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Showing posts with label small. Show all posts
Showing posts with label small. Show all posts

Saturday, April 8, 2017

Everything about your Tibetan Spaniel

Everything about your Tibetan Spaniel
   A prized pet and watchdog for the Tibetan monasteries, the Tibetan Spaniel is lovingly referred to as a "little lion dog." Thought of highly, the breed was gifted to royals throughout Asia. Given to other countries, the popularity of the Tibetan Spaniel grew. A devoted human companion, the breed is immediately loved by all families that own it.

Overview
  The Tibetan Spaniel, also known as the Tibbie, is a dog breed in the Non-Sporting Group. This little Spaniel is not only an excellent companion, but they are highly valued watch dogs that were once called ‘little lions’ by the Buddhist monks of Tibet. The Tibetan Spaniel was approved by the AKC in 1983.
  The average Tibetan Spaniel stands 10 inches high at the shoulders and weighs between 9 and 15 pounds. Their coat requires frequent brushing to help prevent mats and control shedding, and their ears should be cleaned regularly and frequently checked for any signs of infections.

Highlights
  • Although Tibetan Spaniels can learn quickly, they may be stubborn when it comes to obeying commands.
  • Tibetan Spaniels shed small amounts year-round and need weekly brushing to get rid of dead hair.
  • Although Tibetan Spaniels are affectionate toward and protective of children, they're better suited for homes with older children because they can be injured during rough play.
  • Tibetan Spaniels generally get along well with other dogs and pets. They do well in homes with multiple dogs.
  • Tibetan Spaniels thrive when they're with their families. They're not recommended for homes where they'll receive little attention or will be left alone for long periods.
  • Barking can become a favorite pastime of Tibetan Spaniels if they're bored. They'll also bark when people come to the door or when they hear something suspicious. The upside is, they make great watchdogs.
  • Tibetan Spaniels only need moderate exercise and are quite happy with a daily walk or free play in a fenced yard.
  • Tibetan Spaniels must be walked on leash to prevent them from running off to explore. Yards should be fenced.
  • The Tibetan Spaniel is fairly rare, so if you're buying a puppy, it may take a while to find a good breeder, and once you do, there may be a wait for puppies to be available.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from a puppy mill, a pet store, or a breeder who doesn't provide health clearances or guarantees. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies and who breeds for sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts:
  • When you look at a Tibetan Spaniel, you should see a dog with a rectangular body covered in a silky double coat, dark-brown oval-shaped eyes, medium-size ears that hang down and are well feathered, and a plumed tail that curls over the back, falling to one side.
  • The Tibetan Spaniel’s coat can be any color or mixture of colors.
Breed standards

AKC group: Non-sporting
UKC group: Herding
Average lifespan: 14 - 16 years
Average size: 9 - 15 pounds
Coat appearance: Silky
Coloration: Gold, cream, red and sable with white markings on paws
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Small body, short to the ground and longer than it is tall; dark brown, oval eyes and black nose; feathering between the toes; plump and fluffy feathered tail
Possible alterations: May be multicolored
Comparable Breeds: Japanese Chin, Pekingese

History
  Tibetan Spaniels were bred by Buddhist monks to resemble little lions, which are symbolic of Buddha. Like their cousins the Lhasa Apsos, they served as alarm dogs in Tibetan monasteries. Tibetan Spaniels were highly valued and often presented as gifts to great nobles or rulers. The many exchanges of dogs between Tibet and China mean that the Tibetan Spaniel likely shares a common ancestry with breeds such as the Pekingese, the Japanese Chin, and the Shih Tzu.
  British travelers and missionaries brought some of the dogs to the West in the late 19th century and early 20th century. They include Mrs. McLaren Morris, who brought the first Tibetan Spaniel to England; Sir Edward and Lady Wakefield, who bred several litters; and Colonel and Mrs. Hawkins, who brought a pair of the Wakefields’ dogs to England in 1941. Agnes R. H. Greig, who is also associated with the Tibetan Terrier, sent several to her mother in Britain, but only one from the breeding program survived World War II.
  The dogs didn’t get much attention in the United States until the 1960s when a litter was bred from a pair imported from Tibet. Trinity Lutheran Church sexton Leo Kearns is credited with popularizing the dogs after his litter was snatched up by his parishioners in New Haven, Conn. He imported more Tibetan Spaniels from Britain, and others became interested in the dogs. The Tibetan Spaniel Club of America was formed in 1971, and the American Kennel Club recognized the breed in 1984. Tibbies rank 104th among the dogs registered by the AKC.

Personality
  Trusting and affectionate toward family members, Tibetan Spaniels may be aloof toward strangers, although never aggressive. True to their heritage, they make excellent watchdogs and will bark to alert you of anything that seems unusual.
  Tibbies seem to be especially responsive to their people's moods and feelings. As loving as they are, however, they're independent thinkers and won't always obey, especially if they think they know better or don't see any good reason to do as you ask.
Maud Earl Tibetan Spaniels 1898
  As with all dogs, Tibetan Spaniels need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Tibetan Spaniel puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.

Health Problems
  The Tibetan Spaniel is a generally healthy breed. However, this dog may suffer from the following conditions: progressive retinal atrophy, cherry eye, patellar luxation, allergies, and portosystemic shunt (a liver condition).

