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Showing posts with label sporting dog. Show all posts
Showing posts with label sporting dog. Show all posts

Thursday, June 28, 2018

Everything about your Welsh Springer Spaniel

Everything about your Welsh Springer Spaniel
  The Welsh Springer Spaniel dog breed was developed as a gundog to flush, or spring, game in the field. A faithful companion, he’s a favorite of discriminating hunters and families. Give him the exercise and training he needs, and he’ll be your best friend.

Overview
  The Welsh springer spaniel is a hunting dog and should be in hard muscular condition. It is in no way a breed of exaggeration. It is very slightly longer than tall, compact and possessing substance without coarseness. Its strides are powerful and ground-covering.    The coat is flat and straight, dense enough to protect it from water, weather and thorns but not so excessive as to be a hindrance in the dog's work as a flushing spaniel. The expression is soft.
  Less exuberant that the English springer, the Welsh springer spaniel is steady and easygoing. It still needs plenty of hard exercise, however, as it loves to hunt for birds. It is extremely devoted to its family, but it is independent in nature. It is reserved with strangers; some may even be timid.

Highlights
  • Welsh Springer Spaniels are not as outgoing as English Springer Spaniels and may be a bit standoffish with strangers unless they are well socialized.
  • They can suffer from separation anxiety if left alone too much and for too long. If this occurs, they may engage in destructive behavior.
  • Welsh Springer Spaniels have a "soft" personality and will not respond well to harsh training methods.
  • Especially when they are young, Welsh Springer Spaniels can greet you with a great deal of exuberance, jumping up on you and generally showing their joy at seeing you. You might want to train them not to jump, especially if you have children that they might accidentally knock to the ground.
  • Welsh Springer Spaniels were developed to have great stamina and energy. Be sure you can provide your dog with adequate exercise or he may become nervous and destructive.
  • Be sure to keep your Welsh Springer Spaniel on a leash when you take him to unfenced areas. You never know when he will see a bird or other small animal and be overcome by his instinct to hunt!
Other Quick Facts

  • The Welsh Springer is believed to be one of the oldest of the spaniel breeds.
  • Welshies have a flat, straight coat with thick, silky fur. The coat picks up mud, dirt, and stickers, but sheds them just as easily.
  • Although coat color and size are the primary differences between Welshies and English Springer Spaniels, the Welshie also has shorter ears.
Breed standards
AKC group: Sporting
UKC group: Gun Dog Breeds
Average lifespan: 10 to 15 years
Average size: 35 to 55 pounds
Coat appearance: Naturally straight flat and soft to the touch, never wiry or wavy
Coloration: Rich red and white only. Any pattern is acceptable and any white area may be flecked with red ticking.
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles and seniors, houses with yards, hunters
Temperament: Easygoing, independent, intelligent, eager to please

History
An image of English and Welsh Cockers,
published in 1859
  Little is known about the Welsh Springer’s origins, but he’s considered a very old breed, with ancestors dating to Roman Britain. Tapestries from the Renaissance depict spaniels that closely resemble today’s Welsh Springer; similar red-and-white spaniels appear in a few 18th-century portraits. By the 19th century, the dogs were little known, except in the Neath Valley region of southern Wales.
  The preponderance of dog shows in the late 19th century brought about renewed interest in the breed, which made an appearance at the first Kennel Club show, held in 1873. They were judged alongside black-and-white spaniels and white English Springer Spaniels. Eventually, the two breeds were separated.
  The American Kennel Club recognized the Welsh Springer in 1906, but few people were interested in the breed. By the end of World War II, they were practically non-existent in the United States, until 11 of them were imported in 1949. A dozen years later, the Welsh Springer Spaniel Club of America was founded. Today, the Welsh Springer remains a well-kept secret, ranking 127th among the breeds registered by the AKC, down from 113th a decade ago.

Personality
  Welsh Springer Spaniels are less outgoing than their English cousins but still share the same zest for life. They are full of energy and enjoy spending time with people of all ages – even kids and will attach himself deeply to the people he loves. Built for hunting, Welsh Springers still enjoy working in the field, but will also have fun tracking and stalking birds in the backyard. 
  They can be a bit messy, tracking dirt and water throughout the house, but their smiling faces and constantly wagging tails makes staying mad at a Springer nearly impossible. They will alert you that someone is approaching the house, though they are too shy to be effective guard dogs. For active families, Welsh Springer Spaniels make excellent pets.

Health Problems
  Cataracts, progressive retinal atrophy and glaucoma are common eye problems found in the Welsh Springer Spaniel. This breed also has a high incidence of epilepsy, which can be controlled with medications. Rarely has the breed had issues with hip dysplasia.

Care
  Welsh Springer Spaniels can be kept outside, with adequate shelter from the heat and cold, but they are such wonderful family companions, why wouldn't you want them in your house, sleeping at your feet in the evening? Welsh Springer Spaniels are fairly active indoors and can live comfortably in city apartments (with proper exercise, of course) or in the country. They do best with at least an average-size yard in which to run. Wherever they live, they are energetic dogs that need a lot of exercise to keep them from becoming fat, bored, and lazy.
  Keep training sessions short and positive. That's more suited to their personality and attention span than boring repetition. Train them with understanding and patience, and you'll be well rewarded.

