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Showing posts with label small size. Show all posts
Showing posts with label small size. Show all posts

Monday, January 16, 2017

Everything about your Cardigan Welsh Corgis

Everything about your Cardigan Welsh Corgis
  Affectionately called the “yard-long dog” in his native Wales, the Cardigan Welsh Corgi is active and good-natured — and he loves to be busy. Cardigans make excellent watchdogs, but they can become nuisance barkers if they’re not properly trained.


Overview
  The Cardigan is a low-set dog, approximately 1.8 times longer than it is tall, with moderately heavy bone. It is small but powerful — capable of the agility, speed and endurance necessary to drive cattle for extended periods. Its small size allowed it to duck under the cattle's hooves should they kick at it. Its gait is free, smooth, effortless and ground-covering. Its double coat consists of a soft thick undercoat and slightly harsh outer coat of medium length. Its expression is alert, gentle and watchful, yet friendly.

  Fun-loving and high-spirited, yet easygoing, the Cardigan is a devoted and amusing companion. This is a hardy breed, capable of a day dodging kicks, so it is agile and tireless.   At home it is well-mannered but inclined to bark. It tends to be reserved with strangers and can be scrappy with other dogs.

Highlights

  • Cardigans are vocal dogs. They bark at anything and everything.
  • Cardigans are intelligent but can be stubborn. If housetraining is a problem, crate training is advised.
  • Cardigans have a strong herding instinct that may cause them to nip at the heels of your children when they are playing.
  • Cardigans like to eat and will overeat if given a chance. Be sure to monitor their food intake so they don't become obese.
  • Cardigans have a lot of energy and need daily exercise.
  • Cardigans should never be purchased from unknowledgeable breeders, puppy mills, or pet stores.

Other Quick Facts

  • Cardigans belong to the same family of dogs — the teckel group — as Dachshunds and Basset Hounds.
  • The word “Corgi” has several possible meanings: In ancient Welsh, it could translate as “dwarf dog,” or it may derive from the word “cur,” meaning to watch over — a common Corgi trait.
  • Comparable Breeds: Australian Cattle Dog, Pembroke Welsh Corgi
History
  The Cardigan Welsh Corgi is believed to be the older of the two Corgi breeds. Although no one knows for sure, his ancestors may have arrived in Wales alongside ancient Celts who migrated from central Europe. The dog that we know today hails from hilly Cardiganshire, which once teemed with farms and valleys that were perfect for raising cattle. His predecessors drove cattle to market, nipping at their heels to get the cattle to move, and pivoting out of the way if the livestock kicked back.
  Industrialization eventually put an end to the Corgi’s usefulness on the farm, and people began crossing the dogs with other herding breeds, including Collies and early Pomeranians, who were much larger than today’s standard Pom. The Collie cross may have thrown the blue merle coloration into the Cardigan’s gene pool.
  For a time, it looked as if the Cardigan would go the way of the dinosaurs because he was less popular than his cousin, the Pembroke Welsh Corgi. At one point, the two were even considered the same breed, but the Kennel Club separated them in 1934, giving the Cardigan more of a chance to survive on his own. The Cardigan Welsh Corgi Association wrote a standard for the breed, and thanks to a 1931 importation of some Corgis by Mrs. Robert Bole of Boston, Massachusetts, the dogs became known in the United States. In 1935, the American Kennel Club recognized the breed. The descendants of Mrs. Bole’s dogs did well in the show ring, including Ch. Swansea Jon, CD, who took Best of Breed at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show three years running. Today, the Cardigan is still less popular than the Pembroke — the Cardi ranks 84th among the breeds registered by the AKC — but he’s definitely in no danger of disappearing.

Personality
  The Cardigan Welsh Corgi my be small, but they pack a lot of dog into a little body. Originally used to herd cattle and hunt rodents in Cardiganshire, Wales; Corgiw were strong working dogs that took their jobs seriously. They would nip the heels of the cattle, and their small bodies enabled them to avoid being kicked. Today, the Corgi is still used on farms and ranches, but is also an energetic family companion. They are good with other pets, make reliable watchdogs, and are trustworthy around children. Corgis have a mind of their own but still have a desire to please people. They pack a large personality, which varies from clownish and attention seeking, to thoughtful and introspective.