Care
  The Tibetan Spaniel breed is meant for apartment life and should not be allowed to live outdoors. The daily exercise needs of the Tibbie are minimal and can be met by indoor and outdoor games or a short on-leash walk. Its coat requires combing and brushing twice weekly.

Living Conditions
  The Tibetan Spaniel is good for apartment life. It is relatively inactive indoors and will do okay without a yard.

Training
  Because of his stubborn streak, the Tibetan Spaniel can be difficult to train. For the best results, start early and establish yourself as the Alfa of the household. If your dog gets the upper hand, this will be difficult to train them out of. For the best results, use positive training reinforcements, such as praise and treats. And keep training sessions short and interesting to hold your dog’s attention. You’ll be happy to learn that Tibetan Spaniels are pretty easy to house train and it is recommended that you crate train your dog.
  Tibetan Spaniels are known to be vocal, alerting you to a stranger’s presence. With patience and consistency, it is possible to train them to stop barking once they’ve alerted you to the possible threat.

Exercise Requirements
  Because of his size, Tibetan Spaniels can live pretty much anywhere. They do as well in an apartment as they would in a large estate. They make wonderful companions for seniors as they don’t need a lot of daily exercise. A daily walk and some play time will cover all his exercise needs. If you have a back yard, do not leave your Tibbie unattended. This dog needs to be with you and will be happiest when playing with you.

Grooming Needs
  Tibetan Spaniels shed lightly year round, and brushing two to three times per week will keep loose hair under control and keep the coat free from tangles or mats. They typically require a bath every six to eight weeks.
  Check the Tibetan Spaniel's ears on a weekly basis for signs of infection, irritation, or wax build up. Cleanse regularly with a veterinarian-approved cleanser and cotton ball. Brush the teeth at least once per week to prevent tartar buildup and fight gum disease. Additionally, nails should be trimmed once per month if the dog does not wear the toenails down naturally.

Children And Other Pets
  Tibetan Spaniels are affectionate and protective of children, but because they're small, they can be injured easily by rough handling, so they're best suited to homes with children who are at least 6 years old and know to be gentle and not to tease.
  As with any dog, always teach children how to approach and touch your Tibetan Spaniel, and supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear pulling from either party.
  Tibetan Spaniels usually get along well with other dogs and cats. Most enjoy having another dog as a companion.

Is this breed right for you?
  A human lover to the bone, the Tibetan Spaniel goes well with young children and other pets. A great family dog, the breed also makes for an excellent watchdog. Suited for apartment life, he is a true-blue inside dog. Enjoying a daily walk and time out in the yard, he is a bit difficult to train. Requiring moderate grooming, the Tibetan Spaniel is a moderate shedder, but does lose a large amount once a year. In need of a master with good leadership skills, the breed is likely to show behavioral problems if allowed to develop small dog syndrome.

Did You Know?
  The Tibbie is not a true Spaniel. He was referred to as an “epagneul,” a French word used in the Middle Ages to refer to small comforter dogs.

A dream day in the life of a Tibetan Spaniel
   The Tibetan Spaniel is likely to wake up with a smile. Happily wagging his tail at his owner, he will gladly follow his master wherever she may go. Running outside for a romp in the yard, he'll bark at any possible intruders. A lover, he'll play with and lick the children at any available opportunity. Kindhearted, he'll be at your feet until the end of the day, where he'll cuddle close for bedtime.



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Tuesday, December 6, 2016

Everything about your Silky Terrier

Everything about your Silky Terrier
  Bred in Australia from the Yorkshire Terrier and Blue and Tan Australian Terrier, the Silky Terrier was singled out as her own breed. Originally referred to as the Sydney Terrier, the vermin hunter was brought to America by servicemen in the 1950s. Small but fierce, the Silky Terrier makes an excellent watchdog.

Overview
  Some people think they're large Yorkshire Terriers, and others think they're tiny Australian Terriers. But even though those dogs are in his ancestry, the Silky Terrier has his own identity – and isn't likely to let you forget it. Sure, he's a charmer and, at 10 pounds or so, highly portable. But he's also a smart, sassy demanding little dog with a great gift for getting his humans to do exactly what he wants them to, and being a pretty big pain in the neck  when they don't.
  Make no mistake: He might be tiny and he might lack the usual scruffy-rough coat of his terrier cousins, but the Silky is no lap dog. Or he is, but mostly on his own terms. He's endlessly curious, full of energy and loves to play. And like most terriers, he has a great fondness for that sub-genre of gardening known as "digging huge holes in the yard" along with a well-developed interest in barking loudly and chasing cats.
  Train him gently but consistently from a young age to channel his cleverness and independence into activities that won’t involve noise or destructiveness. The American Kennel Club's Earthdog events offer one such possibility; agility or other active sports are others. He's also a bit difficult to housetrain, so careful training from the day he comes home is essential as well.
  Bigger than the Yorkshire Terrier, the Silky is a better choice for families with children, but is still much too small to be played with roughly or unsupervised. In fact, he can be a bit nippy and possessive of his toys, food, and favorite humans. And while the Silky Terrier is not a big shedder, his coat is long and – yes, you guessed it – silky, and it requires frequent brushing to prevent matting.