Living Conditions
  The Welsh Springer Spaniel will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. It is fairly active indoors and will do best with at least an average-sized yard. The Welsh Springer's coat keeps the dog comfortable in both hot and cold weather.

Trainability
  Welsh Springer Spaniels are relatively easy to train, but they can be independent and also carry a touch of doggy ADD which can be frustrating. Keep lots of treats on hand to keep his interest, keep sessions short, and be ready to hand out lots of exuberant praise. Springers do not respond well to harsh discipline – they will shut you out if they start to mistrust you – so it's best to positively reinforce good behavior and ignore the bad.

Exercise
  The Welsh Springer Spaniel is an energetic and lively dog that needs plenty of regular exercise, including a daily, long walk. It will greatly enjoy running off the leash in a safe area. Without enough exercise, these dogs will become bored, fat and lazy and are more likely to develop a wide variety of behavior problems.

Grooming
  The Welsh Springer Spaniel has a straight, silky coat that should be brushed and combed at least twice a week — and each time he comes back from hunting — to prevent tangles. The best tools for the task: a slicker brush and a stainless steel Greyhound comb. Brush out the feathering on the legs, body, and ears with the slicker brush to remove dead hairs; use the comb on the rest of the body. You should also ask your breeder to show you how to do detailed trimming with clippers and shears to produce a neat look. The Welsh Springer Spaniel Club of America offers a how-to on grooming your Welshie to perfection.
  The rest is basic care: Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. And keep the ears clean and dry, especially if your Welshie is a swimmer. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Welsh Springers are gentle around children if they grow up with them or are exposed to them when they're young. If they're raised with them from puppyhood, they are generally good with other pets in the household, even small ones, although they might see birds as prey since that's what they are bred to hunt.

Did You Know?
The Welsh Springer’s iconic red-and-white coat isn’t the breed’s only distinctive trait. He also has slightly webbed feet, giving him an advantage when it comes to fetching waterfowl.

Famous Welsh Springer Spaniels
The Welsh Springer Spaniel has kept a low profile over the centuries, with few truly famous individuals:
  • Corrin, the first dog of the breed to be photographed
  • Goitre Lass, a well-known bitch that produced several champion pups

Read More

Thursday, December 28, 2017

Everything about your Irish Doodle

Everything about your Irish Doodle
  The Irish Doodle is a medium to large hybrid or mixed breed that crosses the Irish Setter with the Standard Poodle. She has a life span of 12 to 15 years and has talents in guarding. She is sometimes also called the Irish Doodle Setter or an Irish Setter/Poodle hybrid. She is known for being very lighthearted and is also a devoted dog.

Overview
  Also known as the Irish Doodle Setter, Irish Poo Setter, Irish Setterdoodle, and Irish Setterpoo, the Irish Doodle is a super cute, friendly, and light-hearted medium-sized crossbreed. A mix of Irish Setter and Poodle, it’s ideal for anyone seeking a dog who won’t shed a lot and who will be loyal, social, and intelligent. This dog rarely barks and will even get along great with children and pets.
  If the Irish Doodle sounds too good to be true, rest assured that it isn’t. Combing adorable looks and an equally loveable attitude, this crossbreed is becoming hugely popular. To find out if this dog would be the right fit for your family, check out some quick facts below.

Breed standards
Breed Type: Crossbreed
Breed Group: Watchdog, Sporting Dog, Guard Dog
Average lifespan: 10 to 13 years
Average size: 40-70 pounds
Coat appearance: Long, soft, wavy
Coloration: Apricot, black, white, black and tan, brown
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Singles, families with children and other pets, seniors, and those living in apartments or houses with or without yards
Temperament: Loyal, devoted, quiet, social, intelligent, friendly
Comparable Breeds: Irish Setter, Poodle

History
  The Irish Doodle is a hybrid canine, a cross between two very different breeds of hunting dog; a German retrieving dog, the Poodle, and an elegant red field hunting dog called the Irish Setter. The Poodle is often associated with France but it was actually developed in Germany, where it was known as a Pudlehund; Pudle meaning to splash around, and hund meaning dog.
  Poodles today are still sometimes employed to retrieve waterfowl, although the modern hunter is more likely to clip them short all over to prevent tangling in the brush and weeds. The Irish Setter was developed in Ireland, at some point in the 1700s as a field hunting dog and by the early 1800s, the breed was popular not just in Ireland, but also throughout the British Isles. Most experts believe that the Irish Setter is an ancestor of breeds such as the Irish Water Spaniel, the Gordon Setter, and the Irish Terrier, but written records from the time are nonexistent. The earliest Irish Setters were bred to be able to search out birds then hold their position, preventing them from entering the line of fire and they often came in either red and white or yellow and white, but in the mid-1800s their characteristic deep red color became the ideal. 
  They were imported into the United States as gun dogs and retrievers that specialized in retrieving gamebirds during the mid-1800s as well and were recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1878. Although the Irish Setter could be crossed with a Miniature or Toy Poodle, the most commonly included Poodle for this hybrid is the Standard Poodle.