Health
  The Cardigan Welsh Corgi, which has an average lifespan of 12 to 14 years, may suffer from degenerative myelopathy and canine hip dysplasia (CHD). This breed may also be prone to progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) and urinary stones. To identify some of these conditions early, a veterinarian may recommend hip, eye, and DNA tests for the dog.

Care
  The Cardigan Welsh Corgi requires a lot of exercise for its small size. Its exercise needs are best met with a good herding session, but a vigorous play session or a moderate walk is also sufficient. It can easily live outdoors in cool or temperate weather, but it serves as an excellent house-dog and is at its best when allowed to spend time in both the yard and home. Its coat requires brushing once every week to remove dead hair.

Training
  Training for the Cardigan Welsh Corgi can be both a pleasure but also a test of your leadership. These dogs are generally obedient so long as you lay the fundamentals down – that is to say, you establish that you are the leader of your household and that your dog’s place is below that of any humans who reside in it. The dog should be able to pick up on this, and when it does, it can make a highly trainable and obedient companion.
Living Conditions
  Corgis will do fine in an apartment if they are sufficiently exercised. With enough exercise they can be calm indoors, but will be very active if they are lacking. Will do okay without a yard so long as they are taken for daily walks.

Exercise Requirements
  If you don’t like getting a lot of exercise, this probably isn’t the breed for you, as the Cardigan Welsh Corgi needs daily exercise that is fairly rigorous, and is capable of handling plenty of exercise on a habitual basis.

Grooming
  The Cardigan has a thick, medium-length double coat that sheds a lot, but it also repels dirt, lacks an odor, and is easy to maintain. To remove dead hair and distribute your Cardigan’s natural skin oils, groom his coat weekly using a shedding blade, slicker brush or fine pin brush. Baths are rarely needed. Cardigans also go through heavier seasonal sheds twice a year, so brush more often during that time to keep flying fur under control.
  The rest is routine care: Trim his nails every few weeks — you can also trim the hair on his feet for a neater look — and brush his teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Cardigans love children, but their herding instincts can motivate them to nip at a youngster’s feet or ankles. They can learn quickly, however, that this behavior is not permitted.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Cardigans are usually friendly toward other pets in the household, so long as they have been socialized with them. They can be aggressive toward dogs that aren’t part of their family, but they enjoy having a second or third dog in the family to play with, especially another Corgi. 

Did You Know?
  You can tell a Cardigan apart from a Pembroke Corgi if you remember that the Cardi has a long tail, like the sleeves of a cardigan sweater, while the Pembroke has a “broke” tail.




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Friday, January 13, 2017

How to Care for a Small Dog

How to Care for a Small Dog
  Small breed dogs are ideal for owners in a variety of living situations. For example, tiny dogs do better in small apartments than larger breeds.Toy dog breeds are extremely popular companion dogs. 
  Many small dog breeds were once the prize possessions of members of the ruling class, and some are a scaled down version of another breed. Bred as house pets, they have served as companions for hundreds, even thousands of years.
  As man's best friend, many small dogs were bred to be companion animals and are very loyal. Like other pets, small dogs have basic needs that are the responsibility of their owner. Caring for small dogs requires an owner to pay attention to the dog's health, their happiness, and their well-being. While dog ownership is a big commitment, it is very rewarding!

Choosing The Right Small Dog Breed
  Not all dogs are created equal and some breeds will be more suitable for your household than others. The first thing you should do once you've identified the breeds you like is to carry out a little research on their care needs, temperament and likely health issues. Don't be scared off by potential health problems - you will find long lists of ailments which can befall particular breeds but your dog may never suffer from any of them. Use them as a guide to what could happen in the future. Provided you are financially and emotionally capable of dealing with illness, you will be fine. If you can purchase pet insurance, do so at an early stage.
  When you are certain that you want to go ahead and buy a small dog, check out breeders in your area. 

