LUV My dogs: snow

LUV My dogs

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Showing posts with label snow. Show all posts
Showing posts with label snow. Show all posts

Friday, January 13, 2017

15 Dog Breeds That Love The Snow

15 Dog Breeds That Love The Snow
  Winter is on its way here. It’s time to bring out the doggy boots, coats, and cold-weather gear to keep your pup from being miserable on those chilly walks. But some breeds aren’t miserable in the snowy weather at all. To them, it’s the most wonderful time of the year. They’re happy to eat snowflakes, chase snowballs, and make snow angel-dogs while you stand there freezing. Here are ten dog breeds who love the snow.

1. Alaskan Malamute
  The Alaskan Malamute is a descendent of the Arctic wolf, and with its thick double coat and large, tough paws, it can handle the snowiest of days. Known for pulling sleds through the snow and having a love for being outdoors, the Alaskan Malamute is a terrific companion for your polar adventures.

2. Akita
  An Akita is truly a royal pup—hailing from Japan, this breed was once only owned by the Imperial family. Statues of the Akita were also given as gifts to new parents to bring health, happiness, and a long life. This dog, originally bred as a cold-weather hunting companion with a dense undercoat and harsh outer coat, can often be independent and stubborn, but will remain protective and loyal to its family.

3. Pembroke Welsh Corgi
  Pembroke Welsh Corgis are believed to be descended from Vallhunds–Swedish cattle dogs brought by the Vikings to Wales–so you know they’re tough. They have a double coat, the undercoat being thick and covered by the longer topcoat. And they shed pretty consistently throughout the year, especially when the weather changes. This makes them well-prepared for romps in the snow, which they’ll most likely love.

4. Bernese Mountain Dog
  Originally from Switzerland, the Bernese Mountain Dog is a loyal, sweet breed that would love nothing more than to go on a nice long walk through a winter wonderland. Its cheerful attitude will definitely put on a smile on anyone's face.

5. Siberian Husky
  Famous for his sledding prowess, the Siberian Husky wears a thick double coat that makes him well-suited for snow and harsh weather. If the Siberian could have his way, his owner would love snow just as much as he does. The breed tends to thrive at winter dog sports, but he’ll usually be happy to try other sports, too. Either way, he needs plenty of exercise all year round.

6. Old English Sheepdog
  The Old English Sheepdog is known for its shaggy coat. In fact, you’ll probably have to spend lots of time grooming an Old English Sheepdog if you want to keep their fur from matting. In the warm months, they can get overheated pretty quickly, so they’ll be much happier in the winter months when their fur coats don’t make them so hot. Be careful to wipe them down before bringing them in from the snow or you’ll have lots of puddles around the house later on.

7. Newfoundland
  The Newfoundland, often referred to as a Gentle Giant, would be crushed if you headed out for a snowy hike without it. Its double, thick coat and super-sweet disposition makes it the perfect candidate to go on a winter hike. And if you happen to get a bit chilly, it would love nothing more than to snuggle up tight and warm you right up! Keep in mind that this breed sheds and drools a lot, even in the winter, so if you're a neat freak, this breed may not be for you.

8. Tibetan Mastiff
  As their name suggests, the Tibetan Mastiff is from Tibet where it is, of course, very cold. They have a thick coat suited for surviving freezing temperatures, which makes them more than able to stand up to most winter walks you’ll be taking them on. They aren’t able to handle the hot months very well, though. They are able to handle a certain level of dry heat provided they have shade and water, but these pups will be happiest when the temperature drops.

9. Pomeranian
  Pomeranians are descended from ancient breeds of the far north, which makes them a bit like a small version of the American Eskimo Dog or the Samoyed. Their undercoat is soft and fluffy, and it’s quite thick. Some owners groom the fur completely to the undercoat, which gives the Pomeranian a stuffed animal-like appearance. They do have an overcoat, too. It’s straight and shiny, and it’s a little harsh to the touch, but it protects them well from cold weather. Pomeranians can overheat easily, which means they’re right at home in the snow.

