LUV My dogs: questions

LUV My dogs

Everything about your dog!

Showing posts with label questions. Show all posts
Showing posts with label questions. Show all posts

Wednesday, May 21, 2014

Dog Adoption Checklist

Dog Adoption Checklist
  Congratulations on deciding to adopt a dog! You are embarking on a wonderful and rewarding relationship. When you adopt a dog there are many responsibilities and lifestyle adjustments to consider.

Questions for All Adopters:
  • Do you have any other dogs and how will they react to a new dog?
  • Is your current residence suited to the dog you’re considering?
  • How will your social life or work obligations affect your ability to care for a dog?
  • Do you have a plan for your new dog during vacations and/or work travel?
  • How do the people you live with feel about having a dog in the house?
  • Are you  intolerant of hair, dirt and other realities of sharing your home with a dog, such as allergies?
  • Do you or any of your household/family members have health issues that may be affected by a dog?
  • What breed of dog is the best fit with your current lifestyle?
  • Is there tension in the home? Dogs quickly pick up on stress in the home, and it can exacerbate their health and behavior problems.
  • Is there an adult in the family who has agreed to be ultimately responsible for the dog’s care?
Your dog is more likely to get loose from you and lost in the first few weeks they are home than any other time.  Be sure to provide them a secure collar and ID tag as soon as possible.  Actually, its a great thing to bring with you when you pick up your newly adopted pet.  And make sure they wear their collar at all times.  Often people make the mistake of removing the collar when their dog is in the house thinking they will never get out of the house without it.  Sadly, too often owners forget to put the collar back on or the dog slips out the door unexpectedly and is now lost without any identification.  Get a collar and tag as soon as possible!

  All dogs require a veterinary exam, a series of vaccinations and regular grooming.  While we will given them their Parvo Distemper (DHLPP) vaccination, Bordatella (INB - kennel cough) and worming, puppies may require additional vaccinations and worming after adoption, so make sure and follow up with your vet for these if needed.  Also all dogs will need their Rabies vaccination if they have not had it already.

  Your home and yard should provide proper confinement and reasonable space for the size of your dog.  When outside, your new dog or puppy should always be on a leash if you don’t have a safe enclosure.

   New house pets should be closely supervised when with other pets and children while they become familiar with their new home.

  Housebreaking your new dog should be done with encouraging words. They should be taken outside after meals and right before and after sleeping. Crate training is an effective training method. There is lots of useful training information on the Web and specifically crate training.

  All dogs need exercise, so allow your dog to play outside everyday. Young dogs and puppies may have extra energy, causing them to chew. Try not to leave them alone for long periods of time and consider crate training to housebreak and curb bad habits.  Organized training is also beneficial and there are several obedience training schools in our area.  Ask friends or other dog owners for the name of someone you can trust. If you cannot find a trainer, HSOP will recommend someone for you.

 In addition to a collar and tag, we also encourage microchipping which we also can do for you here at the Shelter for a small fee.

New Dog Supplies Check List
  • Dog collar, leash, and identification tags
  • Nutritious dog food
  • Dog crate or carrier
  • Dog bed
  • Food and water bowls
  • Dog grooming tools (shampoo, brush and nail clippers)
  • Dog toys
  • Treats & chews  
Other Considerations:
  • What do you expect your dog to contribute to your life? For example, do you want a running and hiking buddy, or is your idea of exercise watching it on TV?
  • If you are thinking of adopting a young dog, do you have the time and patience to work with the dog through its adolescence, taking house-breaking, chewing and energy-level into account? 
  • Have you considered your lifestyle carefully and determined whether a younger or older dog would be a better match for you?
  • Can you train and handle a dog with behavior issues or are you looking for an easy-going friend?
  • Do you need a dog who will be reliable with children or one you can take with you when you travel?
  • Do you want a dog who follows you all around the house or would you prefer a less clingy, more independent character?
Size Considerations:
  • What size dog can your home accommodate?
  • Will you have enough room if your dog grows to be bigger than expected?
  • What size dog would suit the other people who live in or visit your home regularly?
  • Do you have another dog to consider when choosing the size of your next dog?
  • How big a dog can you travel comfortably with?
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Monday, April 28, 2014

What Is The Best Dog Food?

