LUV My dogs: protective

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Showing posts with label protective. Show all posts
Showing posts with label protective. Show all posts

Thursday, September 22, 2016

Everything about your Kuvasz

Everything about your Kuvasz
   Bold, courageous and fearless, the Kuvasz is an unparalleled livestock guard, able to act at just the right moment without instruction and cover rough terrain for long periods of time. One of the larger working breeds, he is well-muscled and agile. His double coat features a coarse guard hair that protects a soft, fine undercoat. The hair ranges from straight to quite wavy, but must always be white.

Overview
  The kuvasz is a large dog, slightly longer than tall, and medium-boned. It is not bulky, but instead light-footed, with a free, easy gait. The breed's combination of power and agility stems from its versatile roots as a guardian, hunter and herder. Its double coat is medium-coarse, ranging from wavy to straight. 
  Despite its sweet looks, the kuvasz is a tough protector, fearlessly defending its family or home. It is gentle with and protective of children in its own family, but it may misinterpret a child's rough-and-tumble games with other children as attacks on its child. It is reserved with strangers and may be aggressive toward strange dogs; however, it tends to be very gentle with other pets and livestock. It is devoted and loyal but not very demonstrative. Some can be domineering.

Highlights
  • Kuvaszok require a confident, experienced owner, one who gains their respect and understands their independent nature.
  • Kuvaszok shed profusely, especially in the spring and fall. Brushing them at least once a week, and preferably every two to three days, is recommended.
  • Like many large dogs, the Kuvasz may develop joint problems if exercised too much while he's still growing. Don't push your Kuvasz to over-exercise, jump excessively, or go up and down stairs too often until he's passed his second birthday.
  • Kuvaszok are suspicious of strangers and can be overly protective. Obedience training is imperative when you own a large guarding dog such as a Kuvasz.
  • Although he's pretty self-sufficient, a Kuvasz doesn't like to be kept apart from his family. Like all dogs, he does best spending at least part of his time with you in the house rather than being left alone in the backyard. There really is no such thing as a "good backyard dog."
  • Your Kuvasz can become aggressive and frustrated if kenneled, tethered, or chained. This is a breed that needs to run. He needs a large, fenced yard as well as a long daily walk or run once he's physically mature.
  • Kuvaszok are intelligent and like many guarding dogs, they think for themselves. Training can be difficult and requires a lot of patience, time, and consistency.
  • Although they're very gentle with children if they were raised with them, Kuvaszok puppies can be rambunctious and may accidentally knock over a small child.
  • Your Kuvasz may consider any children other than the kids in your family to be threats. Opt to be safe rather than sorry, and when other kids come over to play, watch your Kuvasz carefully or put him in a secure area.
  • Never allow anyone to reprimand your Kuvasz. If he feels that the person who's reprimanding him isn't "worthy" to do so, he will resent it.
Other Quick Facts
  • The muscular and agile Kuvasz is large and sturdy with a white double coat, dark-brown almond-shaped eyes, drop ears that fall into a V-shape, and a long, furry tail.
Breed standards
AKC: Working
UKC : Guardian Dogs
Life Span: 10 to 12 years
Weight: 70 to 115 pounds
Height: 26 to 30 inches at the shoulder
Coat : Ranges from straight to wavy
Color: White
Hypoallergenic Breed: No
Comparable Breeds: Komondor, Great Pyrenees

History
  Around 2000 BC, the Magyar tribes moved along the recently established trade routes of the steppes, gradually leading them to the Carpathian Basin in Hungary which they conquered in 896 A.D. With them came Kuvasz-type dogs, which primarily served as livestock guardians. In 1978, the fossilized skeleton of a 9th Century Kuvasz-type dog was discovered in Fenékpuszta near Keszthely, a discovery which was remarkable in that the morphology of the skeleton was almost identical to a modern Kuvasz. If accurate, such a discovery would mark the Kuvasz as among the oldest identifiable dog breeds as only a few breeds can be dated beyond the 9th Century.
  After the Magyar settlement of the Carpathian Basin, the tribes converted to a more agrarian lifestyle and began to devote more resources towards animal husbandry. Whereas the Komondor was used in the lower elevations with drier climates, the Kuvasz was used in the wet pastures of the higher mountains and both were an integral part of the economy. Later, during the 15th Century, the Kuvasz became a highly prized animal and could be found in the royal court of King Matthias Corvinus. Kuvasz puppies were given to visiting dignitaries as a royal gift, and the King was said to have trusted his dogs more than his own councilors. After the king's death, the popularity of the breed among the nobles waned but it was still frequently found in its traditional role of protecting livestock.
  By the end of World War II, nearly all the Kuvasz dogs in Hungary had been killed. The dogs had such a reputation for protecting their families that they were actively sought and killed by German and Soviet soldiers, while at the same time some German officers used to take Kuvasz dogs home with them. After the Soviet invasion and the end of the war, the breed was nearly extinct in Hungary. After the war, it was revealed that fewer than thirty Kuvasz were left in Hungary and some sources indicate the number may have been as few as twelve. Since then, due to many dedicated breeders, Kuvasz breed have repopulated Hungary. However, as a result of this near extinction, the genetic pool available to breeders was severely restricted and there is conjecture that some may have used other breeds, such as the Great Pyrenees, to continue their programs. The issue is further clouded by the need to use an open stud book system at the time to rebuild the breed.

Possible origins of the breed name
  The word most likely comes from the Turkic word kavas meaning guard or soldier or kuwasz meaning protector. A related theory posits that the word may have originated from the ancient farmers of Russia, the Chuvash, who nurtured the breed for generations and contributed many words to the Hungarian language.

