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Showing posts with label protective. Show all posts
Showing posts with label protective. Show all posts

Friday, July 7, 2017

Everything about your American Pit Bull Terrier

Everything about your American Pit Bull Terrier
  The American Pit Bull Terrier has been known by many names, including the Pit Bull and the American Bull Terrier. It is often confused with the American Staffordshire Terrier, however, the United Kennel Club recognizes the American Pit Bull Terrier as its own distinct breed. Affectionately known as "Pitties," the Pit Bull is known for being a loyal, protective, and athletic canine breed.

Overview
  The American Pitbull Terrier often gets a bad rap for being an aggressive breed. This is due to the fact that these dogs are often used for dog fighting. The reality of the situation is, however, that Pitties, as they are often referred to, are not aggressive by nature – any dog will become aggressive out of pain or fear if he is mistreated by his owners. When treated properly, the American Pitbull Terrier is one of the friendliest, most gentle-hearted breeds out there. If you are looking for an energetic and fun-loving family pet, the American Pitbull Terrier may be a great option.
  The American Pitbull Terrier is one of the friendliest, most gentle-hearted breeds out there.

Highlights
  • American Pit Bull Terriers are not a good choice for people who can give them little or no attention.
  • They must be trained and socialized when young to overcome the breed's tendencies toward stubbornness and bossiness, which combined with his strength can make him hard to handle if he hasn't learned you are in charge.
  • Your American Pit Bull Terrier must be kept on leash in public to prevent aggression toward other dogs. It's not a good idea to let these dogs run loose in dog parks. While they might not start a fight, they'll never back down from one, and they fight to the finish. American Pit Bulls who aren't properly socialized as puppies can become aggressive toward other dogs.
  • Breed-specific legislation almost always includes this breed. Be aware of rules in your area as well as neighboring regions if you travel with your dog.
  • American Pit Bull Terriers have a great need to chew, and powerful jaws make quick work of cheap or flimsy toys. Give yours only tough, durable toys that can't be chewed up and swallowed.
  • American Pit Bull Terriers are best suited to owners who can offer firm, fair training, and gentle consistent discipline.
Quick Facts
  • The term “Pit Bull” is often applied indiscriminately to APBTs, American Staffordshire Terriers and sometimes Staffordshire Bull Terriers, a British breed. The term may also be used to label any dog who resembles those breeds, even if he is a Lab mix with little or no “Pit Bull” in his background.
  • An APBT comes in any color, pattern or combination of colors, except merle.
  • Celebrities who count Pitties as their best friends include actresses Jessica Alba, Jessica Biel and Alicia Silverstone; cooking guru Rachael Ray; and political satirist Jon Stewart.
  • Comparable Breeds: Staffordshire Bull Terrier, Bull Terrier
History
  The Pit Bull Terrier was created by breeding Old English Terriers and Old English Bulldogs together to produce a dog that combined the gameness of the terrier with the strength and athleticism of the bulldog.These dogs (Bull and Terriers) were bred in England, and arrived in the United States where they became the direct ancestors of the American Pitbull Terrier.
World War I poster featuring a pit bull
as representation of the U.S.
In the United Kingdom, Bull-and-terriers were used in bloodsports such as bull baiting, bear baiting. These bloodsports were officially eliminated in 1835 as Britain began to introduce animal welfare laws. Since dogfights were cheaper to organise and far easier to conceal from the law than bull or bear baits, bloodsport proponents turned to pitting their dogs against each other instead. Dog fighting was used as both a bloodsport (often involving gambling) and a way to continue to test the quality of their stock. For decades afterwards, dog fighting clandestinely took place in small areas of Britain and America. In the early 20th century, pitbulls were used as catch dogs in America for semi-wild cattle and hogs, to hunt, and drive livestock, and as family companions. Some have been selectively bred for their fighting prowess.

  Pit Bull Terriers successfully fill the role of companion dogs, and police dogs,and therapy dog. Pit Bull Terriers also constitute the majority of dogs used for illegal dog fighting in America. In addition, law enforcement organisations report these dogs are used for other nefarious purposes, such as guarding illegal narcotics operations, use against police, and as attack dogs.
  In an effort to counter the fighting reputation of pit bull-type dogs, in 1996 the San Francisco Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals renamed pit bull terriers to "St. Francis Terriers", so that people might be more likely to adopt them. 60 temperament-screened dogs were adopted until the program was halted, after several of the newly adopted pit bulls killed cats. The New York City Center for Animal Care and Control tried a similar approach in 2004, relabeling their pit bulls as "New Yorkies", but dropped the idea in the face of overwhelming public opposition.


