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Showing posts with label spitz. Show all posts
Showing posts with label spitz. Show all posts

Thursday, June 28, 2018

Everything about your Norwegian Buhund

Everything about your Norwegian Buhund
  Intelligent, independent, and eager to please, the Norwegian Buhund dog breed can handle all kinds of dog jobs and sports with ease. He needs lots of exercise and attention, and is a quick learner.

Overview
  The Norwegian Buhund belongs to a large class of dogs called the Spitz type. Bred as an energetic working dog, Buhunds herd livestock and guard home and family. Today, they are also trained to aid the hearing impaired, perform some types of police work, and perform in obedience and agility trials. Their thick coat is wheaten  or black in color.
  While Norwegian Buhunds make excellent watch dogs, they are also content to lie at your feet at the end of a hard day. Training wise, the Buhund is considered by many to be the most trainable of the Spitz breeds, but obedience training is still a necessity. Because the Buhund was born to herd and sound the alarm, the Buhund needs training and a job to do. Because they are happiest near their owner, they have earned the nickname, “the friendly spitz.”

Other Quick Facts
  • Skeletons of six dogs found at the excavation site of a Viking grave may have been forebears of today’s Buhunds.
  • The Buhund was used by farmers to hunt or run off wolves and bears.
Breed standards

AKC group: Herding
UKC group: Northern Breed
Average lifespan: 12 to 15 years
Average size: 26 to 40 pounds
Coat appearance: Thick, hard, smooth-lying outer coat; soft, dense undercoat
Coloration: Wheaten – from cream to intense orange; black; white patches may appear on the face, neck, chest, feet, and tail; gray coats are rare
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles and seniors, houses with yards, farm/rural areas
Temperament: Loving, loyal, active, intelligent

History
  This Norwegian farm dog, who guarded property, helped herd livestock, and hunted or ran off predators such as wolves and bears, is thought to have a long history. The excavation of a Viking grave dating to the 10th century turned up the skeletons of six dogs of various sizes. They may be the forebears of today’s Buhund. Over the years, Buhunds have escaped the bounds of their herding past to be trained for certain types of police work and as hearing dogs, as well as participating in agility and obedience trials.
  The dogs were first exhibited at dog shows in Norway in the 1920s, and a breed club was organized in 1939. The dogs were first imported to the United States in the 1980s.
  The United Kennel Club recognized the Buhund in 1996 and classifies him as a Northern breed. The American Kennel Club recognized the breed in 2009. He is a member of the AKC’s Herding group and ranks 159th among the breeds registered by the AKC.

Temperament
  The Norwegian Buhund is vigilant, cheerful, active, untiring, intelligent and attentive. Very affectionate, it loves giving kisses and snuggling. This breed needs physical and mental stimulation and require consistent, firm leadership as it can be headstrong if it senses its handlers are not as strong minded as itself. These dogs like to be taught and learn very quickly. A natural watchdog, the Buhund is brave and vocal but not aggressive. It is unlikely to bite or snap unless provoked and led to believe it is alpha over the humans as a result of lack of leadership. Buhunds love their family and are known for their fondness of children. It is an ideal size for a house dog and a great people lover. This is a very trainable breed. 
  The Norwegian Buhund is very active and needs a lot of exercise. It needs obedience training to establish reliable manners. If your dog tends to bark at you when it wants something it is a sign that your dog believes he is above you in the pack order, and you not only need to hush him, but you also need to reevaluate your canine to human leadership skills. A dog that believes he is alpha can be very stubborn. May try to herd humans and needs to be taught this is not acceptable.

Health 
  Fortunately, the Buhund is a healthy dog. There have been cases of Pulverulent Nuclear Cataracts, epilepsy and skin allergies reported in the breed. On the flipside, the breed has a very high incidence of hip dysplasia. Considering that the Norwegian Buhund is not a large breed of dog, breeders and enthusiasts are alarmed at this quickly increasing problem.

Living Conditions
  The Norwegian Buhund would do best living in a house with at least a small fenced-in yard. These dogs are very active and should get plenty of chances to exercise. They can, however, live in an apartment if extra care is given for sufficient exercise and the apartment is fairly big for the dog to move around.

Training
  Norwegian Buhunds are highly intelligent dogs that have a strong desire to please their people. They are one of the easiest to train among the Spitz style breeds. They learn quickly provided the owner is consistent, gives plenty of praise and carries yummy rewards. Although he is independent and tough enough to herd and protect sheep on his own, the Buhund is offended by harsh words and responds well to assertiveness and kindness during training sessions.
  The Norwegian Buhund does very well in events such as obedience, herding and agility trials. This breed has also been used for service, search and police work. His versatility and intellect make him a great all around dog.

Exercise
  This is a very active breed that needs to be exercised every day, with a long, brisk walk or jog. While out on the walk the dog must be made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as in a dog's mind the leader leads the way, and that leader needs to be the human. In addition, they greatly enjoy sessions of play.