Personality
  The Kuvasz is one of the oldest Hungarian dog breeds, with roots tracing back to the 15th century, where they were a favorite guard dog for the noble classes. The modern Kuvasz takes his watchdog role seriously, quietly sizing up newcomers before making a decision about whether they are friend or foe. They are fiercely protective of their property, family, and even other household pets. They have a high tolerance for pain, which means Kuvasz are patient with children who want to climb on them and romp around.

Health
  Although generally a healthy and robust breed which can be expected to live approximately 12–14 years, the Kuvasz are prone to developmental bone problems. Accordingly, owners should take care to provide proper nutrition to their Kuvasz puppy and avoid subjecting the puppy to rough play. As with many large breeds, hip dysplasia, a painful and potentially debilitating condition, is not uncommon. Good genetics and proper nutrition as a puppy are key to avoiding these complications.
  The belief that a large breed puppies including Kuvasz puppy should not be fed a diet high in calories or protein has largely been dispelled by studies. Bone and joint disorders are thought to be genetic. However, weight can be an influencing factor. Puppies should be fed a balanced diet. The Kuvasz has a very efficient metabolism and is predisposed to rapid growth—vitamin supplements are not necessary and, in fact, should be avoided. Cooked bones should never be given to a Kuvasz or any other dog because the cooking process renders the bone brittle and prone to splintering, which can cause serious injury to the dog's mouth and digestive tract.

Care
  Coat care consists of weekly brushing; however, daily brushing is required when the dog undergoes its seasonal shedding. The dog needs daily exercise in the form of a good run in an enclosed area and a long walk.
  It is fond of cold weather and can survive outside in cool and temperate climates. Despite this, Kuvasz experts recommend allowing the dog to spend time both in the yard and indoors.

Living Conditions
  The Kuvasz is not recommended for apartment life. It is fairly active indoors and does best with at least a large yard. Do not leave this dog alone in the backyard for long stretches of time, as he may become destructive. Vigorous exercise should help with this. The Kuvasz should never be left outside all tied up, for this could lead to viciousness. It will do best in a large enclosed yard. It especially enjoys cold weather and can live outdoors in temperate to cold climates as long as it has a doghouse and fresh water, but will do best if allowed access to both the house and yard. The Kuvasz's thick coat makes him very uncomfortable in warm weather or humid conditions; it should always have plenty of shade and fresh water.

Trainability
  Training a Kuvasz can be a challenge. This is a dominant breed with a huge physical presence, and they like to be in charge at all times. They were developed to make independent decisions in the field, and that independent air has not left the modern Kuvasz. You must teach him early who the true leaders are in the house, or he will naturally assume the role.
  Consistency is the key to raising an obedient Kuvasz. They are vigilant, and will be on the lookout for the first sign you have bent the rules, and promptly take over. Training should be firm, but never harsh as this can lead to avoidance behaviors. Positive reinforcement, lots of treats and always meaning what you say are the best recipe for success.
  Protectiveness is in the Kuvasz DNA, so socialization should be conducted early and often. These dogs need to understand how welcome guests behave, so that their wariness of strangers does not get out of hand.

Exercise
  The Kuvasz needs vigorous daily exercise. If it is not actively working as a flock guardian it needs to be taken on a daily, long brisk walk or jog. While out on the walk the dog must be made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as in a dog's mind the leader leads the way, and that leader needs to be the human. Exercising should help with chewing or digging problems—in hopes that it will tire the dog out.

Grooming
  The Kuvasz has a beautiful white double coat that sheds dirt but also sheds hair. Brush him weekly with a pin brush to remove dead hair and keep the skin and coat healthy. Trim the fur between his toes to keep his feet in good condition. His coat repels water and sheds dirt easily with brushing, so a bath is rarely necessary.
  When summer comes along, don’t think that your Kuvasz has suddenly developed a disease that causes hair loss. It’s normal for the Kuvasz to lose most of his long coat during hot weather.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets

  Kuvaszok are fond of children, and can be gentle and protective with them. If your kids are playing with friends, though, it's essential to supervise if a Kuvasz is nearby. He may mistake other children's play for aggression and will move to protect "his" kids. Kuvaszok puppies can be too rambunctious for young children.
  As with any dog, always teach children how to safely approach and touch your Kuvasz, and supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent biting or tail-pulling from either party.

Is the Kuvasz the Right Dog for You?
  Kuvaszok are protective dogs who need socialization and training. They are great with children and other pets, but they should not be left alone with children they do not know.   They are wary of strangers and will be picky when choosing whom to trust. They should not be left alone for very long.
  Daily exercise is a must. These dogs also need regular grooming and can shed heavily a couple of times per year.
  Keeping regular veterinary visits and feeding a quality dog food will give your Kuvasz the best chance at a healthy life. The double coat makes them ideal for colder climates, but they can live in warmer climates and will shed the outer coat.
  If you are looking for a protective family dog and can commit to socializing and training a dog, consider the Kuvasz for your next pet.

Did You Know?
  The name Kuvasz is thought to derive either from a corruption of the Turkish word Kawasz, meaning “armed guard of the nobility,” or the Arabic word kawwasz, meaning “archer.”



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Thursday, September 15, 2016

Everything about your Transylvanian Hound

Everything about your Transylvanian Hound
  When it comes to the Transylvanian Hound, there is much to love. It has a gentle, adaptable personality that comes from centuries of working with people in the wide-ranging climate of Hungary. Gentle and good-natured, it grows very close to family members. This is the type of dog that will romp through the wilderness and cuddle on the living room floor.

