LUV My dogs: siberian Husky

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Showing posts with label siberian Husky. Show all posts
Showing posts with label siberian Husky. Show all posts

Thursday, June 28, 2018

Everything about your Labrador Husky

Everything about your Labrador Husky
  Though the name of this breed might suggest that it is a cross between the Labrador Retriever and the Siberian Husky, the Labrador Husky is actually a completely separate breed. This dog looks remarkably like a wolf, having the same double coat and wild appearance. The dog is still a largely unknown breed but if you are lucky enough to meet one you will never forget the experience.

Overview
  The Labrador Husky has a similar temperament to other Northern breeds which means that they can often be unfriendly or even aggressive with strangers.  However, they can be good if socialized, and they often do well with children.  Being with other dogs always makes them happy, because they are bred to work well in a pack and actually many people believe they should be bought in pairs.  Small animals do not usually do well with Nordic dogs but if they are raised together it should be fine.  Training is easy and fun for them because they naturally learns things well.  However, sometimes stubbornness will prevent them from learning silly tricks or other useless commands.  Intelligence can be their gift but can be your nightmare if they are bored.

Breed standards
Dog Breed Group: Mixed Breed Dogs
Average lifespan: 10-13 years
Average size: 60 - 100 pounds
Coat appearance: Thick double coat - thick undercoat and soft outer coat
Coloration: Solid white, solid black, black and white, red and white, and grey and white
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, active families, active singles, house with a yard
Temperament: Friendly, good-natured, intelligent, quiet
Comparable Breeds: Siberian Husky, Canadian Eskimo Dog

History
  In order to best understand the history of the Labrador Husky, an explanation of the people that these dogs live alongside and serve is necessary. The Thule Inuit people developed along the coast of Alaska sometime after 200 B.C. These people migrated east across Canada, along with their dogs, and occupied the Labrador region by 1300 A.D. The Dorset people originally inhabited this region, but due in part to their lack of canine use for travel, hunting, and companionship, they were driven to extinction by the Inuit. The Inuit brought Husky dogs with them , and over time, bred these dogs with wolves to improve their strength and endurance. As these people became indigenous to the Labrador region, this breed developed independently from the aforementioned Spitz dogs, and became distinct.
  The Labrador Huskies were used for transportation as sled dogs. Prior to the advent of the snowmobile, sleds were the only viable means of transportation across large swaths of land. The dogs contributed to the hunting success of the Inuit people, allowing them to travel further and hunt in a wider geographical range. In addition, the dogs helped keep their human companions warm in encampments. After the snowmobile was invented, these dogs were not needed as sled dogs, except in sled races, but have been utilised as companions and as search-and-rescue canines. In addition, due to their intelligence, they have also been used in bomb or narcotic detection.


Temperament
  The Labrador Husky is an unknown and often misunderstood breed. It is not a mix between a Labrador and a Husky, but a purebred dog native of coastal Labrador. It is similar in a lot of ways to the wolf. It does not bark, but can howl like a wolf. The objective in training this dog is to achieve pack leader status. It is a natural instinct for a dog to have an order in its pack. When we humans live with dogs, we become their pack. 
  The entire pack cooperates under a single leader. Lines are clearly defined and rules are set. Because a dog communicates his displeasure with growling and eventually biting, all other humans MUST be higher up in the order than the dog. The humans must be the ones making the decisions, not the dogs. That is the only way your relationship with your dog can be a complete success.

Health
  The Labrador Husky is fairly unknown so not much information is available about genetic disorders or their life expectancy.  However, special care has been taken in their breeding which could suggest that few health problems exist.

Care
  The Labrador Husky probably needs plenty of brushing as any double coated breed would.  Plus, they shed once a year and during that time they should be brushed every day to make sure the loose hair gets cleaned from their coat.  Exercise is, of course, essential to this sled dog.  A large yard to run in and long walks will help keep them calm.  However, they should also have some sort of work to do such as agility or fly ball which will keep them calm and happy.

Training
  The Labrador Husky is an intelligent breed so it should respond well to training. These dogs are likely to learn quickly as long as you maintain a firm and consistent hand in training. Positive reinforcement training methods are recommended for this breed and you should keep your training sessions short and fun to ensure that your dog doesn’t lose interest and stop paying attention. Because this breed is so smart it needs plenty of mental and physical stimulation to prevent it from becoming bored and developing destructive behaviors.

Exercise
  This breed needs to be taken on a daily long walk or jog. While out on the walk the dog must be made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as in a dog's mind the leader leads the way, and that leader needs to be the human.

