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Showing posts with label popular. Show all posts
Showing posts with label popular. Show all posts

Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Everything about your Field Spaniel

Everything about your Field Spaniel
  The sturdy, medium-sized Field Spaniel dog breed was originally developed to retrieve game from land or water. Today, while he retains his excellent hunting skills, he is mainly a family companion and show dog and is rarely seen in the field. He loves people and is a loyal family friend.

Overview
  The Field Spaniel, also known as the Field, is a breed of dog in the Sporting Group. Known for their grace and agility, this breed is just as famous for their calm and steady personality.   The Field Spaniel was recognized by the AKC in 1894 and AKC approved in 1998.
  The average Field Spaniel stands 17 to 18 inches high at the shoulders and weighs between 35 and 50 pounds. Unlike many Spaniels their short coat is easy to care for, but their long floppy ears need to be cleaned on a regular basis and frequently checked for any signs of bacterial or fungal infections.

Highlights
  • Field Spaniels need regular contact with people; they become neurotic if locked away in a kennel or out in a yard with no human companionship.
  • Socialize them well when young to avoid timidity and problems with other dogs.
  • They are active dogs and require regular exercise.
  • They will follow their nose so a securely fenced yard is a must.
  • Field Spaniels love water and will play in any water they find, including their water bowl in the house. They will share the fun by bringing the water to you also.
  • They love to eat and will steal food when possible.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Field Spaniel is a little bigger than the English Cocker and a little smaller than the English Springer.
  • The Field Spaniel’s slightly wavy, thick coat can be black, liver, golden liver, roan, or any of those colors with tan points.
  • Comparable Breeds: Cocker Spaniel, English Springer Spaniel
History
  The Field Spaniel was developed in England in the latter half of the 19th century to be a medium-sized, all-black dog, which was unusual at the time as most hunters preferred dogs with some white so they could be easily seen in the field. The Field Spaniel was created at the same time that dog shows were becoming popular and is considered the first spaniel developed for conformation showing while at the same time retaining his excellent skills in the field.
  Until 1901, spaniels were divided by weight, so if one puppy in a litter grew to be more than 25 pounds, he was called a Field Spaniel. If he weighed less than 25 pounds, he was classified as a Cocker Spaniel.
Ch. Clareholm Dora, Best Champion at Crufts in 1909.
  The breed started out as a popular dog, but through some not-so-successful cross-breeding, fanciers turned him into a dog that was longer than he was tall, with short legs, a large head, and too much coat. That didn't make for a very good or very attractive hunting dog, and the public expressed its displeasure. The Field Spaniel's popularity bottomed out. Fortunately, a man named Mortimer Smith made the effort to bring back the Field Spaniel's functional good looks.
  The AKC registered its first Field Spaniel, Colehill Rufus, in 1894, but when a fire destroyed a major kennel in 1909, the breed practically disappeared in the United States. The last registration of a Field Spaniel occurred in 1930. The next importation of Field Spaniels occurred in 1967, and those three dogs along with subsequent imports are the basis of the breed today. Despite his fine qualities, he remains a rare breed compared to other spaniels.




Personality
  Larger than a Cocker Spaniel and smaller than a Springer Spaniel, the Field Spaniel is a medium-sized bundle of energy. They have steadier temperaments than their spaniel counterparts and are generally friendly to everyone, even though they are usually not outgoing. They love the outdoors and are at their happiest when involved in family activities such as swimming, hiking, biking and hunting. They are incredibly agile dogs, allowing them to maneuver quickly in heavy brush and marsh to flush birds from their hiding places. Field Spaniels love people and consider all members of the family to be best friends. They also love water and have a reputation for creating quite a mess with their water dish, splashing around as if it is a tiny wading pool. Their temperament, trainability and patience with children makes Field Spaniels make an excellent choice for a first time dog owner, if that person is committed to an active lifestyle.

Health
  The Field Spaniel, which has an average lifespan of 12 to 14 years, may be prone to minor health issues such as hypothyroidism and otitis externa, as well as seizures, heart murmurs, canine hip dysplasia, and patellar luxation. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may recommend heart, hip, thyroid, elbow, eye, and patella exams for this breed of dog.

