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Showing posts with label powerful. Show all posts
Showing posts with label powerful. Show all posts

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Everything about your Staffordshire Bull Terrier

Everything about your Staffordshire Bull Terrier
  The "Staffie" is sometimes mistaken for its cousin, the Pit Bull, and is very popular in the U.K., where ownership of the latter breed is controlled. It is a phenomenally strong, powerful dog for its size, seemingly comprised entirely of muscle. It is, however, considered a loving breed.

Overview
  The Staffordshire Bull Terrier can be an imposing dog with its strong, muscular body, intense stare, and powerful stance. Many are interested in the breed because it looks like a tough dog but are surprised to learn that the Stafford is a sensitive and loving companion who enjoys playing more than being tough. He sees life as a joyful adventure and lives it to the fullest.
  Fans love the Staffordshire Bull Terrier for his small to medium size, short, easy-care coat, and dynamic yet gentle personality. With his short, broad head and muscular body, he resembles the other bull breeds such as American Staffordshire Terriers and American Pit Bull Terriers, but he is a breed unto himself with distinct physical characteristics that set him apart, including size and ear shape.
  Nicknamed the nanny dog, the Stafford is prized for his patience with and love of children, although it goes without saying that no dog should ever be left alone with young children or expected to double as a baby-sitter. He is not always so friendly toward dogs he doesn't know however, a remnant of his origin as a fighting breed, which required him to be aggressive toward other dogs yet gentle with human handlers.

Highlights
  • When you look at a Stafford, you see a small but powerful dog with a smooth coat in solid red, fawn, white, black, blue or brindle. He has a short head with a broad skull set on a short, muscular neck, prominent cheek muscles, a black nose, round dark eyes, and rose or half-pricked ears. At the other end is an undocked tail that resembles an old-fashioned pump handle.
  • Because he may be aggressive toward unknown dogs, a Stafford should never be walked off leash.
  • Staffords are highly intelligent, but they are also freethinkers who like to do things their own way. They need firm, patient, consistent training.
  • Staffordshire Bull Terriers are energetic dogs who need a vigorous walk or play session daily.
  • Staffords shed little, although they may have a heavy shed once a year. They require weekly brushing to remove dead hair and keep their coat shiny.
  • The Stafford needs early socialization, especially if you want him to be friendly toward other animals.
  • Like all terriers, Staffords are diggers. Reinforce the bottom of fences with concrete or chicken wire so they can't dig beneath them.
  • Staffordshire Bull Terriers can do well in apartments if they are properly exercised, but ideal living quarters include a fenced yard where they can play.
  • Staffordshire Bull Terriers do not handle heat very well and need to be monitored on hot days to ensure that they don't overheat.
  • Staffords love children, but despite their nickname of "nanny dog," they should not double as a baby-sitter. Always supervise interactions between children and dogs.
  • If properly socialized and raised with them, Staffordshire Bull Terriers can do well with other dogs and animals. It is important to understand that some Staffordshire Bull 
  • Staffordshire Bull Terriers have a strong prey drive which will send them after small animals around your neighborhood including cats.
  • Staffordshire Bull Terriers have a high pain threshold and can become injured without any outward sign, such as whining.
  • Staffordshire Bull Terriers are protective of family members, but they are not too concerned about property. They are more likely to welcome burglars than to guard the silver.
  • The Staffordshire Bull Terrier’s popularity has increased steadily over the past decade. He has moved up from 94th place in American Kennel Club registrations to 74th.
  • The Staffordshire Bull Terrier is the fifth most popular breed in the U.K.
  • The Staffordshire Bull Terrier is a restricted or banned breed in many cities and the number of cities restricting the breed is rising. It is important to research your city's dog by-laws to avoid the unnecessary seizure and destruction of your dog.
  • Staffordshire Bull Terriers are extremely mouthy as puppies and can be destructive if not closely supervised.
Breed standards
AKC group: Terriers
UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan: 12 - 14 years
Average size:  24 to 38 pounds
Coat appearance: Smooth, short and close
Coloration: Red, fawn, white, black or blue, or any one of these colours with white; any shade of brindle; any shade of brindle with white
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles and seniors, houses with/without yards
Temperament: Loving, gentle, playful, amiable
Comparable Breeds: French Bulldog, Bulldog