Grooming
  Labrador Huskies require extensive grooming during all parts of the year. Its extremely thick and durable coat, also known as a double coat. was made to be able to withstand harsh winters in Labrador Canada. Daily brushing is required to maintain the coat. A bath is sometimes the best way to fully groom and clean the dog. Bathing the dog does not have to be done on a regular basis, but is important in order to ensure a clean and well-groomed dog. It is also vital that the owner of a Labrador Husky checks for fleas and ticks during the warmer months. 
  Because this dog has such a thick coat, it is the perfect place for a tick or flea to nestle in. Not checking for these things can lead to serious problems such as Lyme disease, which can be life-threatening to the dog. The Labrador Husky sheds constantly throughout the year, so it is important to keep up with its grooming.




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Tuesday, June 26, 2018

Everything about your Pomsky

Everything about your Pomsky
  Cute, silly, and suited for apartment life, the Pomsky is a dog that likes to be the center of attention, and with their adorable looks and playful antics, they often get the adoration they crave. Their unfortunate start as a designer breed mixed between Siberian Husky and Pomeranian parents hasn’t stopped them from earning popularity with dog lovers. Unfortunately, those who rush to buy Pomsky puppies from breeders are often overwhelmed and unprepared for their needs, and dogs of this breed sometimes find themselves left at shelters or with rescue groups. 

Overview
  The Pomsky is a mixed breed the result of crossing the Siberian Husky with a Pomeranian. She is a medium sized dog with a life span of 13 to 15 years. She is bred using artificial insemination as natural breeding would be dangerous due to the size difference between the parents. She is a fun and watchful dog who is great for families with older kids, couples or singles or seniors as long as she can be given the exercise she needs.
  The Pomsky is a dog best suited for a household that does not have children or other pets unless she is going to be raised with them. Early socialization and training are important for her. If you love the look of the Husky but do not have the room or the energy for a purebred the Pomsky is a great though expensive substitute.

Highlights
  • Pomsky are very trainable, but may inherit some stubbornness from the Siberian Husky, so they are best suited for experienced dog owners.
  • The Pomsky's thick coat makes it more tolerant of cold weather than most other kinds of lap dogs.
  • Pomskies are vocal dogs that tend to be yappy if they aren't properly trained.
  • The coat of the breed comes in a variety of colors, just like its parent breeds.
  • Socialization with other dogs and people is important, especially at an early age.
  • Pomsky are highly adaptable, don't have large space requirements, and only have moderate exercise needs, making them good apartment dogs.
Other Quick Facts

  • A Pomsky typically has a soft, fluffy, silky coat, prick ears and a furry tail that swishes over the back.
  • The Pomsky is usually bred from a Siberian Husky female and a Pomeranian male. Breedings are usually done through artificial insemination because of the size difference in the two breeds.
  • The size of a Pomsky can vary dramatically, from toy size to medium size. Like their parent breeds, the dogs can come in many different patterns and colors, such as grey/white, brown red, blue merle, blonde and more.
Breed standards
Dog Breed Group: Mixed Breed Dogs
Average lifespan: 12 to 15 years
Average size: 20-30 lb
Coat appearance: Fluffy, soft, wavy, double
Coloration: black-and-white coloration,this breed can exhibit a wide range of colors including black, grey, brown, red, blue, blonde, and more
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with older children, singles and seniors, apartments and houses with/without yards
Temperament: Loving, friendly, energetic, playful
Comparable Breeds: Pomeranian, Siberian Husky

History
  Pomsky breeders have formed the Pomsky Club of America, with the goal of achieving a recognized purebred dog. This can take years, however, and will not be accomplished any time soon.
  But crossing two breeds over and over does not a breed make. To achieve consistency in appearance, size and temperament, breeders must select the puppies with the traits they want and breed them over several generations for the traits to become set.
Crossbreeds such as Pomskies have become popular over the past 10 or 20 years as people seek out dogs that are different from the everyday Yorkie or Poodle. It’s also often claimed that crossbreeds are hypoallergenic or have fewer health problems or will carry the best traits of each breed, but this just isn’t true.
  Whatever his breed, cross or mix, love your dog for what he is: a unique and loving companion.

Personality
  The Pomsky is a bit of a comedian and tends to know that its cute antics will be met with plenty of adoration from human onlookers. They are highly adaptable to change, and their moderate exercise needs make them fairly suited to apartment living, so long as they get at least one long walk per day. That said, they tend to inherit their Husky parents' chatty howling and whining tendencies along with their Pomeranian parents' penchant for yapping.   This makes them very vocal dogs that may get on the neighbors' nerves. Also, they shed a ton, so be prepared to find hair everywhere and have some lint rollers and a vacuum cleaner at the ready. Pomskies tend to latch on to one favorite family member, though they may get along with all humans in the household. Socialization is very important and should begin at an early age. Pomskies can be nervous around strangers if they haven't been properly socialized.

Health
Since the breed is so new, not much is known about any common Pomsky health conditions. Keep in mind, though, that as is common with most mixed breeds, any hereditary health conditions that show up in either the Pomerian  or the Husky  may show up in your Pomsky, as well.

