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Showing posts with label spaniel. Show all posts
Showing posts with label spaniel. Show all posts

Thursday, June 28, 2018

Everything about your Welsh Springer Spaniel

Everything about your Welsh Springer Spaniel
  The Welsh Springer Spaniel dog breed was developed as a gundog to flush, or spring, game in the field. A faithful companion, he’s a favorite of discriminating hunters and families. Give him the exercise and training he needs, and he’ll be your best friend.

Overview
  The Welsh springer spaniel is a hunting dog and should be in hard muscular condition. It is in no way a breed of exaggeration. It is very slightly longer than tall, compact and possessing substance without coarseness. Its strides are powerful and ground-covering.    The coat is flat and straight, dense enough to protect it from water, weather and thorns but not so excessive as to be a hindrance in the dog's work as a flushing spaniel. The expression is soft.
  Less exuberant that the English springer, the Welsh springer spaniel is steady and easygoing. It still needs plenty of hard exercise, however, as it loves to hunt for birds. It is extremely devoted to its family, but it is independent in nature. It is reserved with strangers; some may even be timid.

Highlights
  • Welsh Springer Spaniels are not as outgoing as English Springer Spaniels and may be a bit standoffish with strangers unless they are well socialized.
  • They can suffer from separation anxiety if left alone too much and for too long. If this occurs, they may engage in destructive behavior.
  • Welsh Springer Spaniels have a "soft" personality and will not respond well to harsh training methods.
  • Especially when they are young, Welsh Springer Spaniels can greet you with a great deal of exuberance, jumping up on you and generally showing their joy at seeing you. You might want to train them not to jump, especially if you have children that they might accidentally knock to the ground.
  • Welsh Springer Spaniels were developed to have great stamina and energy. Be sure you can provide your dog with adequate exercise or he may become nervous and destructive.
  • Be sure to keep your Welsh Springer Spaniel on a leash when you take him to unfenced areas. You never know when he will see a bird or other small animal and be overcome by his instinct to hunt!
Other Quick Facts

  • The Welsh Springer is believed to be one of the oldest of the spaniel breeds.
  • Welshies have a flat, straight coat with thick, silky fur. The coat picks up mud, dirt, and stickers, but sheds them just as easily.
  • Although coat color and size are the primary differences between Welshies and English Springer Spaniels, the Welshie also has shorter ears.
Breed standards
AKC group: Sporting
UKC group: Gun Dog Breeds
Average lifespan: 10 to 15 years
Average size: 35 to 55 pounds
Coat appearance: Naturally straight flat and soft to the touch, never wiry or wavy
Coloration: Rich red and white only. Any pattern is acceptable and any white area may be flecked with red ticking.
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles and seniors, houses with yards, hunters
Temperament: Easygoing, independent, intelligent, eager to please

History
An image of English and Welsh Cockers,
published in 1859
  Little is known about the Welsh Springer’s origins, but he’s considered a very old breed, with ancestors dating to Roman Britain. Tapestries from the Renaissance depict spaniels that closely resemble today’s Welsh Springer; similar red-and-white spaniels appear in a few 18th-century portraits. By the 19th century, the dogs were little known, except in the Neath Valley region of southern Wales.
  The preponderance of dog shows in the late 19th century brought about renewed interest in the breed, which made an appearance at the first Kennel Club show, held in 1873. They were judged alongside black-and-white spaniels and white English Springer Spaniels. Eventually, the two breeds were separated.
  The American Kennel Club recognized the Welsh Springer in 1906, but few people were interested in the breed. By the end of World War II, they were practically non-existent in the United States, until 11 of them were imported in 1949. A dozen years later, the Welsh Springer Spaniel Club of America was founded. Today, the Welsh Springer remains a well-kept secret, ranking 127th among the breeds registered by the AKC, down from 113th a decade ago.

Personality
  Welsh Springer Spaniels are less outgoing than their English cousins but still share the same zest for life. They are full of energy and enjoy spending time with people of all ages – even kids and will attach himself deeply to the people he loves. Built for hunting, Welsh Springers still enjoy working in the field, but will also have fun tracking and stalking birds in the backyard. 
  They can be a bit messy, tracking dirt and water throughout the house, but their smiling faces and constantly wagging tails makes staying mad at a Springer nearly impossible. They will alert you that someone is approaching the house, though they are too shy to be effective guard dogs. For active families, Welsh Springer Spaniels make excellent pets.

