LUV My dogs: puppy

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Showing posts with label puppy. Show all posts
Showing posts with label puppy. Show all posts

Sunday, August 17, 2014

Everything about your Chow Chow

Everything about your Chow Chow
  This distinctive-looking dog breed has a proud, independent spirit that some describe as catlike. He can be aloof — if you're looking for a cuddle buddy, this probably isn't the best breed for you — and downright suspicious of strangers. But for the right person, he's a fiercely loyal companion.
  Independent and dignified, the Chow usually attaches himself to one person even though he will have affection for the whole family. When raised with children, he’s usually fine with them, although the kids may be disappointed that he’s not a hugger. An excellent guard dog and watch dog, he’ll protect against strangers.

Overview
  The Chow Chow has several unique characteristics: a blue-black tongue, the coat of a teddy bear, the scowl of a lion, and a distinctive stilted gait. He is a Chinese breed, hailing from that country’s chilly northern region, and was developed as an all-purpose dog capable of hunting, herding, pulling a cart or other vehicle and guarding the home.
  The Chow Chow has a low activity level and can live happily in any home, including an apartment or condo. One or two brief walks daily will satisfy his exercise needs.
All too often, Chow Chows have a reputation for being aggressive toward people, which is not acceptable. Early and frequent socialization is essential to helping them develop the confidence and discrimination they need to recognize what is a threat and what is normal. Buy a Chow Chow only from a breeder who raises puppies in the home and has exposed them to many different people, sounds and experiences before they go to their new homes. When he comes from such a background and continues to be socialized after going to his new home, a   Chow can be a good family dog, ideally with older children who understand how to treat him with respect.
  The Chow Chow is a medium-size dog. He has the typical spitz appearance: a deep muzzle and broad head set off by a ruff, small triangular ears, a smooth or rough double coat in red, black, blue, cinnamon and cream, and a bushy tail curled tightly over his back. Stay away from breeders who try to charge more for a Chow in any color other than red or who tries to sell you a Chow in fancy colors such as lilac, silver, chocolate, white and champagne. Chows come only in red, black, blue, cinnamon and cream. Any other color description is simply a creative marketing term. Nor is it true that colors other than red are rare. If a breeder isn’t honest about coat colors, it’s fair to wonder what else he or she isn’t honest about.
  The Chow Chow needs to live in the house. It’s an unhappy Chow Chow who is relegated to the backyard with little or no human companionship.

Other Quick Facts
  • A dog who looks like a Chow but has a tongue that is pink or mostly pink probably is not a Chow at all but a mix of one of the other spitz breeds, a large family of dogs that includes American Eskimos, Akitas, Norwegian Elkhounds, Pomeranians and many more.
  • The medium-size Chow is a powerful dog with a sturdy, squarely built body and a tail that curves over the back. He has a large head, accentuated by a ruff, and dark-brown, deep-set, almond-shaped eyes; small triangular ears that stand erect; a broad muzzle with a large black nose; and a black mouth and gums and a blue-black tongue. The overall effect is of a dog with a scowling, dignified, lordly, sober and snobbish expression, an accurate representation of the Chow’s temperament.
  • The Chow has a unique stilted gait caused by the straightness of his rear legs.
Highlights
  • Chow Chows are very independent and aloof, and they need an owner who appreciates those traits but won't let the dog take over.
  • Chows should be well socialized — introduced to new people, dogs, and situations beginning in early puppyhood — to ensure that they're safe and relaxed as adults.
  • Chow Chows may bond with just one person or to their immediate family. They're suspicious of strangers.
  • Chows need to be brushed two or three times a week to keep their coat in good condition.
  • Chows can live in apartments or condos, so long as they get daily exercise.
  • Because of his deep-set eyes, the Chow Chow has limited peripheral vision; it's best to approach him from the front.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from a puppy mill, a pet store, or a breeder who doesn't provide health clearances or guarantees. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies and who breeds for sound temperaments.
Breed standards
AKC group: Non-sporting
UKC group: Northern Breed Group
Average lifespan: 9 - 13 years
Average size: 45 - 70 pounds
Coat appearance: Rough or smooth, puffy appearance
Coloration: Black, red, cinnamon, cream and blue
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Double coat with lion-like appearance; large and stocky body type with broad head and wide nostrils; blue-black tongue; dark, almond-shaped eyes; broad chest with tail set high
Possible alterations: N/A
Comparable Breeds: German Shepherd, Chinese Shar-Pei
History
  The Chow is a unique breed of dog thought to be one of the oldest recognizable breeds. Research indicates it is one of the first primitive breeds to evolve from the wolf.DNA analysis confirms that this is one of the oldest breeds of dog that probably originated in the high steppe regions of Siberia or Mongolia, and much later used as temple guards in China, Mongolia and Tibet. A bas-relief from 150 BC (during the Han Dynasty) includes a hunting dog similar in appearance to the Chow. Later Chow Chows were bred as a general-purpose working dog for herding, hunting, pulling, and guarding. From what records survive, some historians believe that the Chow was the dog described as accompanying the Mongolian armies as they invaded southward into China as well as west into Europe and southwest into the Middle East in the 13th century AD.
  Research indicates it is one of the first primitive breeds to evolve from the gray wolf, and is thought by many to have originated in the arid steppes of northern China and Mongolia, although other theorists conjecture that its origin is in Siberian regions of Asia.
The black tongued Chow Chow was also bred for human consumption. Some scholars claim the Chow Chow was the original ancestor of the Samoyed, Norwegian Elkhound, Pomeranian, and Keeshond.
  Chinese legends mention large war dogs from central Asia that resembled black-tongued lions. One Chinese ruler was said to own 5,000 Chows. The Chinese also used Chows to pull dog sleds, and this was remarked upon by Marco Polo.
  A legend says that the original teddy bears were modeled after Queen Victoria's Chow Chow puppy. It is said that she carried the dog everywhere she went. Her friends disapproved, claiming that it did not befit a queen to be seen everywhere with a dog, so they paid a dressmaker to make a stuffed version of the animal for her.
  Today, the AKC registers approximately 10,000 Chow Chows a year. The Canadian Kennel Club registers approximately 350.



