LUV My dogs: stress

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Showing posts with label stress. Show all posts
Showing posts with label stress. Show all posts

Wednesday, June 20, 2018

Reasons Your Dog Has Diarrhea

Reasons Your Dog Has Diarrhea
Dog diarrhea is caused by a number of factors, ranging from simple digestive issues to serious illnesses. It is common health condition characterized by loose bowel movements and abdominal pains.
While most cases are mild and easily treated at home with natural remedies, others could be a sign of more serious problems.
Diarrhea that develops suddenly in an otherwise healthy dog is often due to scavenging behavior, stress, a sudden change in diet, or viral, bacterial or parasitic infections.
More chronic diarrhea can be caused by dietary allergies or intolerances, stress, some types of parasites , bacterial infections, pancreatic disease, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, some types of cancer, and diseases outside of the gastrointestinal tract. 

1. Dietary indiscretion
The most common cause of diarrhea in dogs is what veterinarians call dietary indiscretion. This means that the dog has eaten something other than normal dog food. Leftovers, food that is partly rotten, grease from the barbecue grill, and more: many dogs love to get into and eat what they shouldn’t, and it often leaves them with diarrhea.
There’s actually a name for it in veterinary circles—“garbage toxicosis” or “garbage gut.”

2. Change in diet
Dogs that experience a quick change in diet often develop diarrhea (and sometimes vomiting). This happens commonly when people feel that their dog is bored with a certain diet or when they introduce new treats. If a dog’s diet needs to be changed, it should always be done gradually so as not to induce gastrointestinal upset.

It may take a few days for a dog’s digestive system to adapt to new proteins. That’s why many dog-food manufacturers recommend that you go slow when you switch from one brand of food to another.

3. Food intolerance
Food intolerances, sensitivities, and allergies may cause diarrhea in dogs. Skin involvement, such as scratching, redness, and hair loss is also commonly seen in association with these conditions. One example of a food intolerance is that many dogs are lactose intolerant and develop diarrhea when given milk products.

4. Parasites
Parasites are frequently diagnosed in dogs with diarrhea, especially puppies. Hookworms, roundworms, tapeworms and whipworms are all parasites that cause dog diarrhea. Coccidia and giardia are single-celled organisms that are common causes of diarrhea in dogs as well.

5. Swallowing an indigestible foreign body, like a toy or a dozen or more socks
If a dog ingests something that isn’t edible, it is called a foreign body, and this can cause diarrhea (and often vomiting and decreased appetite). A foreign body may be a ball, stick, rock, toy, cloth, or any other non-food object that a dog may eat.

6. Infections with common viruses 
Viral infections of the gastrointestinal system can cause diarrhea in dogs. The most common of these are parvovirus, distemper virus, and coronavirus. These illnesses are all more common in very young puppies or, in the cases of parvovirus and distemper, unvaccinated dogs.

7. Bacterial infections
Salmonella, E.coli, Clostridia, and Campylobacter are among the most common of the bacteria that cause intestinal infections and diarrhea in dogs. They are most often diagnosed in very young dogs and those that have conditions that cause immunosuppression. Dogs on raw food diets may be more susceptible to bacterial infections than other dogs, as well.

8. Pancreatitis
Inflammation of the pancreas, or pancreatitis, causes diarrhea in many dogs that suffer from it. This condition often causes vomiting and lack of appetite. Pancreatitis is commonly caused when dogs get into or are given a food item that is high in fat. If the dog is not used to this, pancreatitis can occur as a result. This causes pain, diarrhea, vomiting, decreased appetite, and sometimes other organ involvement.

9. Illnesses, such as kidney and liver disease, colitis, inflammatory bowel disease, and cancer
Chronic diarrhea, loss of appetite, and vomiting can be signs of more serious issues occurring within your dog’s body. Diseases of the digestive tract or the surrounding organs can cause bloody stools, painful bowel movements and many other debilitating side effects.
Conditions like inflammatory bowel syndrome may result from sensitivity to certain foods or allergies. IBS is the inflammation of a dog’s intestines that can cause chronic diarrhea, vomiting, gas, upset stomach, fatigue and weight loss. IBS can affect dogs of all ages, but it is commonly found in older dogs and certain breeds who are predisposed to digestive issues. Cancer treatments like  chemotherapy and other potent medication can also contribute to dogs with loose stools.