Health Problems
  Cataracts, progressive retinal atrophy and glaucoma are common eye problems found in the Welsh Springer Spaniel. This breed also has a high incidence of epilepsy, which can be controlled with medications. Rarely has the breed had issues with hip dysplasia.

Care
  Welsh Springer Spaniels can be kept outside, with adequate shelter from the heat and cold, but they are such wonderful family companions, why wouldn't you want them in your house, sleeping at your feet in the evening? Welsh Springer Spaniels are fairly active indoors and can live comfortably in city apartments (with proper exercise, of course) or in the country. They do best with at least an average-size yard in which to run. Wherever they live, they are energetic dogs that need a lot of exercise to keep them from becoming fat, bored, and lazy.
  Keep training sessions short and positive. That's more suited to their personality and attention span than boring repetition. Train them with understanding and patience, and you'll be well rewarded.

Living Conditions
  The Welsh Springer Spaniel will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. It is fairly active indoors and will do best with at least an average-sized yard. The Welsh Springer's coat keeps the dog comfortable in both hot and cold weather.

Trainability
  Welsh Springer Spaniels are relatively easy to train, but they can be independent and also carry a touch of doggy ADD which can be frustrating. Keep lots of treats on hand to keep his interest, keep sessions short, and be ready to hand out lots of exuberant praise. Springers do not respond well to harsh discipline – they will shut you out if they start to mistrust you – so it's best to positively reinforce good behavior and ignore the bad.

Exercise
  The Welsh Springer Spaniel is an energetic and lively dog that needs plenty of regular exercise, including a daily, long walk. It will greatly enjoy running off the leash in a safe area. Without enough exercise, these dogs will become bored, fat and lazy and are more likely to develop a wide variety of behavior problems.

Grooming
  The Welsh Springer Spaniel has a straight, silky coat that should be brushed and combed at least twice a week — and each time he comes back from hunting — to prevent tangles. The best tools for the task: a slicker brush and a stainless steel Greyhound comb. Brush out the feathering on the legs, body, and ears with the slicker brush to remove dead hairs; use the comb on the rest of the body. You should also ask your breeder to show you how to do detailed trimming with clippers and shears to produce a neat look. The Welsh Springer Spaniel Club of America offers a how-to on grooming your Welshie to perfection.
  The rest is basic care: Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. And keep the ears clean and dry, especially if your Welshie is a swimmer. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Welsh Springers are gentle around children if they grow up with them or are exposed to them when they're young. If they're raised with them from puppyhood, they are generally good with other pets in the household, even small ones, although they might see birds as prey since that's what they are bred to hunt.

Did You Know?
The Welsh Springer’s iconic red-and-white coat isn’t the breed’s only distinctive trait. He also has slightly webbed feet, giving him an advantage when it comes to fetching waterfowl.

Famous Welsh Springer Spaniels
The Welsh Springer Spaniel has kept a low profile over the centuries, with few truly famous individuals:
  • Corrin, the first dog of the breed to be photographed
  • Goitre Lass, a well-known bitch that produced several champion pups

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Thursday, December 28, 2017

Everything about your English Cocker Spaniel

Everything about your English Cocker Spaniel
  English Cockers are a medium-size dog breed with long ears and a happy disposition. The name Cocker comes from their use to hunt woodcock in England, although English Cockers have been used to hunt many other types of birds as well. They make great companion dogs for people who can give them the exercise they need.

Overview
  The English cocker must be able to find, flush and retrieve upland game birds for a full day of hunting. It must be small enough to penetrate dense cover, but of sufficient size to retrieve larger game. The broad muzzle helps when retrieving. The dog is slightly taller than long, compactly built and short coupled. This breed loves to hunt and shows it by the wagging of its tail when on the job. The English cocker has a driving, powerful gait that covers ground effortlessly. The coat is of medium length, silky in texture and either flat or slightly wavy. The feathering should not be so profuse that it becomes a hindrance in the field, but it should be long enough to protect the underside of the dog. The expression is soft and melting, yet dignified.
  The English Cocker Spaniel is merry, affectionate and even-tempered. They are easily-trained, are willing workers and excellent companions. They exhibit enthusiasm in the field, accompanied by an incessant action of the tail. Dogs exhibiting sluggish or hyper-active temperaments are to be faulted. They exhibit balance, both in motion and while standing. The head is especially characteristic of the breed, having a brainy appearance indicating high intelligence. The muzzle is also distinctive. The whole is always to be of primary consideration rather than any of the parts. Exaggeration of any of the parts is to be faulted.

