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Showing posts with label silky. Show all posts
Showing posts with label silky. Show all posts

Saturday, April 8, 2017

Everything about your Tibetan Spaniel

Everything about your Tibetan Spaniel
   A prized pet and watchdog for the Tibetan monasteries, the Tibetan Spaniel is lovingly referred to as a "little lion dog." Thought of highly, the breed was gifted to royals throughout Asia. Given to other countries, the popularity of the Tibetan Spaniel grew. A devoted human companion, the breed is immediately loved by all families that own it.

Overview
  The Tibetan Spaniel, also known as the Tibbie, is a dog breed in the Non-Sporting Group. This little Spaniel is not only an excellent companion, but they are highly valued watch dogs that were once called ‘little lions’ by the Buddhist monks of Tibet. The Tibetan Spaniel was approved by the AKC in 1983.
  The average Tibetan Spaniel stands 10 inches high at the shoulders and weighs between 9 and 15 pounds. Their coat requires frequent brushing to help prevent mats and control shedding, and their ears should be cleaned regularly and frequently checked for any signs of infections.

Highlights
  • Although Tibetan Spaniels can learn quickly, they may be stubborn when it comes to obeying commands.
  • Tibetan Spaniels shed small amounts year-round and need weekly brushing to get rid of dead hair.
  • Although Tibetan Spaniels are affectionate toward and protective of children, they're better suited for homes with older children because they can be injured during rough play.
  • Tibetan Spaniels generally get along well with other dogs and pets. They do well in homes with multiple dogs.
  • Tibetan Spaniels thrive when they're with their families. They're not recommended for homes where they'll receive little attention or will be left alone for long periods.
  • Barking can become a favorite pastime of Tibetan Spaniels if they're bored. They'll also bark when people come to the door or when they hear something suspicious. The upside is, they make great watchdogs.
  • Tibetan Spaniels only need moderate exercise and are quite happy with a daily walk or free play in a fenced yard.
  • Tibetan Spaniels must be walked on leash to prevent them from running off to explore. Yards should be fenced.
  • The Tibetan Spaniel is fairly rare, so if you're buying a puppy, it may take a while to find a good breeder, and once you do, there may be a wait for puppies to be available.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from a puppy mill, a pet store, or a breeder who doesn't provide health clearances or guarantees. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies and who breeds for sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts:
  • When you look at a Tibetan Spaniel, you should see a dog with a rectangular body covered in a silky double coat, dark-brown oval-shaped eyes, medium-size ears that hang down and are well feathered, and a plumed tail that curls over the back, falling to one side.
  • The Tibetan Spaniel’s coat can be any color or mixture of colors.
Breed standards

AKC group: Non-sporting
UKC group: Herding
Average lifespan: 14 - 16 years
Average size: 9 - 15 pounds
Coat appearance: Silky
Coloration: Gold, cream, red and sable with white markings on paws
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Small body, short to the ground and longer than it is tall; dark brown, oval eyes and black nose; feathering between the toes; plump and fluffy feathered tail
Possible alterations: May be multicolored
Comparable Breeds: Japanese Chin, Pekingese

History
  Tibetan Spaniels were bred by Buddhist monks to resemble little lions, which are symbolic of Buddha. Like their cousins the Lhasa Apsos, they served as alarm dogs in Tibetan monasteries. Tibetan Spaniels were highly valued and often presented as gifts to great nobles or rulers. The many exchanges of dogs between Tibet and China mean that the Tibetan Spaniel likely shares a common ancestry with breeds such as the Pekingese, the Japanese Chin, and the Shih Tzu.
  British travelers and missionaries brought some of the dogs to the West in the late 19th century and early 20th century. They include Mrs. McLaren Morris, who brought the first Tibetan Spaniel to England; Sir Edward and Lady Wakefield, who bred several litters; and Colonel and Mrs. Hawkins, who brought a pair of the Wakefields’ dogs to England in 1941. Agnes R. H. Greig, who is also associated with the Tibetan Terrier, sent several to her mother in Britain, but only one from the breeding program survived World War II.
  The dogs didn’t get much attention in the United States until the 1960s when a litter was bred from a pair imported from Tibet. Trinity Lutheran Church sexton Leo Kearns is credited with popularizing the dogs after his litter was snatched up by his parishioners in New Haven, Conn. He imported more Tibetan Spaniels from Britain, and others became interested in the dogs. The Tibetan Spaniel Club of America was formed in 1971, and the American Kennel Club recognized the breed in 1984. Tibbies rank 104th among the dogs registered by the AKC.