Grooming
  The Buhund has a thick double coat. Brush it weekly to keep it clean and remove dead hair. The coat sheds some all year round and more heavily once or twice a year. During shedding seasons, which are usually in the spring or fall, daily brushing will help to keep excess hair under control.
  Regular brushing will keep the Buhund clean. It’s rare that he will need a bath. The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Is the Norwegian Buhund the Right Dog for You?
  Norwegian Buhunds are happy, active dogs who adore children and are very affectionate with their families. Although they do need a good amount of exercise each day, they are happy to settle down and snuggle in at the end of the day. They get along with other pets, too, and are regarded as a “people dog” since   they are happy to meet anyone they can.
  Although heavy shedding occurs 2 times a year, regular brushing the rest of the year is all that is needed. The dogs do best indoors with a yard, but they can live in large apartments if they are allowed to exercise outdoors daily. There are only two health problems considered common for this breed, and when added with the minimal grooming they are easy dogs to maintain. They do need training, however, but they are easy to train.
  If you are looking for a playful, affectionate family dog with minimal grooming, good health and a love of children, consider the Norwegian Buhund breed for your next dog.

Did You Know?
  In his homeland of Norway, the Buhund’s name means “farm dog.” He is also called the Norsk Buhund or the Norwegian Sheepdog.
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Everything about your Swedish Lapphund

Everything about your Swedish Lapphund
  The Swedish Lapphund is a breed of dog of the Spitz type from Sweden, one of three Lapphund breeds developed from a type of dog used by the Sami people for herding and guarding their reindeer. The expression "the black beauty of Norrland" is very often attributed to the Swedish lapphund, which is most likely one of Sweden's oldest breeds. The Swedish name of the breed is Svensk lapphund.

Overview
  A typical spitz type dog of slightly less than medium size, with proud head carriage, and a weather resistant coat. The body is compact and slightly longer than tall. The chest is deep to the elbow, and there is prominent forechest. The ribcage is long and oval, with well developed last ribs. The back is level, strong, muscular and springy. The loin is short and broad. The croup is proportionally long, broad and slightly sloping. The belly is slightly tucked up.
  The breed is very receptive and willing to work, and its abilities as a guard and herder made it very useful in the reindeer trade. They are lively, alert, kind and affectionate, easy to train and suitable for many different endeavors such as obedience, agility, herding and tracking.

Other Quick Facts:
  • There are approximately 1,200 Swedish Lapphunds in the world, most of which live in Sweden. Others are located in Finland, Norway, England, Denmark, The Netherlands, France, Germany, Belgium, Austria, Switzerland, Slovenia, Russia, and Australia. Only a few live in the United States.
  • The Lappie used to use his bark to scare off predators and alert reindeer to his presence. Although he doesn’t encounter many wolves or do much herding these days, he retains his tendency to bark.
Breed standards
Breed Group: Herding
UKC group: Northern Breed
Average lifespan: 10 to 13 years
Average size: 33 to 53 pounds
Coat appearance: tight, harsh, medium length outer coat with a soft, dense undercoat
Coloration:  Black, Brown, White
Hypoallergenic: No

History
  The Swedish lapphund has its origins among the ancient hunting tribes of northern Scandinavia, from the land that the Sámi people call Sapmi. In Sámi mythology it is said that the lapphund sought the post of worker amongst the Sámi people in exchange that it would always be well-treated. The lapphund has been used mainly for hunting and guarding. When the Sámi people started to keep domestic reindeer in the mid-18th century, the lapphund's repertoire was expanded to include herding.
  Hard work in the barren landscape of northern Scandinavia has created a very resilient breed. The shifting climate demands a weatherproof coat that is easy to maintain. The rough terrain and the varied work demand a dog with endurance, agility, intelligence and independence. The resulting Swedish lapphund is a well-rounded working dog, well suited both for work as a farm, hunting, and herding dog, and as a pet.



Temperament
 Typical Swedish Lapphunds are clever, gentle, and biddable dogs. In their native Sweden, they undergo an assessment of their temperament – known as mentalbeskrivning – which has allowed breeders to select dogs with the most desirable behavioural traits, while avoiding more negative ones, and this seems to have been quite a successful approach.
  The Lapphund is generally tolerant and sociable with other dogs, and may accept cats if the two are raised together. Likewise, it is fond of children, but it is vital that this working breed is afforded plenty of exercise, as it can otherwise become excessively boisterous, especially when playing. The Lapphund has no tendency to be aggressive, but is aloof with strangers, and will respond to their approach with loud, enthusiastic barking.

Health
  Although the Swedish Lapphund is thought to be a relatively healthy breed, diabetes mellitus and progressive retinal atrophy are a few of the medical conditions that have been identified in the breed.And because they are so rare, popularity and overbreeding have yet to take a major toll on their health, it is advisable to ask the breeders about incidence of hip dysplasia and eye problems, since those are common in many different breeds.