Temperament
  These dogs are loving and affectionate, and are characterized by loyalty and devotion. They are eager to please and have significant native intelligence inherited from their parents. It is their intelligent mind and careful disposition that have made them equally good with kids and other family pets. This makes them an excellent family dog ideal for apartment life. Not do they just love the members of their families, but they are also comfortable meeting strangers.
  These dogs, especially the puppies, love attention until they’re well along in years. Though, it is alert and attentive. If it happens to come across anything suspicious, it would immediately alert its family.

Health
  She is generally a healthy dog and whether or not you believe in the idea of hybrid vigor there is still the possibility a puppy might inherit conditions one or both its parents are at risk of. For the Irish Doodle these include Addison's Disease, Bloat, Cushing's disease, epilepsy, Hypothyroidism, Legg-Perthes, Patellar Luxation, SA , Von Willebrand's Disease, OCD, CAD, HOD, Joint dysplasia, eye problems and Panosteitis. To avoid getting a dog with health problems you can improve the odds by only buying after seeing health clearances for both parents.

Care
  Bathing need not be a frequent occurrence with these canines, usually just a few times a year, but thorough brushing and styling will generally be needed on a regular basis. They type of grooming implements that will be required for this animal can vary a bit, depending on which parent breed they most resemble, although most will need clipping or trimming of some sort on a regular basis. 
  Crossbreeds that inherit the single-layer Poodle coat are less likely to shed and in some cases, may even be low shedding enough to be considered hypoallergenic, however, the coat of the Irish Setter is decidedly not hypoallergenic, and the full composition of the coat may not reveal itself until your Irish Doodle has reached maturity. It is also quite important to check and clean this dog’s ears on a regular basis as they can be prone to internal and external infections.

Training
  The trainability of the Irish doodle is unpredictable. The standard poodle is a happy-go-lucky and easily trainable dog. But the Irish setters are not always so, but would rather get bored easily. Those Irish doodles that take after their setter parents sometimes demand commitment and patience from their trainers. But once the training process is successfully over, your Irish doodle will be the best trained dog in the neighborhood.
  Begin obedience and pack leader trainings from an early age. Train them to socialize and get accustomed to meeting new faces. Like their parents, the Irish doodles are naturally clean, and hence, are easy to be housetrained.

Exercise Requirements
  The Irish Doodle doesn’t need a lot of exercise. Instead, a moderate amount of daily activity, through games like fetch and a walk or jog, will help keep your dog happy and in great shape. If you do have an enclosed, safe yard, you can even let your pooch play freely outside when the weather permits.

Grooming 
  She does not shed much and is hypoallergenic so is good for those with allergies. She should be brushed at least twice a week still to remove mats and tangles and keep the coat looking bright and healthy. Use a solid bristle brush and you should find her coat easy to brush. She will need to have a bath as and when she gets dirty enough to need one! Check her ears once a week and wipe them clean and clip her nails if they grow too long.

Children and other animals
  When training and early socialization is completed she is very good with children and other pets. They will be happy to play and affectionate towards them. Children should be taught how to play nicely with any dog, and that things like ear or tail pulling or messing around with their food at feeding time is not acceptable.

Is the Irish Doodle the Right Breed for you?
Moderate Maintenance: Regular grooming is required to keep its fur in good shape.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Difficult Training: The Irish Doodle isn't deal for a first time dog owner. Patience and perseverance are required to adequately train it.
Slightly Active: Not much exercise is required to keep this dog in shape. Owners who are frequently away or busy might find this breed suitable for their lifestyle.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.
The Irish Setter is a more energetic dog, but when combined with the Poodle, the puppies settle down a great deal. However, I recommend these pups for more active people and families with more energetic children. They will be perfect for the person wanting a devoted running companion, as well as a therapy dog
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Thursday, December 21, 2017

Everything about your Lagotto Romagnolo

Everything about your Lagotto Romagnolo
  If you’re thinking Italian sports car, think again. This curly-coated dog is an Italian truffle hunter who is generally smart, energetic and fun-loving. The medium-sized Lagotto requires regular trims at home or by a professional groomer.

Overview
  The appearance of the Lagotto can vary, and generally have floppy ears, and large round eyes in any shade color ranging from golden to a dark brown. Their water friendly coat is very thick and curly. Solid colors include off-white, golden, or brown. They can also be found white with brown or orange patches or roan. It is a medium to large sized dog that is hypoallergenic, which also means it almost never sheds. A Lagotto often displays white markings that grow out in adult status.
  The Lagotto is made to work. They generally have sharp senses, though their eyesight is more sensitive to motion than detail. They are very loyal and loving, making them the perfect family companion. Some are easy to train, and many get along with other animals quite easily if they're socialized as puppies.  Some Lagotti are excellent swimmers, but some will only paddle. Some will retrieve from lakes, streams and other bodies of water without hesitation. They are lovable family pets and tend to like attention. Lagotti love to dig; many owners give them a sandbox, or have a designated place to allow them satisfy their digging urges. They also love to play seeking games and have very active, and clever minds.