Temperament and Personality
  Despite his teddy-bear appearance, the Chow Chow is not a lovey-dovey kind of dog. He is independent and dignified, usually attaching himself to a single person. The Chow is protective and will certainly have affection for his entire family, but most of his devotion will be given to that one special person. Children may be disappointed in the Chow’s complete lack of interest in cuddling or being hugged.
  He is distrustful of strangers and may be aggressive toward dogs he doesn’t know. The Chow is highly territorial. Intruders or people he doesn’t know will be warned off with a deep growl and perhaps something a little more physical if they don’t take the hint.
  This intelligent but sometimes stubborn dog can be a challenge to train. He responds well to clicker training and positive reinforcement techniques such as play, praise and food rewards, but he also likes to do things his own way. To be successful, you must be patient and you must be willing to try many different methods to see what works. Find a trainer who has an extensive bag of tricks and is experienced with spitz breeds. Keep training sessions short and fun so the Chow Chow doesn’t get bored.
  Start training your puppy the day you bring him home. Even at eight weeks old, he is capable of soaking up everything you can teach him. Don’t wait until he is 6 months old to begin training or you will have a more headstrong dog to deal with. If possible, get him into puppy kindergarten class by the time he is 10 to 12 weeks old, and socialize, socialize, socialize.   However, be aware that many puppy training classes require certain vaccines  to be up to date, and many veterinarians recommend limited exposure to other dogs and public places until puppy vaccines . In lieu of formal training, you can begin training your puppy at home and socializing him among family and friends until puppy vaccines are completed.
  Talk to the breeder, describe exactly what you’re looking for in a dog, and ask for assistance in selecting a puppy. Breeders see the puppies daily and can make uncannily accurate recommendations once they know something about your lifestyle and personality. Whatever you want from an Chow Chow, look for one whose parents have nice personalities and who has been well socialized from early puppyhood.

Health 
  They are prone to suffer eye irritation called entropion, caused by eyelid abnormality; this can be corrected with surgery. Also prone to hip dysplasia, stomach cancer, hot spots and ear infections. Because of their relatively short muzzles they often snore.

Living Conditions
  The Chow Chow will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. It is relatively inactive indoors and a small yard is sufficient. Sensitive to heat, can live in or outdoors in cooler weather.

Exercise
  Chow Chows can be lazy, but need to be taken for a daily walk. Dogs that do not get to go on daily walks are more likely to display a wide array of behavior problems.

Care
  Chows can adapt to a variety of homes, from palaces to apartments. But they should always live indoors with their people, not stuck out in a backyard or kennel. They don't tolerate heat well, so keep them indoors when the weather is sweltering.
  Like any dog, an adult Chow Chow needs daily exercise to stay healthy and happy, but not much — he'll be satisfied with a couple of 15-minute walks daily or one longer walk.
A Chow Chow is a homebody who's not prone to wandering, but you'll still want a secure fence if you've got a yard; it will protect him from traffic and prevent strangers from approaching him when you're not around to supervise.
  Chows are easily housetrained, but crate training is strongly recommended. Crates make housetraining easier and keep your Chow from chewing things while you're away. The crate is a tool, not a jail, however, so don't keep your Chow locked up in it for long periods. The best place for a Chow is with you.
  Chows are more than capable of learning anything you can teach, and a verbal correction is usually all that's required to set them straight. No dog should ever be hit, but it's especially counterproductive with this breed. The fiercely proud and independent Chow will never respond to physical abuse. Earn his respect in puppyhood with firm consistency, and you won't have any problem training him. But if you let the cute pup have his way all the time and then try to train him, you're sure to face problems.

Grooming
  The Chow comes in two coat types: rough and smooth. Both have an undercoat and a top coat. The rough has an abundant coat that stands off from the body. The head is framed by a profuse ruff, and the tail is plumed. The legs have feathering as well. The smooth does not have the abundance of top coat that characterizes the rough, and he lacks a ruff and feathering on the tail and legs. In all other respects, the coats are the same.
  Grooming requirements depend on the type of coat. A smooth coated Chow needs brushing only weekly. One with a rough coat should be brushed every other day. Both varieties shed heavily twice a year, during which time the coat will come out in handfuls. A bath is rarely necessary, although a warm bath followed by a very thorough blow-drying can help remove that shedding coat.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually once a month. Brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath. Check the ears weekly for dirt, redness or a bad odor that can indicate an infection. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball dampened with a gentle ear cleaner recommended by your veterinarian.

Is this breed right for you?
  A great guard dog, the Chow Chow does well with all family members and pets if raised with them, but does best as a one-woman dog. In need of good leadership from its owner and proper obedience training, this breed will need a calm and confident leader who is consistent with him. If the Chow Chow does not receive this, he will believe himself to be the alpha and have the potential for behavioral problems. Due to his dense coat, this breed requires a lot of grooming and sheds often. The Chow Chow will do OK in apartment life if he is exercised regularly. Known as an inside dog, the breed cannot withstand warmer climates due to his double coat.

Children and other pets
  When they're raised with children, Chow Chows can do well with them, but they're not a rough and tumble dog that will tolerate a lot of abuse from a young child. Chows do best in families with older children who understand how to treat a dog.
  As with any dog, always teach children how to approach and touch your Chow, and supervise all interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear pulling from either party.
  Chows who are socialized and trained well can get along with other dogs and cats, especially if they're introduced to them in puppyhood. They do best, however, with dogs of the opposite sex; they may fight with dogs of the same sex.

Did You Know?
A blue-black tongue is one of the Chow’s most distinctive physical traits. When Chow puppies are born, their tongues are pink but darken to blue-black by the time they are 8 to 10 weeks old.

Famous Chow Chow owners
  • Konrad Lorenz, an Austrian zoologist, ethologist, and ornithologist, winner of the 1973 Nobel Prize who is often regarded as one of the founders of modern ethology, had a Chow Chow mix named Stasi. He wrote about his dogs in his book King Solomon's Ring.
  • Sigmund Freud had a Chow Chow named Jo-Fi who attended all of his therapy sessions because he felt that dogs had a special sense that allows them to judge a person's character accurately, and admitted he depended on Jo-Fi for an assessment of a patient's mental state.
  • Martha Stewart owns several chows, which are frequently seen on Stewart's shows, one of them named Genghis Khan.
  • President Calvin Coolidge and his wife owned a black Chow named Timmy. Chow Chows were also popular in the 1930s and 1980s.
  • Vanna Bonta has a cream Chow Chow named Sky in a line of her breed of choice, a blue Chow Chow she had named Seraph, and a red Chow Chow named Beowulf who was immortalized as a fictional dog in the book Flight.
  • Janet Jackson had a Chow Chow named Buckwheat.
  • Italian footballer Mario Balotelli bought his girlfriend two Chow Chow puppies in the UK.
  • Walt Disney famously gave his wife Lillian a Chow Chow puppy named Sunnee in a hatbox as a Christmas gift, later inspiring a similar scene in the Disney animated film Lady and the Tramp.
A dream day in the life of a Chow Chow
A lazy breed, the Chow Chow would be completely content staying indoors alone all day long. However, since this does not best suit him, his owner should take him on a short walk in the cool morning air. After a quick training session, the Chow Chow will be happy to hang around with his master while keeping his home safe from harm and strangers.