Highlights
  • English Cocker Spaniels can be difficult to housetrain. Crate-training is recommended.
  • English Cockers are eager to please and like to be close to their families. But they are hunting dogs and might start chasing birds or small animals when outside. Be sure to keep your English Cocker on a leash whenever you aren't in a fenced area. Teach him to come to you when you call.
  • Cockers have a "soft" personality. Harsh training methods may make them fearful or shut down altogether. Be sure to use gentle, consistent training to get the best results.
  • If your English Cocker doesn't get enough exercise, he may become obese and destructive.
Other Quick Facts
  • What’s in a name? In Britain, what Americans call the “English” Cocker is the Cocker, and the American dog is the American Cocker.
  • The term spaniel used to be applied to any dog that hunted and flushed game birds. They were usually differentiated by size or the way they worked.
Breed standards
AKC group: Sporting
UKC group:  Gun Dog
Average lifespan: 12 to 14 years
Average size: 26 to 34 pounds
Coat appearance: medium-long coats that are flat or slightly wavy, with a silky texture
Coloration: parti-color (white with black, liver, or shades of red); solid black, liver, or shades of red; black and tan; and liver and tan
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles and seniors, houses with yards
Temperament: Cheerful, energetic, loving, devoted
Comparable Breeds: Bichon FriseCavalier King Charles Spaniel


History
  The term spaniel used to be applied to any dog that hunted and flushed game birds. They were usually differentiated by size or the way they worked. For instance, there were land spaniels and water spaniels. Dogs that hunted woodcock became known as Cockers, while larger spaniels that “sprang” game from cover by flushing it became known as Springers. At one time, different types could be born in the same litter, but eventually they were separated into breeds: Cocker Spaniels and Springer Spaniels.
  In the United States and Britain, Cockers developed different looks, so much so that they began to be considered separate breeds. The English Cocker Spaniel Club of America was formed in 1935 for people who appreciated the different look and abilities of the English Cocker. The American Kennel Club recognized it as an individual breed in 1946. The American Cocker became more popular, but fanciers of the English Cocker consider their dogs a well-kept secret. Today, the English Cocker ranks 66th among the breeds registered by the AKC.

Personality
  The English Cocker is described as merry and affectionate with an equable disposition. He's playful, trainable, and friendly toward people (although sometimes reserved with strangers) and other dogs. English Cockers will bark to let you know someone's approaching, so they're good watchdogs, but as typical spaniels they'll happily show the burglar where the silver is.
  Like every dog, English Cocker Spaniels need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your English Cocker puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.



Health
  The English Cocker Spaniel has an average life expectancy of 11 to 12 years. Breed health problems can include a number of cardiovascular conditions, skin disorders, musculoskeletal disorders, immune-mediated hematological / immunological disorders and infectious conditions.

Care
  The English Cocker Spaniel should be taken on long walks, preferably for hours. This will give it the necessary daily exercise. Running and playing will be good physical exercise for the breed as well. Although the English Cocker Spaniel can survive outside in temperate weather, it is best to keep the dog at home with access to a yard.
  One should check its ears regularly to remove dirt, while its coat should be combed and brushed two to three times a week. Trimming the fur at the tail and feet is necessary every two months, and head and ears are to be clipped properly at regular intervals.

Living Conditions
  The English Cocker Spaniel will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. They do best with at least an average-sized yard.

Trainability
  Cockers are easy to train, especially when the reward system involves food. This breed is incredibly sensitive and takes it personally when someone treats them harshly, which results in avoidance behaviors, or in some cases, retaliation. Positive reinforcement is always the best road to take when training a Cocker Spaniel.

Exercise Requirements
  There is no such thing as too much exercise for the English Cocker Spaniel. This breed needs daily exercise, so take it for a walk or run, or even train it for dog competitions. The English Cocker Spaniels excels at hunting, retrieving and agility competitions.

Grooming
  Brush the English Cocker’s medium-length coat two or three times a week to prevent or remove mats and tangles. You may also need to trim it for neatness every couple of months. A bath every six weeks or so doesn’t go amiss. The coat sheds moderately, but regular brushing will help keep loose hair from floating onto your floor, furniture, and clothing.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every couple of weeks. Brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath. Most important, keep the ears clean and dry to prevent bacterial or yeast infections from driving your dog into a state of itchy madness.