Their small size makes them perfect for:


  • Apartment and city dwellers as well as those that live in the country
  • The young and old and everyone in between
  • For singles, couples,  and those with families
  • Basically just about anyone!



Research the unique characteristics of your pet's breed. We use the term ‘small dog’ to refer to dogs that are typically less than eighteen inches tall and weigh less than twenty pounds. This includes toy, miniature, and small breeds like Yorkshire Terriers, Chihuahuas, Miniature Poodles, and Miniature Pinschers. Each breed has their own temperament, appearance, characteristics, and needs.

Feed on a regular schedule. It is important to feed your dog on a regular schedule to maintain consistency and to establish a routine. The amount of food your dog will need to consume each day will depend on their age, size, and activity level. Incorporate training into your feeding schedule by having your dog practice certain obedience commands before you let them eat.

Brush your dog’s teeth several times a week. Tiny dogs often suffer from tooth decay and gum disease, and frequent brushing will keep the teeth and gums healthy.


Avoid feeding small dogs human food. It can be very tempting to share bits of your meal or to give human food to your pet as a treat. However, there are a number of foods that are very harmful to dogs. Feeding your dog human food also encourages negative behaviors, such as begging or bothering people when they are eating.


Always provide access to clean water. Along with food, dogs need water to stay healthy. Always leave a bowl of clean and fresh water for your dog to enjoy.

Crate your tiny dog when you can’t watch her closely. Very little dogs can squeeze into small spaces and may injure themselves trying to escape. Crating is also useful during parties and family gatherings to keep small dogs out from underfoot.

Provide a comfortable place to sleep. Whether you decide to crate train your dog or have them sleep in their own dog bed, your dog wants to feel safe when they sleep. Small dogs sleep an average of twelve to fourteen hours a day as adults, and puppies will sleep even more.

Fit your dog with clothes during cold weather. Dog clothes, such as jackets and sweaters, help regulate body temperature and keep your dog from getting too cold. Choose tight-fitting clothes made from soft material to keep your dog warm and dry.


Schedule routine veterinarian visits. Like humans, dogs need routine medical care to stay healthy. Different small breeds are at higher or lower risks for certain conditions than other breeds.

Spay or neuter your dog. Unless you are planning to breed your dog, neutering or spaying your dog has health benefits and can improve temperament. On average, dogs that are spayed or neutered live up to two year longer than dogs that have not undergone these procedures.


Vaccinate your dog. Your veterinarian will administer vaccinations to your dog, and the number of vaccinations that your dog needs will depend on their age and the area that you live in.

Exercise frequently. Some small dog breeds have more energy than others, though all small dogs need to exercise to stay healthy. Their exercise needs will depend on your dog’s age, their health, and their breed.

Groom the dog at least once a week. Many people assume that small, inside dogs don’t need to be groomed, which is untrue. Brush your dog from nose to tail with a soft brush, and check for mats in long-haired breeds. Clip her nails with a small pair of pet nail clippers, clipping off small bits at a time to prevent cutting the quick.

Provide mental stimulation. Much like physical exercise, small dogs need to exercise their brains to stay stimulated and engaged. Dogs that are not stimulated often exhibit destructive behaviors, like chewing on furniture and digging, because they are bored.

Handle your dog throughout the day. Little dogs are notorious nippers and may bite if not handled enough. Pet the dog gently, run your hands over her ears and touch each of her feet to acclimate her to being handled.

Train your dog. Many small dog breeds have stubborn and independent temperaments that can make training difficult. However, small dogs need to be trained to follow basic obedience commands and to walk on leashes.


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Friday, December 9, 2016

Everything about your Miniature Pinscher

Everything about your Miniature Pinscher
  The Miniature Pinscher is not a scaled-down Doberman, although he is fearless and makes a terrific watchdog. Known as the “King of the Toys,” this little fireball is best suited to an experienced owner who can manage his willful nature. On the plus side, his antics are pure entertainment, and he is simple to groom.

