LUV My dogs: stop

LUV My dogs

Everything about your dog!

Showing posts with label stop. Show all posts
Showing posts with label stop. Show all posts

Monday, October 30, 2017

How To Stop Dog Diarrhea

How To Stop Dog Diarrhea
  Diarrhea is a common canine affliction and it varies in frequency, duration, and intensity from dog to dog.
  Diarrhea is a common problem in dogs, often because they will put almost anything in their mouth. But it can also be caused by more serious health problems, some of which require close attention, especially if the diarrhea is severe or occurs frequently.
  For the most part, diarrhea and vomiting are nature’s way of allowing the body to cleanse and remove a toxin. A small amount of blood or mucus can sometimes be seen in the stool when the intestinal bacteria are out of balance but this isn’t necessarily cause for alarm.
  A great many cases are mild and, with your vet’s advice, may be treated without a trip to the office.But if your dog is an otherwise healthy adult and, it is reasonable to try some home treatment.

An Important First Step
  The most important thing to remember when it comes to treating the diarrhea is that your primary goal should be to let the body do what it must while preventing any further damage.
Most animals will fast themselves when they have digestive disease and it’s a good idea to stop feeding your dog if he doesn’t fast himself. You can start with 6 to 12 hours of no food or water with most dogs. If your dog is very small and prone to hypoglycemia, you should give him tiny licks of honey or karo syrup each hour, or as needed, if he appears weak and trembly.
  After the fast, if there is no further vomiting and the diarrhea has stopped or slowed, offer small sips of water  every few hours.After six hours of water only, you may start some broth or small amounts of food. Gradually increase the amounts of food over the next four to five days.
  Diarrhea can lead to dehydration, so make sure to give your dog access to water at all times. 

Prevent The Recurrence Of Dog Diarrhea
  After a fast, food is usually introduced slowly and many people start with binders, which can normalize stool consistency. Once your dog is reintroduced to food, a bland diet will help prevent a recurrence of diarrhea. Starting with soup is a gentle way to smooth your dog’s transition back to his regular diet.

  Other bland diets include:
  • White rice
  • Rice water: Boil high-quality rice in a lot of water, remove the grains, and offer the dog the creamy white soup that’s left. A splash of broth or a bit baby food will make it more palatable.
  • Herbs, such as fennel, have gut-soothing properties
  • Canned pumpkin has the odd distinction of being effective for diarrhea and constipation.
  • Plain protein sources such as egg (prepared with no butter or oil) or chicken (without skin)
  • Probiotics, live bacteria that aid digestion- these are also found in yogurt
  • Yogurt, which has beneficial bacteria, can help in dogs who can tolerate milk and milk products.
  • Cottage cheese
  • Boiled potatoes, without skin
  • Specially-formulated dog foods: Some manufacturers offer foods that can sooth stomach problems. You may need to obtain these from your vet.
  • Over-the-counter medications for humans may also be effective for doggie diarrhea, but should be given with caution and you should talk to your vet before using them.
  If the diarrhea continues for more than 24 hours or your dog’s condition worsens at any time, call your vet immediately.
  If your dog’s digestive disease is severe or persistent, your veterinarian’s suggestions may include: fecal exams to rule out parasites; blood work to rule out liver, kidney, endocrine or other problems; x-rays or abdominal ultrasound to rule out foreign objects, obstructions, and cancer; and endoscopy to visualize the stomach and intestinal mucosa.
Prevention of Dog Diarrhea
  The best thing that you can do to prevent diarrhea in your dog is to treat it as you would a human. Keep your dog away from stray dogs as much as possible and administer vaccines as scheduled. Be sure to take your dog to the vet for a wellness visit to stave off any issues as soon as possible.
  And be sure to stay with food your dog and stick with it. Change brands if your pet develops allergies, but try to stick with a quality dog food and do not feed your dog table scraps.
Read More

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

How Do I Stop My Dog From Whining?

How Do I Stop My Dog From Whining?
  Whining, though it can be annoying to humans, is one way dogs communicate vocally. And though adult dogs whine for a number of reasons, the behavior usually is a reaction to anxiety, stress or injury - or because your dog wants your attention.  Don't worry; stopping your dog from whining is possible with a few clever tricks. 
   Whining is one of many forms of canine vocal communication. Dogs most commonly whine when they’re seeking attention, when they’re excited, when they’re anxious or when they’re trying to appease you.
  The good news is, with a little patience and the occasional treat, you can stop your dog from whining in a short time.

Identifying the Problem
  • Greeting Behavior. Some dogs whine during greetings. This kind of vocalization is usually motivated by excitement and may be directed at dogs or people.
  • Seeking Attention. Some dogs whine in the presence of their owners in order to get attention, rewards or desired objects.
  • Appeasement Behavior. Some dogs whine excessively when interacting with people and other dogs, usually while adopting a submissive posture.
  • Anxiety. Some dogs whine in response to stressful situations. In this context, whining sometimes seems involuntarily.
  • Separation Anxiety. If your dog only whines just before you leave or during your absence, she may have separation anxiety. If this is the case, your dog will usually display at least one other symptom of the disorder prior to your departure or when left alone, such as pacing, panting, excessive drooling, destruction (especially around doors and windows), urinating or defecating indoors, depression or other signs of distress. 
  • Injury or Medical Condition. Dogs often whine in response to pain or a painful condition. If you notice that your dog vocalizes frequently or has suddenly started to vocalize, it’s important to take her to the vet to rule out medical causes.
Steps! 
1. Exercise to calm down. Make sure the dog is getting enough daily exercise based on its size and energy level. Dogs become stressed when they are not active enough, and this will start them crying.
2. Give the dog a sheltered place of their own. It is very important to use a crate, dog house, igloo, or some warm, comfortable shelter outside where the dog can rest. Put the dog's "inside" bed or blankets as well as their used toys into the shelter so the area smells like them and they will recognize it as their own. Recognize that this new place might not seem like home to your dog, so take some time to gently teach them to go inside it.
3. Practice while you are home. Begin locking the dog outside for short periods of time . Ignore any crying! You must train the dog that nothing good will happen when they cry. If you give in and go out with the dog or allow them to return inside then you are giving positive reinforcement to the unwanted behavior .
4. Praise good behavior! This is a big key to training a dog. Once an allotted amount of time is up go outside with the dog and praise them profusely with attention and petting, and maybe even a bit of food or treats. The dog will eventually make a connection that if they are quiet and well behaved outside, they will be rewarded soon enough.
5. Slowly increase the time alone. Continue the training by lengthening the time outside until the dog remains quiet outdoors for at least an hour. Now the dog should be able to better deal with the separation anxiety when left outside or alone and hopefully quiet down and take a nap instead. And, give the dog something to chew on or play with when they are alone.
Audio tools to cause the dog to stop whining such as previously discussed are inexpensive and are not harmful to your pet. These devices simply produce a sound which the dog does not enjoy. What would happen if you heard a high-pitched, piercing scream every time you sat down with a piece of cake? To keep from hearing that awful sound one more time, you would probably be willing to give up the fattening food. This is the idea behind electrical sound emitters that are used to help your dog learn how to stop whining. 
Tip
  If whining persists, consider a certified professional dog trainer or obedience classes in your area.

Warnings
  Take your dog to the vet if you think she is whining because of pain or injury. Whining often is how dogs tell us they are hurt. If your dog's whining comes on quickly and persists, it is best to take her for treatment.
  If your dog's whining also involves destroying household items or defecating indoors when you leave, she may have severe separation anxiety and needs to see the vet.

Read More