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Wednesday, August 13, 2014

Surviving the First Night with Your Puppy

Surviving the First Night with Your Puppy
  You just brought your little bundle of puppy fur home, and now it's time for the fun to begin. Well, sort of. Sometimes there's fun to be had the first night you spend with your new puppy, but you have quite a lot to do that often involves more work than play. All that work will pay off, though, helping your pup to have a positive start to his new life as your buddy.
The first night home with your new puppy can be a trying experience for both of you. It’s the first time your puppy has spent the night away from his mother and littermates. Because dogs are pack animals, your puppy knows instinctively that being separated from the pack is dangerous. Whining and crying at night is your puppy’s way of calling for his pack to find him. Of course it does nothing to comfort you.
  With a little preparation and patience, you can make the most of the first night with your puppy.
  From an evolutionary point of view - that is, all of the traits that began when dogs were still wild and continue because they have helped to keep the dog species alive - a vulnerable puppy that is separated from his family is at risk of being attacked and killed by predators. In order to discourage his mother from leaving him for long periods, he cries and carries on, resulting in her staying close in order to keep him quiet and therefore ensuring his survival. 
  On this first night, the puppy is going to feel his new aloneness most keenly. A lot of people will respond to the whines and squeals of a puppy by placing them far from earshot, such as in a basement or garage. Or, the puppy may be placed in a cage to keep him from escaping and scratching at doors. In such a situation his sense of insecurity increases and he will whine and squeal as loudly as he can, perhaps until dawn.

Everything’s New…Everything’s a First
  First things first…We are informed that up to this point your puppy has been with his mother and his littermates in a sterile environment. It’s advised that your puppy’s first week at home should be a quiet one. The puppy should be allowed to explore and meet his new family. You should now start teaching the puppy his name . When you first arrive home give your puppy a chance to relieve itself in an area you have designated for that purpose .

  Take your puppy out on leash. Allow your puppy 10-15 minutes, if he hasn’t relieved, take him inside. Try again in 10 minutes. If the puppy does relieve itself in the proper area, give him lots of praise. Then let him explore the house (remember to supervise – don’t let him out of your sight). Afterwards your may take it inside, but remember to supervise the puppy; do not let it out of your sight. Talk to the puppy when it explores to make it feel more at home.


Security, Not Coddling
  The first thing to consider is making a place where the puppy will not feel isolated. This can be a challenge, of course. Some people feel comfortable keeping their dogs in the bedroom on a dog bed or designated blanket on the floor. This can be good for giving the puppy a much needed sense of security. However, it’s probably best if you do not take the puppy into bed with you.
  Despite this, there are those who feel very comfortable with taking their pets into their beds and allowing them to sleep there every night. In fact, this practice has its own practical applications: dogs are a wonderful source of warmth on frigid winter nights.

  Not everyone wants a dog in their bed all the time, and if you are not sure whether you will or not, it is best not to. If you do take the puppy into your bed just to comfort him, it can lead to some behavioral problems later if you should decide that you do not want the dog in your bed every night after all.

Tips for first night
Keep your puppy on his accustomed food. It's fine to switch him to a new food in a few days, as long as you do it gradually, but the first night isn't the moment to start changing his food. He might not even eat the first night, and if he does, he's way better off eating something familiar.
Toss a few toys onto the floor. Squeakers, balls, ropes and such help your puppy feel more comfortable in his new home. They keep him busy, especially if he's teething and in the mood to sink his teeth into something.
Give the little rascal some space. You've got cute little furball in front of you, so it's only natural to lie on the floor next to your pup, scoop him up in your arms every chance you get, and follow him around like a lost ... puppy. You can love on him some, but he needs some quiet space and some time. He's just been taken to a new place where everything is different from what he used to know. He's scared and confused. He'll come around in a few days.
Keep an eye on him. Give your puppy space to explore if he wishes, but don't let him out of your sight for too long, and be suspicious if things get too quiet. You might think he's going to take a nap in your bedroom, but he's really going in to check things out, and that's bad news in the world of puppies. Think of him as you would a child who can't be left unwatched. Otherwise, you may be making a trip to the store to buy new sheets, pillows and a sewing kit.
Take your new little pal outside regularly. You're probably going to be cleaning up after at least one accident the first night you bring him home, unless he's older and already house trained. Take your puppy out as soon as you get home with him, right after he eats, whenever he wakes up after a nap, and right before bedtime. The timing of his outside ventures depends somewhat on his age. He can hold it for a maximum of his age in months plus one hour. So a 2-month-old puppy could hold it at most three hours. Do not try for this limit if you want to avoid accidents. He's a puppy. He's been in the world just eight weeks, and for four of those he was not paying attention. He's ready to learn, but he knows nothing. He will go when he feels the urge, because he doesn't yet know that you have a plan.
Introduce your pup to his crate during the day. If you're lucky, his breeder accustomed him to being in a crate, and he was transported in a crate to your home, so he's familiar with it. Crating usually results in loud wails, as if your puppy is suffering from something horrible. You can ease his transition into the scary crate by playing with him near it, tossing a few treats inside, praising him for getting in, and closing and opening the door. Keep doing this throughout the day. From the start, be certain that you never release him from the crate when he's complaining, but always wait for a time of silence before you walk in and release him with some praise. Otherwise, he'll start trying to train you, instead of the other way around.
Put your new puppy in the comfy crate you have set up for him near your own bed when it's time for sleep. Your puppy will bond best with you if his crate is near you, where he is surrounded by your scent and knows you are right there. Do not allow him to sleep on your bed. First night or not, your puppy does not get to sleep wherever he wants. When he wakes you in the middle of the night, that generally means he needs to potty, and you should take his word for it. Take him outside, and wait for him to squat and do his business, and then take him back to his crate, turn out the lights, and go back to sleep.