Highlights
  • Silky Terriers are active dogs who need exercise and mental stimulation. This doesn't mean strenuous hikes or hours of retrieving, but it does mean you'll need to provide more activity than tummy rubs on the couch.
  • Although they need exercise, they can make good apartment or condo dogs.
  • Silkies have a strong prey drive and will chase cats, squirrels, rodents, and sometimes other dogs. A Silky may not be the best choice if you've got other small pets. Also, keep your Silky leashed when you're in unsecured areas to avoid having him disappear into the wild blue yonder when something small and furry streaks by.
  • Silkies like to be with their families and are happiest when they can spend the whole day in your company.
  • Despite the long coat, Silkies are fairly easy keepers. But they do require some grooming: thorough brushing two to three times a week and a monthly bath.
  • Like all terriers, the Silky enjoys digging. To save your flowerbeds, either consider another breed, or train your Silky to dig in a specific area. It's much easier to channel the instinct than to suppress it.
  • Barking, another terrier trait, is a much-enjoyed pastime for Silkies. Although you can teach your Silky a "Quiet" command, he'll still bark when he thinks it's necessary. The upside is, Silkies are excellent watchdogs.
  • Silky Terriers can be good family dogs, but because of their scrappy personality, children should be about 10 years old and up.
  • Although they're generally friendly, Silkies can be territorial and aggressive toward other dogs if they're not socialized properly.
  • A Silky shouldn't be left unattended in a yard. He's small enough to be considered prey by larger wild animals, terrier enough to dig his way out, and Silky enough to get into mischief.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts

  • Silky Terriers are active in many events. They have earned titles or participated in obedience, rally, agility, herding, tracking, flyball, and earthdog tests. Some Silkys are therapy dogs.
  • The Silky stands low to the ground and is slightly longer than he is tall. His silky blue and tan coat parts to each side, all the way down his back to his tail. It’s not so long that it falls all the way to the floor. He has a moderately long wedge-shaped head; small dark almond-shaped eyes; small V-shaped ears carried erect; and a black nose. The docked tail is carried between the twelve o’clock and two o’clock position. He moves with a lively and light-footed step.
Breed standards
AKC group: Toy
UKC group: Companion
Average lifespan: 12 - 15 years
Average size: 8 - 10 pounds
Coat appearance: Long, silky and parted down the middle.
Coloration: Born black; grows to have a blue coat with red or tan markings
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Other identifiers: Small with fine bones and cat-like feet; body is longer than breed is tall; black nose; black almond-shaped eyes with black rims; erect ears and high-set tail
Possible alterations: Hair is matted if not properly groomed
Comparable Breeds: Cairn Terrier, Yorkshire Terrier

History
  The Silky Terrier originated in Australia in the 1890s, when breeders crossed imported Yorkshire Terriers with their native Australian Terriers. Some of the offspring looked like Yorkies, some looked like Australian Terriers, and others looked like the Silky of today, with a size and coat length that was between the two parent breeds. The Silky-looking dogs were interbred until the puppies predictably had Silky traits.
  In 1906, Australian fanciers developed a breed standard — written guidelines for what the breed should look, move, and act like — in Sydney, New South Wales. In 1909, another standard was drawn up in Victoria. The two standards didn't completely match up, mostly on the preferred weight and ear type. The two camps compromised and a new breed standard came out in 1926.
  The breed has had several names: initially, he was called the Sydney Silky Terrier. In 1955, he became the Australian Silky Terrier (still the official name for the breed in Australia). In the U.S., the name was changed to Silky Terrier.



Personality
  A better name for the Silky Terrier might be the Spunky Terrier. These little dogs pack a lot of personality into a small package. Like other terriers, they believe they are the center of the universe and expect everyone to bow to their needs. Silkies make (harmless) mischief whenever possible, especially if they realize it gets them extra attention. This is an intelligent breed who knows how to manipulate a situation in his favor, and can sometimes even be considered bossy, but most owners don't mind because they are just too darn cute to stay mad at. Silkies are great family dogs for those with older children, as they enjoy the company of people and prefer to have plenty of laps to choose from when it is naptime.

Health
  The Silky Terrier, which has a lifespan of about 11 to 14 years, may suffer from minor problems like patellar luxation and Legg-Perthes disease. Diabetes, epilepsy, allergies, tracheal collapse, and Cushing's disease may sometimes be seen in this breed as well. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may run knee and elbow exams on the dog.

Care
  The Silky Terrier may look like a toy, but he's a real dog who needs exercise and training. He enjoys daily walks, romping with you in the yard, or trips to a dog park with a special area for small breeds. In a pinch, the Silky is happy to take his workout indoors with a rousing game of fetch in the hallway.
  These are not outdoor dogs. The Silky craves the companionship of his people, and he's also small enough to be considered prey by wild animals. And despite his size, another risk is that he may fight with another dog who wanders onto his turf.
When it comes to training, Silky Terriers make willing and able students. Because they're so smart, however, you need to be consistent; otherwise they'll be inclined to make up their own rules. The best way to win your Silky's cooperation is with fun lessons that use positive reinforcement.
  Crate training is the easiest way to housetrain your Silky, and crates are also a good way to keep your Silky safe and out of trouble when you're away from home. Silky Terriers are mischievous by nature and can be destructive when left unsupervised. A crate is also a place where he can retreat for a nap. Crate training at a young age will help your dog accept confinement if he ever needs to be boarded or hospitalized.
  Never stick your Silky in a crate all day long, however. It's not a jail, and he shouldn't spend more than a few hours at a time in it except when he's sleeping at night. Silkys are people dogs, and they aren't meant to spend their lives locked up in a crate or kennel.