Care
  The Field Spaniel should be brushed and combed at least once or twice a week. Show dogs, meanwhile, must be trimmed and clipped on a regular basis to prevent outgrowth. A Field Spaniel's ear should be protected against the accumulation of dirt. Moreover, the inner ear hair and footpad hair should be clipped regularly.
  Regular exercise and training is recommended for the Field Spaniel. The breed should be allows to live inside the home, with access to the outdoors. But beware, some Field Spaniels are prone to snoring.

Living Conditions
  The Field Spaniel is not recommended for apartment life. They are moderately active indoors and do best with at least a large yard. Because these dogs do have deeply rooted hunting instincts, it is essential to have a good fence surrounding your property, as otherwise they are likely to take off after any interesting scent. Do not lock this breed away in a kennel or it will become extremely neurotic. This breed prefers cool climates.

Trainability
  Field Spaniels, like other accomplished sporting breeds, can have an independent streak which can sometimes present training challenges. They like to do things their own way, however with enough treats and praise on hand to reward good behavior, Field Spaniels can be trained with moderate ease. It is best to do the training in short spurts, so that the dog doesn't become bored, and should always be conducted with a gentle hand. Field Spaniels won't respond to discipline or harsh treatment.

Activity Requirements
  Field Spaniels were not meant to be lazy house pets. Their medium size might make them appealing to apartment and condo dwellers, but that living situation would be quite unfair to the Field Spaniel. They are active animals who love being outdoors and need time to run every day. Sending them out in the yard to run around isn't going to cut it, however. Instead, this breed should be involved in interesting activities that involve humans. Biking, jogging, hiking and swimming are high on a Field Spaniel's list of fun activities. Agility and obstacle courses are even better, and if possible, hunting is the Field Spaniel's favorite activity. Their agile bodies and webbed feet makes them exceptional bird hunting companions. They can flush birds out of their hiding places without being detected, and they can efficiently retrieve a hunter's prize from the water.
  If a Field Spaniel does not get enough activity they will become anxious, and that anxiety can often be severe. Destructive behavior in a Field Spaniel is almost always related to lack of adequate exercise.

Grooming
  The Field Spaniel has a single coat, meaning there’s no undercoat. The silky hair is moderately long and can be flat or slightly wavy. The front of the chest, the belly, the backs of the legs, and the rear end all have feathering like that seen on the Setter breeds.
The coat isn’t heavy and it’s easy to maintain. Brush it weekly and comb out the feathering a couple of times a week, or whenever the dog has been outside or has twigs or other debris clinging to his hair. Trim the hair between the footpads and inside the ears. Bathe the dog only as needed; regular brushing should keep him pretty clean. Field Spaniels shed moderately.
  If you plan to show your Field Spaniel, ask the breeder for advice on presenting the dog in the show ring. He should look natural, but he may need a little more neatening with clippers, thinning shears, and stripping knives than a pet dog would receive.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. If your Field Spaniel loves to swim — and even if he doesn’t — keep the hanging ears clean and dry to prevent bacterial or yeast infections. Brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Field Spaniels are fond of children, but noisy roughhousing isn't their style. As with any breed, always supervise the interaction between Field Spaniels and young children to prevent any ear-tugging and tail pulling on the part of either party.

Did You Know?
  In the United States, there were no Field Spaniels until the 1960s. The Field Spaniel Society of America was formed in in 1978.

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Tuesday, January 17, 2017

Everything about your English Springer Spaniel

Everything about your English Springer Spaniel
  The English Springer Spaniel dog breed was developed as a gun dog to flush, or spring, game in the field, but he’s also a popular companion. Athletic and versatile, he’s been known to participate in agility, hunt tests, tracking, obedience trials and more, and he’s a great pal to have along when you go hiking or camping.

Overview
  The oldest and most-established gun dog, the English Springer Spaniel made its appearance during the Renaissance when it would accompany European hunters. Once born alongside Cocker Spaniels, English Springer Spaniels were the larger of the breeds used to chase game. The English Springer Spaniel received its name because of its springing abilities. Now a popular breed in the home, this dog is known for its intelligence, tricks, affection and obedience.