When Nature Calls
  If the puppy does whine excessively, it is reasonable to take the puppy gently by the scruff (back) of the neck , and without getting agitated, tell him in a low voice, “No, go to sleep.” Repeat this several times and as the days pass into weeks he will learn to obey you. In the morning, take him outside to relieve himself.
  Along with going out before bed, going out first thing in the morning should also become a habitual morning ritual. Puppies will typically relieve themselves in small amounts several times before they have finished an outing. Once he is finished, praise him with a pat and perhaps a small training treat and say a few praising words to let him know he has done the right thing.

Stop puppy crying at night
  If and when your puppy starts crying at night, you need to decide if he has to go to the bathroom or if he’s looking for attention. If he’s been quiet for a few hours and suddenly starts to cry or whine, he may need to go out. Puppies have small bladders, so you’ll likely have to take him out at least once during the night. A good rule of thumb is to add one to your puppy’s age in months and that’s generally how long he can go without a trip outside. So a two-month-old puppy can wait three hours. That means your puppy will probably need to go out at least twice during the night.
  If your puppy is crying and you’re sure it’s not for need of relieving himself, reach down and soothe him a little. Don’t be too doting or coddle your puppy. This will only reinforce the behavior and he’ll cry even more. If he continues to whine, a gruff “Quiet” and a quick, but gentle, shake by the scruff should settle the matter. If all else fails, ignore him. Tough love may be difficult, but eventually your puppy will learn that crying at night gets him nowhere. The more persistent you are in your approach, the quicker the situation will be resolved. If you’re stern one minute and sympathetic the next, your puppy will only be confused and his behavior will continue.

In the morning
  Get up right away and take your puppy outside to his soiling area. Carry him. Don’t let him walk there or he may be tempted to go before he gets outside. Let him empty everything out, and praise him when he’s finished.
  As with any new baby, you may not get much sleep the first night with puppy. If you’re patient and understanding, your puppy will learn what you expect of him when it’s time to sleep. You both should wake up rested and ready for the day after a few nights together.


Tips
  If you have other pets, introduce your puppy gradually. It's best to keep kitties and your puppy in separate rooms for a few days.
  Aside from letting your pup out to pee in the middle of the night, do not let him out of his crate if he's whining, barking or throwing a fit. He needs to learn that having a little tantrum doesn't get him anything. Discipline yourself to let him out only when he's quiet.

Warning
  Do not yell at your puppy or rush at him if he does something wrong. You can gently deter him from bad behaviors, but don't frighten him. Teach him. He's a baby exploring a new place. The whole world is new to him, and his early experiences make lasting impressions.
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Wednesday, July 16, 2014

How Do I Stop My Dog From Whining?

How Do I Stop My Dog From Whining?
  Whining, though it can be annoying to humans, is one way dogs communicate vocally. And though adult dogs whine for a number of reasons, the behavior usually is a reaction to anxiety, stress or injury - or because your dog wants your attention.  Don't worry; stopping your dog from whining is possible with a few clever tricks. 
   Whining is one of many forms of canine vocal communication. Dogs most commonly whine when they’re seeking attention, when they’re excited, when they’re anxious or when they’re trying to appease you.
  The good news is, with a little patience and the occasional treat, you can stop your dog from whining in a short time.

Identifying the Problem
  • Greeting Behavior. Some dogs whine during greetings. This kind of vocalization is usually motivated by excitement and may be directed at dogs or people.
  • Seeking Attention. Some dogs whine in the presence of their owners in order to get attention, rewards or desired objects.
  • Appeasement Behavior. Some dogs whine excessively when interacting with people and other dogs, usually while adopting a submissive posture.
  • Anxiety. Some dogs whine in response to stressful situations. In this context, whining sometimes seems involuntarily.
  • Separation Anxiety. If your dog only whines just before you leave or during your absence, she may have separation anxiety. If this is the case, your dog will usually display at least one other symptom of the disorder prior to your departure or when left alone, such as pacing, panting, excessive drooling, destruction (especially around doors and windows), urinating or defecating indoors, depression or other signs of distress. 
  • Injury or Medical Condition. Dogs often whine in response to pain or a painful condition. If you notice that your dog vocalizes frequently or has suddenly started to vocalize, it’s important to take her to the vet to rule out medical causes.
Steps! 
1. Exercise to calm down. Make sure the dog is getting enough daily exercise based on its size and energy level. Dogs become stressed when they are not active enough, and this will start them crying.
2. Give the dog a sheltered place of their own. It is very important to use a crate, dog house, igloo, or some warm, comfortable shelter outside where the dog can rest. Put the dog's "inside" bed or blankets as well as their used toys into the shelter so the area smells like them and they will recognize it as their own. Recognize that this new place might not seem like home to your dog, so take some time to gently teach them to go inside it.
3. Practice while you are home. Begin locking the dog outside for short periods of time . Ignore any crying! You must train the dog that nothing good will happen when they cry. If you give in and go out with the dog or allow them to return inside then you are giving positive reinforcement to the unwanted behavior .
4. Praise good behavior! This is a big key to training a dog. Once an allotted amount of time is up go outside with the dog and praise them profusely with attention and petting, and maybe even a bit of food or treats. The dog will eventually make a connection that if they are quiet and well behaved outside, they will be rewarded soon enough.
5. Slowly increase the time alone. Continue the training by lengthening the time outside until the dog remains quiet outdoors for at least an hour. Now the dog should be able to better deal with the separation anxiety when left outside or alone and hopefully quiet down and take a nap instead. And, give the dog something to chew on or play with when they are alone.
Audio tools to cause the dog to stop whining such as previously discussed are inexpensive and are not harmful to your pet. These devices simply produce a sound which the dog does not enjoy. What would happen if you heard a high-pitched, piercing scream every time you sat down with a piece of cake? To keep from hearing that awful sound one more time, you would probably be willing to give up the fattening food. This is the idea behind electrical sound emitters that are used to help your dog learn how to stop whining. 
Tip
  If whining persists, consider a certified professional dog trainer or obedience classes in your area.

Warnings
  Take your dog to the vet if you think she is whining because of pain or injury. Whining often is how dogs tell us they are hurt. If your dog's whining comes on quickly and persists, it is best to take her for treatment.
  If your dog's whining also involves destroying household items or defecating indoors when you leave, she may have severe separation anxiety and needs to see the vet.

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Tuesday, June 17, 2014

Everything about your Maltese

Everything about your Maltese

The Maltese has been a treasured companion dog for more than 2,000 years.
  With shoe-button eyes framed by a glistening coat of silky white, the Maltese has earned enduring popularity by combining cute with a lively, bright, and bold personality. Weighing less than seven pounds, these charmers are popular with the purse-dog set.
  The Maltese is the quintessential lap dog. It is extremely lovable and playful, and enjoys nothing more than to be pampered and praised by its owner. The breed is easily distinguished by its straight and long white coat, making it appear like it has just stepped out of a doggie hair salon.
  This breed is known for retaining its sweet-natured puppy tendencies through adulthood. Loving, social and loyal, the Maltese is an excellent companion dog in every sense of the word.