History
  Before the 19th century, blood sports such as bull baiting, bear baiting and cock fighting were common. At the cattle market, bulls were set upon by dogs purportedly as a way of tenderising the meat and providing entertainment for the spectators. Fights with bears and other animals were also organised as entertainment.
  The early bull and terrier types were not bred to resemble the breeds of today, but rather for the characteristic known as gameness, with the pitting of dogs against bear or bull; testing the strength and skill of the dogs. Landrace working dogs crossbred with bulldogs provided the ancestral foundation stock for the Staffordshire Bull Terrier. These bloodsports were officially eliminated in 1835 as Britain began to introduce animal welfare laws. A dog fighting another dog was cheaper to organise and easier to conceal from the law. Dog fighting involved gambling and a way to continue to test the animal; dogs were released into a pit, and the last dog still fighting or surviving was recognised the winner.
  The modern breed is one that has a temperament suitable as a companion dog. It is a dog worthy to show and was accepted by The Kennel Club as the Staffordshire Bull Terrier on 25 May 1935.The Staffordshire Bull Terrier Club was formed in June 1935. It is unusual for a breed to be recognised without a club in existence first, and even more unusual for there not to have been a breed standard in place. A standard was not drawn up until June 1935 at the Old Cross Guns, a Black Country pub in Cradley Heath. A group of 30 Stafford enthusiasts gathered there and devised the standard, as well as electing the club's first secretary,   Joseph Dunn, a well-known figure connected with the breed.
  Challenge certificates were awarded to the breed in 1938, and the first champions were Ch. Gentleman Jim (bred by Joseph Dunn) and Ch. Lady Eve (owned by Joseph Dunn), both taking titles in 1939. The breed was recognised in the U.S. by the American Kennel Club in 1975.

Personality
  The Staffordshire Bull Terrier resembles other “tough” breeds like the American Staffordshire and Pit Bull Terrier, but these sturdy dogs look a lot tougher than they really are. The motto of many Stafford owners is, “He's a lover, not a fighter.” Staffords would much rather romp around and play all day than grouse or fight or even stand around looking imposing. They have a zest for life and eat up new experiences with the zeal of a puppy.   
  They love to be with people and they don't particularly care what the activity is: watching TV reading a book in the sun, waking, running, going for a ride in the car – the Stafford just wants to be with the people he loves. They also don't like to make their own choices about what to do, and therefore don't like being left alone, so Staffordshire Bull Terriers are best suited for active families where someone is always home with them. Despite their imposing look and tendency toward dog aggression, Staffords are actually very good with children. Toddlers are not recommended, but older kids who understand a dog's boundaries will find that a Stafford will gladly accept the role of best friend, playmate, and evening pillow during TV time.

Health
  The average life span of the Staffordshire Bull Terrier is 12 to 14 years. Breed health concerns may include cataracts, congenital deafness, follicular dysplasia, pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism, cystine urolithiasis, cataracts, elbow and hip dysplasia, heart problems, hypothyroidism, L-2-hydroxuglutaric aciduria, patellar luxation and skin allergies.

Care
  In mild weather, the Stafford can live outdoors, but the cold can affect it. Moreover, as it craves human contact and company, it does better as an indoor pet. Minimal coat care is required to keep this breed prim and proper.
  As it is an athletic breed, it requires a nice on-leash walk daily. It is fond of a run in a secure area or a good outdoor game. Be aware that most Staffords are not good swimmers.

Living Conditions
  The Staffordshire Bull Terrier will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. It is very active indoors and will do okay with a small yard.

Training
  Strong training from an early age is important with the Staffordshire Bull Terrier. It should be properly socialized to other dogs and to people, and it should certainly learn the boundaries of acceptable behavior in a home setting. For example, too much growling, showing of teeth, and even playful biting should not be considered acceptable despite how often it seems your Staffordshire Bull Terrier is acting on instinct. The Staffordshire Bull Terrier is a dog that will get a lot of use out of chew toys, so be sure to find a few that it likes.