Overview
  Originating in Germany, the Miniature Pinscher was bred as a way to control the rodent population in stables. Developed from the Italian Greyhound and Dachshund, the Miniature Pinscher is small but fast. Often referred to as the "king of toys," the breed enjoys living a very active life that is stimulating both physically and mentally.
  The diminutive Min Pin is a bundle of energy, full of vigor. He's highly curious and tends to investigate — and possibly eat — everything. He must be watched closely so he doesn't get into something he shouldn't. He's a skilled escape artist and should never be outside off-leash — in fact, you'll have to make sure he doesn't dart out whenever you answer the front door.
  For these reasons, the Min Pin is not the dog for everyone, especially first-time dog owners. His energy and intelligence can catch his owner off guard. Without proper training and supervision, he can quickly become a tyrant in the household.

Highlights
  • Miniature Pinschers are hardy little dogs, but they can be easily injured by roughhousing. Because of this, they're better suited as pets for older children who have learned how to care for a dog properly.
  • The Min Pin is sensitive to cold. Be sure to put a sweater or coat on him when you take him outside in really cold weather.
  • Because they were originally bred to hunt vermin, Min Pins may attack small objects , which can be a choking hazard. He may also take off after small pets that he perceives as prey.
  • Min Pins have a lot of energy — probably more than you have. They're also very curious. You must supervise your Min Pin constantly, and if you can't, put him in a crate.
  • You must be willing to take the position of "alpha" in your household. If you don't, the Min Pin will gladly assume the role.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Min Pin is strong-willed and not for novices. He can be possessive of toys and food.
  • The Min Pin can have either cropped or uncropped ears and a docked tail. Coat colors include red, stag red (red with black hairs), black with rust markings, or chocolate with tan.
  • The Min Pin likes to play both indoors and out. He doesn’t need a lot of exercise, but a daily walk is important to give him the mental stimulation he needs.
Breed standards
AKC group: Toy
UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan: 14 - 15 years
Average size: 8 - 12 pounds
Coat appearance: Smooth, short-haired
Coloration: Black and rust, red, stag red, chocolate and tan
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Compact, small, squarish body, with head proportional to the body; dark black eyes; scissor-bite teeth; strong, straight legs, cat-like feet, and cropped tail
Possible alterations: Tail may not be cropped and dewclaws may be removed.
Comparable Breeds: Cairn Terrier, Chihuahua


History
  The Miniature Pinscher is thought to be an old breed, but documentation can only trace it reliably back several hundred years. It was developed in Germany to kill rats in homes and stables.
Drawing of a pinscher and a miniature pinscher
by Jean Bungartz
   There it was first called the Reh Pinscher because of its supposed similarity to the reh, or small deer, that used to inhabit Germany's forests. Many people think that the Miniature Pinscher was developed as a mini Doberman, but though he looks similar, he's a distinct and much older breed.
  Development of the Miniature Pinscher took off in 1895 when German breeders formed the Pinscher Klub, later renamed the Pinscher-Schnauzer Klub. It was then that the first breed standard was written. Miniature Pinschers were first shown at the Stuttgart Dog Show in Germany in 1900, at which time they were virtually unknown outside of their homeland.
  From 1905 until World War I, the Miniature Pinscher rapidly grew in popularity in Germany. After World War I, breeders in Germany and also in the Scandinavian countries worked to improve the line. Around 1919, the first Miniature Pinschers were imported in the United States. Only a few were shown in American Kennel Club dog shows at first. But by 1929, the Miniature Pinscher Club of America, Inc., was formed.
  Also in 1929, the AKC recognized the breed. At that time Min Pins were shown in the Terrier group. In 1930, they were reclassified as Toys and called Pinscher (Miniature). They were renamed Miniature Pinscher in 1972.