10. Labrador Retriever
  This popular family pet’s thick, water-repellant coat is ideal for keeping him dry when retrieving water fowl from frigid lakes during fall hunting season. His stocky build and short, dense double coat provides him with an effective barrier to cold weather and icy conditions however if your pooch is typically an indoor dog wintery weather should be experienced in moderation.

11. Samoyed
  The Samoyed, like the Siberian Husky, is from Siberia where it was a valuable companion for the Samoyede people. It was bred to hunt, haul sledges, herd reindeer, and cuddle up for warmth on cold nights. Their double coat is very thick and sheds constantly. With all that thick fur, they won’t want to be out in the heat for too long, but you might have trouble bringing them back inside in the winter. Especially because their white fur blends in with the snow so well, it may be hard to spot them.

12. American Eskimo Dog
  Originating from Germany, the American Eskimo was originally called the White German Spitz but was renamed after World War II, most likely for its white coat--not for any connection with Eskimos. Though this playful and compact and used to perform indoors with the Barnum and Bailey Circus, outdoor activity suits it much better; its coat resists soaking and thick ears stay warm in low temperatures.

13. Chow Chow
  Considered one of the oldest dog breeds, the Chow Chow’s thick, furry coat will keep it warm for hours during a winter excursion, and its strong, loyal personality will keep you on your toes for many years. This breed is considered a heavy shedder in certain months, so be sure to have your brushes handy.

14. German Shepherd
  The breed's popularity grew with Rin Tin Tin, the abandoned German Shepherd pup found during WWI who went on to star in TV shows and movies. Known for their herding, guarding, and police work, German Shepherds are strong, agile, hard workers that have a lot of energy and learn quickly. This breed commonly suffers from hip dysplasia, which can likely be avoided by buying from a credible breeder.

15. Kuvasz
  To be considered a true Kuvasz, this dog must always sport white fur, according to the American Kennel Club. Originating in Tibet, the Kuvasz—which means "armed guard of nobility" in Turkish—was later owned by the royal family in Hungary before finding a more "common" lifestyle as a light-footed hunter and herder. The Kuvasz's double coat makes it a perfect mountain dog, and its trainability and fearless protective instincts provide a perfect four-legged companion. A fenced-in, open yard works best for this energetic, yet possibly destructive, breed.
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Tuesday, September 27, 2016

Everything about your Chinook

Everything about your Chinook
  Created in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, the Chinook dog breed made his name on Admiral Byrd’s first Antarctic expedition in 1928. These days he’s a multipurpose dog who’s happy hiking, competing in agility and other dog sports, pulling a sled or other conveyance, and playing with the kids.

Overview
  This rare breed of sled dog got his start when musher Arthur Treadwell Walden of Wonalancet, New Hampshire, bred a farm dog of unknown heritage with a “northern” husky, producing a litter of puppies with tawny coats. One of the pups, named Chinook, grew up to father a breed of dogs who not only had his physical characteristics but also his gentle disposition. Indeed, the calm and dignified Chinook lavishes plenty of affection on each family member, but he’s best known for his love of children.
  With his heritage as a hard-working sled dog, the Chinook is intelligent and easy to train if you use positive reinforcement techniques, such as praise, play, and food rewards. If you lead an active, outdoorsy lifestyle, this is the dog for you. Chinooks are great companions for hikers and backpackers, and they thrive at dog sports, including sledding and skijoring.   They also perform well in agility, herding, obedience, and rally.