Highlights
  • English Springer Spaniels don't like to be left alone and may become nuisance barkers if they're bored or lonely.
  • In recent years, there have been reports of English Springer Spaniels who are aggressive or overly submissive. Be sure to get your Springer from a breeder who tests his or her breeding dogs for health and temperament.
  • In essence, there are two varieties of English Spring Spaniel: ones intended to work in the field, and ones intended to show. Be sure you know the difference and get the type that best suits your needs.
  • Don't expect your English Springer Spaniel to be a good guard dog. They bark at noises and when strangers come around, but quickly settle down and want to be pet.
  • English Springer Spaniels were developed to have great stamina and energy. Be sure that you can provide your dog with adequate exercise or he may become nervous and destructive.
  • Some English Springer Spaniels can demonstrate submissive urination, which means they pee in excitement or anxiety when you come home. The best way to deal with this is to make homecomings very low key by not looking at or paying attention to your dog until you've been home for a few minutes. If you do this, your puppy may grow out of this behavior.
  • Be sure to keep your English Springer Spaniel on a leash when you take him to unprotected areas. You never know when he will see a bird and be overcome by his instinct to go after it!
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • Field-bred English Springer Spaniels have less coat and a more pointy muzzle.
  • Show-bred English Springer Spaniels have a heavier build, longer hair, a squarish muzzle and long ears.
  • English English Springer Spaniels are high-energy dogs and need lots of daily exercise. As long as they get plenty of exercise, they can live in any type of home, including an apartment or condo.
  • When you are choosing a English Springer puppy, consider whether you are more interested in the dog for athletic ability and endurance or for the combination of beauty and milder temperament that is the show-bred dog.

Breed standards
AKC group: Sporting Group
UKC group: Gun Dog
Average lifespan: 12 - 14 years
Average size: 40 - 55 pounds
Coat appearance: Medium length, with wave and feathering on ears, legs and face
Coloration: Liver and white; black and white; black, white and liver; white with blue or black markings
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Medium-sized dog, black or liver nose, oval-shaped eyes in brown to hazel color, deep chest, medium-length pendant ears, tails are typically docked and head is proportionate to body.
Possible alterations: Blue in color, various color combinations
Comparable Breeds: Cocker Spaniel, Golden Retriever

History 
English Springer Spaniel from 1807
  Spaniel-type dogs have been popular with hunters for centuries, used to flush feathered and furred game. Spaniels came in several sizes, and it wasn’t unusual for puppies in the same litter to grow up to be different sizes. The smaller ones were used to hunt woodcock, giving rise to the name Cocker Spaniel, and the larger ones were used to “spring” game for the hunter, flushing birds from the brush so they could be shot. They became known as English Springer Spaniels. In 1902, England’s Kennel Club separated the two types into distinct breeds, one becoming the English English Springer Spaniel, the other the English Cocker Spaniel.
  In the U.S., the English Springer Spaniel Field Trial Association formed in 1924 and began the competitions known as field trials, in which the dogs were judged for not only hunting ability but also that elusive quality, style. Since then, the breed has split into two types: the smaller field-bred English Springer prized for his hunting ability and the somewhat larger, beautified show-bred English Springer, known for a milder temperament and a heavier coat. Despite their differences, both types are registered as a single breed with the American Kennel Club. They rank 29 th in popularity, down just slightly from 26 th in 2000, so their appeal holds steady.

Personality
  The typical Springer is friendly, eager to please, quick to learn, and willing to obey. He should never be aggressive or timid. In recent years there have been reports of aggression or excessive timidity in the breed, as well as excessive separation anxiety. These traits aren't desirable and could be an indication of poor breeding. As with any breed of dog, it's important to research breeders and find ones who test their breeding stock not only for genetic diseases but also temperament.
  Temperament is affected by a number of factors, including heredity, training, and socialization. Puppies with nice temperaments are curious and playful, willing to approach people and be held by them. Choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one who's beating up his littermates or the one who's hiding in the corner. Always meet at least one of the parents — usually the mother is the one who's available — to ensure that they have nice temperaments that you're comfortable with. Meeting siblings or other relatives of the parents is also helpful for evaluating what a puppy will be like when he grows up.
  Springers need early socialization and training. Like any dog, they can become timid if they are not properly socialized — exposed to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Early socialization helps ensure that your Springer puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.

Health
  The English Springer Spaniel, which has an average lifespan of 10 to 14 years, is prone to major health problems like elbow dysplasia, otitis externa, and canine hip dysplasia (CHD), and minor issues such as progressive retinal atrophy (PRA), phosphofructokinase deficiency, and retinal dysplasia.
  A few of the tests that are required for them are DNA for phosphofructokinase deficiency, elbow, knee, hip, and eye. Gastric torsion, entropion, patellar luxation, seizures, and rage syndrome can occasionally be seen in them.