Overview
  The small, spunky Maltese is known for retaining his puppy-like attitude throughout his life. The Maltese is one of a handful of similar breeds whose job has always been that of “companion.” They are specifically designed to love and be loved.
  If you want a smart little dog to run you and your home, then this is your breed. Maltese pack a lot of love into their tiny bodies, and are never happier than when cuddling in their owners' laps. That doesn't mean these dogs don't need exercise and training. Resist the impulse to simply carry them everywhere and pluck them out of trouble, and let your dog be a dog. In particular, the Maltese excels at learning tricks and loves to show off.
  While the Maltese's happy, courageous natures make him a wonderful pet for many, this may not be the right dog for families with young children. Maltese are tiny and can easily be injured if play is too rough, or they may snap at a child in self-defense if frightened or hurt.
  This is also the wrong breed for someone who wants the look of a show dog with little effort. Those gorgeous creatures floating around the show ring with their gleaming white coats and perfect topknots are the product of endless hours of washing and combing, followed by keeping the coat in wraps for protection. Most pet Maltese are kept clipped short, which means frequent professional grooming. Neglected coats become tangled and matted, which is painful and can lead to serious skin infections.
  Those shoe-button eyes may look adorable against the white coat, but that look requires a lot of time spent cleaning away tear stains, which cause a rust discoloration that most people find unsightly even though it’s harmless.
  Allergies aren’t harmless, but those who sneeze and wheeze may find this breed more tolerable than others, although Maltese are fully capable of causing an allergic reaction in the most sensitive of sufferers. The size of a Maltese helps limit the amount of dog hair – and dander -- to trigger allergies, and a coat kept clean and clipped short will help further. But don’t believe the hype: there’s no such thing as a dog that doesn’t cause allergies at all.
The Maltese was developed exclusively as a companion dog, so he needs to live in the house and never outdoors.

Breed standards
AKC group: Toy Dog
UKC group: Companion Dog
Average lifespan: 15 - 18 years
Average size:  2 - 4 pounds
Coat appearance: Silky, straight, flat
Coloration: Pure white
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Other identifiers: Small, compact body frame; dark brown round eyes and black button nose
Possible alterations: Long coat standard for show dogs; puppy cut popular for non-show dogs
Comparable Breeds: Miniature Poodle, Shih Tzu
Highlights
  • Although your Maltese will want to please you, he can be difficult to housetrain. Crate training is recommended.
  • Maltese are prone to chills, especially if they are damp or walking in damp areas.
  • If your Maltese has long hair, he can get sunburned on the skin where the hair is parted on the back.
  • Because of their small size and delicate structure, Maltese generally aren't recommended for households with toddlers or small children.
  • Some Maltese have delicate digestive systems and may be picky eaters. Eating problems can occur if your Maltese has teeth or gum problems as well. If your Maltese is showing discomfort when eating or after eating, take him to the vet for a checkup.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.

History
  The Maltese dog is one of the most ancient of the toy breeds, with a history that can be traced back at least two millennia. Artists, poets, and writers immortalized this small dog in the early great cultures of Greece, Rome, and Egypt. They even were mentioned by Aristotle. The Greeks erected tombs for their Maltese dogs, while representations of Maltese-like dogs on Egyptian artifacts suggest that they were prized by that ancient culture. The Egyptians and, centuries later, many Europeans, thought that the Maltese had the ability to cure people of disease and would place one on the pillow of an ill person. This inspired one of its names — "The Comforter." Even before the Christian Era, the breed was widespread in Mediterranean cultures.
  Despite his prominence in history, the exact origin of the Maltese dog is uncertain. Many believe the breed was developed in the Isle of Malta in the Mediterranean Sea from Spitz- or Spaniel-type dogs. Others believe he was developed in Italy, and still others believe that he was originally from Asia and had a part in developing many of the smaller Asian dogs.
Wherever he came from, the Maltese thrived. By the 15th century, he had found a secure place in the arms and hearts of French aristocrats. During the reign of Henry VIII, Maltese arrived in the British Isles. By the end of the 16th century, the Maltese had become a favorite pet for noble and royal ladies. The little dog was a favorite of Queen Elizabeth I, Mary Queen of Scots, and Queen Victoria. Numerous painters, including Goya and Sir Joshua Reynolds, included these small dogs in their portraits of beautiful women.
Although he survived the fall of the Roman Empire and the Dark Ages, the Maltese was nearly destroyed in the 17th and 18th centuries when attempts were made to breed him to be the size of a squirrel. After this nearly disastrous experiment, breeders mixed poodles, miniature spaniels, and East Asian miniature dogs with the breed to save it. This resulted in the Maltese becoming so varied that several new breeds were formed. It is thought by many that Maltese are the direct ancestors of the Bichon Frise, Bolognese and Havanese breeds.
  English breeders developed the Maltese as we know him now. Many of the Maltese in the U.S. today trace their heritage back to English imports. Maltese were first seen in the U.S. in the late 1800s. They were entered in the earliest Westminster Kennel Club shows in the 1870s.
The number of Maltese dogs registered with the AKC grew very slowly until the 1950s. Since then, the breed has become quite popular. Maltese are one of the most popular breeds among spectators at dog shows, and frequently win the Toy Group. They also have an excellent record in the "Best in Show" competition.





Is this breed right for you?
  If you're looking for a pint-sized best friend to bring with you everywhere, the Maltese is right for you. Allergy sufferers rejoice! This breed's luxurious coat of hair means no dander, which will keep sneezing and sniffling to a minimum. The Maltese is a small and fragile breed, especially in its puppy years, and therefore must be supervised around little kids. A perfect companion dog, this adorable breed gets along with just about anyone — canine, feline and human.