Personality
  Trusting and affectionate toward family members, Tibetan Spaniels may be aloof toward strangers, although never aggressive. True to their heritage, they make excellent watchdogs and will bark to alert you of anything that seems unusual.
  Tibbies seem to be especially responsive to their people's moods and feelings. As loving as they are, however, they're independent thinkers and won't always obey, especially if they think they know better or don't see any good reason to do as you ask.
Maud Earl Tibetan Spaniels 1898
  As with all dogs, Tibetan Spaniels need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Tibetan Spaniel puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.

Health Problems
  The Tibetan Spaniel is a generally healthy breed. However, this dog may suffer from the following conditions: progressive retinal atrophy, cherry eye, patellar luxation, allergies, and portosystemic shunt (a liver condition).

Care
  The Tibetan Spaniel breed is meant for apartment life and should not be allowed to live outdoors. The daily exercise needs of the Tibbie are minimal and can be met by indoor and outdoor games or a short on-leash walk. Its coat requires combing and brushing twice weekly.

Living Conditions
  The Tibetan Spaniel is good for apartment life. It is relatively inactive indoors and will do okay without a yard.

Training
  Because of his stubborn streak, the Tibetan Spaniel can be difficult to train. For the best results, start early and establish yourself as the Alfa of the household. If your dog gets the upper hand, this will be difficult to train them out of. For the best results, use positive training reinforcements, such as praise and treats. And keep training sessions short and interesting to hold your dog’s attention. You’ll be happy to learn that Tibetan Spaniels are pretty easy to house train and it is recommended that you crate train your dog.
  Tibetan Spaniels are known to be vocal, alerting you to a stranger’s presence. With patience and consistency, it is possible to train them to stop barking once they’ve alerted you to the possible threat.

Exercise Requirements
  Because of his size, Tibetan Spaniels can live pretty much anywhere. They do as well in an apartment as they would in a large estate. They make wonderful companions for seniors as they don’t need a lot of daily exercise. A daily walk and some play time will cover all his exercise needs. If you have a back yard, do not leave your Tibbie unattended. This dog needs to be with you and will be happiest when playing with you.

Grooming Needs
  Tibetan Spaniels shed lightly year round, and brushing two to three times per week will keep loose hair under control and keep the coat free from tangles or mats. They typically require a bath every six to eight weeks.
  Check the Tibetan Spaniel's ears on a weekly basis for signs of infection, irritation, or wax build up. Cleanse regularly with a veterinarian-approved cleanser and cotton ball. Brush the teeth at least once per week to prevent tartar buildup and fight gum disease. Additionally, nails should be trimmed once per month if the dog does not wear the toenails down naturally.

Children And Other Pets
  Tibetan Spaniels are affectionate and protective of children, but because they're small, they can be injured easily by rough handling, so they're best suited to homes with children who are at least 6 years old and know to be gentle and not to tease.
  As with any dog, always teach children how to approach and touch your Tibetan Spaniel, and supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear pulling from either party.
  Tibetan Spaniels usually get along well with other dogs and cats. Most enjoy having another dog as a companion.