Care
  The English Springer Spaniel needs combing and brushing at least once or twice a week. Apart from that, trimming and clipping every two to three months is good way to maintain a lustrous coat.
  Keeping them inside the house with access to the field is best for this breed, as they love to hunt. They need to be taken on long hours of walking, as routine exercise is very important for these dogs. Proper lessons in obedience should also be given.

Living Conditions
  They will do okay in an apartment if sufficiently exercised. English Springer Spaniels adapt well to town or city life. They are relatively inactive indoors and will do best with at least an average-sized yard.

Training
  Eager to please and generally loyal, it’s important to remember that English Springer Spaniels were bred as a gun dog and have instinctual tendencies toward outdoor hunting-style activities like retrieving. This kind of exercise is good to use during training. As far as the English Springer Spaniel’s temperament for training, it can be highly responsive and eager to please, if not distracted at times. Generally an obedient breed, the English Springer Spaniel should not be a difficult dog to give commands.

Exercise Requirements
  English Springer Spaniels are an active, athletic breed and should be exercised regularly. It’s important to take advantage of their hunting instincts and allow them to roam free in open areas, making them well-suited for the country life. Taking your dog to a park if you live in the city would be advisable – if you can handle this on a regular basis, then your English Springer Spaniel should have better overall mood and weight regulation.

Grooming 
  The English Springer Spaniel should be brushed at least three times per week to prevent tangles and mats, and keep the coat shiny and healthy. Trimming around the head, neck, ears, tail and feet can help neaten the appearance, as well. Trimming is required every six to eight weeks, and most owners take their Springer to a professional groomer for a bath and a trim.
  Check the ears on a weekly basis for signs of infection, irritation, or wax build up. The heavy ears of the English Springer do not allow for air to circulate, making them prone to infections. Cleanse regularly with a veterinarian-approved cleanser and cotton ball. Brush the teeth at least once per week to prevent tartar buildup and fight gum disease.   Additionally, nails should be trimmed once per month if the dog does not wear down the toenails naturally.

Children And Other Pets
  Springers usually do well with children if they are brought up with them from puppyhood. Older Springers who are unfamiliar with children may do best in a home with children who are mature enough to interact with them appropriately.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Springers are also generally good with other pets in the household, even small ones, but they might see pet birds as prey since those are what they are bred to hunt. Keep them separated so they don't hurt each other. A parrot's beak is a mighty weapon.

Is this breed right for you?
  The English Springer Spaniel is a true-blue lover of water. While it's OK for apartment life due to its inactivity level indoors, the breed would love to have a yard to play in and a body of water to swim in. This pup loves children, is extremely loyal and very eager to please its human companion. Although this breed is OK with other animals, the English Springer Spaniel has a natural instinct to hunt for birds. Due to a longer coat, it will need regular grooming and bathing.

Did You Know?
  English Springer Spaniels are bred either as hunting dogs or show dogs - but never as both. There hasn’t been an English Springer Spaniel that has excelled in both the show ring and hunting grounds in more than 50 years.

A dream day in the life
  The loving English Springer Spaniel will wake up at the foot of its owner's bed. Following the family downstairs, it'll go out for a quick romp around the yard and a possible dip in the pool. After checking the home turf, it'll mosey back inside to play with the kids. It'll be happy with a few games, tricks and a nice walk before ending the day with its loved ones.
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Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Everything about your Boxer

Everything about your Boxer
  Boxers are silly, sweet and mischievous. They clown around with family and friends, are patient and playful with children, but show a deliberate and wary face to strangers, responding with unmatched courage to anything that threatens their loved ones. Those characteristics are why people love them.

Overview
  The Boxer is a breed of stocky, medium-sized, short-haired dogs developed in Germany. Their coat is smooth and tight-fitting; colors are fawn or brindled, with or without white markings, which may cover the entire body, and white. Boxers are brachycephalic (they have broad, short skulls), have a square muzzle, mandibular prognathism (an underbite), very strong jaws, and a powerful bite ideal for hanging on to large prey. The Boxer was bred from the Old English Bulldog and the now extinct Bullenbeisser, and is part of the Molosser group. The Boxer is a member of the Working Group.
  Boxers were first exhibited in a dog show for St. Bernards in Munich in 1895, the first Boxer club being founded the next year. Based on 2013 American Kennel Club statistics, Boxers held steady as the seventh most popular breed of dog in the United States for the fourth consecutive year.