Children And Other Pets
  English Cockers are friendly, fun-loving, and gentle family dogs who do well with children, especially if they're brought up with them. Adult English Cockers who aren't familiar with children may do best in a home with older children who understand how to interact with dogs.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  English Cockers enjoy the company of other dogs and can also get along fine with cats, especially if they're introduced at an early age.

Is the English Cocker Spaniel the Right Breed for you?
Moderate Maintenance: Regular grooming is required to keep its fur in good shape. Professional trimming or stripping needed.
Moderate Shedding: Routine brushing will help. Be prepared to vacuum often!
Easy Training: The English Cocker Spaniel is known to listen to commands and obey its owner. Expect fewer repetitions when training this breed.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Good for New Owners: This breed is well suited for those who have little experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  In comparison to the Cocker Spaniel, the English Cocker is taller, has a less abundant coat, and does not come in the popular buff color so often seen in the Cocker. Instead, he sports a silky, lightly feathered coat in black, liver, red, black and tan, liver and tan, or any of these colors on a white background.

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Friday, November 10, 2017

Everything about your Afghan Spaniel

Everything about your Afghan Spaniel
  The Afghan Spaniel is not a purebred dog. It is a cross between the Afghan Hound and the Cocker Spaniel. The best way to determine the temperament of a mixed breed is to look up all breeds in the cross and know you can get any combination of any of the characteristics found in either breed. Not all of these designer hybrid dogs being bred are 50% purebred to 50% purebred. It is very common for breeders to breed multi-generation crosses.

Overview
  The Afghan Spaniel is an interesting blend of two dogs who like to hunt as much as they like to play. The Afghan Hound has always been known for their elegance and speed and the Cocker Spaniel is known for being eager to please and fun. The Cocker Spaniel has two types, the English and American, which are similar in size, energy, appearance, and temperament. These two were considered to be the same breed until 1936 when the English Cocker Spaniel Club was formed in America. The Americans modified the Cocker Spaniel in ways the English Cocker Spaniel Club did not agree with, so they separated.

Breed standards
Breed Type: Mix
Family: Sighthound
Average lifespan: 12-15 Years
Average size: 20-300lbs
Coat appearance: Medium, Short-Haired, and Silky
Coloration: cream, white, golden, black, light brown, brown, and combinations of these
Hypoallergenic: No
Comparable Breeds: Afghan Hound, Cocker Spaniel

History
  There is little known about the Afghan Spaniel because it is so new but the histories of the parent breeds can give insight into its characteristics. The Afghan Hound is a sighthound and one of the oldest breeds in history, dating back to Ancient Egypt where drawings of these beautiful dogs were found. It is thought that the Afghan Hound was used in hunting to flush and catch gazelle and rabbits. They were finally noticed in the early 1800s when they were brought down from the mountains of Afghanistan where they had lived isolated for centuries. 
  At first, the Afghan Hound was known as a Barukhzy Hound or Persian Greyhound but was later renamed for the area in which they originated. They were first noticed in the United States in 1926, when it was recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC) and it became popular but mostly with the wealthy. 
  The Cocker Spaniel comes from a large family called the Spaniels that have seven varieties, which are the Welsh Springer Spaniel, Sussex Spaniel, Irish Water Spaniel, Field Spaniel, English Springer Spaniel, Cocker Spaniel, and Clumber Spaniel. They were divided depending on whether they were water or land Spaniels, with several types of each. This breed dates all the way back to the 1300s when a description was written by Gaston Phebus. 
  The Cocker Spaniel is one of the most popular dogs in the United States and has been a member of the American Kennel Club (AKC) since 1878. The name Cocker comes from their special ability to hunt woodcock.


Personality
  With a playful personality and a love for playing around, the Afghan Spaniel is friendly yet reserved in certain situations. The hound part of the breed is very independent and doesn't need to be lavished with attention, yet the cocker part of the breed is very loveable and wants to be hugged and praised. To get out all their extra energy, the Afghan Spaniel craves long walks and outings at the park.

Health
  Afghan Spaniel is a healthier breed like other hybrid breeds. However Afghan Spaniel has tendency to suffer from some congenital disorders.

Care
  Both the Afghan Hound and Cocker Spaniel have long, fine hair that needs a lot of attention. Therefore, you should be prepared to brush your Afghan Spaniel at least three times a week to keep the coat from getting matted and the skin healthy. Another alternative is to get your dog trimmed and groomed every few months. You can bathe your dog when needed with a gentle shampoo and conditioner specially made for dogs with fine hair.

