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Showing posts with label russian. Show all posts
Showing posts with label russian. Show all posts

Thursday, December 28, 2017

Everything about your Black Russian Terrier

Everything about your Black Russian Terrier
  These majestic black beauties are highly intelligent, confident guard dogs who aren’t actually true terriers. Relatively new and still a rare dog breed, Black Russian Terriers are working dogs who can protect a home or business, play with the family’s children, and excel in agility and obedience competition. Known as the “Black Pearls of Russia,” Blackies are people-oriented and want to be close to the action at all times. They tend to be a bit aloof around strangers, including dogs they don’t know, but they’re devoted to their families — and they don’t bark or shed much. They have large bones and well-developed muscles, creating a vibrant, flowing impression.

Overview
  Also known as Stalin’s dog or Sobaka Stalina, the Black Russian Terrier is a low-maintenance and hard working dog. Developed by the post World War II Soviet Union, the Black Russian Terrier or BRT, is not a true terrier, and is instead categorized as a working dog.
  The BRT is a fairly large dog and has a powerfully built body. Both its forelegs and hindquarters are well-boned and muscular, and end in large, padded feet. The BRT’s head is fairly large and block shaped and is equipped with a powerful set of teeth that meet in a scissor bite. The BRT’s body is covered in a thick double coat. The outer-coat is coarse and wiry while the thick undercoat is soft to the touch. The BRTs coat is black and sometimes has a few stray grey hairs. 
  Brown or white markings are considered to be a fault.
  BRTs are extremely intelligent and self-assured dogs. Bred primarily as guard dogs, they have extremely strong protective instincts and are devoted to their owners. Their strong personalities do however require owners with a thorough understanding of dog psychology and leadership.

Highlights
  • Blackies need a job. They were bred for it and will be unhappy without one. Their job as your companion could be competing in agility, obedience, Schutzhund, or various canine sports.
  • Black Russian Terriers need at least 30 minutes of exercise a day. They are intelligent and powerful, and exercise provides a needed outlet. A Black Russian can manage in an apartment with sufficient outdoor exercise. A fenced yard is best for the Blackie living in a house.
  • Blackies enjoy the company of their families and prefer to stick close to their human pack. They don't do well stuck in the backyard by themselves.
  • The sometimes stubborn Blackie needs firm training as soon as you get him home so that he won't try to establish himself as the leader of the pack.
  • Blackies are by nature aloof with people they don't know, and unless they have regular exposure to lots of different people — ideally beginning in puppyhood — they can become overly protective of you around strangers. This may lead to biting out of fear and aggression. Give your Blackie lots of contact with friends, family, neighbors, and even strangers to help him polish his social skills.
Other Quick Facts

  • The Black Russian Terrier’s coat is slightly to moderately wavy. The hair on the head falls over the eyes and on the face forms a mustache and beard. The coat is trimmed to achieve the dog’s distinctive look.
  • Basic black is this breed’s fashion statement. His double coat - which can be one and a half to six inches long - comes only in black or black with a few gray hairs scattered throughout.
Breed standards
AKC group: Working
UKC group: Guardian Dog
Average lifespan: 10-14 years
Average size: 80–130 pounds
Coat appearance: Rough and thick, slightly waved
Coloration: black coats, but a sprinkling of gray hair
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, active single, houses with yards, farms and rural areas
Temperament: Energetic, confident, brave, hardy
Comparable Breeds: Bouvier des Flandres, Giant Schnauzer

History 
  This dog is a Cold War creation, developed in Moscow after World War II for military and police work. His breeders started with a Giant Schnauzer and crossed him with other breeds that included the Airedale, Rottweiler, and the Moscow Retriever. The result was a large black dog with a protective temperament and a healthy dose of suspicion toward strangers.
  Less than two decades ago, the BRT was seen only in small numbers at European and Scandinavian dog shows, but in 2004 he was recognized by the American Kennel Club as its 151st breed. Today the Black Russian Terrier ranks 135th among the breeds registered by the AKC.