Quick Facts
  • A Lagotto’s coat can be off-white, white with brown or orange patches, brown roan, various shades of solid brown, with or without white, or orange, with or without white. Some dogs have a brown mask or tan markings.
  • The Lagotto is the only dog specifically bred to hunt truffles.
  • Dogs resembling Lagotti appear in paintings dating to the 15th century.    
Breed standards
AKC group: Sporting
UKC group: Gun Dog
Average lifespan: 14 to 16 years
Average size: 24 to 35 pounds
Coat appearance: Long and Water-Repellent
Coloration: Solid colors including: off-white, golden or brown
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles, houses with yards, farms and rural areas
Temperament: Loyal, loving, active, eager to please
Comparable Breeds: Portuguese Water Dog, Poodle

History
  It's thought the Lagotto Romagnolo has been around for centuries having been bred in Italy as a water dog and retriever. The breed has been well-documented throughout history with paintings depicting similar looking, handsome dogs dating as far back as the 1400's. As such, the Lagotto is considered to be one of the most ancient breeds with many other more recent water dog breeds being descendants of the Lagotto.
  The origins of the breed can be narrowed down to the lowlands and marshlands of Comacchio and Ravenna where they were highly prized retrievers and gundogs throughout the ages. Today, the Lagotto remains popular in their native Italy both as working dogs and family pets thanks to their charming looks and loyal, affectionate natures.
  The Lagotto Romagnolo was recognised as a breed in its own right by the Italian Kennel Club in 1991 and their popularity elsewhere in the world has led to more breeders producing good examples of the Lagotto in many countries which includes here in the UK. However, very few puppies are bred and registered with The Kennel Club every year which means that anyone who wants to share their home with a Lagotto would need to register their interest with breeders and agree to being put on a waiting list.



Temperament
  Althougth the Lagotto is first and foremost a working dog, they do make wonderful family pets as long as they are given the right amount of daily exercise and mental stimulation to keep them busy and happy both physically and mentally. They are known to be exceptionally good natured around children and love nothing more than to be part of a family.
  They are best suited to people who lead active, outdoor lives and who would like to have an energetic, intelligent canine companion at their side. They are not the best choice for first time owners because they need to be handled and trained by people who are familiar with this type of dog’s specific needs. The Lagotto does boast having quite a high prey drive having extremely good hearing as well as a very keen sense of smell. They can also spot their prey in the distance which means that when they are being trained, particular attention has to be paid to the "recall" command right from the word go.
  They love being in and around water which means care has to be taken as to where and when they are allowed to run off their leads just in case a dog decides to jump in any of the more dangerous water courses. They also love to dig which can become a problem if dogs are allowed to roam around a garden which often sees a Lagotto happily digging up flower beds and lawns.
  Lagottos form very strong bonds with their owners and as such they like to be with them and are never happy when left to their own devices for any length of time which could see a dog developing some unwanted and destructive behaviours as a way of relieving their stress. They often suffer separation anxiety when they are left alone for long periods of time.

Health Problems
  Lagottos are a generally healthy breed and do not suffer from any major hereditary health issues. Some breeding lines are known to have problems with hip dysplasia and epilepsy.

Care
  As with any other breed, Lagottos need to be groomed on a regular basis to make sure their coats and skin are kept in top condition. They also need to be given regular daily exercise to ensure they remain fit and healthy. On top of this, dogs need to be fed good quality food that meets all their nutritional needs throughout their lives.

Living Conditions
  Thanks to its small size, the Lagotto would do fine in an apartment if properly exercised. Where you live doesn’t matter, as long as you can walk the dog and keep it active, at least 3-4 times a day. If you do have a yard, and like your flowers…well, then you have to fence in your flowers. In the Lagotto’s nature lies a desire to dig. It loves to dig big holes and then stick its head in the hole. These dogs can dig a big hole in matter of seconds!

Trainability
  The Lagotto is an intelligent dog and one that thrives on being around people loving nothing more than to please. As such, in the right hands and environment, they are easy to train and thoroughly enjoy the one-to-one attention they are given during a training session.
It's important to teach puppies the "basics" as soon as they arrive home and to start their training in earnest once they have had all their jabs. Socialising puppies early in their lives helps them grow up to be more outgoing, confident characters and enrolling them into puppy classes is the best way to get their training off to a good start in a safe and controlled environment.
  The key to successfully training a Lagotto is to make their training sessions as interesting and as diverse as possible and to indulge their natural retrieving instincts rather than to try and curb them. Younger dogs find it hard to stay focussed if there is too much repetition in a training session and the same can be said if the session lasts for too long. As such, shorter more interesting training sessions are much better than longer and more repetitive ones.

Exercise Requirements
  Lagottos are born to work hard and require rigorous, daily exercise. They make excellent hiking and jogging partners. Lagottos also love to swim and often take to the water naturally given the opportunity. It is also important to remember that as a working breed, Lagottos require a “meaningful” and mentally stimulating task that they can engage in each day to live happy and fulfilled lives. This can be something as simple as a game of fetch or a session of hide and seek.