Highlights
  • Chinooks have a gentle, even temperament and are rarely shy or aggressive.
  • Chinooks should live indoors with their people, preferably in a home where they have access to a safely fenced yard.
  • Chinooks can be diggers.
  • Chinooks need 30 to 60 minutes of daily exercise. They enjoy hiking, jogging, and pulling, whether what's behind them is a sled, wagon, or person on skis or skates.
  • Chinooks are smart and learn quickly, but if you're not consistent in what you ask of them, they'll take advantage of you.
  • Chinooks are not barkers but can be talkative, whining and "woo-wooing" to express their opinions.
  • Chinooks have thick coats and shed heavily twice a year; the rest of the year they shed small amounts daily.
  • Chinooks need daily brushing to keep their coats clean, but baths are rarely necessary.
  • Chinooks love kids when they're raised with them, but can be reserved with them otherwise.
  • Never buy a Chinook from a puppy broker or pet store. Reputable breeders do not sell to middlemen or retailers, and there are no guarantees as to whether the puppy had healthy parents. Reputable breeders perform various health tests to ensure that their breeding dogs don't pass on a predisposition to genetic diseases.
  • Interview breeders thoroughly, and make sure the puppy's parents have been screened for genetic diseases pertinent to that breed. Ask breeders about the health issues they've encountered in their dogs, and don't believe a breeder who claims that her dogs never have any health problems. Ask for references so you can contact other puppy buyers to see if they're happy with their Chinook. Doing your homework may save you a lot of heartbreak later.
Other Quick Facts
  • In Inuit, Chinook means “warm winter winds.”
  • The Chinook is an uncommon breed, so expect to wait up to a year for a puppy to become available.
  • A Chinook can have either drop or erect ears, and you won’t be able to tell which type he’ll have until he’s four to six months old.
  • His hefty size may ward off an intruder, but the Chinook is not a guardian breed.
Breed standards
AKC group: Working Group
UKC group: Northern Breed Group
Average lifespan: 12 - 15 years
Average size: 55 - 70 pounds
Coat appearance: Dense to medium double coat
Coloration: Tawny, honey or reddish-gold
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Muscular frame, wide nostrils, black nose, dark brown or amber eyes, moderate webbed toes and long curved tail
Possible alterations: May be white in color or have dewclaws, which are typically removed.
Comparable Breeds: Siberian Husky, Greater Swiss Mountain Dog

History
  The Chinook is one of an increasing number of breeds claiming to be “made in America.” The powerful yet friendly dogs were created by musher Arthur Treadwell Walden, who started with some Greenland Husky sled dogs and a mastiff-type farm dog.  Walden was put in charge of assembling the team of 16 Chinooks used to transport supplies for Admiral Richard Byrd’s trek to Antarctica in 1927. Walden’s original dog, named Chinook, was part of this illustrious team.
  Following the expedition, Walden sold his kennel to Milt Seeley, Julia Lombard, and Perry and Honey Greene, but the breed’s numbers began to dwindle. In 1965, the Guinness Book of World Records declared the Chinook the most rare breed of dog in the world. When Neil and Marra Wollpert tried to find a Chinook in 1981, they discovered that there were only 11 dogs left who could be bred, so they worked successfully to preserve the dogs and rebuild the population.
  In an attempt to further save the breed, the Chinook Owners Association, in conjunction with the United Kennel Club, instituted a crossbreeding program. The intent was to add genetic diversity to the Chinook’s gene pool. Today, Chinooks are still uncommon — only 638 were registered with the American Kennel Club’s Foundation Stock Service in 2009. But the breed, which has been named the state dog of New Hampshire, appears to have a future.

Temperament
  One of the most wonderful traits of the Chinook is its gentle, even temperament, making it one of the easiest to own of all sled dog breeds. These calm and patient animals get along famously with children and other dogs. They are neither aggressive nor timid and, as working dogs, are programed to please their people. The Chinook does not make a good guard or watch dog. However, they do make wonderful dogs for high-energy families that have lots of time to spend with their pets. They will not thrive spending most of their time alone or apart from their family. Chinooks need constant companionship, either from other dogs or from their owners. A family that does not allow a dog in the house or rarely has time to train, exercise and socialize with their dog should consider a different breed. The Chinook has no trouble making friends but can be reserved at first with strangers or in unfamiliar surroundings.