Personality
  Black Russian Terriers are truly man's best friend. They thrive on human interaction and have such a strong desire to be with their family that they will follow their people from room to room, and when left alone, will wait longingly by doors or windows until they are happily reunited with the ones they love. This breed adores children – especially female Black Russians. They are patient with small children who want to climb on them and are big enough to keep up with bigger kids' outdoor games. They have bee known to sleep in kids' rooms or outside their bedroom doors as a guardian and protector.

Health
  The Black Russian Terrier, which has an average lifespan of 10 to 14 years, is prone to minor health issues such as elbow dysplasia and major problems like canine hip dysplasia (CHD). The breed may also suffer from progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) and dwarfism. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may recommend hip, elbow, and eye exams for the dog

Care
  The Black Russian Terrier, because of its breeding as a working dog, has a very strong "work ethic", and needs a job to do in order to be happy. Early training is a must and they are very responsive to firm, consistent training, excelling at Obedience competitions. They also perform well in other dog sports, such as Agility, and Schutzhund training. They have a low-shedding coat, and need grooming several times a week. Dogs who compete in conformation need to be groomed a minimum of every three weeks to keep the coat in show condition. The Black Russian Terrier needs lots of exercise, and may become hyperactive and destructive if it does not have a chance to burn off its energy..

Living Conditions
  The Black Russian Terrier will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. They are relatively inactive indoors and no matter how big your yard is they will be sitting at your front door waiting to come in. They love to live very close to their owner. They will follow you from one room to the other. Kept in a garden they will follow you from window to window and wait for you at the door. They need very close human contact. This breed does not do well living in a kennel; they must have close human contact to be happy.

Training
  Black Russian Terriers are extremely intelligent and eager to please and are fairly easy to train. They do however have strong personalities and should be handled with a loving but firm hand from an early age. BRT puppies are inquisitive and playful and some adults too display this extreme curiosity. Black Russian Terriers often excel at various obedience competitions and dog sports such as agility and Schutzhund training.

Activity Requirements
  Black Russian Terriers, despite their larger size, can do well living in an apartment. They don't need an excessive amount of vigorous running time per day, but do need several walks. If left alone in a yard, Black Russian will quickly get bored and want to come inside. Outside activities should always involve interaction with kids or people in order to keep this breed interested.

Grooming
  Regular grooming is essential for the Black Russian Terrier’s handsome good looks. Expect to bathe your dog every two to three months. The wiry coat should be brushed twice a week to prevent tangles.
The rest is basic care. Nails should be trimmed once a month and ears checked every week. Regular tooth brushing with a soft toothbrush and doggie toothpaste keeps the teeth and gums healthy.
  Because the Black Russian Terrier is not a common breed, it is likely some professional groomers will not know exactly how to groom him, especially when it comes to hand stripping. An experienced breeder is probably the best resource for learning how to groom the breed.
  It is important to begin grooming the Black Russian Terrier when he is very young. An early introduction teaches this independent dog that grooming is a normal part of his life and to patiently accept the grooming process. 

Children And Other Pets
  Despite their impressive size, Blackies are great with children and will protect them. Females seem more willing to play with children than the males, but both sexes treat children with whom they are raised with gentleness and respect. Don't forget, however, that Blackies are large and active companions, and extremely young children may be accidentally knocked over or injured by a playful and energetic dog of this size. Use caution with very young children.
  Blackies who have not been exposed to children from puppyhood may not be as tolerant-something to consider if you're looking to add an older or rescue dog to your household.
  Either way, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Make sure your Blackie is well socialized as a puppy and adult so that he doesn't become overprotective of his family and property.
  Male Black Russians don't do well with other dominant dogs. Many of them aren't suited to dog parks for this reason. At home, they do best with other canine companions who were already established in the house. They will be fine with nondominant or small dogs, as well as cats, horses, rabbits, and other pets.