Is this breed right for you?
  A human lover to the bone, the Tibetan Spaniel goes well with young children and other pets. A great family dog, the breed also makes for an excellent watchdog. Suited for apartment life, he is a true-blue inside dog. Enjoying a daily walk and time out in the yard, he is a bit difficult to train. Requiring moderate grooming, the Tibetan Spaniel is a moderate shedder, but does lose a large amount once a year. In need of a master with good leadership skills, the breed is likely to show behavioral problems if allowed to develop small dog syndrome.

Did You Know?
  The Tibbie is not a true Spaniel. He was referred to as an “epagneul,” a French word used in the Middle Ages to refer to small comforter dogs.

A dream day in the life of a Tibetan Spaniel
   The Tibetan Spaniel is likely to wake up with a smile. Happily wagging his tail at his owner, he will gladly follow his master wherever she may go. Running outside for a romp in the yard, he'll bark at any possible intruders. A lover, he'll play with and lick the children at any available opportunity. Kindhearted, he'll be at your feet until the end of the day, where he'll cuddle close for bedtime.



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Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Everything about your Afgan Hound

Everything about your Afgan Hound
  The Afghan Hound is considered an aristocratic sighthound. Tall and slender with a long, narrow, refined head, silky topknot and powerful jaws, the back part of the head and skull are quite prominent. The muzzle is slightly convex and the nose is black. The Afghan has little or no stop, which is the transition area from backskull to muzzle. The teeth should meet in a level or scissors bite. The dark eyes are almond shaped. The ears lie flat to the head. The neck is long and strong. The height at the withers should be almost level and the abdomen well tucked up. The hipbones are quite prominent. The front legs are strong and straight and the feet are large and covered with long hair. The tail has a curl or ring at the tip, but is not carried over the back. The long, rich, silky coat is most often the color of sand with a darker face and ear fringes, though all colors are permitted. White markings, however, are discouraged.

Overview
  The Afghan is built along greyhound-like lines, enabling it to execute a double-suspension gallop and run-down fleet game. The comparatively short back and steep pelvis helped it to leap great heights and to turn almost in place, essential attributes for coursing in rocky mountainous terrain. The large feet gave it a better foothold and were more resistant to injury on rough ground. The silky coat protected the dog from cold nights at high altitudes.   The Afghan appears dignified and aloof, with an exotic expression and proud carriage. This dog's gait shows great elasticity and spring; the Afghan moves with its head and tail high. 
  Despite its glamorous reputation, the Afghan hound is a hunter at heart, bred to chase down game over rugged terrain. While it maintains its regal bearings inside, it needs a daily chance to stretch its legs in a safe area. Its worst trait is a reluctance to come when called. It will chase small animals outside; inside, it will coexist peacefully. Though gentle with children, it may not be playful and interactive enough with them. Described by some as "catlike," it is independent yet sensitive and not overly demonstrative. It is reserved with strangers; some can be timid. It has a gay, clownish side.

Highlights
  • Grooming is essential. Only those who really enjoy grooming, or are willing to pay a professional groomer to do it, should consider an Afghan Hound.
  • The Afghan's natural hunting instinct prompts him to chase prey (the neighbor's cat, your son's rabbit, the third grade class hamster, etc.).
  • The Afghan Hound can be challenging to train due to his independent nature. Training can take a long time and requires patience. House training can be difficult. This breed can continue having accidents in the house up to about six months of age.
  • The Afghan Hound has a low pain tolerance. A minor wound is more bothersome to this breed than to other breeds, and this dog can sometimes seem whiny or babyish.
  • Afghan Hounds are sensitive and high-spirited and do not respond well to rough handling-so be gentle.
  • Although this particular breed is usually good and even loving with children, it is best if the puppy grows up with the children he'll live with and the children are mature enough to understand the importance of being considerate of this dog's sensitive nature.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Afghan’s coat can be any color or combination of colors, including black and tan.
  • The comedic actor Zeppo Marx was an early fan of the Afghan, importing two from Britain in 1931.
  • The Afghan Hound stands out for his distant gaze; long, silky topknot; beautiful coat; prominent hipbones; large feet; and ring tail.
  • Afghan Hounds won Best in Show at Westminster in 1957 and 1983.
Breed standards
AKC group: Hound
UKC group: Sighthound and Pariah
Average lifespan: 12 - 14 years
Average size: 50 - 64 pounds
Coat appearance: Thick, fine, silky
Coloration: Red, off-white, black
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Other identifiers: Tall and slender with long, thin heads and defined skull bone; powerful jawline with black nose and long, outward muzzle; black, almond-shaped eyes; strong neck and flat ears; scooped abdomen, elongated tail, thick, furry and slick coat; lengthy front and hind legs
Possible alterations: May have white markings; coat is kept long with face exposed
Comparable Breeds: American Foxhound, Anatolian Shepherd Dog