Overview
  The Transylvanian Hound  is an ancient dog breed of Hungary, historically primarily used for hunting. It is a strong, medium-sized scent hound, characterized by a black body, with tan and sometimes white markings on the muzzle, chest and extremities, and distinctive tan eyebrow spots. It has a high-pitched bark for a dog of its size. The breed was rescued from extinction by focused breeding efforts in the late 20th century. There were formerly two varieties, the long-legged and short-legged, developed for different kinds of hunting in the Middle Ages. Only the long-legged strain survives.

What makes the Transylvanian Hound Unique?
  Historically, Transylvanian Hound are know primarily for hunting. These dogs re characterized by a black body, and sometimes white markings on the muzzle and they are medium-sized dogs. they are sweet, energetic, loyal and fearless.

Breed standards
FCI: Group 6, Section 1 #241
AKC: FSS- The AKC Foundation Stock Service (FSS) is an optional recording service for purebred dogs that are not yet eligible for AKC registration.
UKC : Scenthound
Life Span: 10 – 12 Years
Colour: Black, Tan
Litter Size: up to 8 puppies
Size: Males –18 to 21 inches; Females – 18 to 21 inches
Weight: Males – 66 to 77 pounds; Females –66 to 77 pounds
Origin: Hungary
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles, houses with yards, hunters
Temperament: Friendly, hardy, courageous, intelligent
Hypoallergenic: No
Comparable Breeds: Black and Tan Coonhound, Rottweiler

History
  The ancestors of the Transylvanian Hound came with the invading Magyar tribes in the ninth century, who brought in hounds and crossed them with local varieties and with Polish hounds.
  The dog was the favourite of the Hungarian aristocracy during the breed's peak in the Middle Ages, for hunting various game animals.Two height varieties developed to hunt different game in different types of terrain, and both varieties were kept together. The long-legged variety was used for hunting woodland and grassland big game, such as European bison, bear, boar, and lynx. The short-legged variety was used for hunting fox, hare, and chamois is overgrown or rocky terrain.
  The breed declined, and was marginalised to the Carpathian woodlands, shrinking with the growth of agriculture and forestry. At the beginning of the twentieth century, the breed was nearly extinct, and not recognised and standardised by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI) until 1963. In 1968, efforts began to save it.Today, a substantial number of the long-legged variety of the dogs may be found in both Hungary and neighboring Romania. However, only the long-legged variety remains.
  The Transylvanian Hound is, naturally, recognised by the national dog breeding and fancier group, the Hungarian Kennel Club (using the FCI breed standard). The breed was recognised with a breed standard by one US-based group, the United Kennel Club (UKC), in 2006.The more prominent American Kennel Club publishes no standard for it, though the organisation at least provisionally recognises its existence, announcing its acceptance in 2015 into the AKC Foundation Stock Service Program, for breeders hoping to establishing it in the United States.


Temperament
  Even though the Transylvanian Hound was originally developed as a hunting dog it also makes a wonderful family pet. These dogs are friendly and amiable by nature and they can be quite loyal and loving with their families. This breed is curious and they have a tendency to follow scents, so you should always keep your dog on a leash when you take him outside.   The Transylvanian Hound can be somewhat independent at times due to their hunting instincts, but they love to spend time with family and they generally get along well with children and other dogs. This breed requires adequate daily mental and physical stimulation to prevent the development of problem behaviors.
  This breed is known for its protective ways and is a good addition as a family dog. The Transylvanian Hound is not only loyal, but also intelligent and easy to train. Bred for hunting purposes, the Transylvanian Hound is energetic, requiring daily exercise.

Health Problems
  The Transylvanian Hound is a very hardy and healthy breed for the most part, not prone to many serious health problems. Like all breeds, however, this dog can develop minor health issues. The diseases most commonly affecting this breed include hip dysplasia and elbow dysplasia.
  This dog breed lives an average of 10 to 12 years.

Care
  The Transylvanian Hound requires little coat maintenance, shedding an average amount. An occasional brushing with a firm bristle brush is sufficient, and bathing should be kept to a minimum to maintain the natural coat.

Training
  The Transylvanian Hound was originally bred for hunting so it is an intelligent breed that learns quickly – it also has the ability to hunt independently. This being the case, the Transylvanian Hound can be a little bit strong-willed at times though they generally aim to please their owners. These dogs can be trained for tracking, pointing and driving game – they may also excel at various dog sports. Positive reinforcement training methods are best for this breed and a firm but consistent hand in training is recommended. As is true for all breeds, you should start training and socialization as early as possible with Transylvanian Hound puppies.

Exercise Requirements
  As a hunting breed, the Transylvanian Hound is fairly active. This being the case, he needs a good bit of daily exercise to remain in good health. This dog will appreciate a long daily walk or jog and he will also enjoy training for hunting or other dog sports. Make sure to give this breed plenty of mental and physical stimulation to prevent the development of problem behaviors.

Coat
  The Transylvanian Hound has a short, smooth coat that is fairly dense with a shiny appearance. It is primarily black with tan markings on the muzzle and legs as well as a tan point above each eyebrow. Because the breed has a double coat, regular brushing is recommended to control shedding.

Grooming
  The Transylvanian Hound requires little coat maintenance, shedding an average amount. An occasional brushing with a firm bristle brush is sufficient, and bathing should be kept to a minimum to maintain the natural coat.