Health Problems
  For the most part, Chinooks are pretty healthy dogs. They are prone to certain afflictions such as Cataracts, Seizures and Hip Dysplasia. Skin allergies have also been known to occur within the breed.

Care
  The coat of a Chinook requires little grooming, but because of its thickness it does shed, so a daily brushing may help to keep the shedding manageable. It requires moderate exercise and is a good family pet.

Living Conditions
  Chinooks adapt well to family life and prefer to accompany their "pack" on outings such as hiking or camping. They do not like to be left alone! Long periods of time without their family can lead to destructive behavior. Also, if left outside, they may attempt to dig under a fence. Although they are working dogs, Chinooks require little activity. They are happy to go along on long walks or hikes, but they are just as content to nap on the couch.


Trainability
  Chinooks are smart, versatile and highly trainable. However, they are strong-willed and can be a bit pushy. Almost every Chinook requires correction in order to avoid taking a dominant position in the household. This breed requires an owner with a firm but gentle hand to prevent personality and hierarchy controversies. Chinooks are high-spirited dogs that need consistent training and discipline in order to establish and maintain proper manners.   Training sessions give a Chinook the opportunity to expend some of its excess energy and use its brain power for constructive purposes. Chinooks are very clever, but they are likely to resist authority in favor of their own desires. Training a Chinook requires not just five or six weeks; training needs to continue every day for the rest of the dog’s life.

Exercise Requirements
  Every dog requires some form of exercise but the Chinook is a breed that craves it. He’ll never run around the backyard catching and bringing back balls or Frisbees but he’ll be a ready, willing and able jogging buddy or hiking companion. The Chinook will gladly stroll through the neighborhood with you on the other end of the leash or hop in the car for a trip to the pet store. With this being said, he will be thrilled to pull your kids’ sleds through the snow in the winter and do so exuberantly. He’ll even pull them around in their wagons in the summer. It’s simply that he was not born to retrieve things and few Chinooks enjoy that tedious task.
  After a good exercise session, he’ll be quite happy to stretch out in the kitchen while you make dinner or curl up next to you on the couch and watch TV. The Chinook is a calm companion indoors provided he does have a workout every day.

Grooming
  The Chinook has a thick, easy-to-groom double coat that sheds lightly every day. To remove dead hair and distribute skin oils, brush the coat once or twice a week. Baths are rarely necessary. Twice a year, the Chinook goes through a heavy shed, known as blowing coat. The process lasts for about three weeks, and you’ll want to brush your Chinook more often during that time to keep the loose hair under control.
  The rest is routine care: Chinook nails grow quickly, so trim them weekly. And brush his teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
   A gentle and friendly Chinook can be a kid's best friend if they're brought up together. If your Chinook hasn't been socialized with kids, introduce the two slowly and calmly so the Chinook can become accustomed to the child at his own speed.
  Regardless, always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any ear biting or tail pulling on the part of either party.
  Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how good-natured, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Because he was created to be a sled dog, the Chinook is a good team worker and usually gets along with other animals, cats included, but early socialization to other pets is still important. Males who haven't been neutered may be aggressive toward other males, especially unneutered males.

Is this breed right for you?
  Although bred as a working dog, the Chinook makes an excellent family pet with adults and children alike, although it is best that it is exposed to kids as a puppy. A calm and easy temperament, it is alert when needed and docile during rest periods. Tremendously loyal, the breed will follow its owner like a shadow and may experience separation anxiety. The Chinook will also need to be socialized early on and know that it is a dog and not a human. In addition, the breed requires very regular exercise and grooming.

Did You Know?
  In 1927, a team of 16 Chinooks accompanied Admiral Richard Byrd on his first expedition to Antarctica.