History 
  The Afghan Hound is from Afghanistan, but little is known of his early history or how long he has existed. A drawing of one of the dogs, sent home by Thomas Duer Broughton while he was in India in 1809, was published in a book of letters in 1813, so the breed has certainly been around for more than 200 years and likely very much longer. Studies of the canine genome indicate that the Afghan descends from one of the oldest types of dogs.
The dogs in Afghanistan were found in several different types, depending on the region they were from. Dogs from mountainous areas were more compact with darker, heavier coats, while desert-dwelling dogs were more rangy, with coats that were lighter in both color and volume. They were used to course fast-running game such as deer and antelope, as well as hares, wolves and jackals. Hunting in partnership with falcons, they flushed quail and partridges for the falcon to bring down or the hunter to shoot.
  British military officers brought the dogs to the West after being posted to the India-Afghanistan border. The dogs died out in Europe during World War I because food shortages limited the breeding and keeping of dogs, but breeding began again in 1920 when some desert-type Afghans were imported to Scotland by people who had been stationed in Baluchistan. Some of the mountain-type dogs were sent from Kabul to England in 1925.   During the same decade, Americans imported some of the Afghans from Britain. The American Kennel Club recognized the breed in 1926, but the Afghan Hound Club of America wasn’t formed until 1937. Today the Afghan ranks 86th among the breeds registered by the AKC.



Personality
  The Afghan Hound is typically a one-person or one-family dog. Do not look for this hound to eagerly greet your guests. More likely, he will offend them by being indifferent to their presence. While some hounds may bark once or twice when a stranger enters the home, this breed is not known to be a good watchdog.
  The independent thinking of the Afghan makes it a challenge to train. This hound is generally not motivated by food and does not possess as strong a desire to please as many other breeds . Though the Afghan makes a stunning presentation in the show ring, for example, more than one professional handler has been embarrassed in the ring by a refusal to cooperative. Even so, this breed is known for outperforming other breeds when the decision to do so is his own.
  Rough handling can cause this dog to become withdrawn or mildly antagonistic. Gentle handling, kindness, and patience work best with this breed, along with an understanding that there will be times when the dog simply will not cooperate.

Health
  The Afghan Hound, which has an average lifespan of 12 to 14 years, is not susceptible to any major health concerns. It should be noted that the breed can suffer from tail injuries and reacts to barbiturate anesthesia. Health ailments like canine hip dysplasia (CHD), cataract and necrotic myelopathy are also occasionally seen in the breed. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may run hip and eye exams on the dog.

Care
  This perfect house dog requires careful brushing and combing of its coat. Special care should be given at the time when the dog sheds its puppy coat. The Afghan Hound also requires daily exercise such as a long walk or a short sprint. In fact, this hound loves to run at a fast pace in small areas. Afghan Hound lovers should make it a point to provide the dog outdoor access and a nice, soft bed.

Living Conditions
  The Afghan Hound is not recommended for apartment life. They are relatively inactive indoors and do best with acreage. This breed can live in or outdoors, although it would be happier sleeping indoors.

Exercise
  The Afghan Hound needs to be taken on a long daily walk or jog. While out on the walk the dog must be made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as in a dog's mind the leader leads the way, and that leader needs to be the human. Dogs that do not get to go on daily walks are more likely to display behavior problems. Teach them to enter and exit door and gateways after the humans. They will also enjoy running free in an open, fenced, safe area.