Activity Requirements
  Though Staffords are happy to lounge around all day if you let them, these dogs need plenty of good running exercise every day to maintain their health and muscle tone. They enjoy walks, hikes, jogs or simple games of catch in the backyard. Enrolling them in organized activities like agility or flyball keeps their minds as sharp as their bodies.
  Staffords are adaptable to just about any living situation be it apartment or estate, city or country. No matter what his living arrangements, a commitment should be made to properly exercise a Staffordshire Bull Terrier.

Grooming
  The Stafford has a short, smooth coat and his grooming needs are modest. Brush the coat a couple of times a week to keep shedding to a minimum. Bathe him every three or four months or as needed if he’s dirty.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  The Stafford is suitable for families with children, but despite his much vaunted patience and gentleness, he should always be supervised in the presence of toddlers or young children. He can be rambunctious and may accidentally knock small children down.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any mouthing, biting, or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating and not to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Some Staffords get along well with other dogs and cats when they're raised with them. As adults, they may require more of an adjustment period before they welcome the company of another dog. To ensure the best relationship, choose a dog of the opposite sex. Make introductions in a neutral area away from your home.

Is the Staffordshire Bull Terrier the Right Breed for you?
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep. No trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Moderately Easy Training: The Staffordshire Bull Terrier is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Not Good for New Owners: This breed is best for those who have previous experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  The Staffordshire Bull Terrier is generally considered one of the breeds known as a "pit bull" in the United States. Staffords are specifically exempted from national breed bans in their native Britain as well as Australia and New Zealand, but that's not the case in the United States, where most laws aimed at "pit bulls" apply to them as well.





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Friday, July 7, 2017

Everything about your Dogo Argentino

Everything about your Dogo Argentino
  The Dogo Argentino, also known as the Argentine Mastiff, is a large, white, muscular dog that was developed in Argentina primarily for the purpose of big-game hunting, including wild boar; the breeder, Antonio Nores Martínez, also wanted a dog that would exhibit steadfast bravery and willingly protect its human companion. It was first bred in 1928, from the Cordoba Fighting Dog along with a wide array of other breeds including the Great Dane.

Overview
  Dogo Argentinos have powerfully built well-muscled bodies. Their large heads are equipped with extremely powerful jaws designed to bite and hold on to large prey. Their necks have an abundance of skin designed to protect their necks when hunting dangerous game. The Dogo’s coat is pure white and any colored markings are considered a fault.
  Despite their imposing appearance, Dogos are in fact extremely gentle and loving. They are highly devoted to their masters and will willingly risk their lives to protect their human owners. Unfortunately, they are banned in certain countries like Ukraine, Iceland, Australia and Singapore.

Other Quick Facts:
  • The Dogo Argentino can weight upwards of 80 pounds
  • This breed was traditionally used to hunt big game in Argentina. 
Breed standards
AKC group: Working

UKC group: Guardian Dog

Average lifespan: 10 to 12 years
Coat appearance: Short
Coloration: White
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, houses with yards, farms/rural areas houses
Temperament: Intelligent, loyal, protective, friendly
Comparable Breeds: American Bulldog, Boxer

History
  In 1928, Antonio Nores Martinez, a medical doctor, professor and surgeon, set out to breed a big game hunting dog that was also capable of being a loyal pet and guard dog. Antonio Martinez picked the Cordoba Fighting Dog to be the base for the breed. 
  This breed is extinct today, but it was said that as a large and ferocious dog, it was a great hunter. Martinez crossed it with the Great Dane, Boxer, Spanish Mastiff, Old English Bulldog, Bull Terrier, Great Pyrenees, Pointer, Irish Wolfhound and Dogue de Bordeaux. Nores Martinez continued to develop the breed via selective breeding to introduce the desired traits.