Personality
  Contrary to popular belief, the Miniature Pinscher was not developed by breeding Doberman Pinschers down to size. In fact, Min Pins are actually a much olde breed than the Doberman. Nicknamed the “King of the Toys,” your Min Pin will also rule as King or Queen of your house. Breeders and owners agree, these little dogs believe they are the center of the universe and expect everyone to cater to their whims. They have a unique high-step manner of walking which has been likened to a prance, and they ooze confidence wherever they may go. Min Pins are cuddle bugs who will find their way to your lap the instant you sit on the couch. They do love to run, however, and will sometimes tear through the house for no apparent reason. Min Pins make excellent watchdogs, sizing up everyone who approaches his kingdom, and requiring all guests earn his trust.

Health
  The Miniature Pischer, which has an average lifespan of 12 to 14 years, may be prone to some minor problems like Legg-Perthes Disease, patellar luxation, hypothyroidism, Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) VI, and heart defects. Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) may also be seen in some Min Pins. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may recommend knee, eye, and hip tests for the dog, as well as DNA to confirm MPS.

Care
  Grooming is easy, as the smooth, short-haired coat requires little attention, needing only occasional brushing and shampooing. Care must be taken in cold weather. Sweaters or baby blankets for a Miniature Pinscher keep it from getting too cold. Miniature Pinschers are an active breed and need access to a fenced yard, or be given a daily walk.
  The Min Pin requires plenty of activity, but as it is small, its exercise requirements can be fulfilled either indoors or outdoors. It needs many good game sessions daily to keep it active. Even though it loves outdoor romps in a secure place, it is not fond of the cold.

Living Conditions
  The Miniature Pinscher is good for apartment life. It is very active indoors and will do okay without a yard. The Miniature Pinscher should be protected from the cold.

Training
  The Miniature Pinscher should not really be treated like a toy dog – it’s not a great socializer and will have a high tolerance for work and exercise. Consequently, if you want to make sure that your dog is properly raised according to the breed’s characteristics, it’s a good idea to make sure that your Miniature Pinscher has plenty of outdoor exercise on a regular basis. Miniature Pinschers aren’t ideal for large families and are generally regarded as a dog for one or two people.

Activity Requirements
  Min Pins are tiny, which makes them excellent for apartment and condo life, but they should be taken for daily walks and allowed to run once or twice per week. Min Pins are often high-strung to begin with, so allowing them to burn off as much energy as possible can keep their temperaments in check.
  A good activity to engage in with a Min Pin is agility. Once leadership is established, Min Pins are highly trainable, and take well to the agility course. He will enjoy the exercise, appreciate the opportunity to use his mental prowess, and more importantly, he will eat up the time spent with his favorite person.

Grooming
  Min Pins are really easy to groom — there’s almost nothing to it because of their short, smooth coat. Just use a bristle brush once or twice a week. They shed an average amount, but their small size means that there is less fur shed than from a larger dog with the same kind of short coat.
  Bathe the Min Pin as you desire or only when he gets dirty. With the gentle dog shampoos available now, you can bathe a Min Pin weekly if you want without harming his coat.
  As with all Toy breeds, dental issues are common. Brush your Min Pin’s teeth daily with a vet-approved pet toothpaste and have your veterinarian check them regularly. Nails should be clipped about every two weeks; you should not be able to hear the toenails click when the dog walks.

Children And Other Pets
  If a Miniature Pinscher is raised with children who treat him carefully and kindly, he will adore them and be a trustworthy companion. However, if children are allowed to grab or treat him roughly, even accidentally, he may develop a bad attitude toward kids, or at least want to avoid them as much as possible. The Min Pin is best suited for children age 10 and older.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Many owners have more than one Min Pin; properly socialized and trained, these dogs get along with other dogs just fine . As far as other pets are concerned, the Min Pin's instinct is to chase, so he isn't well suited to homes with small mammals.