10. Poisonous substances or plants
Sudden diarrhea is one of the first symptoms of dog poisoning. Stomach discomfort is common after your dog has eaten a toxic substance. Lead-based products, poisonous plants, and household products are some of the few things that can result in gastrointestinal problems. These substances are dangerous and can cause a real health scare if left untreated. When your dog ingests these toxins, the body naturally wants to expel the poison, which leads to detoxification processes of vomiting and diarrhea. Always ask your vet in the case of dogs with diarrhea.
You can find toxic products all over your house. Things such as chocolate, human medications, mushrooms, laundry detergents, chalk, charcoal and plants can be very harmful to your pet if ingested.

11. Stress or emotional upset
Dogs that experience stress often develop diarrhea. This is most common in puppies just coming into a new home or dogs in shelters. It is also a common occurrence when new animals are brought into the home or a person in the household leaves or has a new schedule.

12. Antibiotics and other medications

Along with helping cure infections, antibiotics are also known to cause the runs. Gastrointestinal problems are common side effects of antibiotics. Antibiotics are used to kill harmful bacteria in our bodies caused by infections. However, antibiotics kill not only the bad bacteria but good bacteria as well. “Good” bacteria is needed to balance the digestive system, without them your dog will experience stomach discomfort and cramps. Antibiotics can disrupt this bacterial balance and result in diarrhea during and after your dog’s antibiotic treatment.





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Monday, August 18, 2014

What are Signs that Your Dog Is Stressed?

What are Signs that Your Dog Is Stressed?

Most people who live with dogs recognize some of the “bigger” clues that a dog’s anxious, uncomfortable, or outright scared-cowering, whining, and a tucked tail, to name just three. This article discusses a few more subtle signs. They generally don’t reflect full-blown panic, but they tell you that all’s not quite right in Dogalini World.
  Dogs, like many also get anxious. They also have varying degrees of anxiety levels. Some dogs can easily get restless and nervous with simple things like a car horn or a loud knock on the door. In order to solve the issue, it is important for dog owners to determine the factors causing the dogs to be alarmed. By carefully examining the dog's body language, one can easily recognize if there is something wrong. In this article, we will discuss the different warning signs that will tell you that your dog is indeed stressed.
  If we can decode our dogs’ body language, we can bail out sensitive dogs before they get overwhelmed. And even boneheaded, happy-go-lucky types may find some situations too much for them. Come to think of it, watching them closely may reveal that they’re not such boneheads after all.


Dog's Eyes

  From a distance, look at the dog's eyes. It is normal to see the white part of the dog's eyes. Nevertheless, if you cannot see the white anymore and you observe that the eyes of your pet are bloodshot red, then you can tell that your dog is indeed stressed. In canine, the adrenaline reflex shows in red eyes. It is part of the reflex known as the fight or flight reaction. Also, dogs that blink and squint deliberately may signal that they are mildly stressed.


Ear Carriage

  Pay attention to your dog's ear. Know what is normal and abnormal. A dog may be experiencing mild stress if his ear's carriage is higher than normal. However, this is not applicable to Low ear floppy-eared dogs because their ears are always carried low.

  Dogs like snakes, can shed as well. In most breeds, shedding is normal. According to research, practically every breed shed their puppy coat. It usually takes place before they grow their adult double coat. Though, shedding is a natural process, many dogs also shed because of stress. If you want to adopt a dog, make sure that your home is a stress free locale because tension and stress can also cause unhealthy shedding.


Moist Paw Prints
Some people when they are under extreme stress can have sweaty and clammy hands. This is also evident with dogs. If they get anxious and nervous, they can have damp paw prints. This is unhealthy.

Genital Licking
  You may think that it is amusing to see dogs licking their genitals. Dogs lick their reasons for various reasons. Of course, they lick it for sanitary purposes. Aside from that, the behaviour can turn up as a defense mechanism known as displacement. The dog takes out the frustration and anxiety to a less threatening object like a body part.