Personality
  Pit Bull Terriers come with a huge stigma – they are famous for being viscous fighting dogs, and evening news programs often highlight stories of Pit Bull attacks. Shelters are overrun with Pit Bulls, entire cities have banned the breed, and saying the name “Pit Bull” can strike fear into the hearts of some people. But a well bred Pit Bull who lives in a loving, caring home is the opposite of the “killer” splashed around on television. Pit Bulls are loving, loyal, clown dogs who make excellent companions or those with active lifestyles. They love being with people and want to be included in all family activities whether it's a ride in the car, a neighborhood stroll or a romp in the park. While it's true that in the wrong hands, Pit Bulls can be viscous, in the right hands, Pit Bulls can be sweethearts, which many owners describe as babies in a dog's body.

Health
  The average life span of the American Pit Bull Terrier ranges from 10 to 12 years. Health concerns associated with this breed include actinic keratosis (solar keratosis), allergies, bloat (gastric dilatation and volvulus), cancer, cataractsM,congenital heart disease (particularly subaortic stenosis), cranial crutiate ligament rupture, cutaneous hemangioma, cutaneous histiocytoma, hip dysplasia, hypothyroidism and von Willebrand’s disease.

Care
  Expect to spend about an hour a day walking, playing with or otherwise exercising this dog. While they love people, American Pit Bull Terriers are strong for their size and can be stubborn if left to their own devices. Begin obedience training early and continue it throughout the dog's life. Training is the foundation for a strong relationship with your American Pit Bull Terrier.
  American Pit Bull Terriers should not be left outside for long because they can't tolerate the cold well. Even regardless the climate, these dogs do best as housedogs. They form strong attachments to their families and will suffer if left alone for long periods.

Living Conditions
  Pits will do okay in an apartment if they are sufficiently exercised. They are very active indoors and will do alright without a yard provided they get enough exercise. Prefers warm climates.

Trainability
  Training should be started early and always done in calm-assertive manner, as they won't respond to discipline or harsh tones. Training is best done in short sessions due to Pit Bull Terriers' short attention span and they will quickly become uninterested, even if treats are used as a reward. Lots of patience is necessary when working with a Pit Bull Terrier, as training can be a long process.
  Even after a Bull Terrier is fully trained, they may decide to test their boundaries as they get older and project dominance. These situations should be handled with calm assertion; like a teenager, they just want to see what they can get away with.
  Families with children should socialize puppies early on to accept outside children as welcome guests. While Pit Bull Terriers will bond nicely with kids in their own family, they can sometimes be aggressive to to other children and should be taught early on that all kids are to be welcomed with open arms. 

Exercise Requirements
  The American Pitbull Terrier is a fairly active breed, known for its enthusiasm and eager-to-please attitude. These dogs require a long daily walk or jog to use up their excess energy. They also enjoy active play sessions and time spent in a fenced yard.

Grooming
  The grooming needs of the Pit Bull are modest. Brush his coat a couple of times a week to help manage shedding.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually twice a month. Brush the teeth frequently — with a vet-approved pet toothpaste — for good overall health and fresh breath. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball dampened with a gentle ear cleaner recommended by your veterinarian.

Children And Other Pets
  American Pit Bull Terriers love children, and we don't mean for breakfast. Sturdy, energetic, and tolerant, they are ideal playmates. That said, no dog of any size or breed should ever be left unsupervised with children.
  When no adult can be there to oversee what's going on, dogs should be crated or kenneled, especially after they reach sexual maturity, when they may begin to test the possibility of becoming "pack" leader.
  Don't allow children to pull on a dog's ears or tail. Teach them never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away.
  Because of their dog-fighting heritage, some American Pit Bull Terriers retain a tendency to be aggressive with other dogs, but if they are socialized early and trained to know what behavior is expected of them, that aggression can be minimized or overcome, and many are dog- and cat-friendly. Just to be safe, they should always be supervised in the presence of other pets.

Is the American Pit Bull Terrier the Right Breed for you?
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep. No trimming or stripping needed.
Moderate Shedding: Routine brushing will help. Be prepared to vacuum often!
Easy Training: The American Pit Bull Terrier is known to listen to commands and obey its owner. Expect fewer repetitions when training this breed.
Very Active: It will need daily exercise to maintain its shape. Committed and active owners will enjoy performing fitness activities with this breed.
Not Good for New Owners: This breed is best for those who have previous experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  Pit Bulls descend from crosses between Bulldogs and Terriers. The goal was to create a dog with the strength and tenacity of the Bulldog and the speed and agility of the Terrier.