Care
As with any other breed, Pomskies need to be groomed on a regular basis to make sure their coats and skin are kept in top condition. They also need to be given regular daily exercise to ensure they remain fit and healthy. On top of this, dogs need to be fed good quality food that meets all their nutritional needs throughout their lives.

Living Conditions
The Pomsky’s generally small size makes this breed the perfect companion for someone living in an apartment all the way up to a larger home.

Training
Pomskies are highly intelligent and respond well to reward based training methods. However, they can sometimes inherit the Pomeranian’s stubbornness and the willfulness of the Siberian Husky and should therefore be handled with calm and assertive leadership. Failure to do so can result in “small dog syndrome” and other behavioral problems. For instance, Pomskies can be prone to resource guarding like the Pomeranians, and catching early signs of this behavioral problem will help you eliminate before it becomes a serious issue.
  For most new dog owners, it’s important to start with the basics such as potty training and learning to walk on a leash. Depending on the breeder you’ve got your Pomsky from and the puppy’s age, they might already know a trick or two, but it’s also highly likely you’ll need to be the one that that housetrains them. Training a puppy is not an easy feat, but it’s important to teach your Pomsky fur baby manners while they’re still young. If they sniff out you’re not an alpha, they’ll shamelessly exploit your weak side to their advantage- as any smart pupper would do!

Exercise
  Pomskies are high energy, intelligent dogs, much like both parent breeds. As such they must be given the right amount of daily exercise and as much mental stimulation as possible for them to be truly happy, well-rounded dogs. They need to be given a minimum of 30 to 40 minutes exercise a day, but more would be better so that boredom does not set in which could lead to a Pomsky developing some unwanted behavioural issues around the home.
  A shorter walk in the morning would be fine, but a longer more interesting one in the afternoon is a must. These dogs also like to be able to roam around a back garden as often as possible so they can really let off steam. However, the fencing must be extremely secure to keep these energetic dogs in because if they find a weakness in the fence, they will soon escape out and get into all sorts of trouble.

Grooming
  A Pomsky has a double coat that is usually soft, fluffy and silky. Brush or comb the Pomsky coat with a bristle brush at least weekly to distribute skin oils and prevent or remove mats and tangles.
  Bathe a Pomsky as needed. That might be weekly , monthly or somewhere in between.
Twice a year he “blows coat” as it’s called, losing a great deal of hair so new hair can grow in. This period can last up to three months during each shedding season — typically spring and fall. Brushing him daily at this time will help to ensure that loose fur comes out when you want it to and helps to keep it off your clothing and furniture.
  Other grooming needs include trimming his nails every few weeks, keeping his ears clean and dry and brushing his teeth regularly — daily if you can — with a vet-approved pet toothpaste. Small dogs can be especially prone to periodontal disease.

Children And Other Pets
  Pomskies are often wary of small children who may not be properly trained on how to handle animals, and they can nip if they feel uncomfortable or threatened. They can get along with other dogs if they are socialized, especially if they have been raised with them, though the high prey drive they inherit from the Husky means they might like to give chase to smaller animals like cats. It is best to socialize them early, especially if you plan to have them in a household with children or other pets.

Fun Facts About the Pomsky
  • The Pomsky is usually made by crossing a female Siberian Husky with a male Pomeranian to avoid complications caused by the smaller Pomeranian bearing a litter of larger puppies.
  • There is no way to predict which characteristics the Pomsky will inherit from each parent breed, but many Pomskies become protective of their owners and are skittish around children – they may not be the best family pet.
  • Though the black-and-white Husky-like coloration is the most popular for Pomskies, these dogs can range in coat type and length as well as color, including shades of brown, red, and even blonde.
  • Is the Pomsky a vulnerable breed? No, they have become one of the more popular cross breeds thanks to their kind natures and charming looks
  • A Pomsky’s sire is a Pomeranian and their dam is a Siberian Husky to avoid birthing complications
  • They come in lots of sizes, but prospective owners should be careful when considering buying an extra small Pomsky because of the health issues associated with their size
Did You Know?
Pomskies can be smart and learn quickly, especially when motivated by praise and food rewards.
  
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Wednesday, December 27, 2017

Everything about your Alaskan Klee Kai

Everything about your Alaskan Klee Kai
  The Alaskan Klee Kai was developed fairly recently by a woman in Alaska who took a strong interest in a small dog resembling a Husky. Over time other breeders became interested in furthering the development of the Alaskan Klee Kai; however, it is still considered a rare breed.

Overview
  Small, smart, and energetic, the Alaskan Klee Kai is a relatively new breed that looks like a smaller version of the Siberian Husky, and even the name “Klee Kai” comes from an Inuit term meaning “small dog.” While Alaskan Klee Kais may resemble larger Husky breeds, they have some key differences, especially when it comes to temperament, that distinguish it from its ancestor working class dogs of the north. 
  This breed is more suited to the life of a companion, though the Alaskan Klee Kai shares the high energy of the Huskies and demands plenty of exercise. They also tend to be shy around strangers and are prone to expressing their emotions with whines and barks. An inexperienced owner would find it difficult to take on the challenge of caring for an Alaskan Klee Kai, but for an owner that keeps up with training and physical activity, this breed is sweet, loyal, and happy to shower loved ones with affection.