Living Conditions
  The Silky Terrier is good for apartment life. These dogs are very active indoors and will do okay without a yard if sufficiently exercised.

Trainability
  Like other terrier breeds, Silkies can be a handful to train. They are willful and stubborn and most definitely have minds of their own. Training should begin early and be conducted with calm-assertive leadership and never a harsh hand. Small terriers are prone to defensive reactions and if you physically correct your Silky – even to push his bottom down in a “sit” position – he may bite. Treats and excited praise should be enough to motivate a   Silky Terrier, but sessions should be kept short so that he doesn't lose interest.
  When basic obedience has been mastered, your Silky can move on to advanced obedience, trick training or agility classes. These are smart dogs who, despite their stubbornness excel in these activities.

Exercise Requirements
  Silky Terriers are full of energy, have plenty of stamina and love going on daily walks or runs. This breed has a hunting background, so Silky Terriers like to chase small animals. Along with daily walks, your dog will enjoy time spent in an outside fenced yard or a trip to the dog park. If you can’t get outside, an energetic game of fetch, tug-of-war, or chase indoors will keep your dog exercised and active. 

Grooming
  It is difficult to improve on the Silky Terrier’s natural good looks, but you can maintain his long, silky coat by brushing and combing it several times a week with a pin or soft slicker brush and metal comb. Spray-on detangler can make this easier and help prevent breakage. Regular brushing prevents tangles, removes dirt and distributes oils, making for a healthy shine. Periodic bathing, every four weeks or so, and light trimming around his ears, eyes and feet, is also necessary. For extra easy care, some owners opt to have their Silkys trimmed short like a Schnauzer.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every one to two weeks. Keep the ears clean and dry to help prevent infections. Check them weekly for redness or a bad odor that might indicate infection. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball moistened with a mild pH-balanced cleanser recommended by your veterinarian. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath. Introduce your puppy to grooming from an early age so that he learns to accept it with little fuss.

Children And Other Pets 
  The Silky can be a wonderful family pet, so long as he's raised with kids and grows up around their noise and commotion. Given his strong personality, though, he's usually best for families with children older than 10 who know how to handle a dog. He may not tolerate pokes and prods from younger kids.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  The Silky gets along with other dogs very well so long as he's been raised to be dog-friendly, though there may be occasional bossiness and rivalry for attention or treats. Like all terriers, the Silky loves to chase small animals, so he may not be suited for homes with cats, rabbits, or other small pets.

Is this breed right for you?
  Fun-loving and active, the Silky Terrier is a small breed that enjoys activity. Having strong affection for its owner, the breed is smart and can do well with apartment living, although she prefers her own space to play and investigate by nose or digging. An inside dog, the Silky Terrier can develop small dog syndrome if not given the right amount of training or guidance. Doing well with children if she has a good leader, the Silky Terrier can learn to adapt to other animals if socialized correctly.

Did You Know?
  When he was first developed in Australia, this breed was known as the Sydney Silky Terrier. The name was changed in Australia to Australian Silky Terrier in 1955. The same year, in the United States, the name was changed to Silky Terrier.

A dream day in the life of a Silky Terrier
  A playful pup, the Silky Terrier will enjoy waking up and immediately investigating her backyard. With a quick run, she'll sniff out the perimeter to ensure everything is safe. Returning inside, she'll greet her owner with a small amount of affection before requesting a bit of quality playtime. After a game of fetch in the yard, she'll be ready for breakfast. Keeping up on her primary duty of watchdog, she'll be happy in the constant company of her family. After her evening walk, she'll be ready for her daily grooming session of a bath and blow-dry. Once she's brushed and pampered, the Silky Terrier will be ready for a snooze.
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Monday, June 13, 2016

The 10 Best Apartment Dogs

The 10 Best Apartment Dogs
  There's a breed of dog for every person and lifestyle. But just because a certain breed is a match for your personality, it doesn't necessarily mean that breed is a good choice for you. If your home is a small apartment in a big city, it's not a good idea to adopt a breed that needs a lot of time and space outdoors. Fortunately, there are still plenty of options to fit your life.
  Size does matter – especially if you live in compact quarters. Whether you live in a cramped condo, an adequate apartment or closeted quarters, there’s a dog that will fit into your living space.

1. Basenji

  The Basenji is a great option when you have close neighbors and thin walls. This barkless dog rarely gets taller than 18 inches or over 25 pounds. But beware, when left unattended for long periods of time, the Basenji can be a mischievous companion.

2. English Bulldog

  This medium-sized dog doesn’t like to move around much, so an English Bulldog makes a wonderful dog for an apartment (as long as you don’t mind a little extra drool and snoring!). If this breed could talk, he would tell you he’d much rather hang on the couch than at the dog park. And if you don’t like to move about much, good news – the English Bulldog is just as lazy as you!