Activity Requirements
  Due to the limited amount of information on this breed, the temperament of their parent breeds is the best way to determine how they will turn out. The Cocker Spaniel is a loyal and lovable family pet that likes cuddling as much as she likes hunting. They do well with children and pets and is really too friendly to be a guard dog. The Afghan Hound is an independent breed that can be wary of strangers so they make good guard dogs. They can become destructive if they do not get enough of your time to keep them from being bored so think twice about this breed if you are away from home often. However, they are happy if they are able to chase the neighborhood squirrels in a fenced yard all day.

Exercise
  Daily exercise for your Afghan Spaniel is important, dogs are living with human since thousands of years, wild dogs have challenges to survive so they work daily to find food, save food and themselves from other animals but companion dogs have nothing to do, they have ready food and couch to sit, which may affect their health, habits and activity. 
  Your Afghan Spaniel is recommended Fetching,Walking,Swimming regular according to its breed specific exercise requirements.

Training 
  Afghan Spaniel require training in early age like other hybrid dogs. Afghan Spaniel is easy to train.  It learns basic commands such as sit, stay, come easily. Behavior training is also very important for your Afghan Spaniel.  Behavior training prevents and or corrects bad habits of your puppy or dog. Behavior and basic commands training for your Afghan Spaniel should must on these lines. Do not get impatient. You will probably have to repeat the command many times. Never use negative reinforcement. Do not call your dog to come to you for punishment because this will teach your dog not to come on command. Be sure to keep any frustration out of the tone of your voice. If you feel yourself becoming frustrated, take a break. Your dog can sense this and will start to associate training with your unhappiness. You cannot hide your frustration from a dog. You cannot pretend. Dogs can feel human emotion, so stay relaxed, firm and confident.


Children and other pets

  Good with children of all ages and other pets after early socialization training.

Is the Afghan Spaniel the Right Breed for you?
Moderate Maintenance: Regular grooming is required to keep its fur in good shape. Occasional trimming or stripping needed.
Moderately Easy Training: The Afghan Spaniel is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
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Friday, April 21, 2017

Everything about your Sussex Spaniel

Everything about your Sussex Spaniel
  Long and low, with a unique golden liver color, the Sussex Spaniel dog breed was developed in Sussex County, England, to flush birds into the air for hunters. He has a reputation for being slow and sedate, but he livens up when he scents birds. With proper training and attention, the cheerful Sussex is an excellent companion.

Overview
  The low-slung Sussex Spaniel has a compact, rectangular body and weighs 35 to 45 pounds. He stands out for his coat color of rich golden liver and his large, sad eyes, so typical of the spaniel family. In the field, he’s slow but steady, beating his way through thick cover to flush and retrieve birds for a hunter on foot. He’s also a super family dog for people who can give him the exercise and firm, but loving guidance he needs. One Sussex recently put the spotlight on the breed, taking Best in Show at the Westminster Kennel Club dog show in 2009 and earning the breed some new fans.
  He’s highly intelligent but can be stubborn, so he’s not always easy to train. That said, if you find the right motivation — like making use of his super scenting ability — you can teach the Sussex to do almost anything. Train him with positive reinforcement techniques. He is particularly fond of food rewards. Be patient when it comes to housetraining. It can take a long time for a Sussex, especially females, to be trustworthy in this regard.