Care
  Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath. Check the ears weekly for dirt, redness, or a bad odor that could indicate an infection. 
  If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball dampened with a gentle, pH-balanced ear cleaner recommended by your veterinarian. Start grooming your Lappie at an early age so he learns to accept it willingly.Brush the coat weekly to keep it clean and remove dead hair.

Living conditions
  It is dog resistant to bad weather, which likes to live outdoors, in a colder climate with a loving and active family. It likes exercise, long walks and feels the need to burn its energy. It doesn't run away from its master. It needs socialization and training.

Trainability
  Controlling this tendency to bark is perhaps the greatest challenge in training a Swedish Lapphund, for it is otherwise a dog that learns quickly and responds well to praise and positive reinforcement. Teaching a “silent” command is a really useful technique to curtail any nuisance barking, but it requires patience and rigorous consistency in training.
  The other approach to managing this vocalisation is thorough socialisation, introducing the Lapphund to as many new people as possible during its formative months as a pup. While this will never completely eliminate this noisy instinctive behaviour, it is likely to make it a less frequent and persistent annoyance.

Exercise
  Naturally active little dogs, they should always be encouraged to remain so. They need to be taken on a daily walk.

Grooming
  The Lappie has a thick double coat that forms a ruff around the neck and is longer on the back of the legs and the tail. Brush the coat weekly to keep it clean and remove dead hair. During spring and fall shedding seasons, daily brushing will help keep excess hair under control.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath. Check the ears weekly for dirt, redness, or a bad odor that could indicate an infection. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball dampened with a gentle, pH-balanced ear cleaner recommended by your veterinarian. Start grooming your Lappie at an early age so he learns to accept it willingly.

Children and Other Pets
  Swedish Lapphunds are known to be very good around children thanks to their gentle, placid natures. However, any interaction between toddlers and a dog should always be well supervised by an adult to make sure playtime does not get too boisterous which could end up with someone being knocked over and hurt, especially when dogs are still young.
  When dogs have been well socialised from a young enough age, they generally get on well with other dogs they meet and if they have grown up with a family cat in a household, they usually get on well together. However, a Lapp might decide to chase off any other cats they encounter in their travels. Care should be taken when they are around any smaller animals and pets just to be on the safe side.

Did You Know?
  • The Lapphund comes from the far north and is intolerant of heat. Keep him indoors on hot or humid days.
  • The Swedish Lapphund is the national breed of Sweden and was the first dog registered by the Swedish Kennel Club.
  • The Swedish Lapphund was added to the Foundation Stock Service program in 2007.
  • The Swedish Lapphund has been approved to compete in AKC Companion events since January 1, 2010.
  • The Swedish Lapphund has been assigned the Herding Group designation.
  • The Swedish Lapphund is an ancient breed, in existence for thousands of years. It is a natural breed believed to be a descendent of the ancient artic wolf.
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Wednesday, December 27, 2017

Everything about your Icelandic Sheepdog

Everything about your Icelandic Sheepdog
  Thought to be companions to the ancient Vikings, the Icelandic Sheepdog dog breed was used to protect flocks, especially lambs, from birds of prey. They still retain the habit of watching the sky and barking at birds — as well as everything else they see or hear.

Overview
  It's thought that invading Vikings brought the ancestors of this breed with them to Iceland in the ninth century. Thanks to the isolation of Iceland, today's Icelandic Sheepdogs — also called the Icelandic Spitz or Icelandic Dog — probably look a lot like their ancestors.
   He's too friendly to be much of a guard dog, but you'll never be surprised by visitors.
  Affectionate, confident, and playful, the Icelandic Sheepdog gets along well with people and other dogs. Males tend to be more laidback and cuddly than females. Trained with consistency and patience, Icelandics learn quickly and willingly.

Quick Facts
  • The Icelandic Sheepdog’s thick, straight or slightly wavy double coat comes in two lengths and several colors — shades of tan, ranging from cream to reddish brown; chocolate brown; gray and black — all with white markings and sometimes with a black mask.
  • Icies typically have double dewclaws on their hind legs.
Breed standards

AKC group: Herding
UKC group: Herding Group
Average lifespan: 11-14 years
Average size: 20 - 30 pounds
Coat appearance: medium or longer, always with a thick, soft undercoat
Coloration: Tan, reddish-brown, chocolate, gray, black, white is a prominent required color
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles, houses with yards, farms/rural areas
Temperament: Affectionate, confident, playful, loving
Comparable Breeds: American Eskimo Dog, Norwegian Elkhound