Law
  Australia, Ecuador, Malaysia, New Zealand, the territory of Puerto Rico,Singapore, Venezuela,Denmark, Israel, France, Germany, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Spain and Switzerland have enacted some form of breed-specific legislation on pit bull-type dogs, including American Pit Bull Terriers, ranging from outright bans to restrictions on import and conditions on ownership.The state of New South Wales in Australia places restrictions on the breed, including mandatory sterilization.
  Certain counties and cities in the United States have banned ownership of the American Pit Bull Terrier, as well as the province of Ontario in Canada. American Pit Bull Terriers are also on a list of four breeds that are banned in the UK.
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Thursday, June 29, 2017

Everything about your Clumber Spaniel

Everything about your Clumber Spaniel
  The Clumber Spaniel is one of the original nine breeds registered by the American Kennel Club. Long and low, it’s not as fast as other sporting dogs, but will work all day, trotting along in a slow, rolling gait. Dignified and pensive, but possessing great enthusiasm, the Clumber Spaniel also has a beautiful white coat.

Overview
  The largest of all spaniels, the Clumber Spaniel is a dog fit for a king. And indeed, much of the breed’s early history centers around French and British nobility.
  Bred to be a gundog that specializes in hunting in heavy cover, the Clumber Spaniel has the long, soft coat characteristic of all spaniels. Most Clumbers are white in color, while some specimens display brown, lemon or orange markings. It is fairly powerfully built dog with heavy bone structure and a massive head. This large muzzle enables the Clumber Spaniel to retrieve all types of game. The Clumbers have ‘melting’ heads and their faces take on a sleepy, mournful expression.
  Although not as fast as most other breeds of spaniels, the Clumber has great stamina and is able to trot along at a slow gait for hours on end. It is also a highly intelligent dog capable of independent thinking. These characteristics make it an excellent hunting dog; a task the breed was used for prominently amongst the British aristocracy. They are also gentle and loving and make excellent pets as well.

Highlights
  • Clumber Spaniels are rare and finding a breeder who has puppies may take time. Expect to spend time on a waiting list.
  • Clumber Spaniels can be destructive whether through boredom or play. Their strong jaws allow them to demolish many household items with ease and they can destroy many so-called indestructible toys. It is important to take this into consideration before purchasing a Clumber and to take the time to dogproof your house.
  • Clumber Spaniels are notorious counter surfers. They may be short, but their long bodies enable them to reach even the deepest of counter spaces.
  • Clumbers can figure out how to break into refrigerators, cupboards, and drawers.
  • Clumber Spaniels are not for neat freaks. They are heavy shedders and require daily grooming to keep their coats healthy and free of dead hair. Even then, you will find their hair in every part of the house.
  • Clumber Spaniels are an excellent breed for first-time dog owners. They are generally an easy breed to care for and are only moderately stubborn. They have a sweet temperament, and their intelligence makes them a wonderful companion.
  • Clumber Spaniels need 20 to 30 minutes of exercise daily, broken up into two or three short walks or a single walk.
  • It is very important to maintain your Clumber Spaniel at a healthy weight to avoid stress on his joints. The breed has a high incidence of hip dysplasia and can become obese very easily.
  • Clumber Spaniels do very well in apartments if their exercise needs are met.
  • Clumber Spaniels generally do very well with children and other dogs and animals, but it is still important to properly socialize your puppy to prevent timidity.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Clumber’s long, soft coat is white, with lemon or orange markings.
  • Expect to find Clumber drool in odd places, like the roof of your car. They have been known to fling spittle up to five feet up and six feet out.
  • Insomniacs take note: Clumbers snore.
Breed standards
AKC Group: Sporting
UKC Group: Gun Dogs
Lifespan: 10-12 years
Average size: Clumber Spaniel males range in weight from 70-85 pounds
Color: White
Coat: Dense
Hypoallergenic Breed: No
Shedding: Constant
Grooming Needs: Moderate Maintenance
Comparable Breeds: English Cocker Spaniel, Basset Hound