Is the Transylvanian Hound Right For You?
  They are known for being protective and is a good addition as a family dog. The Transylvanian Hound is not only loyal, but also intelligent and easy to train. Bred for hunting purposes, the Transylvanian Hound is energetic, requiring daily exercise.

What They Are Like to Live With...
  Intelligent, curious and protective, the Transylvanian Hound also serves as an admirable watchdog. It has very keen instincts, however, and knows the difference between real danger and a letter carrier, for example. Once a friend or stranger is welcomed into the house, the Transylvanian Hound relaxes and becomes more social.

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Friday, January 30, 2015

Top Loyal Dog Breeds

Top  Loyal Dog Breeds
  We all know dogs are man’s best friend, but which breeds are the most loyal dog breeds? All dogs are loyal and have the capacity to show great loyalty, but some may have stronger instincts for loyalty than others. Throughout history, there have been numerous stories of dogs displaying great valor in order to protect, save or remain alongside their owners. 


German Shepherd – The German Shepherd Dog is hailed as the world’s leading police, guard and military dog, however, this dependable breed is more than its 9-to-5 job. Consistently one of the United States most popular breeds according to AKC Registration Statistics, the German Shepherd Dog is also a loving family companion, herder and show competitor. The breed is approachable, direct and fearless, with a strong, muscular body. The GSD may be most colors, but most commonly is black and tan. – source. These dogs have done anything from save soldiers, police officers, rescue children from fires, you name it.
Story of Loyalty: One family avoided being robbed, and possibly even worse, because of their German Shepherd, Moti’s bravery! Moti jumped into action, barking and trying to protect his family when man with a gun broke into the family’s home. The intruder shot Moti and, rather than continue with whatever misdeeds he had planned, fled the home, leaving the family safe. Moti fully recovered from his gunshot wound, but his family will not likely soon forget his heroism that night. 


Rough Collie- Rough Collie is a breed that hails from Scotland. These dogs are known to be very loyal and nice to their owners. The intelligence and activeness found in these dogs is supposed to create a strong bond between them and their owner. They are quite protective about their owner and save them from all the adverse circumstances. These dogs are often termed as family dogs, because of their friendly nature and the ability to play with children. These dogs generally suffer from the ailment of eye disorders; such a problem is witnessed in this breed quite often.
 Story of Loyalty Sassy, a Rough Collie, is a therapy dog with some pretty amazing skills. In addition to being trained to perform typical tasks for a therapy dog, Sassy is able to tell if someone is going to have a seizure using her sense of smell. A family is hoping to adopt Sassy for their son who suffers from an unusual form of epilepsy, which can cause him to have several seizures a day.


Beagles- This breed of dogs is commonly used by the security people because of the ability of this breed to sniff well. The origin of this breed is Great Britain. They have been used in many references in article dating back to ancient Greece period. These dogs are very friendly and gentle. The attachment they show to their owners makes them one of the most loyal dogs.
Story of Loyalty: When her diabetic owner had a seizure and collapsed, a Beagle named Belle jumped into action. She dialed 911 for her owner by biting into his cell phone so he was able to get the medical attention he needed. 


Kuvasz- This breed hails from the Hungarian lands. The initial use of this breed was to safeguard the livestock of farmers. It is just recently that these dogs have emerged to be house pets. They are highly intelligent and understand the signals of their owner well. They like having attention around them. The built of these dogs makes them good guards of their owner.
Story of Loyalty: Due to his size and strength, a Kuvasz named Pilot is the perfect companion and assistant for his owner. His owner is unable to lift or carry anything that weighs more than five pounds due to injuries she sustained to her neck and shoulders. He helps his owner perform tasks she otherwise would be incapable of performing. Pilot brings laundry up from the basement and pulls the grocery cart, among other tasks. When his owner, who also suffers from dizziness and chronic pain, has a dizzy spell, Pilot is right there for her to lean on so she never has to worry about falling and injuring herself. 


Labrador Retrievers- They hail from the east coast of North America. This breed is known for its happy nature and great energy levels. The friendly nature of this breed with the owners make it the most suitable and loyal breed of dogs available in the market.

Story of Loyalty: A Labrador Retriever named Patty saved her owner from drowning, and possibly hypothermia, after their boat capsized in freezing waters. Patty swam an unknown distance through a strong current, with her owner holding on to her tail, to get them to the safety of dry land where they waited to be rescued. 


Brittany- This breed is the produce of Brittany region of France. These dogs were originally assigned the mission of bird hunting. They are easy to handle and they train easily with the trainers. They have a good nature. They like being pampered by people and are the most loved breed in France.
Story of Loyalty: In the middle of the night, a couple was awoken by their Brittany, Cooper’s barks. Upon looking out of a window, Cooper’s owners saw that both of their vehicles had caught fire and were burning in their driveway. The flames got dangerously close to spreading to the house through a tree in between the drive and the house itself. The family believes that Cooper saved their lives! 


Boxers- This breed hails from Germany and they are known for their kill mode. They are dangerous dogs with incredibly strong jaws. They are used to hold the board or deer until the hunters make an appearance. They are ruthless to the opponent. However, they can be very sweet-natured towards the family. They are lovely to the owner and like to go for outdoors in order to keep fit and to do leisure activities.
Story of Loyalty: After somehow falling off of a 200-foot cliff, Roxy, a Boxer, waited for eight days with her owner, who was killed by the fall. Upon being located, it took the man’s daughter several attempts to get the dog to leave her owner’s side. 


