LUV My dogs: social

LUV My dogs

Everything about your dog!

Showing posts with label social. Show all posts
Showing posts with label social. Show all posts

Tuesday, February 27, 2018

Everything about your Goldendoodle

Everything about your  Goldendoodle
  Also known as the Groodle, the Goldendoodle ranges in size from small to large, depending on the variant of Poodle that the Golden Retriever is crossed with. Originally bred as a larger alternative to the already popular designer breed known as the Cockapoo, the Goldendoodle has proven to be an excellent family dog.
  The Goldendoodle is an affectionate and gentle dog that has gained popularity since he was first developed in 1990s. He's still a young cross compared to other designer breeds, and many of today's litters are the results of first-generation breedings between Poodles and Golden Retrievers.
  Goldendoodles are usually highly social and get along well with everyone. They don't do well in any type of guarding or watchdog role and should not be used in that capacity. They can thrive in both city and country settings, but they're not well suited to apartment living, since they do better with the space provided by a fenced yard. Goldendoodles should not live outside or in a kennel, however, since they thrive when they are in contact with the people they love.

Overview
  The Goldendoodle is a crossbreed. Opening your heart and home to a crossbreed is like opening a beautifully wrapped package on your birthday: it's exciting, but you never know what's inside. It’s often assumed that a cross breed will combine the best of two or more breeds, but genetics doesn’t always work that way. The way genes express themselves is not always subject to a breeder’s control, even less so when two different breeds are crossed. That’s something to keep in mind before you lay down lots of money for a dog that you have been assured will be hypoallergenic or healthier than a purebred.
  The Goldendoodle is a cross between a Golden Retriever and a Poodle . At their best, they are intelligent, friendly, and affectionate. They come in three sizes: miniature, medium , and standard. Because they are a cross breed, their traits are not fixed, so there is not a guarantee that the Goldendoodle puppy you purchase will fall into the desired weight range.
  Poodles have a reputation for being hypoallergenic, meaning that they can supposedly be tolerated by people who have allergies to dogs. Because they have the Poodle in their heritage, Goldendoodles are sometimes promoted as being hypoallergenic. But allergies are not caused by a particular dog coat type but by dander, the dead skin cells that are shed by all dogs . There is no scientific evidence that any breed or cross breed is more or less allergenic than any other dog. Some people with mild allergies react less severely to particular dogs, but no reputable breeder will guarantee that her dogs are hypoallergenic.

Highlights
  • Designer dogs, also called hybrids, aren't true breeds — they're crosses of two specific breeds. If you're interested in a Goldendoodle puppy, understand that his looks, size, and temperament aren't as predictable as those of purebreds, since you don't know which characteristics from each breed will show up in any given dog.
  • The Goldendoodle is considered to be a non- to light shedder, but he requires regular grooming and clipping. If the coat is kept short, it should be clipped every six to eight weeks and brushed every few weeks. If the coat is kept in its natural state, it should be brushed once every week or two.
  • The Goldendoodle is not a watch dog, and he's generally not known to be noisy. He may not bark even if someone knocks on the door.
  • Although he's got an average energy level, the Goldendoodle is not recommended for apartments. He does much better in a home with a fenced yard.
  • The Goldendoodle requires about 20 to 30 minutes of daily exercise.
  • Being a wonderful family companion, the Goldendoodle generally gets along well with children and does well with other dogs and family pets.
  • The Goldendoodle is a very social dog who should not live away from his family. He's are not suited to living in a kennel or outside; he wants to be in the house.
  • The Goldendoodle can suffer from separation anxiety if left for long periods at a time.
  • The Goldendoodle may make an excellent companion to people with allergies.