Miscellaneous
  The breed is sometimes denoted in Latin as canis islandicus, though it is a breed and not a species.
  As the name implies, it is a sheep dog, but is also used as a watch dog and general working dog. When herding, the Icelandic Sheepdogs were not mainly used to take the sheep from one point to another, but to prevent animals from straying. Additionally, the dogs were in charge of herding horses and other animals, as well. When herding failed, the dogs drove the animals by barking. Thus, they tend to bark when they want something, although this behaviour can be controlled by training.
The Icelandic Sheepdog often has
 two dewclaws on each hind leg.
  In the Icelandic landscape, sheep often get lost and it has historically been the dog's job to find them and return them to the herd. They are, therefore, used to working on their own and to figuring things out for themselves, so owners have to beware lest they learn things they should not. As a watch dog, their main task was to alert the inhabitants when somebody was coming, so these dogs tend to bark a lot when they see people approaching.
  The Icelandic Sheepdog is very loyal and wants to be around its family constantly. It follows its owner everywhere. Unlike most working dogs, these calm down when indoors and happily lie down at their master's feet.



History
  The Icelandic Sheepdog is native to, yes, Iceland — the only breed that originated there. It’s thought that Vikings brought the ancestors of this breed with them to Iceland in the 9th century. The dogs were used to protect flocks, especially lambs, from birds of prey.
  The breed has been brought from near-extinction in the 1950s, when only about 50 of the dogs remained, to a population of more than 800 in the United States alone. The American Kennel Club recognized the breed as a member of the Herding Group in 2010.

Temperament
  This breed is prone to separation anxiety, so it is not recommended as an outside-only dog. The breed is social, affectionate, playful and friendly, making it a great option for families.
  Icelandic sheepdogs are great with children, other dogs and smaller pets. The prey drive is not strong in this breed, so smaller pets should be welcomed by them. Always supervise your dog with smaller animals because the hunting instincts can vary depending on the individual dog. Calm but firm training is recommended.
  Icelandic sheepdogs bark when active, working or excited, so apartment residents should take this into consideration.

Health 
  The Icelandic Sheepdog generally has little health issues with an average life expectancy of 12 to 16 years. Main health concerns associated with the Icelandic Sheepdog include hip dysplasia and an eye disorder called distichiasis.

Care
  With such a thick coat, this dog breed does require weekly brushing. An active exercise plan is best for the Icelandic Sheepdog. It should never be left alone for too long as isolation may result in anxiety issues.

Living Conditions
  The Icelandic Sheepdog needs a lot of activity and exercise and needs close contact to the family. Many of these dogs have "home-alone anxiety" problems, because they don't like to be home alone.

Trainability
  As a breed, Icelandic Sheepdogs are smart, willing and eager to please. This makes them pretty easy to train. However, because they are so intelligent and enthusiastic, they should be kept challenged with a variety of different training, exercise and play activities, so that they don’t become bored. It can be helpful to rotate their activities every few days, to keep them alert and happy.

Activity Requirements
  Icelandic Sheepdogs are active, athletic, energetic animals that need lots of exercise to  keep them in tip-top physical and mental shape. They enjoy all sorts of outdoor activities, such as taking long rambling walks with their owners, romping at the dog park and frolicking at the beach or along a river. They love to play with other dogs. They also love to participate in obedience, agility, utility, flyball, herding and other competitive dog sports, at which they excel.

Grooming
  The Icelandic’s coat of many colors can be short or long, with both lengths having an outer coat and an undercoat.
  Brush the Icie’s coat once or twice a week to remove loose fur and reduce the amount of hair you find floating around the house or attached to your clothes. Be sure you have a good vacuum cleaner to keep your home tidy. Icie lovers say he doesn’t shed as much as you might think, but don’t get this breed thinking that he is a low shedder.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails every three to four weeks or as needed. You may also want to clip the tufts of hair between the toes, but other than that, the coat needs no trimming. Brush the teeth often — with a vet-approved pet toothpaste — for good overall health and fresh breath.

Is the Icelandic Sheepdog the Right Breed for you?
Moderate Maintenance: Regular grooming is required to keep its fur in good shape. Professional trimming or stripping needed.
Moderately Easy Training: The Icelandic Sheepdog is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Very Active: It will need daily exercise to maintain its shape. Committed and active owners will enjoy performing fitness activities with this breed.
Not Good for New Owners: This breed is best for those who have previous experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  The Icelandic Sheepdog is also known as the Iceland Spitz.



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Wednesday, November 8, 2017

Everything about your Volpino Italiano

Everything about your Volpino Italiano
  Similar in size and appearance to the Pomeranian, the Volpino Italiano is a much rarer breed. Developed in ancient Italy, this dog breed was loved by royalty and peasants alike as it is very friendly and energetic.
  This small Spitz breed has charmed Italian royalty and peasants alike since at least the 15th century, if not earlier. He has the characteristic double coat, prick ears, wedge-shaped head and upturned tail of the Nordic breeds. While he tends to love people and is often playful and alert, be aware: He can be a barker.