Highlights
  • Sussex Spaniels are known for stretching their back legs out behind them and dragging themselves forward, a behavior called kippering. It's not a disorder and is nothing to worry about.
  • Sussex Spaniels are barkers.
  • Sussex Spaniels can make excellent companions for older children who understand how to interact with dogs.
  • Sussex Spaniels are intelligent and can learn quickly, but they're also stubborn and require a patient, consistent trainer.
  • Sussex Spaniels need 20 to 30 minutes of exercise daily to keep them fit and healthy. They enjoy walks and hikes.
  • Sussex Spaniels can easily become overweight if their eating habits aren't managed.
  • Sussex Spaniels shed moderately and should be brushed two or three times a week to keep loose hair under control and to prevent tangles from forming.
  • Sussex Spaniels dislike being left alone for long periods and can become destructive or noisy if not given enough attention and exercise.
  • Sussex Spaniels generally get along well with other pets and dogs, but if they aren't exposed to lots of dogs during puppyhood, they can be aggressive toward dogs they don't know.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Sussex is an uncommon breed, with only about 75 puppies born each year, so you may experience a wait of six months or even a year or two before a puppy is available.
  • The Sussex has a small gene pool, which can make it difficult to avoid some health problems.
  • His golden-liver coat is the Sussex’s crowning glory, and the color is unique to the breed.
  • Comparable Breeds: Clumber Spaniel, English Springer Spaniel
History
  In 1795, Mr. Fuller of Rosehill Park, Hastings in East Sussex, England began breeding gun dogs to work in districts where the terrain was rough and the undergrowth very dense which meant that a spaniel was needed which could give tongue or to alert the hunter on his quarry. Fuller crossed various breeds such as the liver and white Norfolk Spaniel , the Field Spaniel, and possibly some early English Springer Spaniels. The Sussex was bred specifically to inherit the barking ability that was not common in most Spaniel breeds during this era.
Sussex Spaniel circa 1915
  The Sussex Spaniel was one of the first ten breeds admitted into the stud book by the American Kennel Club in 1884, but lost what little popularity it had achieved in the 1940s. During World War II, breeding was discouraged but the Sussex saved from extinction by English breeder Joy Freer. All modern Sussex Spaniels are descended from the dogs she saved. In 1947, only ten Sussex Spaniels were registered in the English Kennel Club.
In 2004 the breed was identified as a vulnerable native breed by Kennel Club of Great Britain which are described as having annual registration figures of less than 300 per year. In 2008, only 56 puppies were registered.
  In 2009 a Sussex Spaniel named "Clussexx Three D Grinchy Glee," call name "Stump," won best in show at the 133rd Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show. At 10 years old, Stump is the oldest dog to win this title.
  The breed is more popular in the United States than any other country. It is recognised by the Continental Kennel Club, Fédération Cynologique Internationale, American Kennel Club, Kennel Club of Great Britain, Canadian Kennel Club, National Kennel Club, New Zealand Kennel Club, and the American Canine Registry.

Personality
  Sussex Spaniels are gentle, easy-going, affectionate dogs who enjoy being active participants in family life. They are happy to be lazy on the couch for a relaxing Sunday afternoon, but when they are outdoors the Sussex springs to life, running, leaping and playing like a puppy. These hunting dogs were designed to withstand long days in the field, working in rough terrain and all types of weather. This background gives the Sussex energy to spare, so don't take this little dog for a couch potato. He needs several walks a day and plenty of time to run, but as long as the activity involves the people he loves, he is happy.   The Sussex Spaniel is good with older children, gets along well with other family pets and makes an all-around fine family companion.

Health
  The average life span of the Sussex Spaniel is 12 to 14 years. Breed health concerns may include congenital deafness, ear infections, distichiasis, retinal dysplasia, hip dysplasia, hypothyroidism, patent ductus arteriosus, prostate cancer, pulmonary stenosis and Tetralogy of Fallot.

Care
  The Sussex needs 20 to 30 minutes of daily exercise to keep him in best condition. He'll enjoy long walks or hikes, especially if they're through wooded areas where he can hunt for birds. He's a serious spaniel, not given to exuberant romps, but he enjoys spending time with his people in the great outdoors. He's best suited to living indoors but should have access to a safely fenced yard where he can keep a watchful eye on birds, squirrels, and other wildlife.
  Training a Sussex can be a challenge. Members of this breed have a mind of their own. Sussex Spaniels are intelligent and learn quickly, but they need consistency and patience to see the training fully succeed.
  One area that needs to be addressed at a young age is barking. Unlike other spaniels, Sussex Spaniels let their voices ring out when hunting. That carries over into home life as well. They will bark when people come to the door or just for the joy of hearing it. If you don't train your Sussex to bark in moderation, you will find yourself with a dog that barks at everything in excess. The Sussex is especially likely to bark and howl when left alone for long periods, so before acquiring one, consider whether you'll be home frequently enough to keep him happy.

Living Conditions
  The Sussex Spaniel will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. It is moderately active indoors and a small yard will be sufficient. This breed can live outdoors in temperate climates as long as it has warm shelter, but it generally does better as a house dog that also has access to a yard.