Highlights
  • The words "Klee Kai" come from an Inuit term meaning "small dog," which is appropriate for this breed that is a smaller version of its Husky ancestors.
  • The breed hails from Alaska where it was developed in the 1970s and 1980s to be a companion dog, rather than a working sled dog.
  • Although it is not recognized by the American Kennel Club, Alaskan Klee Kais are a recognized breed in the United Kennel Club and the American Rare Breed Association among others.
  • Solid white Alaskan Klee Kais do exist, but breed standards do not include this coat color.
  • Although they can shed a lot, Alaskan Klee Kais do not require much grooming and mostly take care of themselves.
  • Because they are skittish around strangers, these dogs require early socialization training that should last for the rest of their lives if they are to be friendly to unfamiliar faces.
  • The high prey drive of the Alaskan Klee Kai may make them ill suited for homes with other small pets such as cats, rabbits, hamsters, etc. Though they love their human families, small children that are not taught how to interact with dogs may inadvertently hurt Alaskan Klee Kais during play or provoke them to nip or snap.
Breed standards

Dog Breed Group: Companion Dogs
UKC group: Northern Breed
Average lifespan: 12-15 years
Average size: 10 to 15 pounds
Coat appearance: Double coat
Coloration: red and white, black and white, or gray and white, though solid white 
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: families with older children, apartment, houses with/without yards, active singles and seniors
Temperament: Intelligent, energetic, loyal, curious
Comparable Breeds: Siberian Husky, American Eskimo Dog

History
  The breed was developed in Wasilla, Alaska, from the early 1970s to 1988 by Linda S. Spurlin and her family. The breed was developed with Siberian and Alaskan Huskies, using Schipperke and American Eskimo Dog to bring down the size without dwarfism. She bred these dogs in private until she released them to the general public in 1988. Originally called the Klee Kai, the breed split into Alaskan Klee Kai and Klee Kai for political reasons in 1995. 
  The breed consolidated as its current name in 2002. Though a relatively new breed the Alaskan Klee Kai has a rich history. They are extremely energetic and intelligent, and their northern heritage is evident in their appearance. In contrast to Siberian Huskies, which were originally bred as sled dogs, the Alaskan Klee Kai were bred as companion dogs. The Alaskan Klee Kai was officially recognized by the American Rare Breed Association  in 1995 and by the United Kennel Club  on January 1, 1997.



Personality
  Alaskan Klee Kais are intelligent, energetic, and loving to their families. They don't much care for strangers and require lifelong socialization training if they are to be friendly to new people. Their wariness of new faces does, however, make them excellent watchdogs. When it comes to training, Alaskan Klee Kais are quick to pick up on basic commands and may even find themselves at the top of the class. 
  They are eager to please and highly food motivated, and they are more than capable of taking on agility training, which can help burn off some of their high energy throughout the day. Once they have at least a good, long walk and a healthy play session, they're usually happy to spend the rest of the day being couch potatoes, but neglect their exercise needs, and they may become bored, anxious, and destructive. Be careful on walks, as these dogs have a high prey drive that may cause them to bolt if they see wildlife. Alaskan Klee Kais love to be the centers of attention in their families, but they will also be vocal when their needs are not being met. Though they do not tend to be overly mouthy and are generally quieter than their Husky forbears, they will bark and whine to express their displeasure, and they can be sensitive.

Health
  The Alaskan Klee Kai is considered to be quite a healthy breed with few genetic problems. However, owners should be aware that the breed is predisposed to certain conditions that they should keep an eye out for, including luxating patella, thyroid disease, heart conditions, liver shunts, factor VII deficiency, and cataracts. They may also keep their baby teeth, which can cause problems when adult teeth grow in. They may need to have these teeth removed.

Care
  When it comes to Alaskan Klee Kai care, it is very important to make sure their exercise needs are met, as they may become high strung and anxious if they do not have an outlet to burn off energy. Like any dog breed, they require regular teeth brushings, nail clippings, and ear cleanings. You should ask your veterinarian about your dog's specific needs.

Living Conditions
  Because of their size, these dogs can live in an apartment, but a house with at least a small yard is recommended.

Training
  Due to its high intelligence, the Alaskan Klee Klai typically responds well to training. These dogs are quick learners and they enjoy being given a task to complete. For this reason, Alaskan Klee Klais excel in obedience training as well as agility – agility training also gives the dog a way to exercise its brain as well as its body. Because this breed is prone to developing Small Dog Syndrome, it is essential that you start training early and that you maintain a firm and consistent hand.