Overview
  The Volpino Italiano is Italy’s contribution to the Spitz, or Nordic, family of dogs. Although he’s rarely seen in the United States, if you do spot one, he will most likely be adorned in white fur . His coat may also come in fawn, red, black or champagne, but those colors are uncommon.
  Generally alert and intelligent, the Volpino tends to be a good watchdog, barking to alert you of the presence of people on your property. He can be wary of strangers, sharply registering his alarm when he encounters new people or dogs on walks. Even so, this snowball of cuteness will draw the admiration of people wanting to get to know him.
  If you are looking for a small but generally active dog that can potentially excel at dog sports such as agility, nose work and rally, this typical ball of energy is one to consider.

Quick Facts
  • The Volpino is often mistaken for a Pomeranian or Miniature American Eskimo, but he is a distinct breed. Differences can be seen in the head shape and size, with Volpinos being slightly larger than Poms.
  • The Volpino is a rare breed with only 3,000 or so in the world. Most are found in Italy, but other countries where they’ve made their homes include the Scandinavian nations, Great Britain, the United States and Canada.
  • Queen Victoria is said to have brought home a pair of Volpinos from Florence, Italy, in 1888, but she contributed to the breed’s misidentification by referring to them as toy Pomeranians.
Breed standards
FCI group: European Spitz #195
UKC group: Northern Breed
Average lifespan: 14 to 16 years
Average size: 9 to 14 pounds
Coat appearance: Thick, long, dense and fluffy
Coloration: white, black, tan and red colours
Hypoallergenic: No

History
  Volpino Italiano, being a direct descendant of the Spitz breed of dogs, has been in existence for more than 5000 years, as revealed from records. In fact, several paintings and artifacts of the 1500s, depict a similar breed having erect ears and white, curled tails. Being a favorite among the ladies, its popularity in the Italian royalty persisted for over centuries. Queen Victoria had many Volpinos in her possession which she had brought on her visit to Italy, White Turi, Bipo, Lena and Linda being some of them.
  Though small in size, it was used as a guard dog assigned with the task of alerting the bigger breeds at the sight of an intruder. In spite of its long and eventful history, it became popular outside of Italy, not before the 1880s. It obtained recognition from the FCI in 1903, but was on the verge of extinction in the second half of the 20th century, with only five Volpino Italiano registered in the year 1965. Several initiatives were taken for its revival in 1984 by Enrico Franceschetti as well as the Italian National Kennel Club (ENCI).
At present, they are still categorized as a rare breed with only 4000 dogs present in total. Though they are majorly concentrated in Italy, their breeding has been taking place at present in 15 countries including Brazil, Russia, Holland, Denmark, Ireland, Sweden, Greece, Hungary, U.K., U.S.A, Holland, Finland, and Canada.


Temperament
  The Volpino makes a good watchdog, and some can even be used as gun-dogs (bird dogs) if trained properly. They will make extremely active, affectionate pets.
These energetic, lively and active dogs have a loyal and affectionate nature, bonding well with the members of their house, thus emerging as a good family dog.
In spite of its closeness to its family, it is not too clingy and can move around independently.   However, it longs for the affection and attention of its loved ones.
If their watching ability is channelized in a proper way, they can make for good watch and even gun dogs.
  They mingle well with kids, especially those who can handle them in a matured and tactful way.
  The perfect Volpino puppy doesn’t spring fully formed from the whelping box. He’s a product of his background and breeding. Look for a puppy whose parents have nice personalities and who has been well socialized from an early age.

Health
  The basic well being and health of the Volpino Italiano breed are far better than with most dogs. However they are not immune to genetic and other diseases.
  As of mid-2013, the greatest threat facing this race is the genetic mutation of the eye lens called primary lens luxation (PLL). This is an extremely painful disease that manifests itself when the zonal cords holding the lens in place weaken and break at a genetically pre-determined time (usually about 4 to 8 years old). Once the zonal cords break, the lens begins to move into the interior of the eye increasing the pressure in the eye and causing the animal great pain. Because of the expense in removing the lens or the eyes, the animal is usually euthanized.

Care
  The long and dense coat of this breed will need regular brushing to keep it in tiptop condition and maintain its beautiful appearance.
  The Volpino Italiano is pleasingly independent in nature but with its intelligence and human oriented nature, it is generally easy to train. Harsh training methods will not suit this breed and it should be trained in a firm yet gentle manner.
  Because of the long and bushy coat, this dog breed requires weekly coat brushing and regular bathing. The Volpino Italiano requires a small amount of daily exercise.


Trainability 
  Volpino Italiano is easily trainable. Because they are very active, they can easily learn new tricks. Too much time should not be given to them because if they sense they can control you they will easily take advantage of it. The negative aspect of their intelligence is that they can be manipulative and very hard to control later. In the process of training him, you need a lot of positive reinforcement and you will definitely succeed. They should not be trained as watchdogs since they inherit the trait but unlike other breeds, they do not show any aggressiveness in their character.