3.Boston Terrier

  The Boston terrier's nickname is "the American Gentleman," and it's not just for their black-and-white, tuxedo-like coats. They are also polite as a dog can be, and therefore ideal apartment pets. They're quiet, so they won't annoy your neighbors, and they bond closely with their owners, showing undying affection and loyalty. They're also conveniently small, and require only moderate amounts of exercise. Brisk city walks should be enough; no sprawling backyards necessary.

4.Bichon Frise

  Even at their largest, the Bichon Frise  won’t get taller than a foot. These little furballs are energetic, which means they love to play, but also need daily exercise. Bichons also shed less than similar breeds, making them ideal to leave with in close quarters or for people with allergies.


5. Great Dane
  “Huge dog” doesn’t seem like it fits with “great apartment dog,” but the Great Dane (at a majestic 100 to 130 pounds) is such a natural loafer that, though your couch will probably be fully occupied, he’ll take up far less space than you might think. Add to that his calm demeanor, friendliness, trainability, and quiet nature, and the Great Dane makes an excellent choice among apartment dogs.

6.Bulldog

  The Bulldog is perhaps most well-known for his laziness, making them a perfect dog for apartments. A short walk is all these guys need to keep them happy. Otherwise, they’re content to just laze around and snooze. They’re an incredibly gentle dog breed and rarely get taller than a 18 inches high.

7.Shih Tzu

  This regal-looking companion is small in size and maintenance. She doesn’t need much room to move around in. As long as she’s pampered, she’ll be happy. Shih Tzus aren’t a high energy dog, so you won’t need to make many daily trips outdoors for walks. If you don’t mind grooming all that hair, this may be the perfect apartment dog for you. 

  Years of being toted around in starlets' purses may have given this breed something of a privileged diva reputation, but they're actually quite gentle and low-maintenance. After all, how many other breeds are patient enough to tolerate being kept in a purse in the first place? Their tiny size means they can make it in even the most closet-y of New York studio apartments, and even longhaired chihuahuas require only moderate grooming. Keep in mind, though, that Chihuahuas can be a bit loud, so think twice if your pad has thin walls.

  Dachshunds love to be active, but luckily you’re the just the person to take them to the dog park twice a day. Right? Although they can be a little bit stubborn and tend to adapt better to adults and older children than small children, they are extremely affectionate and protective of their loved ones.

  Havanese dogs are small and adaptable to any kind of living situation, including apartment life. They're playful, but they'll burn enough calories charging around your home that gobs of outdoor time won't be necessary. That said, they're relatively quiet, so they won't disturb your neighbors with lots of yapping. One caveat: Of all the breeds on this list, the Havanese is the most high-maintenance in terms of grooming.

As always, it’s important to remember that every dog is an individual. While every breed has a general personality and disposition, there will always be variations. Do your research carefully and be sure to pick a pet that will fit your home, lifestyle, and personality.
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Wednesday, June 18, 2014

Everything about your Beagle

Everything about your Beagle
  The Beagle is a happy, inquisitive, shorthaired hound who makes a great family companion, an eager hunter in the field — or both!
   Small, compact, and hardy, Beagles are active companions for kids and adults alike. Canines in this dog breed are merry and fun loving, but being hounds, they can also be stubborn and require patient, creative training techniques. Their noses guide them through life, and they're never happier than when following an interesting scent. The Beagle originally was bred as a scenthound to track small game, mostly rabbits and hare. He is still used for this purpose in many countries, including the United States.
   Although beagle-type dogs have existed for over 2,000 years, the modern breed was developed in Great Britain around the 1830s from several breeds, including the Talbot Hound, the North Country Beagle, the Southern Hound, and possibly the Harrier.
   Beagles have been depicted in popular culture since Elizabethan times in literature and paintings, and more recently in film, television and comic books. Snoopy of the comic strip Peanuts has been promoted as "the world's most famous beagle".

Overview
  It's difficult to resist the appeal of a Beagle's dark brown or hazel eyes, with his soft, pleading expression. They're happy, outgoing and loving — characteristics more than balanced out by their hound nature, which is inquisitive, determined, and focused on food.
  They aren't yappy dogs, but they do have three distinct vocalizations — a bark/growl, a baying howl, and a half-baying howl (a cross between a frantic bark and a bay). The half-howl vocalization usually is reserved for when they catch sight of quarry — or think it's time to wake the neighbors at 6 a.m.! Being pack dogs, they generally get along well with other animals and their human friends — and they think everyone is their new best friend.
  The most important thing to know about the Beagle is that he is a scenthound. His nose is the most important part of his anatomy and his head is always down to the ground, searching for an interesting trail to follow. Beagles have approximately 220 million scent receptors compared to the paltry 5 million or so in people, which makes them very good at picking up scents. Humorist Dave Barry once described his in-laws' Beagle as "a nose with feet."
   You may have seen the Beagle's nose at work at airports across the country. In 1984, the U.S. Department of Agriculture decided to use Beagles to sniff out contraband food being brought into the United States at the Los Angeles International Airport.
  The experiment was a huge success. Because they are small, friendly, and cute, the Beagles didn't intimidate people who are afraid of dogs, and with their super nose power, they could be trained to identify specific food articles while bypassing those that weren't contraband. Today, members of the "Beagle Brigade" patrol the baggage-claim areas at more than 20 international airports and other points of entry into the United States.
   Although they've branched out into other fields of work, Beagles remain superb hunters of small game. The National Beagle Club's Institute Farm hosts AKC-sanctioned field trials where breeders with packs are put to the test in the field. Many other countries have similar activities for hunting Beagles.
  Because of their small size and gentle temperament, Beagles can do well in apartments if their people are willing to walk them on lead several times a day in all kinds of weather. They need plenty of exercise, about an hour a day if possible. If left alone and unexercised, Beagles can become destructive.