History
A drawing of two Clumber Spaniels from 1858.
  The history of the Clumber Spaniel is unclear. Current thinking is that the breed was developed by hunters and gamekeepers in the latter part of the eighteenth and first half of the nineteenth centuries – who bred dogs to fit function to practical demands. The breed name comes from the Duke of Newcastle’s estate at Clumber Park in Nottinghamshire, England. A number of titled families and local gentry hunted in that area, known as “the Dukeries,” with Clumber Spaniels, and apparently bred them with the Duke’s dogs to create this fine hunting spaniel. Old pictures of this breed depict them almost always as white and orange, with less bone and smaller heads than today’s breed. Clumbers were first shown in England in 1859. The breed came to North America in 1844, coming to Canada with a Lieutenant in Her Majesty’s 97th Regiment stationed in Halifax, Nova Scotia. The first Clumber recognized by the American Kennel Club was in 1878, six years before the American Kennel Club was founded.
  It is clear is that the breed was created to be low to the ground in order to quickly search through the underbrush while on the hunt. Its low and rolling gait was developed for endurance instead of agility or speed. This is a gentle, loyal and affectionate dog with an intrinsic desire to please.

Personality
  Clumber Spaniels are odd-looking, bottom heavy dogs who usually have no idea just how big they really are. They will try to climb on laps, or will lay on feet, with complete disregard for the comfort level of the person they are smothering. They are a happy breed, eager to greet anyone and everyone at the door. Clumbers are not guard dogs, they'll happily walk away with a stranger if you aren't paying attention. Excited Clumbers will pick up the nearest item that will fit in their mouths and shake their entire rear end while tail-wagging, which can lead to hours of laughter. They are polite dogs who rarely make a nuisance of themselves and would much rather sunbathe than alert you that the mailman is approaching.

Health
  The Clumber Spaniel, which has an average lifespan of 10 to 12 years, is susceptible to intervertebral disc disease (IVDD), a major health concern. Besides this particular disease, some of the other minor health problems that the breed is prone to are otitis externa, ectropion, and entropion, as well as seizures. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may recommend elbow, eye, and hip exams early on.

Care
  The dense, flat coat of a Clumber Spaniel requires combing at least two to three times a week. Additionally, regular bathing is essential to keeping its coat clean and neat.
Its exercise requirements, meanwhile, consist of daily outdoor walks or long, energetic games. Be aware that some Clumber Spaniels may snore occasionally or drool.

Living Conditions
  Clumber Spaniels will do okay in an apartment if they are sufficiently exercised. They are very inactive indoors and a small yard will be sufficient. Like cooler weather.

Trainability
  Clumbers are moderately easy to train. Positive reinforcement and a lot of treats are the only way to get a Clumber to do what you want them to do, but they pick up on commands quickly when they learn there is food in the deal. Treating a Clumber with a harsh hand will result in his absolute refusal to move. A Clumber who doesn't appreciate a trainer's tone will sit down and refuse to go any farther, so patience and enthusiasm must always be employed. Consistency is also very important when training a Clumber. They are like teenagers, always looking for a loophole in the rules and will test boundaries daily.

Exercise Requirements
  Clumber Spaniel puppies are highly playful and have a great deal of energy. They however slow down significantly as they age and aren’t very active as adults. This makes them unsuitable for active, athletic owners that enjoy jogging and hiking with their dogs. However, they do require at least an hour of walking exercise each day. They also enjoy carrying things in their mouth as it gives them a meaningful task to be engaged with.

Grooming Needs
  Clumbers shed year round, and during season changes can shed quite heavily. Brushing should be conducted on a daily basis to minimize debris around the house, as well as removing loose hair from the dog's body. Trimming may be done on the rear legs, tail or feet and a breeder can teach the proper technique.
  The white coloring of the Clumber can make the dog appear dirty more often than he looks clean. But regular bathing won't damage the dog's coat, as long as the shampoo is made for dogs and is a gentle formula for frequent baths.
  A Clumber's ears should be checked every week for signs of irritation and infection. Because the ears hang, they can be prone to wax and bacterial build up. Use only a veterinarian-approved solution when cleaning a dog's ears. Teeth should be brushed weekly to prevent bad breath, gum disease and tooth loss, and if the dog goes not naturally wear down his toenails, monthly trimmings may be required.

Children And Other Pets
  It's been said that Clumbers and kids go together like ice cream and cake. Clumbers generally love kids, especially kids who throw a ball for them to fetch. They are usually protective of children in the family and are more likely to walk away than to snap or growl if they're getting unwanted attention from a child.
  If your Clumber puppy is raised with your toddler, you'll probably see a beautiful friendship blossom. The toddler may accidentally get flattened once in a while by an exuberant young Clumber, but he'll be licked until he's back on his feet.
Always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Clumber Spaniels also do very well with other dogs and animals, especially if they are raised with them. They are birdy, however, and you should protect pet birds until you're sure your Clumber understands they're off-limits.