Grooming
  The Afghan Hound has long, thick, silky hair with a fine texture. The coat does not need to be clipped or trimmed; the dog wears it in all its glory. The finishing touch is a topknot of long, silky hair.
  Grooming is an essential part of living with an Afghan. Plan to brush and comb the Afghan Hound’s thick, silky hair three times a week to prevent or remove mats and tangles, and bathe him as needed. You may want to invest in a professional dog blow dryer if you bathe him frequently.
  The Afghan sheds moderately. The more often you brush him, the less hair you will have falling off the dog and onto your floors, furniture and clothing.
The rest is basic care. Trim the nails at least monthly, and keep the long, hanging ears clean and dry to prevent infections. At mealtime, you’ll probably want to put the ears up in a snood to keep them from dragging in the food dish. Good dental hygiene is also important. Brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath.

Is this breed right for you?
  The Afghan Hound is a playful pup who needs and loves a lot of exercise. Great companions with a love of the outdoors, Afghan Hounds need a home that will give them plenty of space to stretch their legs. Best as one person's pet or as the only pet of the family with older children, Afghan Hounds will need an owner that can devote plenty of time to grooming their long, beautiful, thick coat.

Children and other pets
  The Afghan's independent nature and large size make him best suited as an adult companion. The Afghan is not likely to want to follow around and play with children. In fact, a child's quick movements and noise level can startle the Afghan. With proper socialization, though, the Afghan can adjust to life in a family with children and be loving and with them.
  The Afghan tends to most enjoy the company of his own kind-other Afghan Hounds. The Afghan will tolerate, even be indifferent, to other pets in a household. Not surprisingly, the Afghan's hunter's instinct leads him to chase small animals, especially if they run away.

In popular culture
  Because of its distinctive appearance, the Afghan hound has been represented in animated feature films and TV shows, including Universal Pictures' Balto (Sylvie), Disney's Lady and the Tramp II (Ruby), and Brainy Barker from Krypto the Superdog, an Afghan hound also appeared on 101 Dalmatians as well as in 102 Dalmatians as one of the dogs in Cruella De Vil's party and the television series What-a-Mess (Prince Amir of Kinjan; based on children's books by Frank Muir) and, as Prissy in the 1961 Disney animated film One Hundred and One Dalmatians and 101 Dalmatians II: Patch's London Adventure. Afghan hounds have also been featured in television advertisements and in fashion magazines. The Afghan hound is represented in books as well, including being featured in a series of mystery novels by Nina Wright (Abra), and a talking Afghan Hound in David Rothman's The Solomon Scandals (2008, Twilight Times Books). In the novel Between the Acts, Virginia Woolf uses an Afghan hound (named Sohrab) to represent aspects of one of the book's human characters.
  On August 3, 2005, Korean scientist Hwang Woo-Suk announced that his team of researchers had become the first team to successfully clone a dog, an Afghan Hound named Snuppy. In 2006 Hwang Woo-Suk was dismissed from his university position for fabricating data in his research. Snuppy, nonetheless, was a genuine clone, and thus the first cloned dog in history.
  The Afghan Hound features prominently in the avant-garde music video of popular French band M83's, "Set in Stone ."

Did You Know?
  British military officers brought this breed to the West after being posted to the India-Afghanistan border.

A dream day in the life of an Afghan Hound
  Waking up early in the morning with a bowl of chow, the Afghan Hound is ready and waiting for his morning grooming session. After a good brushing, he's yearning to get out and explore the outside world. He'll chase squirrels right off the property while his owner applauds, and after a few laps around the backyard, he'll engage in a wonderful game of play with his master. Going inside for a nice nap, he'll sleep at his owner's feet as he's lovingly brushed down for the second time that day. Another few runs in the yard and the Afghan Hound will happily snuggle down in his dog bed.
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