Is the Black Russian Terrier the Right Breed for you?
Moderate Maintenance: Regular grooming is required to keep its fur in good shape. Professional trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Moderately Easy Training: The Black Russian Terrier is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Not Good for New Owners: This breed is best for those who have previous experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
Despite the word Terrier in his name, the Black Russian Terrier is a member of the American Kennel Club’s Working Group.
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Thursday, November 17, 2016

Everything about your Borzoi

Everything about your Borzoi
  Borzoi dog breed was developed in Russia as coursing and hunting dogs. These hounds were hunted in teams of three to go after rabbit, fox, and wolves. They later became popular as a companion for royalty across continental Europe.
  The undisputed glamour queens and kings of the sighthound world, these cousins of the Greyhound are tall, curvy and elegant. Their distinctive heads and flowing coats are featured in art and fashion photography, and they've been the favored pets of the aristocracy and royalty for even longer.

Overview
  With his tall, lean body, long, narrow head, and silky coat, the Borzoi is the picture of refinement and elegance. Borzois carry themselves proudly, and it's easy to envision them lounging in the palaces of Russian Tsars or swiftly running down a wolf in the Russian countryside. But before you bring a Borzoi to your palace, you need to decide if a Borzoi is right for you.
  Despite his relaxed attitude and regal appearance, the Borzoi is not simply a beautiful showpiece for your home. This giant breed, whose height ranges from 28 to 32 inches, has a mind of his own and a desire for human companionship. He's not the best choice for people who are away from home for long hours every day. His luxurious double coat, which kept him warm during brutal Russian winters, sheds heavily. His size is also a consideration for people with small children. The Borzoi is gentle, but puppies are enthusiastic and may accidentally knock over a toddler in play.
  No longer a royal hunting companion, today the Borzoi's most important job is that of family friend. With his sweet, gentle demeanor, it's a job at which he excels.

Highlights
  • Borzoi are sighthounds and will chase anything that moves. They should never be allowed to run loose unless in a secure area.
  • Borzoi can be sensitive to drugs, especially anesthetics, due to their lack of body fat. Make sure your vet is aware of this. The drug Ropum (Xylazine) should never be used for a Borzoi. Also, avoid exercising them on lawns that have been recently treated with fertilizer, insecticides, herbicides, or other chemicals.
  • Borzoi can be fussy eaters.
  • Borzoi can be prone to bloat. Feed frequent small meals and prevent heavy exercise after eating.
  • Borzoi can be nervous around children and should be introduced to them at a young age if they will be in frequent contact with them.
  • Borzoi bark infrequently and do not have strong guarding instincts. They make poor watchdogs as they cannot be relied upon to raise the alarm when an intruder is sighted.
  • They can live successfully with cats and small animals if introduced to them at an early age. Some Borzoi only follow the "no chase" rule indoors and cannot resist the instinct to chase a running cat if outdoors.
  • The Borzoi is not a common breed, so it may take some searching to find a breeder who has puppies. Be patient.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Borzoi is a sighthound, bred to chase running prey.
  • The graceful, elegant Borzoi was a favorite subject of artists during the Art Deco era.
  • The Borzoi’s long, silky coat can be any color or combination of colors.
  • The Borzoi is a giant breed.
Breed standards
AKC group: Hound
UKC group: Sighthound
Average lifespan: 7 - 10 years
Average size: 60 - 105 pounds
Coat appearance: Long, silky, flat
Coloration: Golden, black, white, red, brindle, cream
Hypoallergenic: No
Possible alterations: Long, narrow head; slightly slanted, dark eyes; small ears close to the head; large, black nose; arched back, straight legs and long, curved tail
Possible alterations: Coat can be slightly wavy with many color variations, including black markings
Comparable Breeds: Afghan Hound, Greyhound