Trainability
  The Sussex is an easy going spaniel, but can be difficult to train. Breeders encourage owners to begin training as soon as you bring your puppy home, at about 8 to 12 week of age. Positive reinforcement and treats are the best method use in order to get your Sussex to respond. Harsh discipline will cause your dog to simply ignore you. They are little dogs but they can exhibit dominance, so leadership is an owners 24 hour responsibility. If you bend the rules just once for a Sussex, he will take that as an invitation to walk all over you.
  Though they can be a handful to train, once leadership has been established and basic obedience has been mastered, you should enroll your Sussex in advanced activities like agility or flyball to keep him on his toes mentally and physically.

Exercise Requirements
  Because the Sussex Spaniel is a hunting breed, it requires a fair amount of daily exercise. Sussex Spaniels should be given a daily walk as well as plenty of outdoor play time. Lack of exercise for this breed can lead to the development of behavioral problems.

Grooming
  The Sussex has an abundant coat that is flat or slightly wavy with feathering on the legs and tail and a pretty frill beneath the neck. The coat can be cared for by brushing at least once or twice a week to remove tangles or mats and distribute skin oils. Bathe him as needed. The Sussex sheds moderately, and daily brushing will reduce the amount of hair that lands on your floor, furniture and clothing.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, and keep the hanging ears clean and dry. Good dental hygiene is also important. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Sussex Spaniels have a calm demeanor and get along well with children, especially if they're raised with them. As with most dogs, they're best suited to homes with children that are at least six years old and understand how to interact with dogs. It's never appropriate to leave dogs and young children alone together. They should always be supervised to prevent any ear biting or tail pulling on the part of either party.
  The Sussex generally gets along well with other pets, including cats, although he's said to be a bit bossy. If Sussex aren't socialized as pupsters, they may be aggressive toward dogs they don't know, so don't neglect this important stage of development. On the down side, a Sussex may be a little too interested in getting to know pet birds, if you know what we mean.

Did You Know?
  The Sussex is named for the county in England where he was favored as a hunting dog. He was mentioned as early as 1803 in a magazine called "Sportsmen’s Cabinet."



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Saturday, January 31, 2015

Everything about your Brittany

Everything about your Brittany
  Brittanys are charming, gentle and personable members of the household. Except for the Golden Retriever, you would be hard-pressed to find a more personable family dog. Lively and fun, Brittanys are always up for a roll on the carpet, a game in the back yard or a cuddle on the couch.
  Brittanys were bred as gundogs, and they definitely have birds on the brain. Although they're often called Brittany Spaniels, the American Kennel Club dropped the word "spaniel" from this pointing breed's name in 1982. The energetic Brittany is a versatile family companion and hunting dog who works more closely to the hunter than other pointing breeds.

Overview
  Great balls of fire! Life with a Brittany is never dull. This breed is smart, active, agile and relatively easy to train. For an active home with room for an active companion, you can’t do much better than the Brittany, a moderately sized dog with relatively few health or temperament problems. This dog can hunt, if that’s what you’re into, but for most people, the appeal is that the Brittany is athletic, bright and people-oriented.
  If you want a dog that will do anything you want to do as long as it’s active, this is a great dog for you. His wash-and-wear coat can be kept in shape with a weekly brushing to keep shedding under control, and he's typically friendly with other dogs, cats and children.
But make no mistake: this is not a couch-potato puppy: The Brittany is a canine overachiever and needs daily, heart-thumping exercise to keep his high spirits from bounding off. Don't get a Brittany if you're not going to make him a part of your family, or if you're not going to give him mentally and physically challenging activities.
  That work doesn't need to be hunting, although the Brittany does remain very popular among people who value a good bird dog. The Brittany does well in all kinds of canine sports, including agility, flyball and obedience and will be an active participant in any human-centered activity as well, from running and hiking to playing fetch with the kids.
  When we say you need to keep your Brittany busy, we’re not just thinking of the dog but of you. Left to his own devices and without sufficient exercise, the Brittany can become destructive and noisy instead of the happy family dog he was meant to be.