Activity Requirements 
  Since the dog is active, he requires a lot of time to exercise and to play. Additionally, they are problem solvers so if they do not find enough activity they can be very destructive. They must be kept busy always. They are recommended to be kept in homes with fenced compounds with much room to run about. If you keep the dog in an apartment, he will become bored and stressed hence the best families to keep them are the ones staying in a compound.

Behavioral Traits 
  He tends to bark a lot especially when left alone. To some neighbors are not comfortable with noise, the barking can annoy them and they will not cope up with high-peached dogs produced by these breeds of dogs. The training can help them to stop barking at command but the desire to start barking cannot be removed out them. Because they love company, separation can really affect them.

Grooming
  The Volpino has a double coat — a soft, dense undercoat and a topcoat of rough, protective guard hairs. A ruff around the neck and a furry tail add to his beauty.
  The Volpino sheds, so brush him once or twice a week, with plenty of petting in between, to remove dead hair and help keep it off your clothing and furniture.
  You may also want to trim the hair on the feet between the pads and toes to give the dog a neat appearance. Of course, it’s important to keep the eyes and ears clean, too.
How often you bathe a Volpino depends on personal preference. If he spends a lot of time on your furniture, you can bathe him weekly if you use a mild veterinary shampoo or you can give him a bath only as needed. Be sure you comb out any mats or tangles before bathing him.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails every couple of weeks or as needed. Brush the teeth often — with a vet-approved pet toothpaste — for good overall health and fresh breath.


Is the Volpino Italiano the Right Breed for you?
Moderate Maintenance: Regular grooming is required to keep its fur in good shape.
Moderate Shedding: Routine brushing will help. Be prepared to vacuum often!
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.


Did You Know?
  The Volpino takes his name from the Latin word “vulpes,” meaning fox, a reference to the breed’s foxy appearance.
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Friday, February 26, 2016

Everything about your Finnish Spitz

Everything about your Finnish Spitz
  Choosing to add a furry friend to your growing household is a long-term commitment, and picking a breed that fits your lifestyle presents the key to a happy home. With over 160 American Kennel Club-recognized breeds, that decision can seem overwhelming. 
  Finnish Spitz want to be members of the family and are naturally protective. They are sensitive dogs and don't do well in homes where there's a lot of tension. But give them a loving atmosphere and include them in everything you do and they'll become a loyal, lively, and fun-loving friend. We're here to help you meet the breed that's right for you. If you're looking for an active breed that gets along well with every member of the family, learn all you need to know about the Finnish Spitz.

Overview
  The Finnish Spitz barks. That’s the first thing you should know about him. He was developed to bark and that’s what he does. He uses many different sounds to communicate, and “talking” to you will be an important part of his life. Get this dog only if you are willing to teach him when it’s okay to bark and when it’s not. On the plus side, he’s an excellent watchdog and will always let you know if someone is approaching the house or something out of the ordinary is going on.
  This is an active dog that needs daily exercise that will challenge him physically and mentally and prevent him from becoming destructive or noisy in an attempt to entertain himself. Plan to exercise him for 20 to 30 minutes at least once a day. He performs well in dog sports such as agility, flyball, obedience and rally, and is a sturdy and tireless playmate for kids.
  This intelligent and highly trainable dog responds well to positive reinforcement techniques such as play, praise and food rewards, but he is an independent thinker. Don’t expect unquestioning obedience from him and you won’t be disappointed. Keep training sessions short and fun so he doesn’t get bored.
  If the presence of Finnish Spitz dust puppies would make you crazy, reconsider your decision to get this breed. He’s not difficult to groom, but he does shed a fair amount of hair. Brush his double coat weekly to keep it clean and remove dead hair. During spring and fall shedding seasons, daily brushing will help to keep excess hair under control. In addition, trim his nails as needed, brush his teeth, and keep the ears clean to prevent infections.
  Last but not least, it should go without saying that a people-loving dog like the Finnish Spitz needs to live in the house. It’s an unhappy Finnish Spitz who is relegated to the backyard with little or no human companionship.