Is this breed right for you?
  Although suited for apartment life due to his small size, the Miniature Pinscher requires a lot of activity to satisfy him. He enjoys running, playing and needs a daily walk to fulfill his physical needs. The Miniature Pinscher will partake of regular romps in the yard, but will require a large fence to avoid attempting an escape. In need of proper training, the dog can easily develop behavioral problems if allowed to form small-dog syndrome. OK with older children, it's advised that they are taught how to behave around dogs, as he may nip or bite. In addition, he doesn't care too much for strangers and may bark or attack them unless taught otherwise.

Did You Know?
  It’s thought that the Min Pin was created by crossing breeds as diverse as the Dachshund, the old German Pinscher, the Manchester Terrier, and the Italian Greyhound.

A dream day in the life of a Miniature Pinscher
  It's likely that your Miniature Pinscher will wake at the crack of dawn, before his owners. Ensuring the home is safe, he'll make his way outside to sniff out any vermin and engage in games by himself. Once he hears the family awaken, he'll greet you in the kitchen, patiently awaiting his meal. After a quick walk, he may have a quick nap, but will then spend the day guarding his home and playing with his toys. Not keen on too much affection, he'll end the day with a quick pat on the head for his excellent behavior.


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Thursday, August 4, 2016

Everything about your Yorkshire Terrier

Everything about your Yorkshire Terrier
  Yorkshire Terriers, affectionately known as "Yorkies," offer big personalities in a small package. Though members of the Toy Group, they are terriers by nature and are brave, determined, investigative and energetic. Named for the English county from which they originally hail, Yorkshire Terriers were used in the nineteenth century to catch rats in clothing mills. Surprisingly enough, in its beginnings, the Yorkie belonged to the working class, especially the weavers; in fact, facetious comments were often made about how the dogs' fine, silky coats were the ultimate product of the looms. Eventually, the breed left the workforce and became a companion animal to families of European high society.

Overview
  The Yorkie's terrier heritage can be seen in its sharp, intelligent expression, confident carriage, and compact body. It is a diminutive breed, however, now more noted for its long, silky hair, which should be fine, glossy, and perfectly straight. Color is a hallmark of this breed, with the blue a dark steel blue and the tan a clear tan. 
  The Yorkshire Terrier seems oblivious of its small size, ever eager for adventure and trouble. It is busy, inquisitive, bold, stubborn, and can be aggressive to strange dogs and small animals in other words, it is true to its terrier heritage. Although some tend to bark a lot, it can easily be taught not to do so.

Highlights
  • Yorkshire Terriers are known for being difficult to housetrain. Crate-training is recommended.
  • Yorkshire Terriers don't like the cold and are prone to chills, especially if they're damp or in damp areas.
  • Because of their small size, delicate structure, and terrier personality, Yorkshire Terrier generally aren't recommended for households with toddlers or small children.
  • Some Yorkshire Terriers can be "yappy," barking at every sound they hear. Early and consistent training can help. If you don't feel qualified to provide this training, consult a professional dog trainer.
  • Yorkshire Terriers can have delicate digestive systems and may be picky eaters. Eating problems can occur if your Yorkie has teeth or gum problems as well. If your Yorkie is showing discomfort when eating or after eating, take him to the vet for a checkup.
  • Yorkshire Terriers think they are big dogs and will try to pick a fight with a big dog if allowed. Be sure to keep your Yorkie under control. Even better, try to socialize your Yorkie at an early age by taking him to obedience classes.
  • Yorkies tend to retain their puppy teeth, especially the canines. When your puppy is around five months old, check his teeth often. If you notice that an adult tooth is trying to come in but the baby tooth is still there, take him to your vet. Retained baby teeth can cause the adult teeth to come in unevenly, which may contribute to tooth decay in later years.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Yorkshire Terrier has an inquisitive temperament — not to mention an impish sense of humor.
  • Yorkies have stunning blue-and-tan coats, but they’re not born that way. Puppies are black, and their coat color develops as they mature.
  • Despite their Toy status, these dogs love speed, action, and plenty of applause, so sports such as agility and rally are tailor-made for them.
  • Show dogs should weigh between four to seven pounds, but pet Yorkies can weigh as much as 12 to 15 pounds. A Yorkie who weighs less than four pounds is more prone to health problems, and more likely to suffer complications while under anesthesia.
  • Comparable Breeds: Cairn Terrier, Pomeranian