Breed standards
AKC group: Hound
UKC group: Scenthound
Average lifespan: 12-15 years
Average size: 20-25 lbs
Coat appearance: Sleek, smooth, short
Coloration: Brown, white & black, and more
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Squarely built, fairly long body with short legs for hunting and chasing. The square muzzle is straight and medium in length. Long, wide-set ears. Black nose is broad with full nostrils for piqued sense of smell and a high-set, straight tail, never curled.
Possible alterations: Coat coloring varies and can be seen in tricolor, black and tan, red and white, orange and white, and many other variations.
Comparable Breeds: Basset Hound, Bloodhound
Highlights
  • Beagles can be difficult to housetrain. Some people say it can take up to a year to fully housetrain some Beagles. Crate training is absolutely recommended.
  • Beagles can get bored if left alone in a house too long. If left in a backyard, Beagles will start finding ways to amuse themselves, usually by howling, digging, or trying to escape.
  • The most common reason Beagles are turned over to rescue groups is because either their owners or their owners' neighbors got tired of their baying. Be sure that you are prepared to work with your dog to control excessive barking and howling.
  • Beagles are targets for thieves who would steal them and perhaps sell them to research laboratories for use in experiments. Supervise your Beagle when he is outdoors and be sure to have him microchipped!
  • Since they are scenthounds, Beagles will wander off if they catch an enticing smell in the air. Their noses control their brains, and if they smell something interesting, nothing else exists in their world.
  • Although they are loving and gentle, Beagles can have an independent, stubborn streak. Obedience training is recommended, but be sure the instructor of the class understands hound personality and favors using food as a reward.

Other Quick Facts
  • Beagles come in two sizes; both sizes of Beagles can be born in a single litter. If you want to be sure you get one of a certain size, wait to purchase a puppy until he is about nine months old.
  • Beagles bred for hunting are more likely to be noisy and active than Beagles bred for the show ring.
  • You might not think so when you are trying to train him, but the Beagle is very smart in the sense that he is a good problem-solver. He might not respond instantly to your commands, but he will quickly figure out how to overcome any obstacles that are preventing him from getting something he wants.
  • Beagles need daily exercise and mental stimulation in the form of sniffing. Without it they can become bored and destructive. Provide them with the attention, training and activity they need or suffer the consequences.
  • Shyness and aggression are not common Beagle characteristics. Do not choose a puppy who shows signs of these behaviors.
History
  The origin of the word "beagle" is uncertain. It's thought that it may have been derived from the French word begueule, meaning open throat, or from the Old English word beag, meaning small. Others think it may have come from the French word beugler, meaning to bellow, or the German word begele, meaning to scold.
  The breed's history is cloudy as well because breeds as we know them today didn't really develop until the 19th century. Greek documents from 400 B.C. describe Beagle-like dogs, and the Romans may have brought small rabbit-hunting hounds with them to England and bred them with the local hounds.
   William the Conqueror reportedly brought Talbot hounds to England during the Norman Conquest in 1066. These dogs are thought to be the ancestors of the Beagle and the Foxhound.
   Beagles became popular in England very early in its history. During the reigns of Edward II (1307 - 1327) and Henry VII (1485 - 1509), extremely small beagles, called Glove Beagles, were popular. They reportedly were small enough to be held in a gloved hand. There's also mention of Singing Beagles, named for their bugling voices.
  Elizabeth I (1533 - 1603) kept packs of Pocket Beagles that stood only 9 inches tall. These small dogs were depicted in paintings as short-legged and pointy nosed. They were used for hunting, but quickly fell out of favor because they weren't very fast.
  In the 1700s, fox hunting became popular in England, and the Beagle fell out of favor as the larger Foxhound became the dog of choice. If it hadn't been for the farmers in England, Ireland, and Wales who continued to keep packs to hunt rabbit and hare, the breed might have become extinct at that time.
   In the mid-1800s Reverend Phillip Honeywood established a pack of Beagles in Essex, England. These dogs are thought to be the ancestors of the modern Beagle. Rev. Honeywood bred for hunting skills, not looks. Thomas Johnson, a fellow Englishman, was responsible for breeding Beagles who were both attractive and good hunters.
  At about the same time, American breeders started importing Beagles from England to improve the looks of their own dogs. Many of the English imports were bred to an average height of 15 to 17 inches at the shoulder so they could hunt fox. American breeders started breeding them to be smaller for rabbit hunting.
   Of interest is the "Patch" Beagle strain developed by Willet Randall in New York around 1880. The line is primarily white with a very large tri-colored spot. They were very popular in the 1940s and 1950s because they were able to run so fast. Today, many people call lemon and white or red and white beagles "Patch" beagles.
  The American Kennel Club and the first Beagle specialty club both were founded in 1884. In that same year, the AKC began registering Beagles.
   In 1916, five members of the National Beagle Club purchased 508 acres in Western Loudoun County, Virginia for the purpose of holding field trials. The men who purchased it formed a corporation called Institute Corporate to purchase and own the land, then leasing it to the Institute Foundation that maintains the property for the National Beagle Club, which today is the site of many activities of the National Beagle Club.