What Is The Best Dog Food?
  Every day veterinarians are asked that question by dog owners. It's a sincere question because most dog owners want to feed the very best to their furry friends. Good health begins with proper nutrition, regardless of price or convenience of acquisition.
  Deciding on the type of dog food you provide is one of the most important decisions you will ever make for your puppy or older dog. Dog food nutrition directly influences every aspect of your dog's life. Things like how puppies grow, their behavior habits, health, overall well-being and appearance are all closely connected to the nutrition we provide - it's a big responsibility.
  With all the recent publicity and concern with the dog food recall of 2008 the spotlight has been aimed fairly and squarely at the big commercial dog food companies. Us dog lovers are finally becoming more aware and educated about providing wholesome, nutritionally balanced meals for our dogs. So where do we start in our search to find the best dog food? What are our options, and who can we trust or even believe?
  Choosing the best dog food can be an overwhelming decision - but why does it have to be so hard? I know from personal experience it can be difficult to see through all of the conflicting views, hype, marketing tactics and secrecy surrounding the dog food industry. After years of experimenting with different dog foods and lots of research I have reached an unfortunate conclusion. I feel that the vast majority of the big commercial dog food companies are far more focussed on extracting the money from our pockets rather than the health and wellbeing of our precious dogs.
  So when I set out to determine the best dog food available my main focus was always the health, vitality and longevity of my dogs - I want my dogs to thrive. I hope this article will help you to determine the very best puppy food for your dogs and make your feeding decision clearer.
  A wholesome well balanced dog food diet promotes: Healthy skin and coat, strong well developed bones, bright clear eyes, firmer stools (and less of them), well defined muscle tone, quality of life and longevity, healthy teeth and gums, fewer trips to your Vet, no bad odor, fewer digestive problems, energy, vitality, fewer behavior problems and over-all health.

What Are The Choices - What Should We Feed Our Dogs?
1. Commercial Dog Food: This includes the packaged foods you find at your local supermarket, pet store or veterinarian. Commercial dog food is available in dry, semi dry and wet (canned).
  • Royal Canin offers dry foods formulated for specific dog breeds. This can be helpful if your breed has unique health problems. For boxers, Royal Canin includes ingredients to protect heart function. 
  • Eukanuba offers a meals with added nutrients, such as glucosamine and Omega 3 and Omega 6 fatty acids, to protect larger dogs' joints. 
  • Avoderm Natural- This oven-baked food is formulated for dogs with sensitive stomachs. 
  • Pinnacle Holistic- This dry food is made with trout and sweet potatoes, eliminating common allergens such as corn, wheat and soy. 
  • Innova- With ingredients such as herring oil, pumpkin and carrots, Innova embraces the concept of holistic food for pets.
  • Solid Gold has been manufacturing holistic pet food for more than 30 years. Bison and salmon are the main ingredients in this food for large-breed puppies. 
  • Wellness - This dry food is made with ingredients fit for human consumption and additives to help avoid common health problems among dogs. Probiotics also are added to aid in digestion. 
  • Blue Buffalo - This premium food for dogs includes Omega 6 fatty acids and glucosamine for joint health. 
  • Science Diet offers dogs meals with real meat instead of relying on byproducts as its main ingredient. This food is available in chicken and brown rice and lamb and brown rice. 
  • Canidae includes human-grade meats and reduces fillers to help your dog shed unnecessary pounds. 
2. Raw Dog Food
  The raw dog food diet is the growth sector within the dog food marketplace. This category includes the raw food you source and prepare yourself or the pre-made and packaged products.


  Raw dog food is a fairly broad term as there are many variations on this feeding method. The common thread with raw food enthusiasts is that they believe feeding raw is the most natural way to feed a dog. Raw foodies believe that this is the way dogs have successfully evolved and that eating a raw diet is the way nature intended dogs to get their nutrition. The raw food diet is said to replicate how a dog would eat in the wild. 

  Some raw food proponents love to give big meaty bones and others won't. The same applies with fruit and vegetables - some people say that vegetable matter is a natural part of a wild dogs diet, gathered from the stomach of their prey.
   Another benefit of feeding raw is healthy teeth and gums and well developed jaws, neck and shoulder muscles (from all the chewing).
  On the other hand detractors of feeding raw focus on the danger of foodborne illness through the threat of bacteria like salmonella and E. coli. Some also say that it is difficult to feed a nutritionally balanced meal the raw way.

3. Homemade Dog Food
  With all the recent news about the dog food recall and associated concerns with commercial dog foods, the homemade dog food option has really come to the fore.
 Preparing your dog's meals from scratch has many benefits, including the complete control of all meals served. You know exactly what goes into every meal (and where it was sourced) and you also know that it has been prepared in a clean environment.
  The homemade dog food option also comes with the added responsibility of formulating nutritionally balanced meals (proteins, vitamins etc.) and meeting the calorie requirements for your individual dog. If you arm yourself with some good dog food recipes and get into a routine this process is not all that difficult to maintain.
  Typical homemade dog meals include big meaty stews, healthy soups, pies, vegetables and maybe some raw bones every now and then.

In conclusion...  look at the ingredient list and a meat such as chicken should be listed as the first ingredient. Look at the guaranteed analysis to see that the protein level is at 30 percent or more. The fat content should be at 18 percent or more. And if there is a rather wide spectrum of ingredients such as omega fatty acids and vitamin E, that's good, too. There should be NO FOOD COLORING!



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