Dachshunds- They also have roots in Germany. Because of the long length of body, these dogs are often referred as the hot dogs. They are commonly used to hunt rabbits and other prey on the basis of their strong jaws and energy-bound legs. These dogs like to play with the family members. The love for outdoors is seen in this breed too. The attachment they show towards the owner is incomparable.

Story of Loyalty: When JoJo, a Dachshund, kept leaving their sleeping daughter’s room and trying to get their attention, his owners knew something was up. As they checked their daughter’s room, they found the wall behind her bed to be giving off a lot of heat. It turned out that an outlet was incredibly close to catching fire. Not only did JoJo save the girl from potential harm, he saved his family’s home! 


Golden Retrievers- Hailing from the greens of Scotland, this breed of dogs is used for the retrieving game. They are quite happy to play with people and do not like to be alone. The patience practiced by them is often admirable. They are often considered as a family dog and never falsify this statement.
Story of Loyalty: A Golden Retriever named Toby saved his owner from choking on an apple. She performed a sort of dog Heimlich maneuver, by jumping hard onto his owner. The force of Toby’s paws hitting his owner’s chest knocked the piece of apple lodged in her throat loose so she could breath again. 


Yorkshire Terriers- They are often termed as Yorkie. They are the tiniest of the terrier breeds available in the market. Their forefathers come a long way from 1800’s. They are often used in dog shows and their ability to train well makes them the most attractive breed among the others in the dog shows. They are admirable and most of the owners just love them.

Story of Loyalty: A Yorkshire Terrier named Smokey was the first therapy dog! While recovering from an injury during World War II, a U.S. Navy corporal was given a Yorkie by a friend. Not only did little Smokey have an uplifting effect on his owner, he also helped the other soldiers who were recovering from their injuries. Dr. Charles Mayo began taking the little pooch along on his rounds to brighten the soldiers’ days. 














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Sunday, January 4, 2015

Protective Breeds: Right Dog For You?

Protective Breeds: Right Dog For You?
  Sometimes known as working dogs, guardian dogs were bred to guard homes, people and valuables, as well as livestock. While they might sound like a useful sort of dog to have around, these dog breeds are not for everyone. Large and reserved in nature, the guardian breeds are gentle with family and friends but fierce when provoked.

  Some, such as the Rottweiler and the Doberman, were bred to live closely with people as personal guards. Although their guarding instincts can work for you, they can also work against you if your dog is poorly bred, poorly socialized or untrained.
  Throughout history, one of the main jobs of the domesticated dog has been to protect its owners and guard against unwanted people or animals. While many modern dogs will instinctually act as home guardians, there are specific breeds that are known for possessing the characteristics needed to best ward off unwanted intruders.


1. Bullmastiff 
  A prized cross between a bulldog and a mastiff, the Bullmastiff was originally bred in England as a gamekeeper's dog to track and tackle poachers. If an intruder happens to make it into a home, he'll meet a powerful dog who will knock him down and hold him until help arrives.
  Search far and wide for all manner of dog breeds, but you will never find one with the size and power of the bullmastiff. That’s because these dogs have been specifically bred for nearly two centuries to ensure one thing: whatever they watch over remains undisturbed. 
  This breed is known for its physical strength, protection instincts, courageousness, and extreme family loyalty. If an intruder crosses its path, a Bullmastiff will typically use its strength to knock them over or block their path. The breed is very docile in a family environment, however, and makes a great household pet.
  The quiet and docile Bullmastiff is patient and gentle with friends and family, especially children. Bullmastiff's will, however, be protective and territorial. This breed can weigh 100 to 130 pounds. They have a low activity level, but needs socialization and training. The Bullmastiff does well with a family and can adjust to most living situations but may be too large for apartment life.
  As these dogs grow large, however, they often do not live very long, with a median age of only seven or eight years. During that time, however, they’re sure to be a protective force that can intimidate anyone thinking of breaking into a property where they are stationed, no matter what they happen to guard within its four walls.

2.Doberman Pinscher 
  All that you need to know about a Doberman’s instincts to protect its master is that they were originally bred to be dogs that accompanied a tax collector around as he made his rounds. Today, Dobermans are considered some of the very best guard dogs in all the world, with an aggressive nature that often makes them stereotyped as dogs that are harmful to strangers and children.
  If you're looking for the ultimate guard dog, the highly intelligent, strong and athletic Dobie may be for you. This intimidating pawed protector is considered one of the most dangerous canine breeds.
  This breed is incredibly fast and is able to reach an intruder in a short amount of time. Known as the fifth-smartest dog breed in the world, Dobermans are fearless, alert, and loyal dogs.
  In reality, Dobermans only ever attack on the command of their owner, having been bred to have great restraint and personal discipline, even in the face of a new threat. Over the years their ability to obey a command in a high-stress situation made them invaluable as military or police dogs, although they’ve become less used in recent years since they do not have the size or raw strength of some other large dog breeds.
  These are some of the smartest dogs out there, however, and an owner needs to carefully exercise their Doberman’s mind as well as its body to keep it fit, happy, and obedient to their commands, or else the dog will grow restless and end up chewing whatever’s in the vicinity.



