies, as adults Bouviers mellow into dignified and sober housemates.   They love to be with people and are happiest when completely surrounded by their “flock” of humans. Their protective nature makes them excellent watchdogs, and they are patient with children.
  The Bouvier has a strong personality: He needs an owner who can kindly and consistently show leadership, otherwise, he's likely to fill the void. This doesn't mean you should take a drill sergeant approach, but you must act the confident leader and consistently, albeit gently, enforce guidelines.

Health Problems
  Prone to hip dysplasia, eye problems such as cataracts. The Bouvier has a very high pain threshold. They can take a lot of contact with the cattle's legs without feeling it. This does not make them a veterinarian's favorite patient, as they cannot tell where the dog is hurting by manipulating the legs and/or other body parts. Tends to pass gas.

Care
  Although the Bouvier des Flandres breed is capable of living outside, they are at their best when given access to both house and field. They love human companionship and should be given a great deal of regular exercise. They enjoy playing for hours, which is a good exercise choice. Jogging or walking for long hours also keeps them healthy. Herding is one of their favorite games. Occasional combing and trimming of their coat is essential to keep them at their best. They can be great house dogs.
  You'll need to take special care if you're raising a Bouvier puppy. Like other large breeds, the Bouvier grows very rapidly between the age of four and seven months, making him susceptible to bone disorders. Don't let your Bouvier puppy run and play on very hard surfaces such as pavement or pull a cart until he's full grown and his joints are fully formed. Normal play on grass is fine, as is puppy agility play, with its one-inch jumps.

Living Conditions
  The Bouvier des Flandres will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. It is relatively inactive indoors and will do best with at least a large yard.

Training
  Bouviers are extremely intelligent dogs however; they require a strong authority figure. It is essential that a Bouvier des Flandres thoroughly understands his place within the household. Given the chance, he will overtake the home and attempt to rule the roost.
  Many Bouviers excel in herding, agility and obedience trials. Their desire to work and do their jobs well make them well-suited for many other things including tracking, search and rescue as well as police work. Training should be started early. It should be done with patience, kindness and assertiveness. Plenty of delectable treats should be used as rewards for doing well.

Activity Requirements
  This gentle giant requires a lot of vigorous activity throughout the day. As Bouviers move from adolescence to adulthood, they will become a bit lethargic and will often need to be told when it's time to exercise, but keeping their activity levels high is very important to their health and mental well being, even if they need to be coaxed into it.
  This breed, despite their large size, is well-suited for an apartment or condominium, so long as they are exercised daily. If Bouvier Des Flandres aren't exercised enough they can become destructive, and an apartment would be mincemeat in the mouth of a bored Bouvier. A house with a large fenced-in yard for running is great, but as the Bouvier gets older, he may appreciate long walks more so than romping in the grass.

Grooming
  The Bouvier has a double coat, with a tousled look. His undercoat, which offers warmth and water-resistance, is soft, dense, and topped by rough hairs that protect the dog from inclement weather. A mustache, beard, and eyebrows give the Bouvier his characteristic gruff appearance.
  If you adore the way Bouviers look in the show ring, think twice about getting the breed: This well-coiffed look takes hours to achieve. At home, the Bouvier is your typical shaggy dog. His coat doesn’t shed much, but it does develop mats and tangles if not thoroughly brushed once a week. A good brushing takes about an hour; ask your breeder or a groomer to show you how to line brush the coat, so you don’t miss any mats. You’ll need a stiff bristle or pin brush, as well as blunt-tipped scissors. If you don’t plan to show him, it’s okay to trim the Bouvier’s beard and coat for easier upkeep. The rest is routine care: bath your Bouvier when he’s dirty, as well as clean his ears and trim his nails on a regular basis.

Children And Other Pets
  The Bouvier is a wonderful family dog who is devoted and protective with his family, including children. He may wish to herd his children with nudges and barks.
  To best teach him to get along with kids, he should be raised with them or, if he doesn't live with them, he should be exposed to children as he grows up.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  The Bouvier should be raised with other dogs and animals for the best chance at getting along with them when he grows up. If he is socialized and trained properly, he usually just ignores other animals in his household. Buy hid instinct to herd and chase is strong, supervision is always a good idea.

Is this breed right for you?
  The Bouvier des Flandres is known as one of the most loyal of dog breeds on the planet. A friendly disposition, it can sometimes be shy and needs to be both trained and socialized young with both people and non-canine pets. A lover of children, it makes a great family dog, although it is a large breed and needs to learn how to behave around younger kids as a puppy. This dog most definitely needs a strong leader to show who is boss and avoid any behavioral problems. Generally inactive indoors, the Bouvier des Flandres does OK with apartment living, although it does best with a large yard or plenty of land in which to roam free. Requiring daily brushing and bathing, this breed requires a lot of grooming; however, due to low shedding, it is an awesome addition for allergy sufferers.

Did You Know?
  The Bouvier des Flandres has several European nicknames: Vuilbaard (dirty beard), Koehond (cow dog), and Toucheur de Boeuf (cattle driver).

Notable Bouviers des Flandres
Lucky, pet of Ronald Reagan
  • Soprano de la Thudinie, the post-war foundation stud of Justin Chastel's de la Thudinie kennel in Belgium and the most prominent ancestor of the modern type of Bouvier des Flandres.
  • Lucky, pet of Ronald Reagan.
  • Patrasche, the dog found by a boy named Nello in A Dog of Flanders, is often asserted to be a Bouvier des Flandres.
  • Max and his mate Madchen and their puppies, fictional characters featured in W.E.B. Griffin's Presidential Agent series.
A dream day in the life
The Bouvier des Flandres is a lover of people and family and will enjoy waking up around those it enjoys most. Going to work outside, it'll happily follow the commandments of its owner. Once its day's work has finished, it'll guard the house and romp around with the kids. After a nice run around the block, the Bouvier des Flandres will nestle in with the rest of the brood for a good night's rest..

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