Personality
  The Dogo Argentino is an amiable, outgoing, powerful breed that should never be aggressive towards people. It was bred to be gentle and protective of family members, especially children. However, it also was bred to be a strong, tenacious, fearless hunter of large, dangerous prey. These qualities are sometimes in conflict, although this breed has a remarkable instinctive ability to separate its ferociousness from its friendliness. Dogos can make excellent companions for active, experienced dog owners. Some Dogos – especially intact males – are assertive, overbearing and territorial around other dogs.   However, the breed generally has a kind and loving disposition and is gentle at home, easily making the transition from hunter to companion. Dogos are terrific watchdogs, being protective and loyal to their family without showing overly-aggressive behavior. A properly-socialized Dogo Argentino makes friends easily but reacts instantly to threatening or challenging behavior from friend or foe. This breed will usually try to assert itself as Alpha over other animals and people. It is important that a clear hierarchy be established within the household so that all people and pets can coexist harmoniously.

Health
  As in the Dalmatian, white Boxer, and the white Bull Terrier, the dogo may experience pigment-related deafness. There is possibility of an approximate 10% deafness rate overall with some dogos afflicted uniaurally (one deaf ear) and some binaurally (deaf in both ears). Studies have shown that the incidence of deafness is drastically reduced when the only breeding stock used is that with bilaterally normal hearing.

Hunting and legality
  While the Dogo Argentino was bred primarily from the extinct Cordoba Fighting Dog, it was bred to be a cooperative hunter, i.e. to accompany other catch dogs and bay dogs on the hunt without fighting with the other dogs. Aggressive traits inherent in the Cordoban Dog were specifically bred out to enable a stable cooperative nature in a pack. However, in areas where illegal dog fighting continues, the Dogo Argentino has been used for fighting due to its fearless nature and great stamina. Dogos of these lines are not suited for big game hunting, unlike the original Dogo Argentino.
  The Dogo Argentino is banned in certain countries including Ukraine, Denmark, Iceland, Fiji,Australia, Singapore and the Cayman Islands. In the United Kingdom, under the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991, it is illegal to own a Dogo Argentino without lawful authority.

Living Conditions
  This breed will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised and does best with at least an average-sized yard. Be sure to bring the Dogo inside when temperatures drop below freezing.

Training
  Dogos are incredibly intelligent and are quick learners. They respond well to training when it is done consistently, gently and with positive reinforcement. When given praise, rewards and affection for proper behavior, Dogos quickly learn what is expected of them. When scolded, yelled at or punished harshly, Dogos tend to withdraw and become stubborn or unresponsive. They can also become unruly with rough treatment, and sometimes turn dangerous. Basic obedience training and socialization must start at an early age for this breed. Delaying socialization can create a fearful, aggressive dog instead of the friendly yet imposing watchdog that the Dogo Argentino was bred to be. Dogos are competitive in dog sports such as obstacle coursing and disc-catching. Obedience training is fun for these dogs. They are natural heelers and want to please their owners. If bred and raised properly, they have a steady temperament and seem to adjust themselves quickly to different situations.

Exercise Requirements
  Dogo Argentinos are highly energetic dogs and are unsuitable for owners that cannot provide them with daily, rigorous exercise. They are able to navigate various types of terrain and make excellent jogging partners. As a working breed of dog, they are also at their happiest when given a ‘meaningful’ task which they can devote themselves to.

Grooming
  Grooming the Dogo is easy because of his short coat, though his large size means it’s a big job. A bath every three months  in a mild dog shampoo is a good idea. Brush his sleek coat with a natural bristle brush or mitt once a week. Use coat conditioner/polish to brighten the sheen.
  The rest is basic care. His ears need to be checked every week and cleaned if needed and toenails trimmed once a month. Regular brushing with a soft toothbrush and vet-approved doggie toothpaste keep the teeth and gums healthy. It is essential to introduce grooming to the Dogo when he is very young so he learns to accept the handling and fuss peacefully.

Is the Dogo Argentino the Right Breed for you?
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep. No trimming or stripping needed.
Moderate Shedding: Routine brushing will help. Be prepared to vacuum often!
Moderately Easy Training: The Dogo Argentino is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  You may have heard that the Dogo Argentino is hypoallergenic. That is not true. No breed is. Allergies are not caused by a particular dog coat type but by dander, the dead skin cells that are shed by all dogs.