Grooming
  There are conflicting ideas on how to groom this breed. Some say they should be brushed regularly and others believe their coat should be allowed to grow to a naturally fluffy coat.   The lagotti coat gets matted easily, and the mats should be carefully pulled apart without tearing the coat. It is recommended that the coat be cut down at least once every year.
If the coat is kept trimmed to approximately 1.5 inches all over the body and slightly longer on the head, it will be easier to maintain. Hair on the ears should be trimmed around the edges to the leather. If the ears show irritation or buildup of dirt and earwax, the hairs from the ear canal should be gently plucked out regularly. Some coats matt more easily than others. If left untended, Lagotti hair will grow to cover the eyes, meaning the hair around their eyes should be clipped periodically to ensure that they can see.

Children and Other Pets
  The Lagotto Romagnolo forms very strong bonds with their families and this includes the children in a household. They thrive in a family environment and thoroughly enjoy being involved in everything that goes on around them. They are very gentle and good natured around children although any interaction between toddlers and a dog should always be well supervised by an adult to make sure playtime does not end up getting too boisterous.
  When well socialised from a young enough age, the Lagotto generally gets on with other dogs they meet and if they have grown up with a family cat in the home, they usually get on well together. However, if a Lagotto meets any other cats, they would think nothing of chasing them off. As with other breeds, it's best to be careful when they are around smaller animals and pets just to be on the safe side.

Is the Lagotto Romagnolo the Right Breed for you?
High Maintenance: Grooming should be performed often to keep the dog's coat in good shape. Occasional trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Easy Training: The Lagotto Romagnolo is known to listen to commands and obey its owner. Expect fewer repetitions when training this breed.
Very Active: It will need daily exercise to maintain its shape. Committed and active owners will enjoy performing fitness activities with this breed.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  True to his truffle-hunting heritage, the Lagotto loves to dig. Be prepared to have him “help” you with your landscaping efforts.
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Friday, November 24, 2017

Everything about your Pointer

Everything about your Pointer
  He’s one of the earliest Sporting breeds, used as far back as the 17th century to point hares and later birds for the new 18th century sport of “wing shooting.” The lithe and muscular Pointer is full of “hunt,” and he has a competitive spirit that makes him tops in field trials. He’s handsome, dressed in a short, smooth coat of liver, lemon, black or orange, with or without white.

Overview
  The Pointer is instantly recognizable. From long head to finely pointed tail, his entire body suggests his purpose: to point game for the hunter. When a Pointer scents game birds he stands tall and still, one foot raised off the ground, pointing the hunter in the right direction. Before the development of guns, this was an essential skill, as birds were netted rather than shot. When shooting birds became popular, the Pointer was still needed to point and then retrieve them.
  Today, the Pointer is known as the Cadillac of bird dogs, prized for his speed, ability to go all day in the field, "stand steady to wing and shot" — meaning that he holds his position as birds rise into the sky and the guns go off — and his personable nature. His love of people and short, easy-care coat make him an excellent candidate as family companion as well.
  Thanks to his sporting dog heritage, the Pointer runs hard and fast and is a super companion for a runner or cyclist. His competitive nature also makes the Pointer a natural at dog sports such as field trials, obedience, rally, and agility. This is a dog who loves to perform in public. His flashy looks and love of attention make him an excellent show dog as well.

Highlights
  • Pointers are very active and require vigorous exercise every day. If you do not have the time or energy to exercise your Pointer at least one hour each day, then you should not purchase a Pointer.
  • Pointers can be very destructive when they are bored or don't get enough exercise, especially when young. This can result in chewing, digging, and many other negative behaviors that can lead to expensive vet bills and replacement costs.
  • Pointers are wonderful family dogs who thrive when they can spend time with their people. A Pointer should not live outdoors but should enjoy the same comforts as his family.
  • Pointers are not suited for apartment dwellings; they do much better in homes with a large fenced yard where they can expend some of their energy.
  • Pointers generally do well with other dogs and other pets, especially if they're raised with them. They may, however, be very interested in pet birds, and the two should be protected from each other. You don't want your Pointer injured by a parrot's beak, and you don't want him trying to retrieve your parrot, canary or finch.
  • Pointers are strong and energetic with a mind of their own. They're not a good choice for first-time dog owners or people who aren't strong enough to handle them and give them the exercise they need.
  • Training is a must with this breed because he has a will of his own. Training can take time, but once the foundation is there, there is no limit to how far Pointers can go in various dog competitions.
  • Pointers are average shedders and require only minimal grooming.
Other Quick Facts
  • Three Pointers have won Best in Show at Westminster: Ch. Governor Moscow in 1925, Ch. Nancolleth Markable in 1932 and Ch. Marjetta National Acclaim in 1986.
  • The Pointer’s coat comes in liver, lemon, black, or orange and can be solid or combined with white. The breed standard says that a good Pointer cannot be a bad color.
  • A Pointer’s hunting instincts develop early, and he retains what he learns throughout his life.
Breed standards
AKC group: Sporting
UKC group: Gun Dogs
Average lifespan: 11-14 years
Average size: 45 to 75 pounds
Coat appearance: Dense and Short
Coloration: They are generally white with either liver, lemon, orange or black markings
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, hunters, active singles, houses with yard, farms/rural areas
Temperament: Affectionate, friendly, energetic, protective