Highlights
  • Boxers are high-energy dogs and need a lot of exercise. Make sure you have the time, desire, and energy to give them the play and activity they need.
  • Boxers are exuberant and will greet you ecstatically.
  • Early, consistent training is critical — before your Boxer gets too big to handle!
  • Although they are large, Boxers are not "outdoor dogs." Their short noses and short hair make them uncomfortable in hot and cold weather, and they need to be kept as housedogs.
  • Boxers mature slowly and act like rambunctious puppies for several years.
  • Boxers don't just like to be around their family — they need to be around them! If left alone for too long or kept in the backyard away from people, they can become ill-tempered and destructive.
  • Boxers drool, a lot. Boxers also snore, loudly.
  • Although they have short hair, Boxers shed, especially in the spring.
  • Boxers are intelligent and respond well to firm but fun training. They also have an independent streak and don't like to be bossed around or treated harshly. You'll have the biggest success in training your Boxer if you can make it fun for him.
  • Some Boxers take their guarding duties a little too seriously, while others may not exhibit any guarding instincts at all.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • Boxers are big dogs with a big streak of mischief in their makeup. You’ll need a sense of humor to live with one.
  • Boxers are great watchdogs but not aggressive toward people unless the situation calls for it.
  • Boxers are athletic and excel in many dog sports, including agility and herding.
  • Boxers are lovers, not fighters, but they won’t back away from a showdown if another dog starts something.
  • Comparable Breeds: Bull Terrier, Bulldog
History 
  The Boxer was developed as a working breed in Germany in the late nineteenth century. He belongs to the family of bull breeds, which include the Bulldog, Bull Terrier and Dogue de Bordeaux, to name just a few.
  In his modern incarnation, the Boxer has existed for only about a century, but you can see hints of him in the dogs portrayed on old tapestries from the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Those big Mastiff-type dogs may have been ancestors of the Boxer. They were known as bullenbeissers, a German word meaning “bull biter.” Bullenbeissers were used on great estates to bring down large game, and later they were employed by butchers and cattle drovers to keep livestock in line.
  The modern Boxer was born in the 1880s, when a man named George Alt, who lived in Munich, imported a brindle bullenbeisser named Flora from France. Her offspring became the foundation of the Boxer breed. It’s unclear whether the breed name comes from a corruption of the word “beisser” or is a reference to the breed’s habit of using his front paws in a fight. Boxers were trained for police work, were some of the earliest guide dogs and served in the German military during World War I as messengers and scouts.
  The American Kennel Club first registered a Boxer in 1904. The breed didn’t catch on right away, and the dislike for German breeds that occurred during World War I didn’t help matters any. It wasn’t until the 1940s and 1950s that the Boxer became a popular breed. In 1951, a Boxer named Bang Away won Best in Show at Westminster, the third Boxer to do so, and for the time, he was a rock star. You could see Bang Away’s photo in Lifeand Esquire, and when he flew to dog shows, he rode in the cabin of the plane, never in cargo. Only one other Boxer has won Westminster since the days of Bang Away, Ch. Arriba’s Prima Donna, who won in 1971.
  Boxers today are more refined and elegant than their ancestors, but they are still strong, smart, and fearless. The breed ranks seventh among those registered by the AKC.

Personality
  Boxers may look like imposing figures from afar, but up close and personal they are playful and loving family companions. Often dubbed the Peter Pan of dogs, Boxers are highly energetic, and as they grow into adulthood, they never lose the desire to romp and play like a puppy. Perpetual cuddle bugs, Boxers will try to wriggle into even the smallest spaces possible to get close to the ones they love. They love to be the center of attention and make a sound unique to their breed that some owners call a “Woo Woo.” When they want something they will make this “woo woo” sound to attract an audience.
  Protective of their family, Boxers are alert and reliable watchdogs, sounding the alarm that strangers are approaching. Their menacing, muscular appearance will deter anyone whose intent is not above board. Boxers get along well with other pets, including cats and make a loving and loyal addition to any active family.