History
  The Borzoi originated centuries ago in Czarist Russia, where they were bred by aristocrats as coursing sighthounds. The Borzoi’s predecessors are thought to have come from Egypt and include the long-coated, smooth-faced Russian Bearhound, the coursing hounds of the Tatars, the Owtchar, a tall Russian sheepdog and other ancient sighthound breeds. Whatever the mix, by 1260 the sport of hare coursing was documented in connection with the Court of the Grand Duke of Novgorod. The first Borzoi standard was written in 1650 and apparently did not differ much from the standard today. According to the American Kennel Club, “from the time of Ivan the Terrible in the mid-1500s to the abolition of serfdom in 1861, hunting with Borzoi was the national sport of the aristocracy.”
Sarah Bernhardt, depicted with borzoi,
by Georges Clairin, French painter
  During this period, great rural estates with hundreds of serfs and thousands of acres were devoted to breeding, training and hunting with the Borzoi. The breed was pampered and promoted by Russian royalty on a grand scale unparalleled in the development of any other breed. Guests, horses, dogs, tents, kitchens and carriages came by special trains to attend ceremonial “hunts.” More than a hundred Borzoi in matched pairs or trios, with additional foxhound packs and riders on horseback, made up the primary hunting party, with “beaters” on foot to flush out the game - usually a wolf. The Borzoi would pursue the wolf, and the horsemen would pursue the Borzoi, until the dogs captured, pinned and held their quarry. Typically, the huntsmen would leap off their horses, grab, gag and bind the wolf, and then either kill it or set it free. These extravagant affairs involved elaborate attire, feasting and festivity.
  Several Borzoi were sent as gifts to Princess Alexandra of Britain in 1842, and the breed was exhibited at the first Crufts World Dog Show in 1891. In 1863, the Imperial Association was formed to protect and promote the old-style Borzoi. Many present-day American bloodlines are traceable to the dogs of breeders who were members of this club. Most notable among these were the Grand Duke Nicholas, uncle to the Czar and field marshal of the Russian armies, and Artem Boldareff, a wealthy Russian aristocrat. The first Borzoi to come to America was allegedly brought from England in 1889 by a fancier of the breed living in Pennsylvania. The first American to travel to Russia and directly import Borzois was C. Steadman Hanks, the Massachusetts founder of the Seacroft Kennels in the 1890s. In 1903, Joseph B. Thomas of Valley Farm Kennels made several trips to Russia to obtain specimens of the breed that played a key role in the development of American Borzoi pedigrees, including dogs from the Perchino Kennels owned by the Grand Duke Nicholas and from the Woronzova Kennels owned by Artem Boldareff.
Wolf hunting with borzois (1904), Efim A. Tikhmenev.
  The Borzoi Club of America was formed in November of 1903, then called the “Russian Wolfhound Club of America.” The breed standard was approved at a meeting held during the Westminster Kennel Club dog show in February of 1904, and the breed club was elected to membership in the American Kennel Club in May of that year. The official breed standard was formally adopted in 1905 and is essentially the same today, with minor revisions made in 1940 and 1972. The breed’s name was changed from Russian Wolfhound to Borzoi in 1936, and the parent club’s name was changed to the Borzoi Club of America that same year.
  Today, this breed is largely unchanged from its Russian ancestors in both appearance and ability. Borzois are still used by farmers in the Western United States to ward off coyotes. They excel in AKC lure coursing competitions and in the conformation ring. Above all, Borzois are graceful, glamorous, gentle and devoted companions.