History
  The history of the Pointer, like many breeds, is a reasonably debatable topic.Records of Pointers in England trace as far back as 1650. According to one source, the Pointer came to be in the 16th and 17th centuries, when pointing breeds, including the Old Spanish and Portuguese pointer, were brought from the European mainland to England.
  Through both history and anatomical evaluation, at least four breeds appear to have been instrumental in Pointer crosses: Greyhounds, Foxhounds, Bloodhounds, and Bull Terriers. Each of these were established breeds with unique qualities the Pointer could use to do its job.
  Pointers were brought to the United States, where the breed flourished in the abundant open hunting land. At that time (late 1800s), the Setter was considered to be the bird-hunting dog and pointers were not even permitted to compete in field trials with setters.   Around 1910, however, the Pointer began to beat the Setter at its own game. The Pointer has dominated the pointing breed field trials since then.
  One of the earliest dogs to exert influence on the breed in the US was a dog imported from England in 1876 – "Sensation". He is well known as the dog on the emblem of the Westminster Kennel Club.
  One modern American kennel, established in 1936, and known for breeding large quantities of Pointers, Elhew Kennels produced a popular and successful line of gun dogs. Elhew pointers were well-known competitors at field trials for several decades.
  In the southern United States, where the dog is so dominant it is often simply referred to as the "bird dog," Pointers are found in abundance. The bobwhite quail is the primary game bird there, and is considered classic English Pointer game, as the bobwhite will hold well for a pointing dog. Pointers also work game birds such as the pheasant, grouse, and woodcock with success.


Temperament
  The English Pointer is an active and friendly breed that is affectionate with family. The Pointer is an active and friendly breed that is affectionate with family. These dogs love to spend time with family and they typically do very well with children when they are raised together from a young age. It is important to note, however, that Pointers can be rambunctious so supervision around children is recommended. 
  This breed is not suited for apartment-style or urban living because they require a great deal of daily exercise and plenty of time outdoors. English Pointers generally get along well with other dogs and household pets when raised together, though they may be a little too interested in pet birds so keep the two apart.

Health
  The Pointer has a lifespan of about 12 to 15 years. It is prone to tail-tip injuries and will occasionally suffer from deafness and cataracts. Some minor health conditions affecting Pointers are hypothyroidism and canine hip dysplasia (CHD), while entropion is a major health issue which can affect the breed. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may run hip, thyroid, and exams on the dog.

Care
  Pointers enjoy the great outdoors, and they enjoy being with their families. They should not live outside but instead should enjoy the same comforts as their families. They do well in active homes where hiking, camping, and other outdoor activities are enjoyed by all. They do need a large fenced yard where they can run. When they're given the exercise and training they need, they are quiet and mannerly house dogs.
  The Pointer is an active, intelligent dog who needs daily exercise and stimulation. He was developed to be a hunting dog who could work all day long, and his exercise needs don't change just because he's a family companion. Give him at least an hour of exercise per day and more if possible. A vigorous walk isn't enough. Take him running, teach him to run alongside your bicycle, play Frisbee in the backyard, or train him for agility, flyball, or other dog sports.
  A Pointer puppy is still growing and doesn't need the hard exercise that an adult can take. Let him play and nap on his own schedule throughout the day, and restrict jumping until he's reached his full growth at about 18 months of age. Jumping and running on hard surfaces at an early age can stress his joints and cause orthopedic problems.

Living Conditions
  These dogs are not recommended for apartment life. They are moderately active indoors and do best with acreage.
  A fenced yard is essential.Keep your Pointer inside a securely fenced yard or dog run for his safety and your peace of mind. Some Pointers have been known to do well with underground electronic fencing as long as training isn't rushed, but keep in mind that these fences don't keep out other animals or human intruders.

Trainability
  The English Pointer can be somewhat strong-willed, so it is important that you start training from an early age. Pointers are very smart, so they pick up on training quickly but they may test your resolve from time to time. The Pointer breed can be trained for pointing, honor, and retrieving though, in reality, they will enjoy any sport or game you teach them.
  House training a Pointer is a long process and many breeders and trainers recommend crating a Pointer until he gets the hang of it, which can unfortunately be several months.

Exercise Requirements
  Because the Pointer was bred for hunting, it is a naturally high-energy dog that requires a good deal of daily exercise. A simple walk will not do for this breed – they require vigorous exercise on a daily basis or they will become destructive in the home. Other behavioral problems may develop as a result of insufficient exercise.
  English Pointers are rowdy and rambunctious and need a lot of exercise; and just when you think they've had enough, they'll probably want more. This breed was not designed to be a household pet, but rather to be a sturdy, reliable hunting companion in the field, and the modern Pointer has not lost this desire. For owners who do not hunt, a commitment should be made to enroll their pointer in tracking or agility activities in order to satisfy their need to run and think. If a Pointer does not get enough exercise, they will resort to barking and chewing which may develop severe anxiety.