Health 
  Some major concerns are cardiomyopathy and other heart problems, sub-aortic stenosis and thyroid. Can be prone to skin and other allergies. Sometimes prone to epilepsy. From age eight on they are more likely to get tumors than other breeds. Prone to cancer. Boxers are highly prone to mast cell tumors. Prone to arthritis, hip dysplasia, back and knee issues. These dogs may drool and snore. May have excessive flatulence, especially when fed something other than their own dog food. Some white Boxers are prone to deafness.

Care
  The Boxer’s coat needs just occasional brushing to get rid of dead hair. Daily physical and mental exercise is essential for the dog, which also loves to run. A long walk on leash or a good jog is enough to meet the dog’s exercise needs. It is not suited to live outdoors nor does it like hot weather. The dog is at its best when given a chance to spend equal time in the yard and home. Some Boxers may snore.

Living Conditions
  Boxers will do okay in an apartment if sufficiently exercised. They are fairly active indoors and do best with at least an average-sized yard. Boxers are temperature sensitive, getting easily overheated and chilling very quickly.

Exercise
  An active, athletic breed, Boxers need daily work or exercise, as well as a long brisk, daily walk. They also enjoy fetching a ball or other sessions of play.

Grooming
  The Boxer is an easy-care dog. His short, smooth coat benefits from weekly brushing with a firm bristle brush or rubber curry brush to keep it shiny and healthy and to remove dead hairs that would otherwise find their way to your clothes and furniture.
  Frequent baths are not necessary unless he gets dirty, but with the gentle dog shampoos available now, you can bathe a Boxer weekly if you want without harming his coat.
  Clean the ears as needed with a solution recommended by your veterinarian. Don’t use cotton swabs inside the ear; they can push gunk further down into it. Wipe out the ear with a cotton ball, never going deeper than the first knuckle of your finger.
   Trim the nails every couple of weeks or as needed. Don’t let them get so long that you can hear them clicking on the floor.

Children and other pets
  Boxers love kids and are great playmates for active older children. They can be too rambunctious for toddlers, however, and can accidentally knock them down in play.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Boxers can get along well with other dogs and cats, especially if they're raised with them.

Did You Know?
  White Boxers are not albinos and their coloration is not the result of a genetic mutation. In Boxers, white is just a color. But white dogs tend to burn in the sun and may be at increased risk of skin cancer.

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Monday, September 8, 2014

Everything about your German Shepherd

Everything about your German Shepherd
  The German Shepherd Dog is a natural protector and so adaptable and intelligent that he has performed just about every job known to dog. If he had opposable thumbs, he would be unstoppable.
  The German Shepherd Dog is one of America's most popular dog breeds — for good reason. He's an intelligent and capable working dog. His devotion and courage are unmatched. And he's amazingly versatile, excelling at most anything he's trained to do: guide and assistance work for the handicapped, police and military service, herding, search and rescue, drug detection, competitive obedience and, last but not least, faithful companion.

Overview
  Rin Tin Tin, a pup found in a World War I battle zone, became the world’s first canine movie star, forever marking the German Shepherd Dog as one of the most easily recognized breeds. From his imposing size to his erect ears and dark, intelligent eyes, he has achieved legendary status as the ideal canine. A versatile, athletic and fearless working dog, the Shepherd has done just about every job a dog can do, from leading the blind and detecting illicit drugs to bringing down fleeing criminals and serving in the armed forces. An energetic, loyal and devoted companion, the German Shepherd isn’t a breed but a lifestyle.
  The abilities of this breed go far beyond its origin as a herding dog. The German Shepherd has made a name for himself as a police and military dog, guide and assistance dog, search and rescue dog, and detector dog. He has excelled in every canine sport, including agility, obedience, rally, tracking and, of course, herding. German Shepherds still work livestock on farms and ranches around the world, including the United States. If you have horses, they will trot alongside you while you ride and help you put the horses back in the barn when you’re done.
  It takes some dedication to live with a German Shepherd.  Be prepared to provide plenty of exercise and mental stimulation. A half-hour walk twice a day, plus a vigorous play or training session, is a good start.
  The protective but loving German Shepherd is a great choice for families with children, but singles and couples who love the outdoors also match up well with this breed. With sufficient exercise and opportunities to use their considerable athleticism and brains, these versatile companions can handle anything from a small city apartment to a vast ranch.   They're not suited for life in the backyard or a doghouse, but need to live indoors as a member of the family.