Temperament and Personality
  Beagles are happy, outgoing and loving. They are often described as having a merry temperament, but they are also known for their mischievous nature. Beagles like to have their own way, and they can be naughty, determined and stubborn in their efforts to get what they want, which is usually food.
  Start training early, be patient and be consistent, and one day you will wake up to find that you live with a great dog. But even so, there are a few Beagle behaviors that you should expect to live with throughout his life. They are part and parcel of being a Beagle, and nothing you do will change them. Beagles love good smells, Beagles howl, Beagles have selective hearing, and Beagles love to eat.
  Everything a Beagle does somehow leads back to his nose. His powerful sense of smell overcomes any good sense you might have tried to instill and tells the Beagle to escape from the yard or break into the dog food bag in the pantry or see what’s in the trash. When channeled properly, it’s also what makes him a great arson dog or termite detector, so it all evens out in the end. Just remember that when your Beagle’s nose is down, his “other brain” is turned off.
  Beagles have what fans call a “musical” voice, but to your neighbors it’s just going to sound like really annoying noise. Beagles will sing along to sirens, “give tongue” when they are hunting, and bark when strangers come to the door, but they aren’t usually nuisance barkers unless they are bored or lonely. If you don’t live out in the country where no one else is around to hear his drawn-out “Aaaaarrrroooooh,” keep your Beagle occupied with toys, the company of another animal or, best of all, your presence so he doesn’t feel the need to serenade the neighborhood.
  Beagles like to do what they want to do, not necessarily what you want them to do. They are true masters when it comes to selective hearing. If a Beagle isn’t interested in the request you’ve made — commands are futile with this breed — he will simply ignore you or wander off. That can be frustrating if you’re not prepared for it. Successfully living with a Beagle means making everything a game, one that will hold his attention.
  As for eating, well, Beagles will try to eat anything. They are professional food thieves, and they will eat anything that even looks like it might be food, including things that you wouldn’t imagine would interest them. If nothing else, living with a Beagle will teach you, your spouse and your kids not to leave food of any kind within a Beagle’s nose range.
  The biggest trick to training a Beagle is to make everything you do with him seem like fun. Never try to force a Beagle to do anything, and never count on a Beagle to be obedient unless you can offer treats as an incentive. This is one breed where it’s important to keep in mind that old saying about catching more flies with honey than with vinegar.
  Your Beagle’s personality will also be affected by the kind of breeder who produced him. Beagles from breeders who produce hunting dogs are more likely to be hard-charging and demanding of exercise. They are unsuited to lying around the house all day while everyone is at work or school. More laid back Beagles typically come from a breeder who shows dogs in conformation.
  Any dog, no matter how nice, can develop obnoxious levels of barking, digging, food stealing and other undesirable behaviors if he is bored, untrained or unsupervised. And any dog can be a trial to live with during adolescence. In the case of the Beagle, the “teen” years can start at six months and continue until the dog is about three years old and sometimes throughout life.   Some Beagles just never lose that fun-loving, happy-go-lucky puppy nature. While it makes them entertaining to live with, it also means that they need more supervision than the average adult dog. Fair warning!
  The perfect Beagle doesn’t spring fully formed from the whelping box. He’s a product of his background and breeding. Whether you want a Beagle as a companion, show dog, hunting dog or all three in one, look for one whose parents have nice personalities and who has been well socialized from early puppyhood.


Health
  The typical longevity of Beagles is 12–15 years, which is a common lifespan for dogs of their size. Beagles may be prone to epilepsy, but this can often be controlled with medication. Hypothyroidism and a number of types of dwarfism occur in Beagles. Two conditions in particular are unique to the breed: "Funny Puppy", in which the puppy is slow to develop and eventually develops weak legs, a crooked back and although normally healthy, is prone to a range of illnesses;Hip dysplasia, common in Harriers and in some larger breeds, is rarely considered a problem in Beagles. Beagles are considered a chondrodystrophic breed, meaning that they are prone to types of disk diseases.
   In rare cases, Beagles may develop immune mediated polygenic arthritis  even at a young age. The symptoms can sometimes be relieved by steroid treatments. Another rare disease in the breed is neonatal cerebellar cortical degeneration. Affected puppies are slow, have lower co-ordination, fall more often and don't have a normal gait. It has an estimated carrier rate of 5% and affected rate of 0.1%. A genetic test is available.
  Their long floppy ears can mean that the inner ear does not receive a substantial air flow or that moist air becomes trapped, and this can lead to ear infections. Beagles may also be affected by a range of eye problems; two common ophthalmic conditions in Beagles are glaucoma and corneal dystrophy. "Cherry eye", a prolapse of the gland of the third eyelid, and distichiasis, a condition in which eyelashes grow into the eye causing irritation, sometimes exist; both these conditions can be corrected with surgery.They can suffer from several types of retinal atrophy. Failure of the nasolacrimal drainage system can cause dry eye or leakage of tears onto the face.