  A dominant and loyal breed, the Giant Schnauzer is a high-energy dog that craves companionship and is quick to defend its humans. Just make sure you have enough time to give your Schnauz plenty of physical and mental stimulation to keep it from getting bored and becoming destructive.
  These are dogs that  require strict training.  They need constant attention and need to know who is in charge otherwise they might take over.  Giant Schnauzers are powerful, compact, and intimidating.  But what makes them such exceptional guard dogs is their loyalty to their owners.
  A giant schnauzer can weigh as much as 100 pounds and the breed has been put to practical use for centuries as work dogs capable of helping farmers take their livestock to the market, helping to guard homes or buildings, and working with police to smell out narcotics or explosives. Their thick, shaggy coat has been grown out over the years in order to make them more difficult to grab onto, whether by an intruder or by another dog or by a bigger animal.

  With an intelligent disposition, furthermore, they grow bored easily and may be less interested in learning new tricks if the tricks do not change up. Any person interested in attaining a giant schnauzer for watching over their home needs to ensure that they are not left alone often, since their energy can lead to destructive behavior like chewing objects within the home. If properly trained and well-mannered, however, they have a calm demeanor even in the presence of new people, and that makes them very friendly and dependable.




  Don't let the friendly appearance of the Kuvasz fool you. This large, strong-willed herd dog is extremely protective and territorial. Even if you don't regularly need to defend your home against wolves or bears, the Kuvasz, who was bred to fend off animal predators, will fiercely guard your property.
 This breed is very territorial and has a strong instinct to guard its family and home. The Kuvasz tends to be aloof with strangers but craves affection from its family.  You need to train these guys from a very young age.  But they are most awesome when it comes to family protection.  Don’t mess with these guys.
   The owner has to be firm, confident and calm.  All family members need to learn how to handle the dog from puppyhood.  It is also important to stress that the Kuvasz does not respond well to harsh discipline – it must not be humiliated or confused with contradictory commands and rules.
  This overly protective dog breed will not let any harm happen to you or your property.  They are extremely loyal and devoted and would give their life for you.
  If you want your Kuvasz to work as a flock guard, remember that special training is needed and you might want to hire an expert to help you with the training.

  If you’re looking for a guard dog that doubles as a nanny, an Akita may be the perfect pet for you. This large breed has strong protective instincts and will immediately investigate any hint of an intrusion into his family home. But unlike most other dogs, the Akita usually investigates quietly. If it barks, that probably means something is seriously wrong.
  The Akita is a dominant and independent dog breed that requires obedience training from puppyhood.  Although they are very affectionate towards their human family, they have strong guarding instincts and will not be friendly towards strangers.
  However, if someone tries to break into your house, be sure that the Akita will react and protect both you and your property.
  The Akita has to be firmly and properly trained from an early age and needs to be aware that humans are pack leaders.  The dog needs to understand the rules of behavior and follow them at all times.  If the dog becomes the alpha, the Akita will become willful, stubborn and aggressive.
  Akitas are extremely loyal and devoted pets that thrive on proper human leadership.  Apart from the training, Akitas need to be provided with enough daily exercise.  They become easily bored, so it’s important to keep them active.  They are not recommended for first time dog owners and inexperienced trainers.

Other guardian dog breeds include: 
  Those who don’t want to deal with the added responsibility of owning a guard dog but are looking for a dog to alert them of intruders should consider a watchdog. Several breeds are known for their persistent barking and ability to alert their owners and scare away trespassers.



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Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Everything about your Doberman Pinscher

Everything about your Doberman Pinscher
  Although the Doberman has a reputation as a sharp and even sinister dog, his devoted fans consider him the most loving and loyal of companions. Believe it or not, a good Doberman is a stable, friendly dog - unless you threaten his family.
  The Doberman Pinscher was developed in Germany during the late 19th century, primarily as a guard dog. His exact ancestry is unknown, but he's believed to be a mixture of many dog breeds, including the Rottweiler, Black and Tan Terrier, and German Pinscher. With his sleek coat, athletic build, and characteristic cropped ears and docked tail, the Doberman Pinscher looks like an aristocrat. He is a highly energetic and intelligent dog, suited for police and military work, canine sports, and as a family guardian and companion.


Overview
  Because the Doberman Pinscher came into existence at the end of the 19th century, he is, in the world of dogs, the new kid on the block. This hasn't stopped the Dobie, as he is affectionately called, from becoming one of the most popular and recognized breeds in the United States.
  His look is elegant and his style is athletic; the Dobie is also intelligent, alert, and loyal. He is a courageous guard dog as well as a beloved family companion.
  The Dobie's fierce reputation precedes him. He is feared by those who don't know him, stereotyped as highly aggressive and vicious. True, he is a formidable guardian, but he is usually a gentle, watchful, and loving dog. He does not go looking for trouble, but he is fearless and will defend his family and turf if he perceives danger.
  The Doberman Pinscher enjoys being part of a family. He likes to be close to those he loves and, when this love is present, he is a natural protector. He is trustworthy with his family's children, friends, and guests as long as he is treated kindly.
  In spite of his positive qualities, the Dobie isn't the right breed for everyone. He's large, at 60 to 80 pounds, and he's extremely active, both physically and mentally. He needs a lot of exercise.
  He also needs plenty of mental challenges to keep him from becoming bored. He needs a strong owner/pack leader who can take time to properly socialize and train him, and who will keep him busy every day. This may be too much to handle for people who lead a more laid-back lifestyle.
  The current look of the Dobie is slimmer and sleeker than that of past years. His temperament has also changed somewhat, say breed enthusiasts, softening a bit from his early days in Germany, though he is still an excellent guard dog.
  Originally, Dobies' ears were cropped to increase their ability to locate sounds, and tail docking gave the breed a more streamlined look. North American breeders usually dock the tails and crop the ears of Doberman puppies, though it's not mandatory. Docking and ear cropping is illegal in some countries.
  Those who know him say that a well-bred and properly socialized Dobie is an excellent pet and companion, suitable for families with other dogs, gentle with young children, and overall a loyal and devoted family member.