Is the Clumber Spaniel the Right Breed for you?
Moderate Maintenance: Regular grooming is required to keep its fur in good shape. Little to no trimming or stripping needed.
Constant Shedding: Routine brushing will help. Be prepared to vacuum often!
Moderately Easy Training: The Clumber Spaniel is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Slightly Active: Not much exercise is required to keep this dog in shape. Owners who are frequently away or busy might find this breed suitable for their lifestyle.
Good for New Owners: This breed is well suited for those who have little experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  Some pretty important Brits were enamored with the Clumber Spaniel: Queen Victoria’s husband, Prince Albert, as well as Edward VII, were both fans of the breed.


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Tuesday, June 27, 2017

Everything about your Chesapeake Bay Retriever

Everything about your Chesapeake Bay Retriever
  The Chesapeake Bay Retriever dog breed originated as a water dog used to hunt and retrieve ducks in the chilly chop of Maryland’s Chesapeake Bay. The dog’s sturdy build, dense coat, stamina, and strength made him ideal for this purpose. Today, he’s still known as a fine hunting dog as well as a wonderful companion for active, experienced dog owners who can give him the structure and exercise he needs.

Overview
  The Chessie is possessed of a nature that is more protective and less welcoming to strangers than that of many sporting dogs, but that doesn’t make him bad-tempered. He is fond of and careful with children but will guard your home and hunting gear with alacrity. To a far greater degree than his more amiable cousins the Labrador and Golden Retrievers, the Chessie thinks for himself and does things the way he wants to do them. And really, who’s going to argue with him? That would be a waste of time. This is an assertive, confident dog who requires an owner with the diplomatic finesse and commanding presence of a Colin Powell.
  The Chessie is not the right dog for you if all you want is a companion. No matter how much exercise or training or dog sports or companionship you think you could give him, the Chessie is a hunting dog at heart. And not just any old hunting dog: he’s a waterfowling dog and lives to get wet in the quest to bring back his feathered quarry. Limiting a Chessie to life as a pet is like blasting away at a duck with a cannon. That doesn’t mean he can’t also be a therapy dog or jogging buddy or family friend, just that hunting is his first love.

Highlights
  • Chessies require a great deal of exercise, including swimming if possible. If they don't receive adequate exercise, they can become frustrated and destructive.
  • Chesapeake Bay Retrievers are not recommended for inexperienced or first-time dog owners.
  • They can be prone to dominance problems if not properly trained and socialized. You must provide strong leadership without being harsh.
  • Chessies can be more aggressive, willful, and reserved with strangers than other retrievers.
  • Chesapeake Bay Retrievers may be combative toward other dogs.
  • Chessies are strong dogs, slow to mature, with a tendency to be territorial. They need firm training and management.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from a backyard breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts

  • The Chessie’s oily coat protects him in the water, but it also gives him a doggy odor.
  • Chessies enjoy spending time with their family and should not live outdoors with little human interaction.
  • Chessies are an uncommon breed. Expect to spend some months or even a year or more on a waiting list before a puppy is available.
Breed standards
AKC group: Sporting Group
UKC group: Gun dog
Average lifespan: 11 - 13 years
Average size: 55 - 80 pounds
Coat appearance: Thick, harsh and oily. Water runs off the coat similar to a duck.
Coloration: Red, brown and tan
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Muscular body, webbed toes, high-set hanging ears, medium-length tail, yellow or amber eyes, thin lips and brown nose
Possible alterations: White markings on body
Comparable Breeds: Golden Retriever, Labrador Retriever

History
A Chesapeake Bay Retriever circa 1915
  The Chesapeake Bay Retriever is one of the few breeds that can claim to be born in the USA. The breed is thought to descend from two Newfoundland dogs named Sailor and Canton who were traveling aboard a ship bound for England in 1807. The ship ran aground, but the crew and the two dogs Sailor, a dingy red male, and Canton, a black female, were rescued. Sailor found a home with John Mercer of West River and Canton with Dr. James Stewart of Sparrow's Point.
  Both dogs gained a reputation as excellent water dogs, especially when it came to duck hunting, and their puppies inherited their abilities — and their unusual yellowish or amber-colored eyes. There was no recorded mating of the two dogs, but seventy years later, when strains from both the eastern and western shores of Maryland met at the Poultry & Fanciers   Association show in Baltimore in 1877, their similarities were sufficient that they were recognized as one breed, "The Chesapeake Bay Ducking Dog." Records show that the offspring of Canton and Sailor were intermingled at the Carroll Island Kennels and spread from there throughout the region.
  By the time the American Kennel Club was established in 1884, a definite Chesapeake variety had been developed and was well known for its prowess in the rough, icy waters of the Chesapeake Bay. The American Chesapeake Club was formed in 1918. The American Chesapeake Club held the first licensed retriever trial in 1932. Fittingly, the front door of the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michael's, Maryland, is guarded by a pair of cast-iron statues of Chessies.