Grooming
  A Pointer has a short, dense, smooth, shiny coat. There’s just about nothing easier to groom. Give him a quick going over weekly with a rubber curry brush or hound mitt to remove dead hair and distribute skin oils. A rubdown with a chamois brings out shine. 
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two, or less often if your Pointer wears down his nails naturally with all the exercise he gets. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Pointers are usually good with children and other animals, particularly if they are raised with them. Teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Pointers can also get along well with other pets, including cats, if they're raised with them, although they may be a little too fond of birds, if you know what I mean.

Is the Pointer the Right Breed for you?
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep. No trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Moderately Easy Training: The Pointer is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Very Active: It will need daily exercise to maintain its shape. Committed and active owners will enjoy performing fitness activities with this breed.
Not Good for New Owners: This breed is best for those who have previous experience with dog ownership.
Judy on the deck of HMS Grasshopper
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  The emblem of the Westminster Kennel Club is a Pointer named Sensation, who was imported from England by club members in 1876. He was a handsome lemon and white dog who lives on as the cover dog for the WKC’s show catalog.

Famous pointers
  • Judy, awarded the Dickin Medal
  • The first Pointer was entered at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show in 1877. Three Pointers have won "Best in Show" there, the first being Ch. Governor Moscow in 1925, second being Ch. Nancolleth Markable,  and the most recent being Ch. Marjetta's National Acclaim in 1986.



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Tuesday, January 17, 2017

Everything about your English Springer Spaniel

Everything about your English Springer Spaniel
  The English Springer Spaniel dog breed was developed as a gun dog to flush, or spring, game in the field, but he’s also a popular companion. Athletic and versatile, he’s been known to participate in agility, hunt tests, tracking, obedience trials and more, and he’s a great pal to have along when you go hiking or camping.

Overview
  The oldest and most-established gun dog, the English Springer Spaniel made its appearance during the Renaissance when it would accompany European hunters. Once born alongside Cocker Spaniels, English Springer Spaniels were the larger of the breeds used to chase game. The English Springer Spaniel received its name because of its springing abilities. Now a popular breed in the home, this dog is known for its intelligence, tricks, affection and obedience.

Highlights
  • English Springer Spaniels don't like to be left alone and may become nuisance barkers if they're bored or lonely.
  • In recent years, there have been reports of English Springer Spaniels who are aggressive or overly submissive. Be sure to get your Springer from a breeder who tests his or her breeding dogs for health and temperament.
  • In essence, there are two varieties of English Spring Spaniel: ones intended to work in the field, and ones intended to show. Be sure you know the difference and get the type that best suits your needs.
  • Don't expect your English Springer Spaniel to be a good guard dog. They bark at noises and when strangers come around, but quickly settle down and want to be pet.
  • English Springer Spaniels were developed to have great stamina and energy. Be sure that you can provide your dog with adequate exercise or he may become nervous and destructive.
  • Some English Springer Spaniels can demonstrate submissive urination, which means they pee in excitement or anxiety when you come home. The best way to deal with this is to make homecomings very low key by not looking at or paying attention to your dog until you've been home for a few minutes. If you do this, your puppy may grow out of this behavior.
  • Be sure to keep your English Springer Spaniel on a leash when you take him to unprotected areas. You never know when he will see a bird and be overcome by his instinct to go after it!
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • Field-bred English Springer Spaniels have less coat and a more pointy muzzle.
  • Show-bred English Springer Spaniels have a heavier build, longer hair, a squarish muzzle and long ears.
  • English English Springer Spaniels are high-energy dogs and need lots of daily exercise. As long as they get plenty of exercise, they can live in any type of home, including an apartment or condo.
  • When you are choosing a English Springer puppy, consider whether you are more interested in the dog for athletic ability and endurance or for the combination of beauty and milder temperament that is the show-bred dog.

Breed standards
AKC group: Sporting Group
UKC group: Gun Dog
Average lifespan: 12 - 14 years
Average size: 40 - 55 pounds
Coat appearance: Medium length, with wave and feathering on ears, legs and face
Coloration: Liver and white; black and white; black, white and liver; white with blue or black markings
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Medium-sized dog, black or liver nose, oval-shaped eyes in brown to hazel color, deep chest, medium-length pendant ears, tails are typically docked and head is proportionate to body.
Possible alterations: Blue in color, various color combinations
Comparable Breeds: Cocker Spaniel, Golden Retriever

History 
English Springer Spaniel from 1807
  Spaniel-type dogs have been popular with hunters for centuries, used to flush feathered and furred game. Spaniels came in several sizes, and it wasn’t unusual for puppies in the same litter to grow up to be different sizes. The smaller ones were used to hunt woodcock, giving rise to the name Cocker Spaniel, and the larger ones were used to “spring” game for the hunter, flushing birds from the brush so they could be shot. They became known as English Springer Spaniels. In 1902, England’s Kennel Club separated the two types into distinct breeds, one becoming the English English Springer Spaniel, the other the English Cocker Spaniel.
  In the U.S., the English Springer Spaniel Field Trial Association formed in 1924 and began the competitions known as field trials, in which the dogs were judged for not only hunting ability but also that elusive quality, style. Since then, the breed has split into two types: the smaller field-bred English Springer prized for his hunting ability and the somewhat larger, beautified show-bred English Springer, known for a milder temperament and a heavier coat. Despite their differences, both types are registered as a single breed with the American Kennel Club. They rank 29 th in popularity, down just slightly from 26 th in 2000, so their appeal holds steady.