History
  The Yorkshire Terrier’s bold nature descends directly from his ancestors, which include the long-extinct Clydesdale Terrier and the Black-and-Tan Terrier. Scottish weavers who migrated south to England during tough economic times took their terriers with them to York, Manchester, and Leeds. The weavers ultimately crossbred their little terriers with local dogs, creating the small but feisty terrier known today for its shimmering cloak of blue and gold.
  Yorkies proved to be fine ratters in the English woolen mills, a skill they retain to this day. As they became more and more of a companion dog, breeders began to select for smaller size. The dog considered to be the foundation sire of the modern Yorkie, Huddersfield Ben, was born in 1865. At the time, the dogs were called Broken Haired Scotch Terriers or Toy Terriers, but by 1870, they were known as Yorkshire Terriers, after the region where they were first produced. It wasn’t long before these tough ratters morphed into domestic sidekicks for fashionable ladies, and began appearing at dog shows as “fancy terriers.”
  By 1872, Yorkshire Terriers had made their way to the U.S., where they quickly became upper-crust favorites and even political mascots. The Nixon family shared the White House with their beloved Yorkie, Pasha. The Yorkshire Terrier currently holds third place among the breeds registered by the American Kennel Club.

Personality
  Smart and self-assured, the Yorkshire Terrier is a combination of endearingly small size and adventurous terrier spirit. The breed displays a range of personalities. Some are cuddly and perky, wanting nothing more than to follow in their people's footsteps throughout the day. Others are mischievous, outgoing, and into everything.
  Set limits, and your Yorkie will be a wonderful companion, but if you spoil him, watch out! Start training when they're puppies, and you'll have much better luck than if you let them have their way and then try to correct bad habits.
  Like all dogs, Yorkies needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Yorkie will be a friendly, well-rounded dog.

Health
  Some Yorkies are prone to slipped stifle, bronchitis, eye infections, early tooth decay, poor tolerance of anesthetic, and delicate digestion. Exotic treats should be avoided. They sometimes suffer paralysis in the hindquarters caused by herniated disks and other problems of the spine. Falls or knocks can cause fractures of fragile bones. Abnormal skull formations in Yorkies measuring less than 8 inches (20 cm). Dams often have trouble delivering puppies and sometimes need to have cesareans. Be sure to feed Yorkies some type of dry food or bone to chew on to help keep their teeth clean and strong. They should get their teeth cleaned at the vet to keep them from falling out and creating infection.

"Teacup Yorkies"
  "Teacup" Yorkshire terriers is a term used to describe very small Yorkshire terriers. The AKC and other Kennel clubs do not acknowledge the Teacup as a variation of the breed or recognize it as a separate variety.Usually a teacup is any dog weighing less than 4 lbs (1.8 kg) when fully grown, when the actual breed standard is given at 7 lbs maximum. Breeding for "Teacup" is a controversial practice that is not encouraged by responsible breeders.
  A fashion pressure, they are bred to appeal with their puppy-like features, rather than bred to expel health issues. There is great risk to a dam (mother) during pregnancy who is too small, most of these litters are a result of cesarean sections and have a high mortality rate.
  There are many health issues associated with teacup dogs, such as luxating patella, heart disease, hydrocephalus, hypoglycemia, chronic pelvic pain syndrome, open fontanels and seizures.

Exercise
  These are active little dogs that need a daily walk. Play will take care of a lot of their exercise needs, however, as with all breeds, it will not fulfill their primal instinct to walk. Dogs that do not get to go on daily walks are more likely to display behavior problems. If your Yorkie zooms around the house like a speeding bullet, it is a sign that he needs to go on more/longer walks where he is made to heel beside or behind the human. Remember, in a dog’s mind, the leader leads the way. They will also enjoy a good romp in a safe, open area off lead, such as a large, fenced-in yard.