Exercise Requirements
  The Alaskan Klee Klai is a very active and energetic breed that requires a significant amount of daily exercise. This breed can be adaptable to apartment life but you will need to take the dog for a long walk on a daily basis. Regular playtime is also encouraged to help this breed work off its energy.

Grooming
  Unlike many other breeds, Alaskan Klee Kais do not usually develop a dog odor, and they generally like to groom themselves, so they may not need to bathe as frequently as some other dogs. They will likely need regular brushing during the seasons in which their coats blow out, which happens before summer and winter. During this time, they tend to shed profusely, while they only shed moderately the rest of the year.

Children And Other Pets
  The Alaskan Klee Kai is a dedicated family dog that loves its humans, even children. However, they are small dogs, and children that are very young are not always taught how to interact with animals. They may injure or provoke Alaskan Klee Kais to nip. Children should always be supervised when playing with dogs, and the Alaskan Klee Kai is no exception to that rule. 
  Alaskan Klee Kais are usually good with other dogs, especially if they have been socialized early on, though they have a high prey drive. This makes them ill suited for homes that have smaller pets unless they are specifically trained to live with them.

Is the Alaskan Klee Kai the Right Breed for you?
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Moderately Easy Training: The Alaskan Klee Kai is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Very Active: It will need daily exercise to maintain its shape. Committed and active owners will enjoy performing fitness activities with this breed.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.
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Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Everything about your Swedish Vallhund

Everything about your Swedish Vallhund
  The Swedish Vallhund is a member of the Spitz family, so you might recognize its thick double coat and curled tail. Unlike many Spitz-type breeds, however, the Vallhund has a short, stout stature that is more like that of the Corgi than the Siberian Husky. These little dogs are energetic and playful, eager to make friends and to spend time with family. As well, this breed comes with one of three different types of tail: no tail (bobtail), a stub tail or a full curl tail. If you are looking for a friendly dog with a loving personality, the Swedish Vallhund may be right for you.

Overview
  True to his heritage as a working farm dog breed, the Swedish Vallhund is an intelligent and alert companion. He is an active dog who needs an equally active owner. Train him for dog sports or give him a job to do around the house, and you’ll get along fine with him. The Swedish Vallhund is generally healthy, although he can fall victim to a hereditary eye disease called retinopathy. His medium-length coat comes in many different colors and combinations.

Highlights
  • The Swedish Vallhund bears a strong resemblance to the Cardigan and Pembroke Welsh Corgis, but genetically they do not appear to be all that closely related.
  • A Swedish Vallhund’s tail may be long, stubby or bobbed. All tail types, natural or docked, are equally acceptable.
  • The Vallhund has wedge-shaped head with medium-size ears that stand erect.
  • Swedish Vallhunds do not respond well to harsh verbal or physical corrections.
  • The Vallhund can become a nuisance barker, especially if he is frequently left alone.
  • The Vallhund is a herding breed and may nip at children’s ankles as they run by.
  • The Vallhund is not necessarily a good “first dog.” He requires plenty of socialization, training, and exercise to be a good companion.
Other Quick Facts:
  • The Swedish Vallhund’s coat has harness markings, bands of light color running down the sides from the shoulders. Some nicely marked Vallhunds have a mask of lighter hair around the eyes, on the muzzle, and under the throat, contrasting with the head color.
  • Within a single Swedish Vallhund litter, puppies can have natural bobtails or the traditional long Spitz tail.
Breed standards
AKC group: Working Dogs
UKC group: Herding Dogs
Average lifespan: 12 to 15 years
Average size: 22 to 35 pounds
Coat appearance: Dense, Harsh and Rough, and Thick
Coloration:  sable pattern of gray to red or combinations of colors in various shades.
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles and seniors, houses with yards
Temperament: Even-tempered, friendly, energetic, intelligent
Comparable Breeds: Cardigan Welsh Corgi, Pembroke Welsh Corgi

History
  The Swedish Vallhund is an ancient, national dog breed of Sweden and may date back to the 8th or 9th century. Swedish Vallhunds originated in the county of Västergötland, which lies just south of Vänern. Here the small dog proved to be excellent for watching, guarding and herding. The breed dates to the Viking settlement of England and is thought to have played a part in the development of the modern Welsh Corgi and the Lancashire Heeler.   According to the American Kennel Club, another theory of the breed's origin is that during the eighth or ninth century "either the Swedish Vallhund was brought to Wales or the Corgi was taken to Sweden, hence the similarities between the two breeds".
  The Swedish Vallhund is related to larger spitz dogs and moose hunting dogs of Scandinavia. Large dogs of this spitz-type have been found buried with their masters in stone-age settlements in Scandinavia. The skeleton of a Swedish Vallhund is remarkably similar to that of the modern Norwegian Elkhound, another breed of spitz dog.
  The Swedish Kennel Club recognized the breed in 1943, making the Valhund a popular pet in both Sweden and Britain. The dogs were first brought to the United States in 1983, and the American Kennel Club recognized the Vallhund in 2007. Today he ranks 142nd among the breeds registered by the AKC.