Other Quick Facts

  • Some Goldendoodles have been trained as guide dogs, a job for which their temperament and intelligence is ideally suited.
  • Goldendoodles are companion dogs. They love their people and need to live in the house, never outdoors.
  • Like their Poodle parent, Goldendoodles can come in many different colors.
Breed standards
AKC group, UKC group: Not recognized as a standardized breed by any major kennel club.
Dog Breed Group: Hybrid Dogs
Average lifespan: 10-13 years
Average size: 50 to 90 pounds
Coat appearance: Dense, Medium, Silky, Thick, and Water-Repellent
Coloration: Cream, Gold, Red, Black, Brown, White
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Families with children, singles and seniors, houses with yards
Temperament: Intelligent, lovable, energetic, friendly
Comparable Breeds: Golden Retriever, Poodle



History
  The Goldendoodle was first bred by Monica Dickens in 1969.Popularity for the goldendoodle grew in the 1990s when breeders in North America and Australia began crossing Golden Retrievers with Standard Poodles. The original purpose of the cross was to develop guide dogs suitable for visually impaired individuals with allergies. Poodles are considered to be hypoallergenic. Their coats do not shed, which reduces dander. Dander is a protein that sheds from the skin and causes allergies in humans.
  The goldendoodle is referred to as a designer dog. The Encyclopædia Britannica traces the term "designer dog" to the late 20th century when breeders began to cross purebred    Poodles with other purebred breeds in order to obtain a dog with the poodle's non-shedding coat, along with various desirable characteristics from other breeds.In regards to goldendoodles, golden retrievers are considered a great family dog,which is why they have been used to cross breed with poodles.

Temperament
  Goldendoodles of whatever generation are usually friends of everyone and strangers to no one, which makes them an ideal choice as a family dog. Due to their affable, outgoing personalities, Goldendoodles also make excellent companions for people with disabilities. They are cheerful, trustworthy, gentle, affectionate, smart and highly trainable animals that have a keen desire to please. 
  When properly socialized, Goldendoodles get along famously with kids, strangers and other companion animals. They don’t have a particularly strong prey drive and can be quite compatible with cats and smaller dogs, when introduced in a good way. These are social dogs that thrive in the presence of people and crumble if they are not given enough time, attention and affection. 
  Like any dog, Goldendoodles can get into mischief and develop behavioral problems if they are left alone for long periods of time. Goldendoodles require a moderate amount of exercise and can live happily in urban or rural environments. This is a “breed-in-progress,” whose temperament and other traits should become more consistent and predictable as time goes on.

Health Problems
  Goldendoodles can be predisposed to all of the health issues faced by Golden Retrievers and Poodles because they are a combination of the two breeds. Some of the most common health problems are hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, Von Willebrand’s Disease, juvenile cataracts, progressive retinal atrophy, subaortic stenosis, sebaceous adenitis, patella luxation, hypothyroidism and ear infections.

Care

  The Goldendoodle can be easy to train. Intelligent, he's usually eager to please — a perfect combination for either first-time trainers or experienced trainers. He should be trained with positive reinforcement, since harsh corrections could damage his confidence.
Socialization is important for all breeds, but for a gentle dog like the Goldendoodle it can be instrumental in discouraging any shyness or timidity.
  The Goldendoodle has an average energy level and will require daily exercise through walks or a good romp in the back yard. Generally speaking, 20 to 30 minutes of daily exercise will be enough to keep a Goldendoodle from becoming bored. He's known for his love of water, so swimming provides another opportunity for appropriate exercise.
  Since the Goldendoodle may grow large, he does require room to move. He's not recommended for apartments but should have a home with some type of fenced yard. He's not an ideal pet for outdoor or kennel living, since he thrives when he's with his family, so owners should expect to keep him primarily in the house.
  The Goldendoodle can also suffer from separation anxiety, which can lead to destructive behavior, if he's left alone for long periods at a time.

Trainability

  Most Goldendoodles are smart and easy to train. They are eager, willing learners that respond best to positive reinforcement and gentleness. Harsh, loud corrections or training by punishment are not helpful when working with these  dogs. Socialization and training should start while the dog is still a puppy and continue throughout its life. A well-socialized, well-trained Goldendoodle is a happy Goldendoodle and a wonderful companion.