Personality
  The typical Springer is friendly, eager to please, quick to learn, and willing to obey. He should never be aggressive or timid. In recent years there have been reports of aggression or excessive timidity in the breed, as well as excessive separation anxiety. These traits aren't desirable and could be an indication of poor breeding. As with any breed of dog, it's important to research breeders and find ones who test their breeding stock not only for genetic diseases but also temperament.
  Temperament is affected by a number of factors, including heredity, training, and socialization. Puppies with nice temperaments are curious and playful, willing to approach people and be held by them. Choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one who's beating up his littermates or the one who's hiding in the corner. Always meet at least one of the parents — usually the mother is the one who's available — to ensure that they have nice temperaments that you're comfortable with. Meeting siblings or other relatives of the parents is also helpful for evaluating what a puppy will be like when he grows up.
  Springers need early socialization and training. Like any dog, they can become timid if they are not properly socialized — exposed to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Early socialization helps ensure that your Springer puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.

Health
  The English Springer Spaniel, which has an average lifespan of 10 to 14 years, is prone to major health problems like elbow dysplasia, otitis externa, and canine hip dysplasia (CHD), and minor issues such as progressive retinal atrophy (PRA), phosphofructokinase deficiency, and retinal dysplasia.
  A few of the tests that are required for them are DNA for phosphofructokinase deficiency, elbow, knee, hip, and eye. Gastric torsion, entropion, patellar luxation, seizures, and rage syndrome can occasionally be seen in them.

Care
  The English Springer Spaniel needs combing and brushing at least once or twice a week. Apart from that, trimming and clipping every two to three months is good way to maintain a lustrous coat.
  Keeping them inside the house with access to the field is best for this breed, as they love to hunt. They need to be taken on long hours of walking, as routine exercise is very important for these dogs. Proper lessons in obedience should also be given.

Living Conditions
  They will do okay in an apartment if sufficiently exercised. English Springer Spaniels adapt well to town or city life. They are relatively inactive indoors and will do best with at least an average-sized yard.

Training
  Eager to please and generally loyal, it’s important to remember that English Springer Spaniels were bred as a gun dog and have instinctual tendencies toward outdoor hunting-style activities like retrieving. This kind of exercise is good to use during training. As far as the English Springer Spaniel’s temperament for training, it can be highly responsive and eager to please, if not distracted at times. Generally an obedient breed, the English Springer Spaniel should not be a difficult dog to give commands.

Exercise Requirements
  English Springer Spaniels are an active, athletic breed and should be exercised regularly. It’s important to take advantage of their hunting instincts and allow them to roam free in open areas, making them well-suited for the country life. Taking your dog to a park if you live in the city would be advisable – if you can handle this on a regular basis, then your English Springer Spaniel should have better overall mood and weight regulation.

Grooming 
  The English Springer Spaniel should be brushed at least three times per week to prevent tangles and mats, and keep the coat shiny and healthy. Trimming around the head, neck, ears, tail and feet can help neaten the appearance, as well. Trimming is required every six to eight weeks, and most owners take their Springer to a professional groomer for a bath and a trim.
  Check the ears on a weekly basis for signs of infection, irritation, or wax build up. The heavy ears of the English Springer do not allow for air to circulate, making them prone to infections. Cleanse regularly with a veterinarian-approved cleanser and cotton ball. Brush the teeth at least once per week to prevent tartar buildup and fight gum disease.   Additionally, nails should be trimmed once per month if the dog does not wear down the toenails naturally.

Children And Other Pets
  Springers usually do well with children if they are brought up with them from puppyhood. Older Springers who are unfamiliar with children may do best in a home with children who are mature enough to interact with them appropriately.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Springers are also generally good with other pets in the household, even small ones, but they might see pet birds as prey since those are what they are bred to hunt. Keep them separated so they don't hurt each other. A parrot's beak is a mighty weapon.

Is this breed right for you?
  The English Springer Spaniel is a true-blue lover of water. While it's OK for apartment life due to its inactivity level indoors, the breed would love to have a yard to play in and a body of water to swim in. This pup loves children, is extremely loyal and very eager to please its human companion. Although this breed is OK with other animals, the English Springer Spaniel has a natural instinct to hunt for birds. Due to a longer coat, it will need regular grooming and bathing.

Did You Know?
  English Springer Spaniels are bred either as hunting dogs or show dogs - but never as both. There hasn’t been an English Springer Spaniel that has excelled in both the show ring and hunting grounds in more than 50 years.

A dream day in the life
  The loving English Springer Spaniel will wake up at the foot of its owner's bed. Following the family downstairs, it'll go out for a quick romp around the yard and a possible dip in the pool. After checking the home turf, it'll mosey back inside to play with the kids. It'll be happy with a few games, tricks and a nice walk before ending the day with its loved ones.
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