A dream day in the life
  The Chinook will likely wake up in the bedroom of its owner. Following you diligently, the breed will likely be your shadow throughout the day. After a long and brisk run, it'll settle in for breakfast with you. It will continue its day of activity, running in and out of the house and playing with the other members of the family. After its very busy day, it'll snooze happily at your feet.





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Saturday, November 22, 2014

Winter Activities That Are Fun for Your Dog

Winter Activities That Are Fun for Your Dog
  The nights are colder, the days are shorter and your dog's favorite chew toy is buried under ten inches of snow. What a perfect day to play with your dog. While not all dogs care for snow in the same way, they all still need regular exercise to stay fit and healthy for life. Here are few games you can try to help boost your dog's energy and fitness level over the next few winter months.

  Winter weather shouldn't be an excuse to hibernate. There are tons of fun winter activities you can do with your dog - inside and out. If you want a happy dog, give him regular exercise, after all it will be good for both of you! 

Snowed in? Keep your pup stimulated

  Dogs are meant to be outdoors, love being outdoors, live for being outdoors. Keeping your dog well-exercised will help you both keep your sanity. Regardless of the season, professional dog behaviorist Nicola Anderson, suggests daily stimulation for your pet. I often recommend doing some basic obedience exercises with your dog – just about 10 minutes a day.

Play a game with your dog.

  Hide-and-seek is a wonderful way to get your dog up and moving and mentally engaged. You can hide a treat or her favorite toy, but it’s better to make her come find you. Start by throwing a treat to get her to go away from you, and then hide in another part of the house. This game can really tire your pup out as she rushes around searching, and it’s good for reinforcing the “come” command.

Treasure Hunt

  Try burying a stick, toy or even a treat in the snow. Then sit back and watch his natural tracking instinct kick in. For dogs that require a bit of help finding their reward, try hiding the object closer to your dog at first, then slowly burying it further away the better your dog gets at the game.

Skijoring

  Another fun activity is Skijoring, an activity where all that is required is you, your dog, and a pair of skis. Even small dogs will enjoy this outdoor activity.

Cross country skiing is a popular activity all throughout the snowbelt. Bring your dog along to enjoy the experience, and you’ll find he’s just as excited to help pull you along the trail. That’s what Skijoring is all about!

Challenge your dog’s nose.

  Dogs have incredibly powerful scenting abilities, so exercises that require your pal to use her nose are especially stimulating. Make her work for her dinner by creating an obstacle course she has to get through to find her food. Hide her meal in a box, or, better yet, put it in a Kong Wobbler or a Buster Ball.

Fetch, Catch and Beyond

  If your dog loves to fetch or catch rubber balls chances are he will love trying to do the same with snowball. Fair warning dogs really love this game so be prepared to make a large stockpile of snowballs, and be careful not to pack the show too much.

Tracking - Sniff in all that cold winter air and train your dog to track scents.
  Tracking is like a game for dogs...hide-and-seek. Tracking challenges a dog's problem solving skills and keeps their keen sense of smell active. It also rewarding when they successfully track a scent. Call a local trainer or find a good tracking training book to get started.

Tracking - Sniff in all that cold winter air and train your dog to track scents. 
  Tracking is like a game for dogs...hide-and-seek. Tracking challenges a dog's problem solving skills and keeps their keen sense of smell active. It also rewarding when they successfully track a scent. Call a local trainer or find a good tracking training book to get started.

Snow Shoe
  If the snow isn't outrageously deep, you can always have your dog join you for a snowshoe walk. Keep in mind you may have to leash your dog so be aware of the local park or trail bylaws.

  Some popular people activities are simply too dangerous to try to include your dog. While cross-country skiing seems passive and relaxing enough, skis are fun to chase for dogs and your pet may end up injuring himself.


Don’t be a wimp…get outdoors!

  Most bigger dogs love snow, and they can get a great workout by plowing through it. Spend 30 to 40 minutes in the snow, and your dog will get a workout that leaves her exhausted—and her muscles toned. When you come in, be sure to wash your dog’s paws to clean off any salt.



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