Exercise Requirements
  Goldendoodles require a fair amount of exercise each day. They need to be walked at least three times daily. Each walk should last for around half an hour. Time to stretch their legs and run is essential for the Goldendoodle. Living in the city is fine, provided they will have access to a dog park weekly. Those who have a fenced in yard will find that the Goldendoodle will get all the exercise he needs by playing ball with the kids in the backyard. Never let this dog exercise without being in a securely, fenced area or on a leash.

Grooming
  Goldendoodles can have different types of fur. Some look like shaggy retrievers, others resemble a Poodle with loose curls and some fall somewhere in the middle. They are not low-maintenance dogs when it comes to grooming. Plan to brush the Goldendoodle at least every other day, using a slicker brush, and have him clipped every eight to twelve weeks.
  Ear infections can be a problem in Goldendoodles. Be sure to keep the ears dry and clean, especially after the dog has had a bath or gone swimming. Report redness, bad odor, head shaking, or other potential ear issues to your veterinarian. 
  The rest is basic care. Trim his nails every few weeks, and brush his teeth regularly with a vet-approved pet toothpaste -daily if possible -  especially if he’s on the small side. Small dogs are especially prone to periodontal disease. Brushing the teeth contributes to overall good health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  The Goldendoodle makes a wonderful family pet, especially if his nature takes after the Golden Retriever parent. He's likely to be highly patient and gentle and to get along well with children of all ages.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
He does well in homes with other dogs and pets and doesn't actively show aggression toward other animals. Of course, as with all dogs, it's important to properly socialize your Goldendoodle from puppyhood.

Is the Goldendoodle the Right Breed for you?
High Maintenance: Grooming should be performed often to keep the dog's coat in good shape. Occasional trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Easy Training: The Goldendoodle is known to listen to commands and obey its owner. Expect fewer repetitions when training this breed.
Very Active: It will need daily exercise to maintain its shape. Committed and active owners will enjoy performing fitness activities with this breed.
Good for New Owners: This breed is well suited for those who have little experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?

  Well-bred Goldendoodles are outgoing, social dogs and often have an uncanny ability to communicate with their people. Some Goldendoodles have even been trained as guide dogs.
  Since 2005, Goldendoodles have been used as pets, agility dogs, guide dogs, therapy dogs, diabetic dogs, search dogs and rescue dogs, as they have inherited the poodle's intelligence and the golden retriever's ease of training. Goldendoodles have also become increasingly used as domestic pets due to their affection towards families, as well as their friendliness and patience with children and strangers.



Read More

Saturday, May 3, 2014

The Secrets To A Happy Dog

The Secrets To A Happy Dog
   A happy dog is a friendly and more lovable member of your family. Your dog brings you joy. Do you ever look over at her while she is sleeping and wonder if you make her as happy as she makes you? Is she as glad to be yours as you are to be hers? How do you know if your dog is content? All social species have the same basic needs, just different ways those needs are fulfilled. 

Steps
1. First and foremost treat your dog with a lot of love and care. Treat him like a friend / family member. Dogs are not toys that you just play with them for a second and throw them away the next.

2. Don't keep him locked up in the house all day long. Don't put on choke chains n tie him up in a corner. Dogs love to run around and play. It's the way they are.

3. Take some time out of your schedule and play with him. Maybe a game of catch. This will help in keeping your dog active and energetic.

4. Take him out frequently for walks in the park. Let him sniff around and play with the other dogs.

5. Go swimming. Many breeds of dogs love to swim. Its also healthy for them. If you have a clean and safe river or lake near by, that's perfect. Your dog and even you if you want can go swimming. But make sure he or she likes the water.

6. Simply give him a nice scratch behind the ears or some loving pats on the head maybe a relaxing belly rub. Dogs, especially old dogs, love to just sit around and have their favorite person give them a rub or pat.

7. Bring your dog with you for a car ride. They love these, especially with open windows.

8. Give them treats. Anything which they like.

9. Find out what your dog likes to play. E.g. try tug-o-war, fetch, chase, etc. and play it often. Always give your dog attention whenever possible. Scratch and rub their bellies when they want it.