Care
  Yorkshire Terriers enjoy taking a walk with you or playing outside, but since they're very active while indoors, it doesn't take a lot of effort to keep them well exercised.
  In general, Yorkies are receptive to training, especially if it brings them attention for performing cute tricks or performing in agility or obedience trials. They can be difficult to housetrain, however, because their "accidents" are so small and easy to clean up that people let it slide. That's a mistake. It's better to show them where to go from the beginning and reward them for doing their business in the right place. When you make the effort, you can end up with a very well trained Yorkie indeed.
  They definitely are housedogs and don't tolerate extreme heat or cold well. Many people paper train their Yorkshire Terriers so they don't have to take them outdoors when the weather is too hot or cold.

Living Conditions
  The Yorkie is a good dog for apartment life. It is very active indoors and will do okay without a yard. The Yorkie is sensitive to the cold and prefers warm climates.

Grooming
  Yorkies are definitely not low-maintenance pooches. If you keep their coats show-dog long, they need to be brushed daily, with their long topknot tied up and kept out of their eyes. Most pet-owners opt for a “puppy” clip, with the facial hair left a bit longer than the hair on the body. Regular trips to a professional groomer are a must, along with weekly baths.
   On the plus side, Yorkies don’t shed much, possibly making them less problematic for some people with allergies. However, this varies from dog to dog, so don’t believe anyone who tells you that Yorkies are “non-allergenic.”
  The rest is basic care: Trim his nails every week or two. And brush his teeth regularly with a pet toothpaste for overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Because of their small size, Yorkies aren't suited to families with young children. Most breeders won't sell puppies to people whose children are younger than 5 or 6 years old. It's just too easy for children to drop them, step on them, or hold them too tightly.
  Yorkies can get along well with other pets, including cats, if socialized to them at an early age. They're bold in going after strange dogs, however, even those that outweigh them by a factor of ten, and protecting them from themselves becomes second nature to people with Yorkies.

Is this breed right for you?
  Yorkies make excellent companions for pet owners looking for a shed-free and allergen-free addition to their family. A Yorkie's compact size makes it a perfect apartment dog as long as exercise is part of the daily routine. This breed is sensitive to extreme temperatures, and leaving them outside unattended can cause severe health issues. Due to their independent and stubborn nature, this toy breed may not do well with small children, as most Yorkies enjoy personalized attention. Don't be overwhelmed by the long locks of AKC-bred Yorkies — regardless of hair length, this breed simply needs a weekly brushing to keep up its looks.

Did You Know?
  The feisty Yorkie was once coveted in England for its excellent ratter abilities. In the U.S., the diminutive breed became a popular lap dog for society ladies — and even set paw in the White House. President Nixon had a Yorkie named Pasha.

Notability
  • Show dogs: In 1997, Champion Ozmilion Mystification became the first Yorkie to win Best in Show at Crufts, the world's largest annual dog show.
  • Small dogs: Sylvia, a matchbox-sized Yorkshire Terrier owned by Arthur Marples of Blackburn, England, was the smallest dog in recorded history. The dog died in 1945 when she was two years old, at which point she stood 2.5 inches tall at the shoulder, measured 3.5 inches from nose tip to tail, and weighed 4 ounces.
  • War dogs: Smoky, a war dog and hero of World War II, was owned by William Wynne of Cleveland, Ohio. Wynne adopted Smoky while he was serving with the 5th Air Force in the Pacific.
  • White House dogs: Pasha, Tricia Nixon Cox's pet Yorkie, lived in the White House during the Richard Nixon presidency.
A dream day in the life of a Yorkshire Terrier
  Because they were bred as working dogs, Yorkies love a challenge and mental stimulation. This intelligent breed can pick up training techniques faster than most pooches and enjoys the special attention and bonding time of training sessions. Weighing in at an average of 5 to 7 pounds, Yorkies make first-rate travel companions, as they can fit in most purses or carriers. This tiny breed is very attentive to their human counterparts, and constant companionship is a must.


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