Personality
  The Swedish Vallhund dates back to the Vikings who used these short, sturdy animals to herd cattle. Like their Viking friends, Vallhunds are strong and fearless, and their owners believe these dogs have no idea they are so small. They are friendly, spirited and eager to please, they get along well with children and can be trusted around other household pets, though they won't hesitate to chase strange dogs and cats. 
  Vallhunds can be used as farm dogs and are truly in their element around livestock. Vallhunds individual personalities vary from dog to dog – some are more outgoing while others are more introverted, but all Vallhunds are loyal companions who make an excellent addition to families with active lifestyles.

Health
  The Swedish Vallhund lives an average lifespan of 12 to 15 years. The health issue most associated with this dog breed is progressive retinal atrophy, a genetic disease that causes blindness in both eyes.

Care
  The Vallhund’s short legs belie his agility and speed. He corners like a race car and is an excellent agility competitor. He is sturdy and muscular and packs a big punch for his size.As a herding breed, he is bred to move flocks long distances. Even if he doesn’t do that for a living anymore, he still needs daily exercise in the form of a long walk or hike or training for a dog sport such as agility. If he gets the activity he needs, the Vallhund is happy in any environment, from city condo to country estate.
 With his short legs and long back, the Vallhund can be prone to back injuries if mishandled. Because their skeletal development is not yet complete, avoid letting puppies jump on and off furniture. Don’t pick them up without supporting both the front legs and the rear end. The Vallhund has a weather-resistant coat designed to withstand the harsh elements of Sweden, but that doesn’t mean he’s an outside dog. He is highly people-oriented and should never be shunted off to the backyard with little human interaction.

Living Conditions
  The Swedish Vallhund will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. This breed is very active indoors and will do okay without a yard.

Trainability
  As herding dogs, Swedish Vallhunds are independent thinkers and can be a tad bossy. They prefer to do things on their own time, so a lot of patience is required when training this breed. Positive reinforcement and lots of treats will ensure a responsive Vallhund. Once consistent leadership is established, they take well to training and enjoy learning new tasks.
  After beginning obedience training is complete, Swedish Vallhunds should graduate to advanced training and if possible, involved in tracking and agility classes. This is one “old dog” that likes to learn new tricks, and training should continue throughout their lives.

Exercise 
  The Swedish Vallhund was bred to be a herding dog so they are a fairly active and energetic breed. These dogs tend to thrive when given a job to do and they are excellent at a number of dog sports including obedience, agility trials, herding, flyball, and tracking. This dog requires a long walk every day to meet his exercise requirements.

Activity Requirements
  Despite their high energy level, Swedish Vallhunds only need a moderate amount of exercise to maintain health and happiness. They are adaptable dogs who can thrive on a ranch, in a home with a yard, in an apartment or condominium. They should be walked daily, and if they don't have a yard to play in at home, should be allowed to run in a park at least once a week.
  Vallhunds need a lot of mental stimulation so that they don't get bored. As with other breeds who have roots as farm dogs, they like to stay busy. They excel in agility training and advanced obedience. If not properly exercised physically and mentally, Vallhunds can become anxious and destructive when left alone.

Grooming
  The Vallhund has a medium-length double coat. Double-coated dogs shed, so expect to find hair on your clothing and furniture. Brush the coat once or twice a week to remove dead hair and reduce the amount of loose hair floating around your house. The only other kind of grooming you need to do is to trim the hair on the footpads.
  The rest is basic care: Trim his nails as needed, usually every week or two, and brush his teeth regularly with a vet-approved pet toothpastefor good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Vallhunds usually love children, but their herding instincts can motivate them to nip at a youngster’s feet or ankles. They can learn quickly, however, that this behavior is not permitted. As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. 
  Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child. Vallhunds are usually friendly toward other pets in the household, including cats, so long as they have been socialized with them from an early age. They enjoy having a second or third dog in the family to play with, especially another Vallhund.

Is the Swedish Vallhund the Right Breed for you?
Moderate Maintenance: Regular grooming is required to keep its fur in good shape. No trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Easy Training: The Swedish Vallhund is known to listen to commands and obey its owner. Expect fewer repetitions when training this breed.
Very Active: It will need daily exercise to maintain its shape. Committed and active owners will enjoy performing fitness activities with this breed.
Not Good for New Owners: This breed is best for those who have previous experience with dog ownership.
Not Good with Kids: In isolation, this dog breed might not be the best option for kids. However, to mitigate the risks, have the puppy grow up with kids and provide it with plenty of pleasant and relaxed experiences with them.

Did You Know?
  Though the Swedish Vallhund resembles a Corgi, you can see differences in the head and coat pattern.