10. Above all just treat your dog with whole loads of love and affection. They are man's best friend after all!

Physiological Needs
  Clean water - The most basic and most vital need for dogs is fresh clean water. Give your dog virtually unlimited access to water. The only exception is limiting a few hours before bedtime when house training. Keep water bowls clean and free of debris. Make sure outside water does not freeze in winter or overheat in summer. Change water in outdoor containers often. Stagnant water can lead to disease. It doesn't have to be Evian, but it should be fresh! If your dog has a habit of knocking over her water bowl, it's not because she doesn't want water. It's because dogs live in the right now, and right now it's fun. It doesn't occur to her that later, she won't have any water to drink. Weighted water bowls will solve this problem.


  Good Nutrition - Ask a dozen people what dog food is the best, you will get a dozen answers. The elusive Absolute Best Brand has not yet revealed itself. However, there are better and worse choices. Feeding a quality dog food means your dog will be healthier from the inside out - from a stronger heart and bones to a shinier coat with less shedding and itching. The little extra money spent on a better food is more than made up for in fewer Vet visits. Nutritionally balanced dogs get sick much less often, fewer ear infections, fewer outbreaks of worms, fewer UT Is, and even fewer injuries. There is even evidence that better food makes for a better behaved dog, as well! A quality dog food will have meat as at least the first 2 ingredients and little or no corn as a filler. Dogs are primarily meat eaters. If your dog has a dull coat and flaky skin, it could be her food!

  Exercise - In addition to proper nutrition, exercise is vital for good health. Not only will it increase your dog's longevity, it will also decrease her unwanted behaviors. A dog's energy has to go somewhere. If she doesn't get enough exercise, she may find undesirable ways to expend that extra energy or even develop neuroses such as obsessive spinning. Just as you should see your doctor before starting an exercise program, so should your dog see hers! Some breeds need more exercise than others, and some cannot tolerate intense activity. Be sure your dog's exercise program is right for her breed. more...

  Good Hygiene - It's true, dogs love to roll around in the stinkiest thing they can find. They don't seem to mind being dirty or smelly. However, for a dog's overall happiness, cleanliness is next to dog liness! Dogs may not care how they smell, but people sure do. A smelly dog does not get petted by people and generally isn't allowed in the house, and a dog shunned to the back yard with little or no human contact is not a happy dog. Filthiness can also lead to health problems. For example, dirty ears can lead to ear mites which are itchy and can cause ear infections. Being too dirty can also be painful, especially for a long-haired dog. Mats in a dog's fur pull on the skin and are extremely uncomfortable. Nails that grow too long can cause a dog to walk awkwardly and lead to problems in their joints and muscles. Keeping coats brushed, ears cleaned, and nails trimmed is essential for a happy dog. Bathing too often can lead to dry itchy skin. Dogs need a bath only when they start to smell bad. If your dog is on a quality food, this won't be very often. 

  Chew Toys - Dogs have a physiological need to chew. This is especially true for teething puppies. Providing them with safe chew toys will help them satisfy this urge without having to gnaw on your coffee table. Thick rubber toys like Kongs are a good option because they will not break apart and become a choking or obstruction hazard. 

  Elimination - Dogs need reliable and sufficient opportunity to eliminate away from their sleeping area. Normal healthy dogs will not eliminate where they eat and sleep. Dogs who do use the bathroom in their dens do so because they have learned that they will not be given sufficient opportunity to eliminate elsewhere. For optimal happiness, make sure your dog doesn't have to hold it too long. 

  ShelterIn the wild, dogs are able to seek out shelter when they need it to get out of the rain, to shield themselves from the cold, or to find relief from the heat. In a domestic environment, we keep them confined to a limited area. They don't have the option to go out and look for adequate shelter. Therefore, it is up to us to provide it. The ideal place for your dog when it's raining or cold is in the home with you. Most dogs are happiest living inside with you. It's also the easiest way to provide appropriate shelter. However, if your dog is one of the few who prefer living outdoors, or bringing her inside is not an option, you can make sure she is well-sheltered outdoors. Follow these tips to properly prepare her dog house for winter weather.