Personality
  The Chesapeake Bay Retriever has the strongest personality of all retrievers. They are not as easy-going as the other breeds, are more independent and are probably the hardest to train. Despite that, they are some of the most durable hunting dogs around. They love to swim and can handle an entire day of retrieving ducks or sticks from frigid waters. They are a true outdoorsperson's dog and will happily accompany people on hikes, bike trips, jogs or camping excursions.

Health
  The Chesapeake Bay Retriever, which has an average lifespan of 10 to 13 years, is prone to some major health issues such as gastric torsion and canine hip dysplasia (CHD), and minor concerns like hypothyroidism and progressive retinal atrophy (PRA). Some other potential issues affecting the breed include elbow dysplasia, entropion, cerebellar abiotrophy, and Osteochondrosis Dissecans (OCD). To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may recommend regular eye, hip, and thyroid exams for the dog.

Living Conditions
  Chesapeake Bay Retrievers are not recommended for apartment life. They are relatively inactive indoors and will do best with at least an average-sized yard. Chesapeake Bay Retrievers often enjoy sleeping outdoors if it is cooler outside, as they prefer cool climates.

Training
  In many ways, the Chesapeake Bay Retriever is a classic retriever when it comes to behavior and training. They are loyal, easy to get along with, and don’t mind being put to work. This breed especially has been bred for water retrieving and other similar activities, so helping them understand their role in your family can include those sporty activities.
Generally, a well-socialized Chesapeake Bay Retriever will be about as friendly as you can hope a big dog to get. Proper training and raising, as always, is important for any dog.

Activity Requirements
  Chesapeakes need a lot of exercise and a couple of walks around the block won't cut it. They are a hunting dog who loves to be outdoors – they can retrieve in cold water all day long (up to 200 ducks a day) and never tire of working alongside hunters. They also enjoy jogging, hiking, chasing sticks and catching frisbees. The Chesapeake Bay Retriever is by no means an apartment dog. They are rowdy and rambunctious well into adulthood, need a lot of exercise, and if they don't get it they can be quite destructive.

Grooming
  The Chessie has an oily, harsh outer coat atop a dense, fine, woolly undercoat. Dirt and debris brush out easily with a rubber curry brush. The undercoat sheds heavily in the spring, so be prepared to brush the dog more frequently during this time to keep loose hair from collecting on clothing and furniture.
  Give the Chessie a thorough freshwater rinse after he’s been in saltwater or swum through slime in a pond or lake, but to maintain the coat’s water resistance, avoid bathing him unless absolutely necessary. That can be as little as twice a year.
  The rest is basic care. Keep the ears clean and dry so they don’t get infected, and trim the nails as needed, usually every couple of weeks. Brush the teeth for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  In general, Chessies love kids but won't put up with a lot of harassment, instead preferring to walk away. They can, however, be possessive of food and toys, which can make them a poor match for homes with young children. They are protective of children but can misinterpret their play with their friends and react inappropriately. Many breeders won't sell   Chessie puppies to families with children younger than 8 years of age. An adult Chessie who's familiar with children is a better match for a family with young kids.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Chessies can be aggressive toward strange dogs, but should get along fine with other family dogs and cats if they're raised with them.

Is this breed right for you?
  Although a wonderful breed for the family life, the Chesapeake Bay Retriever requires an outdoor environment with a lot of activity to truly be happy. A natural retriever, it needs proper training and a confident owner to understand its own boundaries. While relatively inactive indoors, the Chessie is not at all recommended for apartment life and should have a very large yard, preferably with a swimming area for regular exercise. It will get along with cats if raised with them, but it may have an issue when introduced later in life and will most likely not get along with other dogs. Simple to groom, the Chesapeake Bay Retriever does require regular bathing to avoid smelling fowl.

Did You Know?
  The Chessie isn’t hardwired to be a companion; he’s a hunting dog, pure and simple. And not just any old hunting dog - he’s a waterfowling dog and lives to get wet in the quest to bring back his feathered quarry.

A dream day in the life
  The Chesapeake Bay Retriever will be happy waking inside or outside, so long as it's cool enough. Going for a quick dip, it'll easily shake off the water to enjoy some downtime in the house with its family members. After a nice long hunt or walk, the Chessie would love to practice some obedience training and engage in a bit of play before heading in for the night. Regardless of where it is, this breed will always be on the lookout to ensure the home is safe and sound from human and furry intruders.