Highlights
  • The Doberman has a great deal of energy and needs a lot of exercise.
  • This breed can be protective, so don't be surprised when he assumes the role of household guardian.
  • The Dobie will assume the alpha role in your household if you're not a strong leader. Early, consistent training is critical to establish your role as pack leader.
  • The Dobie is sensitive to cold weather and needs adequate shelter in winter (he likes to be in the house next to the fireplace).
  • The Doberman Pinscher is a family dog and shouldn't be left alone. He thrives when he's included in family activities.
  • The Doberman has gained a reputation as being vicious. Even though your Doberman may have a sweet personality, neighbors and strangers may be afraid of him.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Doberman originated in Germany, created by tax collector Louis Dobermann to keep himself and the taxes he carried safe from thieves.
  • In the 1950s, long before the advent of agility and freestyle competitions, the Doberman Drill Team thrilled audiences with their amazing physical feats. Today the breed is highly competitive in obedience and agility trials as well as many other dog sports and activities.
  • The Doberman who is raised with children and other pets will love and protect them and be a good companion for kids.
  • The first Doberman to win Best in Show at Westminster was Ch. Ferry v Raufelsen of Giralda in 1939. He was followed by his grandson, Ch. Rancho Dobe's Storm, who had back to back wins in 1952 and 1953 and more recently by Ch. Royal Tudor Wild as the Wind in 1989.
Breed standards
AKC group: Working
UKC group: Guardian Dog
Average lifespan: 10-11 years
Average size: 66-88 pounds
Coat appearance: Short, hard, thick
Coloration: Black, red, blue, and fawn
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Athletic build, muscular body, ears pricked and erect, tail short and cropped
Possible alterations: Dobermans are born with floppy ears and long tails.
Comparable Breeds: Dalmatian, Rottweiler
History
  Doberman Pinschers were first bred in the town of Apolda, in the German state of Thuringia around 1890, following the Franco-Prussian War by Karl Friedrich Louis Dobermann. Dobermann served in the dangerous role of local tax collector, and ran the Apolda dog pound. With access to dogs of many breeds, he aimed to create a breed that would be ideal for protecting him during his collections, which took him through many bandit-infested areas. He set out to breed a new type of dog that, in his opinion, would be the perfect combination of strength, speed, endurance, loyalty, intelligence, and ferocity. Later, Otto Goeller and Philip Greunig continued to develop the breed to become the dog that is seen today.
  The breed is believed to have been created from several different breeds of dogs that had the characteristics that Dobermann was looking for, including the German Pinscher, the Beauceron, the Rottweiler, the Thuringian Sylvan Dog, the Greyhound, the Great Dane, the Weimaraner, the German Shorthaired Pointer, the Manchester Terrier, the Old German Shepherd Dog, the American Pit Bull Terrier, Thuringian Shepherd Dog . The exact ratios of mixing, and even the exact breeds that were used, remain uncertain to this day, although many experts believe that the Doberman Pinscher is a combination of at least four of these breeds. The single exception is the documented crossing with the Greyhound and Manchester Terrier. It is also widely believed that the old German Shepherd gene pool was the single largest contributor to the Doberman breed. Philip Greunig'sThe Dobermann Pinscher (1939), is considered the foremost study of the development of the breed by one of its most ardent students. Greunig's study describes the breed's early development by Otto Goeller, whose hand allowed the Doberman to become the dog we recognize today. The American Kennel Club believes the breeds utilized to develop the Doberman Pinscher may have included the old shorthaired shepherd, Rottweiler, Black and Tan Terrier and the German Pinscher.
  After Dobermann's death in 1894, the Germans named the breed Dobermann-pinscher in his honor, but a half century later dropped the 'pinscher' on the grounds that this German word for terrier was no longer appropriate. The British did the same a few years later.
During World War II, the United States Marine Corps adopted the Doberman Pinscher as its official War Dog, although the Corps did not exclusively use this breed in the role.
In the post war era the breed was nearly lost. There were no new litters registered in West Germany from 1949 to 1958. Werner Jung is credited with single-handedly saving the breed. He searched the farms in Germany for typical Pinschers and used these along with 4 oversized Miniature Pinschers and a black and red bitch from East Germany. Jung risked his life to smuggle her into West Germany. Most German Pinschers today are descendants of these dogs. Some pedigrees in the 1959 PSK Standardbuch show a number of dogs with unknown parentage.
  In the United States, the American Kennel Club ranked the Doberman Pinscher as the 12th most popular pure-breed in 2012 and 2013.





Personality
  A super-intelligent and super-active dog — that's what you get when you get a Doberman Pinscher. You also get an extremely loyal, trustworthy dog who's playful and fun-loving with his family. He's a natural protector who won't hesitate to act when he thinks his family is under threat, but he is not aggressive without reason.
  The Dobie likes to be busy, physically and mentally. He learns quickly, and training him is easy. Because he learns so fast, it's challenging to keep lessons fresh and interesting. He can have his own ideas about things, though typically he's not overly stubborn or willful with an owner who provides consistent, kind leadership.
  The Dobie takes a while to grow up. He remains puppyish until he is three to four years old.
Temperament is affected by a number of factors, including heredity, training, and socialization. Puppies with nice temperaments are curious and playful, willing to approach people and be held by them. Choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one who's beating up his littermates or the one who's hiding in the corner.
  Always meet at least one of the parents — usually the mother is the one who's available — to ensure that they have nice temperaments that you're comfortable with. Meeting siblings or other relatives of the parents is also helpful for evaluating what a puppy will be like when he grows up.
  Like every dog, the Dobie needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Dobie puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.
  Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.