Personality
  The gentle-spirited Borzoi personality ranges from serious and stately to clownish. As a companion, the Borzoi is quiet, sensible, and intelligent. He prefers not to be left alone for long periods. His reaction to strangers ranges from aloof to friendly. In general, he's trusting of people and not shy. The Borzoi's easygoing nature doesn't necessarily mean he's easy to train, however. He's an independent thinker and can be stubborn. Last but not least, it's important to the Borzoi to know that he's loved, cared for, and will never be put in harm's way.
  Temperament is affected by a number of factors, including heredity, training, and socialization. Puppies with nice temperaments are curious and playful, willing to approach people and be held by them. Choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one who's beating up his littermates or the one who's hiding in the corner. Always meet at least one of the parents — usually the mother is the one who's available — to ensure that they have nice temperaments that you're comfortable with. Meeting siblings or other relatives of the parents is also helpful for evaluating what a puppy will be like when he grows up.
  Like every dog, Borzoi need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Borzoi puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog. Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.

Health
  With an average lifespan of 10 to 12 years, the Borzoi dog breed is prone to major health concerns such as gastric torsion, and minor problems like cardiomyopathy and hypothyroidism. The Borzoi reacts adversely barbiturate anesthesia. To identify some of these issues, your veterinarian may run thyroid and cardiac tests on this breed of dog.

Exercise
  To maintain their fitness these dogs need plenty of exercise, including a long daily walk and regular opportunities to run off the leash, however in some countries it is forbidden to allow all the dogs in this fleet-footed hunting category off the leash. The Borzoi make excellent jogging companions and usually enjoy running alongside a bicycle but beware, a Borzoi is quite likely to shoot off after any prey it catches sight of. If this happens you will need to react very quickly.

Care
  Functioning best as house dogs, with easy access to a yard, Borzoi can reside outdoors in cold weather, provided a warm shelter and soft bedding are offered. The male Borzoi has a fuller coat than the female, and requires combing or brushing two or three times a week. There are times when the dog sheds a great deal. This breed of dog does well when given a chance to exercise every day with a long walk and a sprint in an enclosed area.

Grooming Needs
  Borzoi should be brushed weekly to keep the coat healthy, manageable and mat-free. Groomers recommend using a pin brush on this breed, as wire slicker brushes can damage the coat. They shed lightly throughout the year and heavy during the change of seasons, so more brushing may be required in the Spring and Fall months. Borzoi are clean dogs whose coats naturally deflect dirt and only require baths on an as-needed basis.
  Regular ear and teeth cleanings will keep harmful bacteria from building up in the ear canal and mouth leading to infections or bad breath. Nails need to be trimmed once or twice a month.

Is this breed right for you?
  Best for homes with larger yards, this breed is a loyal member of the family. Affectionate to both familiar people and strangers, the Borzoi would make a great pet for someone who has a lot of company. Good with children but not prone to roughhousing, this pet is best suited for families with teens or without children. Likely to hunt and chase smaller animals, this is not a good breed to pair with a cat. Quiet but large, he would do OK with apartment life if exercised regularly.

Children And Other Pets
  The Borzoi can be too large for a household with small children, especially toddlers. They're giant dogs and can easily knock over a child by accident. Nor are they especially tolerant of toddlers poking and prodding them. They're best suited to homes with older children who understand how to interact with dogs.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Generally, Borzoi aren't aggressive toward other dogs, although in an uncontrolled situation their sighthound heritage may take over, especially if small dogs are running around. Some can be aggressive toward dogs of the same sex. With training, young Borzoi can learn not to chase or snap at smaller household pets, including cats. That training may only hold indoors, however. Cats outdoors — even your own cat — may be viewed as fair game.

Did You Know?
  The Borzoi was bred in Russia to course wolves and other game across open fields and, if necessary, to capture and hold it until the arrival of the huntsman. Leo Tolstoy’s novel “War and Peace” has a scene describing such a hunt.

A dream day in the life of a Borzoi
  Waking up slowly, the Borzoi will quietly sneak downstairs for his daily feeding. After checking out the home, he'll go outside for a run and trail any possible animals in the yard. Once he knows the coast is clear, he'll be ready for a nap in the sun. When his owner gets home, the Borzoi will be patiently waiting for his daily run. After dinner, he'll snooze next to his master.

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