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Friday, January 13, 2017

15 Dog Breeds That Love The Snow

15 Dog Breeds That Love The Snow
  Winter is on its way here. It’s time to bring out the doggy boots, coats, and cold-weather gear to keep your pup from being miserable on those chilly walks. But some breeds aren’t miserable in the snowy weather at all. To them, it’s the most wonderful time of the year. They’re happy to eat snowflakes, chase snowballs, and make snow angel-dogs while you stand there freezing. Here are ten dog breeds who love the snow.

1. Alaskan Malamute
  The Alaskan Malamute is a descendent of the Arctic wolf, and with its thick double coat and large, tough paws, it can handle the snowiest of days. Known for pulling sleds through the snow and having a love for being outdoors, the Alaskan Malamute is a terrific companion for your polar adventures.

2. Akita
  An Akita is truly a royal pup—hailing from Japan, this breed was once only owned by the Imperial family. Statues of the Akita were also given as gifts to new parents to bring health, happiness, and a long life. This dog, originally bred as a cold-weather hunting companion with a dense undercoat and harsh outer coat, can often be independent and stubborn, but will remain protective and loyal to its family.

3. Pembroke Welsh Corgi
  Pembroke Welsh Corgis are believed to be descended from Vallhunds–Swedish cattle dogs brought by the Vikings to Wales–so you know they’re tough. They have a double coat, the undercoat being thick and covered by the longer topcoat. And they shed pretty consistently throughout the year, especially when the weather changes. This makes them well-prepared for romps in the snow, which they’ll most likely love.

4. Bernese Mountain Dog
  Originally from Switzerland, the Bernese Mountain Dog is a loyal, sweet breed that would love nothing more than to go on a nice long walk through a winter wonderland. Its cheerful attitude will definitely put on a smile on anyone's face.

5. Siberian Husky
  Famous for his sledding prowess, the Siberian Husky wears a thick double coat that makes him well-suited for snow and harsh weather. If the Siberian could have his way, his owner would love snow just as much as he does. The breed tends to thrive at winter dog sports, but he’ll usually be happy to try other sports, too. Either way, he needs plenty of exercise all year round.

6. Old English Sheepdog
  The Old English Sheepdog is known for its shaggy coat. In fact, you’ll probably have to spend lots of time grooming an Old English Sheepdog if you want to keep their fur from matting. In the warm months, they can get overheated pretty quickly, so they’ll be much happier in the winter months when their fur coats don’t make them so hot. Be careful to wipe them down before bringing them in from the snow or you’ll have lots of puddles around the house later on.

7. Newfoundland
  The Newfoundland, often referred to as a Gentle Giant, would be crushed if you headed out for a snowy hike without it. Its double, thick coat and super-sweet disposition makes it the perfect candidate to go on a winter hike. And if you happen to get a bit chilly, it would love nothing more than to snuggle up tight and warm you right up! Keep in mind that this breed sheds and drools a lot, even in the winter, so if you're a neat freak, this breed may not be for you.

8. Tibetan Mastiff
  As their name suggests, the Tibetan Mastiff is from Tibet where it is, of course, very cold. They have a thick coat suited for surviving freezing temperatures, which makes them more than able to stand up to most winter walks you’ll be taking them on. They aren’t able to handle the hot months very well, though. They are able to handle a certain level of dry heat provided they have shade and water, but these pups will be happiest when the temperature drops.

9. Pomeranian
  Pomeranians are descended from ancient breeds of the far north, which makes them a bit like a small version of the American Eskimo Dog or the Samoyed. Their undercoat is soft and fluffy, and it’s quite thick. Some owners groom the fur completely to the undercoat, which gives the Pomeranian a stuffed animal-like appearance. They do have an overcoat, too. It’s straight and shiny, and it’s a little harsh to the touch, but it protects them well from cold weather. Pomeranians can overheat easily, which means they’re right at home in the snow.

10. Labrador Retriever
  This popular family pet’s thick, water-repellant coat is ideal for keeping him dry when retrieving water fowl from frigid lakes during fall hunting season. His stocky build and short, dense double coat provides him with an effective barrier to cold weather and icy conditions however if your pooch is typically an indoor dog wintery weather should be experienced in moderation.

11. Samoyed
  The Samoyed, like the Siberian Husky, is from Siberia where it was a valuable companion for the Samoyede people. It was bred to hunt, haul sledges, herd reindeer, and cuddle up for warmth on cold nights. Their double coat is very thick and sheds constantly. With all that thick fur, they won’t want to be out in the heat for too long, but you might have trouble bringing them back inside in the winter. Especially because their white fur blends in with the snow so well, it may be hard to spot them.

12. American Eskimo Dog
  Originating from Germany, the American Eskimo was originally called the White German Spitz but was renamed after World War II, most likely for its white coat--not for any connection with Eskimos. Though this playful and compact and used to perform indoors with the Barnum and Bailey Circus, outdoor activity suits it much better; its coat resists soaking and thick ears stay warm in low temperatures.