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Tuesday, January 17, 2017

Everything about your Keeshond

Everything about your Keeshond
  The Keeshond is an old dog breed, once a companion and watchdog on the barges and boats that traveled the canals and rivers of Holland in the 17th and 18th centuries. He’s almost exclusively a companion dog today. He’s a people-lover; willing to participate in all family activities, he thrives with people who expect this of their dog. He is lively, alert, and intelligent — qualities that won him status as the most beloved dog in Holland.

Overview
  Originating from the Arctic region, the Keeshond is believed to be related to the Chow Chow, Finnish Spitz and more. Especially popular with the Dutch, the breed is known for protecting farms, riverboats and barges. Extremely friendly, the dog still makes for a great watchdog due to his bark, but will be nice to strangers. A great companion, the Keeshond makes a great family pet and is very quick to learn.
  While the Keeshond will issue a stern bark when someone approaches his property, he's such a love that he'll readily accept anyone his owner brings into the household. In truth, he isn't a very effective guard dog.
  The Keeshond is a fan of cool weather. He likes spending time outside when the weather is crisp. However, he isn't a backyard dog; he's too people-oriented for that. He needs to live inside with his family and participate in all their activities.

Highlights
  • The Keeshond is never reluctant to issue a warning bark to alert his family to strangers. His propensity to bark can be a problem if he's left alone too much and becomes bored.
  • The best way to make a Keeshond miserable is to keep him separated from his family. He was bred to be a companion, and he needs to be part of family life. If you don't want a dog joining in family barbeques, card games, or movie time, consider a more independent breed.
  • Keeping the Keeshond coat in good condition isn't terribly difficult, but the breed does shed like crazy once or twice or year. Luckily, frequent bathing isn't usually needed — the Keeshond scores low on doggie odor.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts

  • The Keeshond is a member of the Spitz, or Nordic, family of dogs. He has a wedge-shaped head with a foxy expression, dark-brown eyes that are almond-shaped, and a lionlike mane around his neck.
  • Early Keeshonden were known by such names as “fox dog,” “overweight Pomeranians” and “Dutch barge dogs.”
Breed standards
AKC group: Non-sporting
UKC group: Northern Breed
Average lifespan: 13 - 15 years
Average size: 35 - 45 pounds
Coat appearance: Harsh outer coat, downy undercoat
Coloration: Gray, black and cream
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Medium-sized, sturdy body with a striking resemblance to the Samoyed; dark eyes with black markings on the face; fluffy coat and exterior, erect ears and thick tail that curls over the back
Possible alterations: None

Comparable Breeds: Samoyed, Schipperke

History 
  If you were to travel back to the Amsterdam of in the early 1800s, you'd see a familiar face on the barges passing by: the Keeshond. Paintings by Dutch artists such as Jan Steen portray a dog that is not much different than the Keeshond we see today. This handsome dog is related to other Spitz breeds such as the Chow Chow, Norwegian Elkhound, Finnish Spitz, and Pomeranian. The little Pom is one of his closest relatives.
  The Dutch barge dog rode on small vessels that traveled the Rhine River, acting as both watchdogs and companions to barge captains. Their travels made them known well beyond   The Netherlands, but they really gained a name during the political turmoil that gripped Holland in the late 18th century. The leader of the Patriot party, Kees de Gyselaer, was accompanied by one of the personable dogs, also named Kees, and he came to symbolize the Patriot movement. Unfortunately, when the Patriots were defeated the dogs’ popularity plummeted and eventually only a few remained.
  The Keeshond’s fortunes turned around in 1920 when Baroness van Hardenbroek took an interest in the breed and helped bring it back into favor. A decade later, the American Kennel Club recognized the breed.
  The Keeshond is now considered the national dog of The Netherlands. In the United States, he ranks 87 th among the breeds registered by the AKC.

Personality
  The Keeshond was bred more to be a companion than a watchdog. He's not a hunter, nor does he have an innate desire for any special job. He is, first and foremost, a devoted friend.
  He's also intelligent and highly trainable. He's so smart, in fact, that he can be a little mischievous. Expect the unexpected with these fellows. Despite this, the breed easily learns proper canine manners and can do well in the obedience ring.
  A Keeshond is a lively, alert dog, full of personality. When he's excited or happy, he likes to share his joy with everyone, often spinning in circles. His outgoing personality, as well as his love of adults and children alike, endears him to all.
  As with every dog, the Keeshond needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences. Socialization helps ensure that your Keeshond puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.
  Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.