Highlights
  • Finnish Spitz are lively, high-energy dogs and require lots of daily exercise.
  • These dogs are called Bark Pointers for a good reason. They love to bark! Train them at an early age to stop barking on command, or hope that you have tolerant neighbors!
  • Because Finnish Spitz are hunting dogs, they should never be turned out in unsecured areas. A fenced yard is a necessity.
  • If left outside alone for too long, Finnish Spitz will bark at everything they see unless trained at an early age not to do so.
  • Finnish Spitz take a long time to mature mentally, and can be rather silly and puppyish until they are three to four years old.
  • Hunting dogs in general can be independent thinkers, which makes them appear to be stubborn at times. Finnish Spitz are no different. Learn the proper training methods and motivations, however, and you'll be pleased with your dog's intelligence and willingness to learn.
  • Finnish Spitz generally are good with other pets in the household, but can be aggressive with dogs they don't know.
  • This is a breed that tends to be aloof and suspicious of strangers. They aren't good guard dogs, but they will alert you by barking if someone approaches your home.
  • Finnish Spitz love to eat, especially treats. Since they can be somewhat manipulative, they will try to get as many treats from you as possible and can become overweight. Try giving them a carrot or a low-fat treat instead.
  • Never buy a Finnish Spitz from a puppy mill, a pet store, or a breeder who doesn't provide health clearances or guarantees. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies and who breeds for sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • In Finland this breed is called the Finsk Spetz. Other names include Finnish Hunting Dog and Barking Bird Dog.
  • When you look at a Finnish Spitz, you see a medium-size dog with a wedge-shaped head, small prick ears, a foxlike expression, a square body covered in beautiful red-gold coat and a tail that curls over the back. Males are larger with more coat.
  • The Finnish Spitz was bred to track everything from squirrels and rodents to big game like bears.
  • The Finnish Spitz's ancestors were bred from Spitz-type dogs in central Russia over 2000 years ago.
Breed standards
AKC group: Non-sporting
UKC group: Northern Breed
Average lifespan: 12 - 15 years
Average size: 31 - 35 pounds
Coat appearance: Soft undercoat, harsh outer coat
Coloration: Red, auburn, honey
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Square and well-balanced body and frame with a deep chest; resembles a red fox; black nose, lips and black-rimmed eyes; catlike feet and hairy tail that curls upward
Possible alterations: Born with a darker coat that gets lighter as he gets older
Comparable Breeds: Siberian Husky, Chinese Shar-Pei

History
  The Finnish Spitz developed from selectively bred Spitz-type dogs that inhabited central Russia several thousand years ago. Isolated Finno-Ugrian tribes in the far northern regions bred dogs according to their specific needs. 
  These small clans of woodsmen relied on their dogs to help them obtain food, and the excellent hunting ability of the Finnish Spitz made it a favorite choice.
  By 1880, as advanced means of transportation brought diverse peoples and their dogs together, Finnish Spitzes mated with other breeds of dogs, and were becoming extinct as a distinct breed. At about that time, a Finnish sportsman from Helsinki named Hugo Roos observed the pure native Finnish Spitz while hunting in the northern forests. He realized the many virtues of the pure Finnish Spitz breed and decided to select dogs that were untainted examples of the genuine Finnish Spitz in order to try to revive the breed.Thirty years of careful breeding resulted in the modern Finnish Spitz; the dogs are descendents of his original foundation stock.
  In the 19 th century, as mass transportation became more available and convenient, the Finns began crossing the Finkie with other breeds, so much so that by 1880 few examples remained of the original, unadulterated dog. Two hunters from Helsinki realized what was about to be lost and launched a successful effort to revive the breed, culminating in the breed’s recognition by the Finnish Kennel Club in 1892.
  The Finnish Spitz was first imported to the United States in 1959. The Finnish Spitz Club of America was founded in 1975, and the American Kennel Club recognized the breed in 1988, adding it to the Non-Sporting Group. The Finnish Spitz ranks 158 th among the breeds registered by the AKC.

Lineage
Nearly all dog breeds’ genetic closeness to the gray wolf is due to admixture.However, several Arctic dog breeds show a genetic closeness with the now-extinct Taymyr wolf of North Asia due to admixture. These breeds are associated with high latitudes - the Siberian husky and Greenland dog that are also associated with arctic human populations, and to a lesser extent the Shar Pei and Finnish spitz. An admixture graph of the Greenland dog indicates a best-fit of 3.5% shared material, however an ancestry proportion ranging between 1.4% and 27.3% is consistent with the data. This indicates admixture between the Taymyr wolf population and the ancestral dog population of these 4 high-latitude breeds. This introgression could have provided early dogs living in high latitudes with phenotypic variation beneficial for adaption to a new and challenging environment. It also indicates the ancestry of present-day dog breeds descends from more than one region

Personality
  This Nordic breed is active and friendly. His alert nature makes him an excellent watchdog, and he's protective of family members. He may be cautious toward strangers but should never be shy or aggressive.
  He loves children and gets along with other animals, especially when he's been raised with them. On the down side, he's an independent thinker and can be a challenge to train. He may not be mentally and emotionally mature until he's three or four years old.
  Like every dog, Finnish Spitz need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Finnish Spitz puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.