Health
  The Doberman Pinscher has a lifespan of 10 to 12 years. Wobbler's syndrome, cervical vertebral instability (CVI), and cardiomyopathy are some serious health problems affecting Dobermans; some minor diseases seen in this breed of dog include canine hip dysplasia (CHD), osteosarcoma, von Willebrand's disease (vWD), demodicosis, and gastric torsion. Albinism, narcolepsy, hypothyroidism, and progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) are occasionally seen in Dobermans, while the Blue Doberman is more prone to hair loss. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may run cardiac, eye, hip, and DNA tests.


Living Conditions
  Will do okay in an apartment if sufficiently exercised, but does best with at least an average-sized yard. Dobes are very cold sensitive and are not outside dogs. That is why police in areas where it gets cold are not able to use them.

Exercise
  The Doberman is very energetic, with great stamina. They need to be taken on a daily, long walk or jog, and need to be made to heel beside or behind the human holding the lead, as in a dog's mind the leader leads the way and that leader needs to be the humans.

Care
  The Doberman requires mental and physical exertion daily or it may become destructive or frustrated. This need can be easily met with a walk on a leash, a run in an enclosed area, or a long jog. And while it can live outdoors in cool climate, the Doberman is most effective indoors as a guardian and a family companion. Its coat requires minimal care.

Grooming
  Grooming is a breeze. Brush the Doberman with a slicker brush or hound glove every week, or even just run a wet towel over him. On the days he needs a bath, use a dog shampoo, not a human product. Rinse thoroughly and let him shake dry or towel-dry him.
  The Doberman sheds moderately. Regular brushing will help keep him and your home neat.  As with any dog, brushing before a bath helps eliminate more dead hair, which leaves less hair to shed. Your vacuum cleaner will work longer if you brush your Doberman regularly.
  The rest is basic care. Trim his nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Brush his teeth for good overall health and fresh breath.

Is this breed right for you?
  The Doberman Pinscher is definitely not right for everyone. This is a highly intelligent breed meant to guard and work, and its owners must have the time and dedication to provide proper upbringing to this potentially dangerous breed, especially for households with young children. Highly trainable and loyal, the Doberman Pinscher makes a wonderful addition to an experienced household. This is a tidy breed as it does not shed much and has a low-maintenance grooming routine.

Children and other pets
  The well-bred Doberman is a wonderful family dog. He is trustworthy and protective of the children in his family, as long as he's been socialized and trained appropriately. Children must be respectful and kind to the Dobie, and he will be just that in return.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  He's also friendly with other dogs and animals in his home, especially if he has been raised with them. He can be aggressive toward dogs outside his family if he considers them a threat to his loved ones.

Famous Doberman Pinschers
  • Graf Belling v. Grönland: first registered Dobermann, in 1898.
  • First Doberman registered with the American Kennel Club, 1908
  • Ch. Big Boy of White Gate (owner/breeder Howard K. Mohr) wins the 1st Best in Show for an American-bred Doberman at the Rhode Island Kennel Club show, 1928.
  • Ch. Ferry v Raufelsen of Giralda (owner/breeder Mrs. M Hartley Dodge) is the first Doberman to win Best in Show at the Westminster Kennel Club show, 1939
  • Kurt, A Doberman who saved the lives of 250 U.S. Marines when he alerted them to Japanese soldiers. Kurt became the first k-9 casualty, July 23, when he was mortally wounded by a Japanese grenade. He was the first to be buried in what would become the war dog cemetery and he is the dog depicted in bronze sitting quiet but alert atop the World War II War Dog Memorial. Kurt, along with 24 other Dobermans whose names are inscribed on the memorial, died fighting with the US Marine Corps against Japanese forces on Guam in 1944.
  • Ch. Rancho Dobe's Storm: back to back Westminster Best in Show (1952, 1953). While other Dobermans may have more group or best in show or even more breed wins than Ch Rancho Dobe's Storm, he remains the only Doberman that has never been defeated by another Doberman.
  • Bingo von Ellendonk: first Dobermann to score 300 points (perfect score) in Schutzhund.
  • Ch. Cambria Cactus Cash: Sired 155 AKC champions as of January 2011.
  • Ch. Borong the Warlock: won his championship title in three countries, including 230 Best of Breed, 30 Specialty Show "bests," six all-breed Best in Show, and 66 Working Groups. He was the only Doberman ever to have won the Doberman Pinscher Club of America National Specialty Show three times, and in 1961 five Doberman specialists judged him Top in the breed in an annual Top Ten competition event.
  • Am. Ch. Brunswigs Cryptonite: achieved Best In Show on 124 occasions
Did You Know?
  Doberman’s get a bad reputation as attack dogs. Alpha in the Academy Award-winning film “UP” embodies every stereotype of the Doberman Pinscher: he’s both mean and not very smart. Fortunately, he’s also fictional and nothing like a real Doberman.

A dream day in the life of a Doberman Pinscher
  The Doberman Pinscher is a dog who thrives on work. Give this workaholic a job and he'll be the happiest pup on the block. Whether it's standing guard for the household, getting involved with search and rescue or any other type of accelerated training, this no-nonsense breed is up for the challenge.
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