Is this breed right for you?
  Beagles make excellent family pets. They love affection and attention, and their loving personalities make them great pets to have around kids. Their medium-sized builds allow Beagles to feel comfortable in most environments; however, they are a very vocal and energetic breed, so apartment life may not be ideal.

Care
  A fenced backyard is a necessity with a scenthound such as a Beagle. When outside, your Beagle should be on lead in unconfined areas, or securely confined and supervised. He's a wanderer by nature, so in case he escapes — a common occurrence with Beagles — be sure he's microchipped and wearing identification tags on his collar so he can be returned to you.
Some people prefer to use an underground electronic fence, but this type of enclosure doesn't prevent other animals from coming into your yard. Besides, if a scent is enticing enough your Beagle will be more than willing to risk a momentary shock to follow it.
  Like all dogs, Beagles benefit from obedience training. Positive reinforcement techniques work best because Beagles will simply switch off when treated harshly. Most Beagles are more than happy to do anything for a tasty treat.
  Adolescent Beagles are full of energy and need a lot of opportunities to work it all off. They love to go for walks with their family, or, even better, a good run across a field to hunt down rabbits . They'll enjoy jogging with you, but wait until they're 18 months or older before starting them on a repetitive exercise like this.
Grooming
  Beagles are easy-care dogs who don’t need a lot of fancy grooming. A good going-over with a hound mitt once or twice a week removes dead hairs and helps keep them from migrating to clothing and furniture. And that’s the bad news: Beagles shed year-round. The good news: unless your Beagle rolls in something stinky, which is a strong possibility, he shouldn’t need a bath more than three or four times a year.
  Keep your Beagle’s droopy ears clean with a solution recommended by your veterinarian. Don’t use cotton swabs inside the ear; they can push gunk further down into it. Wipe out the ear with a cotton ball, never going deeper than the first knuckle of your finger.
  Trim his nails regularly, usually every couple of weeks. They should never be so long that you hear them clicking on the floor.
  When mature, a Beagle can become fairly lazy, content to lie about the house all day, getting up for meals and perhaps an occasional scratching of the ears. Since this is a breed prone to obesity, don't let this happen.

Living Conditions
 Beagles will do okay in an apartment if they get plenty of chances to be outdoors. They are very active indoors and a small yard will be sufficient.

Exercise
  Energetic and possessing great stamina, the Beagle needs plenty of exercise, including a brisk daily walk. It should have a fenced yard of reasonable size to romp in. Always use a lead when walking this breed or you will be running the risk of it disappearing in search of wild game.

Did You Know?
  Beagles are used as scent detection dogs at U.S. airports, where their friendliness allows them to search for weapons, drugs and illegal food items without making passengers nervous the way a larger “police dog” might.
Children and other pets
  Beagles bond with everyone in the family, especially children. They can be rambunctious when playing, however, so they need to be properly socialized and supervised with very young children. In addition, Beagles tend to be "mouthy," grabbing things, including your or your child's hand, with their mouths to play. They do this in fun and can be trained not to do this.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and supervise any interactions. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Because of their pack dog heritage, Beagles enjoy company and don't like to be left alone. Another dog or even a cat will help meet their companionship needs.

In popular culture
  Beagles have been featured across a wide range of media. References to the dog appear before the 19th century in works by such writers as William Shakespeare, John Webster, John Dryden, Thomas Tickell, Henry Fielding and William Cowper, and in Alexander Pope's translation of Homer's Iliad. Beagles appeared in funny animal comic strips and animated cartoons from the 1950s with the Peanuts character Snoopy, billed as "the world's most famous Beagle",Walt Disney's Beagle Boys, Odie, Garfield's friend and "chew dog" and Beegle Beagle, the constant companion of Hanna-Barbera's Grape Ape. They have appeared in numerous films, taking a central role in Underdog, Cats & Dogs and its sequel, and the title roles in the adaptation of Phyllis Reynolds Naylor's book Shiloh. 
They have played supporting roles in films including Audition, The Monster Squad, I Am Number Four and The Royal Tenenbaums, and on television in Star Trek: Enterprise, EastEnders, The Wonder Years, and To the Manor Born among others. Former US President Lyndon Baines Johnson had several Beagles, and caused an outcry when he picked up one of them by its ears during an official greeting on the White House lawn. The ship on which Charles Darwin made the voyage which provided much of the inspiration for On the Origin of Species was named HMS Beagle after the breed, and, in turn, lent its name to the ill-fated British Martian lander Beagle 2. Gromit of Wallace and Gromit is also a beagle.

A dream day in the life
  Romping with the kids at the park or roaming wide-open spaces with its human best friends would mark an excellent day for this high-energy, attention-loving breed. A day of fun in the sun with plenty to sniff, chase and howl about is just what Beagle dreams are made of. After a few hours of playtime, a cozy nap on a warm lap would top off a perfect day.






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