Health
  All purebred dogs have the potential to develop genetic health problems, just as all people have the potential to inherit a particular disease. Run, don’t walk, from any breeder who does not offer a health guarantee on puppies, who tells you that the breed is 100 percent healthy and has no known problems, or who tells you that her puppies are isolated from the main part of the household for health reasons. A reputable breeder will be honest and open about health problems in the breed and the incidence with which they occur in her lines.
  That said, the Finnish Spitz is a pretty healthy breed. Health problems that may be seen include diabetes, hypothyroidism, cataracts, an autoimmune skin condition called pemphigus foliaceous, and epilepsy.
  Do not purchase a puppy from a breeder who cannot provide you with written documentation that the parents were cleared of health problems that affect the breed.   Having the dogs "vet checked" is not a substitute for genetic health testing.
  Remember that after you’ve taken a new puppy into your home, you have the power to protect him from one of the most common health problems: obesity. Keeping a Finnish Spitz at an appropriate weight is one of the easiest ways to extend his life. Make the most of your preventive abilities to help ensure a healthier dog for life

Activity Requirements
  The Finnish Spitz is not a lazy house dog. They were developed to be sturdy bird-hunting companions and they have a built-in need to run and keep their minds active. Their medium size may be appealing to condo or apartment dwellers, but the Finnish Spitz needs several hours of vigorous exercise every day in order to stave off boredom and destructiveness.    
  Active families are perfect for this breed, as they are a true family dog who will happily engage in group activities like jogging, hiking or biking. They adore children and will romp in the yard with kids for hours on end. Yards should be fenced in, as this hunter will take off after birds or small animals and aren't likely to obey calls to return home. For this reason, farms are not an ideal locale for the Finnish Spitz.

Care
  Although the Finnish Spitz can survive outdoors in cool and temperate climates, it prefers living indoors, as it craves social contact. Because it is lively and active, the Finnish Spitz requires daily physical exercise such as a long on-leash walk or a run around the park. One should be careful, however, that this hunting breed does not go hunting on its own.
Its double coat requires occasional brushing every week and more often during the shedding season. The Finkie is not oily and generally remains clean.

Living Conditions
 The Finnish Spitz will do okay in an apartment and without a yard provided it gets enough exercise. It is relatively inactive indoors and prefers cool climates.

Trainability
  Their independent streak, coupled with a four-year strong puppyhood can make a Finnish Spitz difficult to train. Calm assertiveness is the best tack to take with this breed, as they don't respond well to discipline. They can become easily bored with repetitive training exercises, so breeders and trainers recommend keeping sessions short and mixing up the routine.
  Once leadership is established and basic obedience has been mastered, the Finnish Spitz should be graduated to advanced obedience classes or agility training. They are intelligent dogs and need to be mentally stimulated as much as they need to be physically exercised.

Grooming
  This handsome redhead has a double coat of a soft, dense undercoat covered by long, straight, harshly textured guard hairs. The Finnish Spitz is a naturally clean dog, but he does need some grooming. He should be brushed with a slicker brush at least once a week to minimize shed hair around your house, and bathed every three to four months.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually once a month. Brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath. Check the ears weekly for dirt, redness or a bad odor that can indicate an infection. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball dampened with a gentle, pH-balanced ear cleaner. Begin grooming the Finnish Spitz when he is very young so he learns to accept the handling and fuss of grooming patiently.  


Children And Other Pets
  Finnish Spitz love children and will tolerate a lot, walking away when they've had too much. They're sturdy enough that they're not easily injured by toddlers whose motor skills aren't fully developed.
  That said, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how good-natured, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Finnish Spitz get along well with other dogs and cats, especially if they're raised with them, but they can be aggressive toward dogs they don't know. And pet birds might want to watch their back around them.

Is this breed right for you?
  Getting along well with other animals and children, the Finnish Spitz is an awesome addition to families. Regardless of his loud bark, the breed is well-suited to apartment life if given daily exercise and walks. 
 Preferring the indoors, a small yard will do just fine for this dog. It's best that the Finnish Spitz receive a good amount of leadership and training from his owner to avoid poor behavioral traits. Do not let him believe he's the dominant member of the household or he'll act negatively. In addition, this dog requires a good amount of grooming and is a normal shedder.

Did You Know?
  This is one dog who can truly lay claim to the title King of the Barkers. The Finnish Spitz, the national dog of Finland, was developed to be a barking hunting dog. That is, he trails game, and when he finds it, he barks until the hunter arrives to bag it. One Finnish Spitz each year is chosen for his hunting prowess to be King of the Barkers.

A dream day in the life of a Finnish Spitz
  A sweet and mild-tempered dog, he may wake you up with a bark if he hears something out of the ordinary. Spending his day inside with the family, the Finnish Spitz will be happy to let the kiddos roll about and roughhouse with him. Playing quietly with his toys, he will bark when he feels he's protecting the security of his home. Running inside and outside the house, he loves to use his doggie door. Going for a short walk when you return home, he'll be happy to end his day in the comfort of his family.
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