Care
  Although the Keeshond can survive outdoors in cool or temperate climates, it is a very sociable dog that prefers to live indoors with its human family. As it is a lively breed, moderate exercise, such as a brisk on-leash walk or a vigorous game session, is sufficient for meeting its needs. The dog's double coat, meanwhile, requires brushing occasionally every week and more during the shedding seasons.

Health 
  Keeshonden are not without health issues. They are generally healthy animals however; predisposed problems can prove to be detrimental. These diseases/disorders include Addison’s disease, Hip Dysplasia, Diabetes Mellitus, Progressive Retinal Atrophy, Cataracts, Hypothyroidism, Von Willebrand’s Disease, Allergies and Epilepsy. If left untreated, some of these issues can jeopardize the life of a Keeshond. Other ailment might be problematic but with proper care, medication and treatment, a dog can live a long, fulfilling and comfortable life.

Living conditions
  Will be okay in an apartment, although they should at least have an average-sized yard. Keeshonden prefer cool climates; they cannot withstand the heat well due to their thick coats.

Training
  The Keeshond is a fast learner that seems to be able to read his owner’s mind. Although they do have an independent streak, with patience and kindness, the Keeshond can be an incredibly obedient yet still fun-loving companion. He needs an owner who is caring and gentle. Repetitive training sessions that are calm and result in the dog getting some kind of yummy reward are most successful. Harsh words and treatment will get you nowhere with a Keeshond. They require love, kindness and easy instruction during all training sessions. Positive reinforcement will have your Keeshond the picture perfect companion.
  Keeshonden can go from the home to the breed ring to the obedience in zero to sixty seconds. They also make great therapy dogs. Their adorable appearance coupled with their caring nature make them perfect for visiting ailing kids and adults in hospitals, rehabilitation facilities and nursing bills.

Exercise Requirements
  Keeshonden do not need a boatload of exercise daily. Inside of a fenced backyard, coupled with a family member who loves to play fetch will provide the average Keeshond with all the running time he needs to stay healthy, happy and out of trouble. Without appropriate exercise, Keeshonden can become unruly and rip things apart inside of the house. Nobody wants their home destroyed so at the very least, a few brisk walks daily will keep your Keeshond content.  Exercise shouldn’t be boring and repetitive. It should be spontaneous at times.

Grooming
  The Keeshond has a long, abundant double coat with a harsh texture. There’s a lot of it, and the dogs shed heavily. The adult coat comes in when the dog is 18 months to 2 years old.
  Although the Keeshond’s coat looks like it might take a lot of work to maintain, it can be kept up with brushing once or twice a week — more often when he’s shedding. You’ll spend about an hour caring for the coat each week. Grooming tools to have on hand are a soft slicker brush for the cottony puppy coat, a pin brush, a stainless steel Greyhound comb, and a good pair of shears or scissors for trimming the hair on the feet. Ask your puppy’s breeder for advice on how to groom the dog or visit this breeder’s website for detailed grooming tips.
If you do a good job of keeping the Keeshond brushed, he shouldn’t need a bath more than two or three times a year. Whatever you do, don’t shave the coat. It serves as insulation from heat and cold.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  The Keeshond is a great pet for families with children. He's a playful, good-natured companion for kids of all ages. And as long as he is well socialized and well trained, the Keeshond gets along well with other dogs and pets.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.

Is this breed right for you?
  A family-friendly breed, the Keeshond gets along great with children and other animals of the house. Playful and adventurous, the dog loves to romp outside and will do best with a decent-sized yard that he can have access to. Not exactly a guard dog due to his friendly and outgoing nature, the Keeshond does make for a wonderful watchdog. Barking at anything he's unsure of, he does his best to protect his loved ones. With a double coat, the dog requires brushing every other week and sheds twice a year.

Did You Know?
  The Keeshond is a Dutch breed who served as a watchdog on barges and is named for an 18th century political figure — Kees de Gyselaer — who owned one of the dogs. The name is pronounced “kayz hund,” not “keesh hound,” and the plural is “Keeshonden.”

A dream day in the life of a Keeshond
  A family dog through and through, the Keeshond will be happiest when waking up surrounded by his loved ones. Running outside to check the perimeter of the house, he'll play and romp around a bit before returning inside. Affectionate, he loves getting petted and praised. Playing around with the little members of the family, he'll enjoy an evening stroll before having a bit of family time and will then doze off with the rest of the gang.

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