Temperament and Personality
  Despite his tiny size, the Maltese is a lively and vigorous dog. He loves nothing more than to spend the day with his family.
  Because Maltese are so focused on their people, they take well to training. Attention and the ability to please are all it takes to get a Maltese to learn. He’s a ham who will show off tricks at home and excel in dog sports, including agility, obedience, rally and, believe it or not, tracking. A Maltese can also be a super therapy dog.
  Start training your puppy the day you bring him home. He is capable of soaking up everything you can teach him. If possible, get him into puppy kindergarten class by the time he is 10 to 12 weeks old, and socialize, socialize, socialize. However, be aware that many puppy training classes require certain vaccines (like kennel cough) to be up to date, and many veterinarians recommend limited exposure to other dogs and public places until puppy vaccines (including rabies, distemper and parvovirus) have been completed. In lieu of formal training, you can begin training your puppy at home and socializing him among family and friends until puppy vaccines are completed.
  Talk to the breeder, describe exactly what you’re looking for in a dog, and ask for assistance in selecting a puppy. Breeders see the puppies daily and can make uncannily accurate recommendations once they know something about your lifestyle and personality.
The perfect Maltese doesn’t spring fully formed from the whelping box. He’s a product of his background and breeding. Whatever you want from a Maltese, look for one whose parents have nice personalities and who has been well socialized from early puppyhood.

Health 
  Prone to sunburn along the hair parting, skin, eye issues, respiratory, and slipped stifle. Some may be difficult to feed with weak, upset digestion. They may get the chills, and they experience discomfort in hot weather. Maltese should be kept out of damp areas. Also prone to teeth problems. Feeding dry dog biscuits in addition to their normal food can help the teeth stay clean and healthy.

Care
  Maltese have no undercoat, and have little to no shedding if cared for properly. Like their relatives, the Poodles and Bichon Frisé, they are considered to be largely hypoallergenic and many people who are allergic to dogs may not be allergic to the Maltese. Daily cleaning is required to prevent the risk of tear-staining. Many owners find that a weekly bath is sufficient for keeping the coat clean, although it is recommended to not wash a dog so often, so washing your Maltese every 3 weeks is sufficient, although if the dog keeps clean even longer than that. They need to get professionally groomed about once every month and a half.
  Regular grooming is also required to prevent the coats of non-shedding dogs from matting. Many owners will keep their Maltese clipped in a "puppy cut," a 1 - 2" all over trim that makes the dog resemble a puppy. Some owners, especially those who show Maltese in the sport of conformation, prefer to wrap the long fur to keep it from matting and breaking off, and then to show the dog with the hair unwrapped combed out to its full length. Some Maltese need to be blow-dried in order to prevent mats because drying is ineffective to some dogs.
  Dark staining in the hair around the eyes, "tear staining", can be a problem in this breed, and is mostly a function of how much the individual dog's eyes water and the size of the tear ducts. To get rid of tear staining, you can get a solution or powder specially made for tear stains, which can often be found in local pet stores. A fine-toothed metal pet comb, moistened with hot water and applied perhaps twice weekly, also works extremely well. The antibiotic, Cephalexin has been shown to completely clear up "tear staining" in some cases.
  Maltese are susceptible to "reverse sneezing," which sounds like a honking, snorting, or gagging sound and results often from over-excitement, play, allergies, or upon waking up. It is not life-threatening or dangerous, it will go away after about a minute.
  They are ranked 59th out of 69 in Stanley Coren's The Intelligence of Dogs . which indexes obedience and the ability of a dog breed to follow commands, with very light focus on skills seen outside of working breeds, such as emotional intelligence.
  Maltese tend to have many or several tooth problems usually resulting in cavities, without proper care the infected teeth may fall out as the dog gets older. Maltese might need additional care, and have their teeth brushed with soft-bristled toothbrush and special dog toothpaste every week to avoid tooth problems.

Living Conditions
  The Maltese is a good dog for apartment life. They are very active indoors and will do okay without a yard.

Exercise
  Maltese need a daily walk. Play will take care of a lot of their exercise needs, however, as with all breeds, play will not fulfill their primal instinct to walk. Dogs that do not get to go on daily walks are more likely to display behavior problems. They will also enjoy a good romp in a safe, open area off lead, such as a large, fenced-in yard. They remain playful well into old age. They are very active indoors.

Grooming
  The glamorous Maltese is a high-maintenance dog. The Maltese has a silky single white coat that should be groomed daily with a pin brush or a stainless steel comb to prevent or remove any mats and tangles. Maltese who are allowed to become matted will probably need to be trimmed short because it will be too painful to comb or brush out the mats.
  As you comb or brush your Maltese, spray the coat with a mixture of coat conditioner diluted with water. This will help protect the hair from breakage and prevent the buildup of static. When your Maltese is dry and beautiful, pull up the hair around his face into a cute topknot or trim it so it doesn’t fall into his eyes.
  Bathe your Maltese whenever his coat starts to look dingy. With the gentle pet shampoos available, you can bathe him weekly if you want without harming his coat.
Before bathing, comb the coat out thoroughly to remove all tangles. Use a whitening shampoo, followed by a conditioner for dogs with long hair. Rinse thoroughly, and then rinse again to make sure you’ve removed all the shampoo and conditioner. Use a towel to soak up as much moisture as possible, then blow dry the coat until it is completely dry. Never let your Maltese air-dry, or his coat won’t look pretty at all.
  If all of this sounds like too much work, take your Maltese to a professional groomer who can give the coat the care it needs or trim it into an easy-care puppy clip that you can manage at home.
  Of course, a Maltese also needs the same basic care as other dogs. Trim his nails every week or two, short enough that they don’t click on the floor, and brush his teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children and other pets
  Most Maltese breeders will not sell puppies to families with young children. It's just too easy for a toddler to injure a tiny Maltese by dropping him, stepping on him, or holding him too tightly. He does much better in a home with quiet older children or adults only who will treat him with the care he needs.
  Maltese can get along with other dogs and cats if they are socialized to them at an early age. They're unaware of their tiny size, however, and must be protected from taking on dogs that are ten or twenty times their size.

Did You Know?
  The sweet little Maltese is a favorite of celebrities, including Halle Berry, Heather Locklear, and Eva Longoria. Could it be because they’re so darn cute in photographs? We think so.




A dream day in the life of a Maltese
  Looking adorable while sitting on your lap is all in a day's work for the Maltese. Compact and friendly as can be, this breed loves to go anywhere with you. More than just a beautiful face, this pooch has brains and loves to show them off. A day of learning new tricks and showing off would keep this pup's tail wagging. Resist the urge to coddle your Maltese — yes, it makes them happy, but in the long run it's best to teach them a little independence.