In popular culture
  • Bombon (film) Carlos Sorín's, a 2005 film starring a Dogo Argentino named Gregorio
  • On Animal Planet's Pit Boss episode "Shorty's Top Dog", Shorty Rossi and Hercules adopted a Dogo Argentino puppy named Mario.

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Friday, September 16, 2016

Everything about your Dogue de Bordeaux

Everything about your Dogue de Bordeaux
  A powerful and muscular French breed, the Dogue de Bordeaux is a molossoid , "dogue" meaning Mastiff in French. A massive head and stocky body are trademarks of the breed. Americans became aware of the Dogue de Bordeaux when he appeared as drooling, messy "Hooch" in the 1989 Tom Hanks' film,Turner and Hooch. The breed's short, fine coat is fawn-colored, ranging from a dark red to a light fawn.

Overview
  The Dogue de Bordeaux is one of the most ancient French breeds. He is a typical brachycephalic molossoid type. He is a very powerful dog, with a very muscular body yet retaining a harmonious general outline. Built rather close to the ground, the distance from the deepest point of the chest to the ground is slightly less than the depth of the chest. A massive head with proper proportions and features is an important characteristic of the breed. His serious expression, stocky and athletic build, and self assurance make him very imposing. Bitches have identical characteristics, but less prominent.

Other Quick Facts
  • The Dogue de Bordeaux is a member of the mastiff family and originated in France.
  • The Dogue de Bordeaux can get along with cats and other dogs if he is brought up with them, but he has a strong prey drive and is likely to chase animals who stray onto his property.
  • The Dogue has thick, loose-fitting skin covered in fine, short hair. His coat can be any shade of fawn from light to dark-red, with or without a black or brown mask.
Breed standards
AKC group: Working Group

UKC group: Guardian Dog Group
Average lifespan: 8 - 10 years
Average size: 120 - 145 pounds
Coat appearance: Short and fine
Coloration: Fawn or mahogany with black or red masking
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Powerful, muscular body with thick skin; wrinkled face; hazel to brown eyes; muscular legs; and thick tail
Possible alterations: May have white markings on the body.
Comparable Breeds: Bullmastiff, Mastiff

History
  The translation of Dogue de Bordeaux could perhaps be described as “Bordeaux Mastiff,” but it is also known as a French Mastiff in areas outside of the country, particularly in America. As for its historical origins, the translations are not so clear. Many think the Dogue de Bordeaux could have descended from the Tibetan Mastiff and the Bulldog – which would certainly make the nickname “Bordeaux Bulldog” more appropriate. Dogs in the Middle Ages in the Aquitaine region may have also been ancestors to the modern Dogue de Bordeaux, and by the end of the Middle Ages, its use as a companion and guard dog was more frequent.
  Although the Dogue de Bordeaux took a heavy hit during the French Revolution, it regained its numbers throughout the years and a man named Raymond Triquet helped it to survive by taking the breed under his wing.
  The dog’s very tough history includes use in war, guardianship, and even training in hunting large game like bears, bulls, and jaguars. It was only recognized by the American Kennel Club in 2008.

Temperament
  The Bordeaux has a good and calm temperament. It is extremely loyal, patient and devoted to his family. Fearless and confrontational with strangers, he is a first class watch and guard dog. Socialize very well with other animals, preferably starting from an early age to avoid him being aggressive with other dogs. 
  The Dogue de Bordeaux snores and drools. Despite his fearsome appearance, the Dogue de Bordeaux is gentle with children and family members.   However, this is a powerful animal, and is not suitable for an inexperienced dog owner. The objective in training this dog is to achieve pack leader status. It is a natural instinct for a dog to have an order in its pack. When we humans live with dogs, we become their pack. The entire pack cooperates under a single leader. Lines are clearly defined and rules are set. You and all other humans MUST be higher up in the order than the dog. That is the only way your relationship can be a success. This breed needs a calm, but firm owner who displays a natural authority over the dog. One who is confident and consistent.