13. Chow Chow
  Considered one of the oldest dog breeds, the Chow Chow’s thick, furry coat will keep it warm for hours during a winter excursion, and its strong, loyal personality will keep you on your toes for many years. This breed is considered a heavy shedder in certain months, so be sure to have your brushes handy.

14. German Shepherd
  The breed's popularity grew with Rin Tin Tin, the abandoned German Shepherd pup found during WWI who went on to star in TV shows and movies. Known for their herding, guarding, and police work, German Shepherds are strong, agile, hard workers that have a lot of energy and learn quickly. This breed commonly suffers from hip dysplasia, which can likely be avoided by buying from a credible breeder.

15. Kuvasz
  To be considered a true Kuvasz, this dog must always sport white fur, according to the American Kennel Club. Originating in Tibet, the Kuvasz—which means "armed guard of nobility" in Turkish—was later owned by the royal family in Hungary before finding a more "common" lifestyle as a light-footed hunter and herder. The Kuvasz's double coat makes it a perfect mountain dog, and its trainability and fearless protective instincts provide a perfect four-legged companion. A fenced-in, open yard works best for this energetic, yet possibly destructive, breed.
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Wednesday, October 26, 2016

Top 5 Mountain Dog Breeds

Top 5 Mountain Dog Breeds
  More and more people are looking to large, mountain dog breeds to provide them with the companionship and protection that they need within their home.
  Here are the top 5 mountain dog breeds that more and more dog lovers are starting to become interested.

1.St. Bernard

  The breed that has been credited with saving more than 2,500 travelers lost in the snow was named for the Hospice du Grand St. Bernard in Switzerland, where the monks have bred these large dogs since the 17th century. The Saint needs lots of room indoors and out for regular daily exercise. This dog is great for children who won’t be bowled over by its size, and it’s an excellent watchdog.

  They’re known for copious amounts of drooling, but also for their wonderful sense of smell. They make excellent watchdogs and are quite gentle with children. Supervision should still be paid, however, as these dogs aren’t aware of just how big they are or how easily they can bowl over other people and children

2.Great Pyrenees

  Giant Pyrenees is a very gentle and elegant dog with long hairs all over their body. The nature of this dog breed is normally very calm and they are very social in nature. They have a great ability to sense the danger in advance and are great guard dogs. So because of their such beautiful qualities, they are regarded as one of the best mountain dog breeds. They have originated from France.
  They were also bred to be companion dogs, providing shepherds and livestock farmers with their friendly disposition once the work day was over. They’re a sturdy stocky dog, weighing anywhere from 100 to 125 pounds. Their double coat provides all the warmth that they need, and should be brushed at least once a week. Special attention should be paid to trimming their nails, especially if they’re not very active outside.

3.Bernese Mountain Dog

  Regarded by many as the most beautiful of the four breeds of Swiss Mountain Dogs, the Bernese is the only one with a long coat. Its ancestry traces to mastiff-type dogs of Roman times, which crossbred with local herding dogs to produce offspring smaller in stature but just as trustworthy and devoted.
  With very alert eyes and a playful smile, the Bernese mountain dog can be traced back to its Mastiff heritage during the times of the Romans. It was bred in Switzerland to be a herding dog, ensuring that the livestock never roamed too far from the rest of its herd to be taken by predators. They live for roughly 7 to 10 years, and can weigh up to 110 pounds.

4. Siberian Husky


  Believed to have descended from the Chukchi sled dogs of the Siberian Arctic, which had bred true for 3,000 years, these quick dogs were used to haul sleds and herd reindeer. They were able to travel great distances and work for long periods on little food.

  They come in a wide array of colors and live for longer than twelve years. They shed twice a year, and require extensive amounts of bathing and brushing in order to remove all of the fur. This is not a dog breed for those who are prone to pet dander allergies. Despite being a mountain dog breed, they don’t get much larger than sixty pounds, but that weight is typically all lean muscle.

5.Tibetan Mastiff

  This dog was bred in the Himalayan foothills to guard flocks, and it has remained relatively unchanged because of its isolation and the need to produce a large, strong working animal. Because of its inborn protective instincts, the Tibetan Mastiff was also used as a guardian for mansion and monastery.
  They have an extremely heavy undercoat that’s designed to keep them warm in winter, and can lead to extremely heavy shedding seasons when the weather becomes warmer. They can weigh up to 150 pounds, so they are quite stocky and sturdy dogs. They thrive best in large, open spaces and though are protective of children, can very easily knock them over.


If you’re still deciding whether a mountain dog breed is right for you, find someone you know or a breeder who would be willing to let you meet their dogs and get a feel for what being around one is like. Not a lot of people can appreciate the size of a large dog until they’ve met on in person. Taking the right steps to ensure both the safety and health of your mountain breed dog will definitely pay off in the long run, and you can both enjoy the years of fun and companionship together.
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