Highlights
  • Brittanys are high-energy dogs. They need at least an hour of intensive exercise each day. Without sufficient exercise, your Brittany may become neurotic and destructive.
  • Brittanys are smart and need mental stimulation as well as physical exercise. Training for dog sports is a great way to provide this.
  • Brittanys don't respond well to harsh treatment. Be gentle and consistent but firm — don't let them run the household.
  • Brittanys are people-oriented and don't like to be left alone for long periods of time without something to keep them busy. If you work outside the home, you should consider getting two Brittanys to keep each other company.
  • Although they are friendly and like children, it's not recommended that you let your small children play with your Brittany without supervision. Your Brittany has so much energy and enthusiasm, he may accidentally injure your child.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Brittany is a French breed from the province of Brittany. He was developed to point and retrieve in different types of terrain.
  • Brittanies have a short coat with a little feathering on the legs and are easy to groom, but like all breeds they shed.
  • A Brittany’s coat is white and orange or white and liver. Some Brittanies have tricolor coats, but that’s not a popular pattern.
  • Comparable Breeds: Cocker Spaniel, English Setter
History
  The name "Brittany" is taken from the Brittany region in northwestern France where the dog originated. Images of orange and white Brittany-like dogs hunting and retrieving game were first seen on tapestries and paintings from the 17th century. The first written and verifiable record of Brittanys comes from a hunting description written by Reverend Davies in 1850. He described hunting with small "bobtailed" dogs who pointed and were excellent retrievers. It was around the same time that the modern Brittany is rumored to have been bred by mating with English Setters. The Brittany was first shown at the Paris Dog Show in 1900.
  The Brittany was first recognized as a breed in 1907 when an orange and white male named "Boy" was registered in France. As a result, the first standards were outlined in the same year. America recognized the Brittany in 1931 and the breed was approved by the American Kennel Club in 1934. In 1982 the "Spaniel" was officially dropped from the name.


Personality
  Brittanys are happy and alert. As befits a pointing breed, they are curious and independent, but respond well to their people and want to please them. They can be singleminded when it comes to birds, but when they're not focused on their feathered prey, they enjoy spending time with their people, especially if they're doing something active. Brittanys are not just energetic, they're smart, so they needs loads of exercise and mental stimulation each day. When it comes to training, be consistent but never harsh.
  Temperament is affected by a number of factors, including heredity, training, and socialization. Puppies with nice temperaments are curious and playful, willing to approach people and be held by them. Choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one who's beating up his littermates or the one who's hiding in the corner. Always meet at least one of the parents — usually the mother is the one who's available — to ensure that they have nice temperaments that you're comfortable with. Meeting siblings or other relatives of the parents is also helpful for evaluating what a puppy will be like when he grows up.
  Like every dog, Brittanys need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Brittany puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog. Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.


Health
  Brittanys are generally healthy and hardy dogs. The median lifespan for Brittanys in France is 12.6 years.A UK Kennel Club survey puts the breed's median lifespan at 12 years 11 months, with about 1 in 5 dogs dying of old age at an average of 14–15 years.Brittanys have no undercoat and need minimal grooming or bathing. However, their floppy ears tend to trap moisture in the ear canal and should be cleaned regularly.
  Diseases found in the breed include Hip dysplasia, with 14.9% of Brittanys tested between 1974 and 2009 by the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals displaying the condition, and a lesser rate of 10.3% for dogs born 2003-2004. The breed is listed among those commonly affected by Canine discoid lupus erythematosus. Epilepsy is also found, with owners of affected dogs encouraged to submit DNA to the UC Davis Veterinary Genetics Lab's ongoing project on Brittany and canine health.

Care
  Mental and physical exercise are very important for the Brittany, as the breed is strong and tough by nature. One need not spend a great deal of time on coat maintenance, though. Brushing a Brittany dog once or twice a week is all that is needed. Brittanys are also quite adaptable to living in temperate weather outdoors.

Living Conditions
  The Brittany is not recommended for apartment life. They are very active indoors and will do best with acreage. This breed is resistant to cold and damp conditions.

Exercise
  Brittanys need and love extensive exercise and have great stamina. They should be taken on a long, brisk daily walk or jog and need an active owner.

Grooming
  The Brittany’s flat or wavy coat has a little feathering on the legs and belly, and it’s easy to care for with a weekly brushing. His coat sheds moderately, but regular brushing will keep loose hair off your floor, furniture and clothing. A bath is necessary only when he gets dirty.

  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every couple of weeks, and brush his teeth for good overall health and fresh breath.


Children and other pets
  Brittanys are a good choice for a family with active children, but their energy level might be overwhelming for toddlers.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Brittanys enjoy the company of other dogs and can also get along fine with cats, especially if they're introduced at an early age.

Did You Know?
  Brittanies are hunting dogs, but don’t skip this breed if you’re not a hunter; they also excel at canine sports, including agility, flyball and obedience, and enjoy running, hiking and playing fetch with their people.


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