Security- Huck on the patioHappy dogs feel safe in their environment from threats either real or perceived. Dogs who live confined outdoors but without a physical fence are not secure. Invisible fences and chains may keep the dog in the yard, but they do not keep other animals out. A dog living this way is a sitting duck. She is vulnerable to attacks from coyotes, other dogs, and even mean people, and she has no way to escape. The dog who lives this way is not a happy dog.

Social Needs-  Dogs are social animals who thrive on companionship with others. They are unique in the animal world because they enjoy companionship with people as much as they do with other dogs. A dog who lives in a backyard with only minimal human contact is a lonely dog, like a hermit living on an isolated mountain. The happy dog gets lots of ear scritches and belly rubs. She gets to associate with lots of different people and dogs because she has been well-socialized and trained in basic obedience and manners. She is a dog who can go anywhere, and people are happy to see her.  

Esteem Needs- Do dogs have a sense of self-esteem? If you doubt it, just watch a dog who has accomplished a complicated task. See how she holds her head high and struts! Dogs need to have confidence in themselves and their ability to master tasks. Training a dog builds her self-esteem. It makes them feel good to master the perfect Sit and earn your appreciation! Learning tricks is fun for dogs. There are also all sorts of canine sports available that dogs enjoy. Agility, flyball, ultimate frisbee, and lure coursing are just some of the examples. A dog with a hobby is a fulfilled dog.

Cognitive Needs- Dogs are more than just instincts. They also have the ability to think and problem solve. They need to experience more than just the same old scenery of their own home. Mental stimulation leads to a happy dog. Just walking a different path and letting her smell new smells and see new sights provides mental stimulation. At home, puzzle toys like the Buster Cube let her put her brain to use. You can play games with her like hiding and she has to find you, or hiding a treat that she has to find. Learning new tricks also works her brain. Put her to work. Make her fetch the paper (make sure it's safe first) or bring you a drink from the fridge. Yes, working makes for a happy dog!

The Secret to Happiness
The meaning of life is to live it. The secret to a happy dog is to help her live a fulfilled life. That means she actively participates in it. She plays, goes places, and does things. Basically, the secret to a happy dog is not much different at all from the secret to a happy person.

Tips
  • Whenever you call your dog, make sure it is always in a nice and friendly tone.
  • Give your dog some toys, bones, or kong toys to keep them busy while you're at work or at school.
  • Avoid shouting at your dogs, they may not understand your words but they read emotions.
  • Train your pet all the basics at least... A trained pet is always more enjoyable.
  • Talk to your dog and smile at him/her as you would a human and/or in a cooing voice. Even if your dog doesn't understand your words it helps you and your dog bond.
  • If you are always at work, school, college, or any activity where you are not home often and you have a dog, you should consider getting another dog to keep him/her happy and content, or getting a dog-sitter.
  • Treat your dog with respect, he or she is a family member too that deserves good treatment, love and exercise.
  • Always cuddle with your dog and lay down and just pet them.
  • Always be friendly to dogs so they don't feel upset, they can sense it.
  • Teach your dog new tricks. Put a dog treat on the ground and have your dog sit in front of it but don't let him eat it just yet. Say colors such as red, blue, yellow, basically any color but green. If at any time while your saying the colors, your dog goes for the treat, gently but firmly hold him back and have him sit again. Finally,when your dog knows not to eat the food when you say those words, say green and signal to your dog that he can now eat it. This is just a simple trick to have your dog go on green, like a car! Try the trick again, just to make sure your dog has it down and then your done! You can now feel proud of both yourself and your dog!
  • If your dog likes to play fetch, after you throw the ball or toy, hide somewhere so that your dog will need to find you. This will help his tracking skills.
  • Take your dog out to socialize with other dogs.
  • Get two dogs; they keep each other company and entertain each other.






Read More