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Everything about your Pomeranian

Everything about your Pomeranian
  The Pomeranian is a cocky, animated companion with an extroverted personality. This compact little dog is an active toy breed with an alert character and fox-like expression. Today, the Pomeranian is a popular companion dog and competitive show dog. They can come in all colors, patterns, and variations although orange and red are the most popular.
   Pomeranians are little dogs with “big dog” personalities. While lively, friendly and fun, they can be slightly territorial. They grow very attached to their owners and can develop a protectiveness that makes them suspicious of strangers. This not only makes for a loyal, tried-and-true companion, it makes for a superb watchdog. Pomeranians, though small, can really deliver on the barks when a stranger approaches the house.
  Descended from large sled dog breeds, the now-tiny Pomeranian has a long and interesting history. The foxy-faced dog, nicknamed "the little dog who thinks he can," is compact, active, and capable of competing in agility and obedience or simply being a family friend.

Overview
  Pomeranians are the tiniest of the Spitz, or Nordic, breeds, but they have the courage of much bigger dogs. A perennially popular breed, the Pom weighs less than 7 pounds, but you won’t often find him in a puppy purse. That’s because Pomeranians think big. They know they have four feet and prefer to use them, just as larger dogs would.
  Everything about the Pomeranian is bright: his eyes, his temperament, and his intelligence. Though he’s very fond of his family and delighted to get some lap time, he’s also a busy little guy. You’re more likely to find him trotting around your house on an important mission than snoozing on the sofa.
  The Pom’s activity level makes him an ideal pet for someone who wants a small dog with the personality traits of the full-size sled and herding dogs from which this breed originates. Because he’s tiny, he can probably get enough exercise indoors, but he’s happiest when he gets to go on long walks, chase leaves, and play with other small dogs. He is athletic and frequently participates in dog sports such as agility, freestyle, obedience, rally, and tracking. Because of his diminutive size, he is suited to life in an apartment, but he is just as at home on a ranch or estate. However, he’s far too tiny to live outdoors. He needs to live inside with his family.
  Pomeranians have a profuse double coat that needs regular brushing but are otherwise easy to care for. And, make no mistake, Poms bark. It may not be deafening, but it can be annoying and difficult to stop, even with training. As with many small dogs, Pomeranians may be harder to housetrain.
  Ask your breeder about any behavior or health problems in dogs related to your prospective puppy. If she says there aren’t any, run. She should provide you with written documentation from the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) that the parents of the puppy had normal hips, elbows, and knees, as well as from the Canine Eye Registry Foundation (CERF), certifying that they were free of vision problems.
  A Pomeranian can go to his new home at 8 to 10 weeks of age, but some breeders like to keep pups until they are 12 to 14 weeks old to make sure they are mature enough to go to their new homes and to see which ones will shake out as show prospects.

Highlights
  • Pomeranians often are suspicious of strangers and can bark a lot.
  • Pomeranians can be difficult to housetrain. Crate training is recommended.
  • High heat and humidity can cause your Pom to become overheated and possibly have heat stroke. When your Pom is outdoors, watch him carefully for signs of overheating and take him inside immediately. They definitely are housedogs and should not be kept outdoors.
  • While Poms are good with children, they are not a good choice for very young or highly active children because of their small size. Never let your small children and your Pom play without supervision.
  • Because they are so small, Poms can be perceived as prey by owls, eagles, hawks, coyotes, and other wild animals. Never leave them outside unattended, and be watchful if there are predatory birds in your location. If this is the case, stay close to your Pom to discourage birds from trying to carry them off!
  • Because they are small and attractive, Poms are targets for dognappers, another reason why you shouldn't leave them outside unattended, even in a fenced yard.
  • Although they are small, Poms don't seem to realize it and can have a "big dog" attitude. This can spell disaster if they decide to chase a bigger dog that they think is encroaching upon their territory, or if they jump from a high place. It's up to you to make sure that your little one doesn't harm himself due to not realizing his limitations.
  • When your Pom gets old, he may develop bald spots in his beautiful coat.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Breed standards
AKC group: Toy Dog
UKC group: Companion Dog
Average lifespan: 12 - 15 years
Average size:  4 - 6 pounds
Coat appearance: Harsh, thick, dense
Coloration: Varies
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Other identifiers: Compact, square body frame; tiny pointed ears stand erect; high-set feathered tail
Possible alterations: None
Comparable Breeds: Papillon, Yorkshire Terrier

Other Quick Facts
  • The breed became popular in 1888 after Queen Victoria fell in love with a Pom while vacationing in Italy.
  • Pomeranians have a thick, beautiful coat that comes in many colors and patterns, and they are easy to groom.
  • Pomeranians get along well with other pets but should be protected from rambunctious children.

History
  The forerunners of today's Pomeranian breed were large working dogs from the Arctic regions. These dogs are commonly known as the Wolfspitz or Spitz type, which is German for "sharp point" which was the term originally used by Count Eberhard zu Sayn in the 16th Century as a reference to the features of the dog's nose and muzzle. The Pomeranian is considered to be descended from the German Spitz.
  The breed is thought to have acquired its name by association with the area known as Pomerania which is located in northern Poland and Germany along the Baltic Sea. Although not the origin of the breed, this area is credited with the breeding which led to the original Pomeranian type of dog. Proper documentation was lacking until the breed's introduction into the United Kingdom.
  An early modern recorded reference to the Pomeranian breed is from 2 November 1764, in a diary entry in James Boswell's Boswell on the Grand Tour: Germany and Switzerland. "The Frenchman had a Pomeranian dog named Pomer whom he was mighty fond of." The offspring of a Pomeranian and a wolf bred by an animal merchant from London is discussed in Thomas Pennant's A Tour in Scotland from 1769.
  Two members of the British Royal Family influenced the evolution of the breed. In 1767, Queen Charlotte, Queen-consort of King George III of England, brought two Pomeranians to England. Named Phoebe and Mercury, the dogs were depicted in paintings by Sir Thomas Gainsborough. These paintings depicted a dog larger than the modern breed, reportedly weighing as much as 14–23 kg, but showing modern traits such as the heavy coat, ears and a tail curled over the back.
  Queen Victoria, Queen Charlotte's granddaughter, was also an enthusiast and established a large breeding kennel. One of her favoured dogs was a comparatively small red sable Pomeranian which she named "Windor's Marco" and was reported to weigh only 5.4 kg. When she first exhibited Marco in 1891, it caused the smaller type Pomeranian to become immediately popular and breeders began selecting only the smaller specimens for breeding.   During her lifetime, the size of the Pomeranian breed was reported to have decreased by 50%. Queen Victoria worked to improve and promote the Pomeranian breed by importing smaller Pomeranians of different colors from various European countries to add to her breeding program. Royal owners during this period also included Joséphine de Beauharnais, the wife of Napoleon I of France, and King George IV of England.
  The first breed club was set up in England in 1891, and the first breed standard was written shortly afterwards. The first member of the breed was registered in America to the American Kennel Club in 1898, and it was recognized in 1900.
In 1912, two Pomeranians were among only three dogs to survive the sinking of RMS Titanic. A Pomeranian called "Lady", owned by Miss Margaret Hays, escaped with her owner in lifeboat number seven, while Elizabeth Barrett Rothschild took her pet to safety with her in lifeboat number six.
  Glen Rose Flashaway won the Toy Group at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show in 1926, the first Pomeranian to win a group at Westminster. It would take until 1988 for the first Pomeranian, "Great Elms Prince Charming II", to win the Best in Show prize from the Westminster Kennel Club.
  In the standard published in 1998, the Pomeranian is included in the German Spitz standard, along with the Keeshond, by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale. According to the standard "Spitz breeds are captivating" and have a "unique characteristic, cheeky appearance."
  The Pomeranian has been among the more popular dog breeds in the United States, featuring consistently in the top 20 of registered AKC dog breeds over the last 10 years. The breed ranked 17 in the 2011 rankings, dropping two spots from the previous year.
It is not listed in the top 20 breeds in the UK in either 2007 or 2008. In Australia their popularity has declined since 1986, with a peak of 1128 Pomeranians registered with the Australian National Kennel Council in 1987; only 577 were registered in 2008. However, this is an increase from 2004, when only 491 dogs were registered.