Growling
 Do not think of a growl as something negative. Not all growls are bad. We have this notion that bad dogs growl. Possibly, it is because of the terrifying experience we associate with growling. Did you know that your dog may growl because he is actually warning you? Your dog can be very discomforting or probably he is feeling threatened, the only way he can tell you his sentiment is by growling.

Loss Of Appetite
  Lack of interest to food can signify depression. Monitor your dog's eating habit. Also, consider the recent events that took place, for example, an arrival of a new pup or baby. These incidents can cause the dog's appetite to subside. Aside from loss of appetite, observe your dogs for symptoms like lethargy and queasiness. It is best to seek medical attention because your dog may not be receiving adequate nutrition and it detrimental for your dog's health.

Other Signs
  • Low body posture
  • Weight shifted to back legs
  • Excessive shedding
  • Excessive whining or other vocalization
  • Slow or tense movement
  • Refusal of food (especially when normally food-motivated)
  • Restlessness or pacing
  • Inattentiveness to owner
  • Sweating from paws
  • Dilated pupils
  • Tension around eyes and mouth
Dogs have feelings. They feel stressed and fearful too. It is important that we know the different warning signs that will tell us that dogs are experiencing stress. At times, after the dog has given us several warnings, a bite is imminent. Therefore, these warning signs should not be ignored.



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Thursday, April 10, 2014

Everything about Canine Bloat

Everything about Canine Bloat
   Many well seasoned dog owners warn against the dangers of canine bloat and vets even give recommendations on how to prevent your dog from suffering from canine bloat but some dog owners have no idea what this illness is, how it occurs or how to prevent it. Read on to learn everything you ever wanted to know about canine bloat.

Gastric Dilatation-Volvulus
  Canine bloat is the regularly used term for the illness but often times it is referred to by the scientific term Gastric Dilitation-Volvulus (GDV) of simply Gastric Dilation. Canine bloat as it will be referred to from here on out, is a particularly serious and often life threatening illness that strikes a good many dogs every year and the outcome of each dogs affliction depends on a variety of factors. The biggest factor in helping a dog to survive canine bloat is the speed with which treatment is administered to a dog suffering from bloat.

What Is Bloat?
  When bloat occurs, the dog’s stomach fills with air, fluid and/or food. The enlarged stomach puts pressure on other organs, can cause difficulty breathing, and eventually may decrease blood supply to a dog’s vital organs.
  People often use the word "bloat" to refer to a life-threatening condition that requires immediate veterinary care known as gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV), gastric torsion and twisted stomach. This condition can cause rapid clinical signs and death in several hours. Even with immediate treatment, approximately 25% to 40% of dogs die from this medical emergency.

Causes of bloat
  Veterinarians have no definitive data as to why canine bloat occurs and despite attempts to intentionally recreate canine bloat in laboratories they have been unsuccessful in doing so as of yet. There are, however, a variety of theories relating to factors that are believed to contribute to bloating.
  Theories about what causes GDV abound, including issues related to anatomy, environment, and care. There are certain factors and practices that appear to increase the risk of GDV, some of which fly in the face of conventional wisdom.
  The most widely recognized and accepted risk factor is anatomical – being a larger, deep-chested dog. When viewed from the side, these dogs have chest cavities that are significantly longer from spine to sternum, when compared to the width of the chest cavity viewed from the front.
   This body shape may increase the risk of bloat because of a change in the relationship between the esophagus and the stomach. In dogs with deeper abdomens, the stretching of the gastric ligaments over time may allow the stomach to descend relative to the esophagus, thus increasing the gastroesophageal angle, and this may promote bloat.
  All dog guardians should be familiar with the signs of bloat, and be ready to rush their dog to the vet if any of the symptoms are present.
  Likelihood of an incident of bloat seems to increase with age. Purdue reports that there is a 20 percent increase in risk for each year increase in age. This may be related to increased weakness, over time, in the ligaments holding the stomach in place.
  Another key risk factor is having a close relative that has experienced GDV. According to one of the Purdue studies that focused on nondietary risk factors for GDV, there is a 63 percent increase in risk associated with having a first degree relative (sibling, parent, or offspring) who experienced bloat.
Personality and stress also seem to play a role. Risk of GDV was increased by 257 percent in fearful dogs versus nonfearful dogs. Dogs described as having a happy personality bloated less frequently than other dogs.
Dogs who eat rapidly and are given just one large meal per day have an increased susceptibility to GDV than other dogs. The Purdue research found that for both large- and giant-breed dogs, the risk of GDV was highest for dogs fed a larger volume of food once daily.
  Dogs fed a dry food that included a fat source in the first four ingredients were 170 percent more likely to bloat than dogs who were fed food without fat in the first four ingredients. In addition, the risk of GDV increased 320 percent in dogs fed dry foods that contained citric acid and were moistened before feeding. On the other hand, a rendered meat meal that included bone among the first four ingredients lowered risk by 53 percent.
  It is often recommended that limiting exercise and water before and after eating will decrease the risk of bloat. 