Health
  Like all breeds there may be some health issues, like hip, elbow and cardiac disease. Some dogs may be faced with these health challenges in their lives, but the majority of Dogue de Bordeaux are healthy dogs.
  Working with a responsible breeder, those wishing to own a Dogue de Bordeaux can gain the education they need to know about specific health concerns within the breed. Good breeders utilize genetic testing of their breeding stock to reduce the likelihood of disease in their puppies.

Care
  The dog is quite well groomed however sheds seasonally. Brushing twice a week during shedding season and once a week in rest of the year is comfortable for its grooming. The apartment living is not suitable until you accept its drools and snores; generally you will have everything covered in drool. Additionally wide area is required for exercise requirements.

Living Conditions
  This breed will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. They are very inactive indoors and will do okay without a yard.

Training
  Like all large dogs, training with the Dogue de Bordeaux should be handled with care. You will undoubtedly notice the fierce guardian instincts in this dog, and you’ll feel quite safe in its presence, but care should be taken so that the dog does not become suspicious of all strangers and all other dogs. Calm leadership that places clear boundaries on the Dogue de Bordeaux will be important, as will ensuring a pecking order that includes the dog in the family, but makes sure the dog understands its place below every human.

Exercise
  The two major issues are concerned with these dogs during puppyhood which necessitate regular exercises. Firstly, it is a healthy eater and gains weight rapidly, secondly it possesses high energies, it may be boisterous if not satisfied by its physical activities. Adult dog are more prone to get clumsy and fat. Healthy amount of daily exercises including long walks and accompanying in running and jogging are mandatory. Remember an unsatisfied dog would become too rambunctious to romp all over your house. They need any partner to exercise their activities, if left alone they would avoid exertion and would result in destructive dog instead.

Grooming
  The Dogue’s short coat is easy to groom. Brush him once a week with a rubber curry brush to remove dead hairs.
  But there’s more to grooming than coat care. The Dogue has wrinkles and they need special care so they don’t become infected. Wipe them out using a damp cloth or a baby wipe, then dry the folds thoroughly to prevent skin infections.
  Carry a hand towel for wiping his wrinkled face after every meal or drink of water. When he shakes that big head, he slings gobs of drool everywhere. He also sheds heavily, so you’ll be spending plenty of time sweeping and vacuuming.
  The rest is basic care. Check the ears weekly and clean them if necessary, brush the teeth as often as possible, and trim the nails regularly, usually every few weeks.

Children and other pets
  The breed is protective to family and remains curious to strangers, this breed needs to be introduced with your friends to accept them. The dog is sensible to differentiate between friendly and threatening elements. The Dogue de Bordeaux are excellent with children of 8 years and above. They may knock over young kids unintentionally due to their massive physique. Young kids should be governed when around them. This breed is aggressive to other dogs, some of them are more aggressive to same sex while some do not like opposite sex in the pack. They are healthy chaser of small animals including cats and other creatures. A demanding socialization from their early age is extremely needed to adapt the dog in multi-pet house

Is this breed right for you?
  Extremely family-friendly, the Dogue de Bordeaux has a much tougher exterior than it does demeanor. Calm and content, the dog will only be aggressive if its home feels threatened or if it is not socialized with other animals as a puppy. Requiring training and a good leader, this breed will become rough out of instinct if not taught how to behave properly. Relatively calm indoors, it will do OK with apartment life but will need regular exercise. A loud snorer and big drooler, the Dogue de Bordeaux is prone to many health problems, including epilepsy, heart problems and hip dysplasia.

Did You Know?
  The Dogue de Bordeaux, related to the Mastiff, starred alongside Tom Hanks in the 1989 comedy “Turner and Hooch.” The canine star’s name was Beasley, and although he stole nearly every scene he was in, this was his first and only film.

A dream day in the life
  This affectionate breed will likely wake up in one of its family member's room, although it will probably spend most of the night ensuring the home is safe from any harm. Enjoying a long walk, it'll settle in close to the ones that it loves. A calm and easygoing dog, the Dogue de Bordeaux will enjoy occasional rubdowns and play sessions while it keeps alert for anything out of the ordinary outside of the home.

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