Personality
 The Pomeranian has a proud and glamorous appearance with a personality to match. He’s an extrovert who is clever and lively. It’s hard to appear in public with a Pom and not attract attention. The adorable little dogs with the dark, almond-shaped eyes and alert, happy expression are tiny but intrepid. They have a take-charge temperament and tend not to be fearful of strangers or other animals. For more than a century, the Pom has had a well-deserved reputation for being a great watchdog. He may weigh only a few pounds, but he views himself as absolute guardian of his home and family.
  The perfect little Pom is calm and easy to live with. He enjoys sitting in your lap and giving kisses. He is busy but doesn’t bounce off the walls. That said, Poms do like to bark. Start early and be consistent if you plan to teach him the “No bark” or “Quiet” command.
  Poms may look like toys, but they are not good pets for young children. They are too delicate to be handled roughly, and they prefer the company of adults.
  Housetraining does not always come easy to Poms. They can be stubborn about going outside to potty, especially if it’s rainy or cold outside. As a compromise, consider paper-training a Pom so that you both have options when the weather is bad.

Right Breed for You?
  Pomeranians make excellent companions for all households. Due to the size and frame of Pomeranians, it's important to watch this breed around young children to ensure they are handled properly. Owners of this energetic breed must be able to provide time for daily exercise and playtime. Their pocket-size frames make Pomeranians very suitable for apartment dwellers provided they can get their pets out for frequent walks. Potential owners should be ready to love being surrounded by luscious locks of Pomeranian fur, as this breed is very prone to shedding.

Health 
Pomeranians are prone to dislocated patella (kneecap), slipped stifle, heart problems, eye infections, skin irritations and tooth decay and early loss. It is recommended that they are fed dry dog food or crunchy Milk Bones daily to help keep the teeth and gums in good condition. Newborn Pom puppies are very tiny and fragile. Three newborns can be held in the palm of one’s hand. Dams on the smaller side often need to deliver by cesarean section. When the dog is old it may become molted with bald spots.

Care
  Pomeranians are very active indoors and are good choices for apartment dwellers and people without a fenced yard. They have a moderate activity level and will enjoy several short daily walks or play times.
   They are remarkably hearty and enjoy longer walks, but always keep in mind that they are small and sensitive to heat. They love to play and can get bored easily, so be sure to give them lots of toys and rotate them frequently so there's always something new. They especially enjoy toys that challenge them.
  One activity that both you and your Pom will enjoy is trick training. Poms love to learn new things and enjoy being the center of attention, so teaching them tricks is a perfect way to bond with them while providing them with exercise and mental stimulation.
  They have a short attention span, so keep training sessions brief and fun. Reward your Pom with praise, treats, or play whenever he correctly performs a command or does something else you like.

Grooming
  Pomeranians have what is called a double coat. The undercoat is soft and dense; the outer coat is long and straight with a course texture.
  Thanks to their small size, Pomeranians are easy to groom, even with all that coat. Brush the coat a few times a week to prevent mats or tangles. Use a medium to harsh slicker brush that will get down to the skin without hurting the dog.
  You may have heard that Poms don’t shed. Forget that. They do. Luckily, they are small enough that the amount of hair they lose is negligible. If you brush your Pom regularly, shedding shouldn’t be a big issue.
  Bathe a Pom every couple of months or more often as needed. If you use a gentle dog shampoo, you can even bathe a Pom as often as once or twice a week if you want.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the toenails every week or two. They should never get long enough to clack on the floor. Brush teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good dental health and fresh breath.

Living Conditions
  The Pomeranian is good for apartment living. These dogs are very active indoors and will do okay without a yard. Be careful they do not overheat in hot weather.

Exercise
  Poms need a daily walk. Play will take care of a lot of their exercise needs, however, as with all breeds, play will not fulfill their primal instinct to walk. Dogs that do not get to go on daily walks are more likely to display behavior problems. They will also enjoy a good romp in a safe, open area off lead, such as a large, fenced-in yard.
Children and other pets
  The bold and active Pomeranian loves to play, but he's best suited to a home with older children who can be trusted to handle him carefully. Many breeders refuse to sell puppies to homes with very young children, for good reason. Sturdy though he is, the diminutive Pom is all too easily injured if he's accidentally dropped or stepped on by a clumsy child.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Pomeranians can get along great with cats and other animals, especially if they're raised with them. Protect them from bigger dogs. Poms don't realize just how small they are, and they have no fear of challenging bigger dogs.

Did You Know?
  The original Pomeranians weighed 20 to 30 pounds — much larger than the Pom that we know and love today.
A dream day in the life of a Pomeranian
  The adorable Pom knows its own cuteness and demands constant pampering and attention, but one look at that face and you'll be happy to oblige. These petite partners are known for big, full and spunky hair, fit to match their equally boisterous personalities. Pampering a Pomeranian with weekly brushings and frequent trips to the groomer is a must to keep them happy. This happy-go-lucky pup loves socializing as much as she loves curling up on a warm lap, and a day of play and cuddles would make for time well spent.



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