Other Factors which Increase Risk of Bloat 
  Dog’s Breed—Large-breed dogs are most susceptible, although on occasion, small dogs may bloat too.
 Dogs that are “deep-chested.” This means the length of the chest from backbone to sternum is long and the width of the chest is narrower.
 Dogs that have ancestor-history of bloating. It’s thought to be hereditary.
 Underweight, or thin, dogs.
 Anxious or fearful temperament. These dogs should always eat in an environment made as peaceful as possible for them.
 Aggressive dogs. Numbers five and six indicate that “nerves” or emotions can play a role in triggering a bloat episode.
 Male dogs get it more than females.
 Dogs older than seven years of age are more at risk than those that are younger.

Breeds Most At-Risk for Bloat
  1. Afghan
  2. Akita
  3. Alaskan Malamute
  4. Bernese Mountain Dog
  5. Bloodhound
  6. Boxer
  7. Doberman
  8. Great Dane
  9. Great Pyrenees
  10. German Shepherd
  11. Golden Retriever
  12. Irish Setter
  13. Irish Wolfhound
  14. King Shepherd
  15. Kuvasz
  16. Labrador Retriever
  17. Newfoundland
  18. Rottweiler
  19. Shiloh Shepherd
  20. Standard Poodle
  21. St. Bernard
  22. Weimaraner
What Are the General Symptoms of Bloat/GDV in Dogs?
  • Distended abdomen
  • Unsuccessful attempts to belch or vomit
  • Retching without producing anything
  • Weakness
  • Excessive salivation
  • Shortness of breath
  • Cold body temperature
  • Pale gums
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Collapse
How do They Treat Bloat
  There are only two basic things that are done to the dog in the case of bloat. The first thing a vet may try is to insert a tube down the throat making a passage for the gas to escape. But if the stomach has twisted volvulus, surgery is the only solution. The vet will have to make an incision into the stomach and relieve the gas that way. While in there, he may decide to perform what is called gastropexy. This is where the stomach is actually stapled into its normal position, or anchored into place, so that it cannot blow up should there be another episode of bloat.
  Even if the dog has been relieved of the bloat with just a tube and not surgery, he should be surgically examined regardless, so that the vet may assess the damage done by the episode. Damaged parts of the stomach may need to be removed, or the patient’s owner may decide to allow gastroplexy since many dogs that experience bloat often go through it again at a later date. Sometimes only a day or two later, they may bloat again.
   It is a good idea to have on hand at home an over the counter drug such as Phazyme, Mylanta Gas (not regular Mylanta) or Gas-X. They contain simethicone which helps reduce gas. This may buy you a little more time to get to a vet.

How Can I Prevent Bloat/GDV?
   Because the theories and research on what causes bloat aren’t always in agreement, the ways to prevent GDV can conflict as well. One thing that everyone can agree on, though, is that feeding smaller meals several times a day is the best option for reducing the risk.
   Dogs who respond to nonsurgical treatment have a 70 percent chance of having another episode of bloat. Some of these episodes can be prevented by following these practices:
  • Divide the day’s ration into three equal meals, spaced well apart.
  • Do not feed your dog from a raised food bowl.
  • Avoid feeding dry dog food that has fat among the first four ingredients listed on the label.
  • Avoid foods that contain citric acid.
  • Restrict access to water for one hour before and after meals.
  • Never let your dog drink a large amount of water all at once.
  • Avoid strenuous exercise on a full stomach.



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