Highlights
  • German Shepherds isn't the breed for you if you're away from home frequently or for long periods of time. When left alone they can become anxious or bored, and are likely to express their worry in ways you don't like — barking, chewing, and digging.
  • The German Shepherd is an active and intelligent dog. He must be kept busy learning, playing, and working. Daily exercise, both physical and mental, is a must.
  • German Shepherds can be aloof and suspicious of strangers. To raise a social and well-behaved dog, expose your German Shepherd puppy to many experiences, places, and people. Obedience training, beginning with puppy classes, is important for getting him used to other people and dogs, as well as teaching him basic canine manners.
  • These dogs shed, shed, shed — in fact, their nickname is the "German shedder." Brush him several times a week and buy a good vacuum. You'll need it.
  • Crate training is not only a wonderful way to housetrain a puppy, it helps teach him to be calm and happy when separated from his owner. This is especially important for the German Shepherd, who sometimes suffers separation anxiety, or extreme anxiety when left alone.
  • He's got a reputation for being a great watchdog — and he is — but the German Shepherd should never be chained or tethered just to stand guard. No dog should; it leads to frustration and aggression. The German Shepherd is happiest living indoors with the family, but with access to a large, fenced yard, where he can burn off some of his natural energy.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The German Shepherd is highly intelligent and will not be content to live life as a couch potato. He’s a dog of action, and he needs to live with an active person who will give him a job worthy of his talents.
  • German Shepherds love children and make great family dogs when they are given early socialization and training.
  • Most of us think of the German Shepherd as a black and tan dog, but they can also be sable and solid black. Dogs with white, blue or liver-colored coats are frowned upon by breeders, so don’t fall for marketing claims that those colors are “rare” and command a higher price.
  • A German Shepherd should never be shy, nervous or aggressive.
  • Comparable Breeds: Doberman Pinscher, Rottweiler


History
   As his name suggests, the German Shepherd originated in Germany, where he was created in the nineteenth century primarily by Captain Max von Stephanitz, who wanted to develop a dog that could be used for military and police work. The result was a dog that encompassed striking good looks, intelligence and versatility.
  The adaptable and attractive dogs soon drew the attention of dog lovers in other countries. While Rin Tin Tin is the most famous of the early German Shepherds, he was not the first to come to the United States. One is known to have been brought to the U.S. in 1906, and the American Kennel Club registered a German Shepherd in 1912. The following year, people interested in the breed formed the German Shepherd Dog Club of America.
World War I put a dent in the breed’s burgeoning popularity because the dogs were associated with the enemy. German Shepherds braved artillery fire, land mines and tanks to supply German soldiers in the trenches with deliveries of food and other necessities.
  After the war, movies featuring Rin Tin Tin and fellow German Shepherd Strongheart brought the breed back into favor. American audiences loved them. For a time, the German Shepherd was the most popular breed in the United States.
  One of the best known modern German Shepherds was the first and so far only member of the breed to win Best in Show at Westminster Kennel Club, in 1987. His name was Ch. Covy Tucker Hill’s Manhattan, ROM, nicknamed Hatter. Hatter drew crowds wherever he went and loved meeting his fans, especially children.
  These days, the breed’s star is rising again. Current AKC rankings place him second only to the Labrador Retriever.

Personality
  The German Shepherd personality is aloof but not usually aggressive. He's a reserved dog; he doesn't make friends immediately, but once he does, he's extremely loyal. With his family he's easy-going and approachable, but when threatened he can be strong and protective, making him an excellent watchdog.
  This highly intelligent and trainable breed thrives on having a job to do — any job. The German Shepherd can be trained to do almost anything, from alerting a deaf person to a doorbell ring to sniffing out an avalanche victim.
  One thing he's not good at is being alone for long periods of time. Without the companionship he needs — as well as exercise and the chance to put his intelligence to work — he becomes bored and frustrated. A German Shepherd who's under-exercised and ignored by his family is likely to express his pent-up energy in ways you don't like, such as barking and chewing.
  Like every dog, the German Shepherd needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your German Shepherd puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.

Health
  The German Shepherd has an average lifespan of between 10 to 12 years. It is, however, susceptible to some serious health conditions like elbow dysplasia and canine hip dysplasia (CHD), as well as minor problems like cardiomyopathy, hemangiosarcoma, panosteitis, von Willebrand's Disease (vWD), degenerative myelopathy, cauda equina, malignant neoplasms, pannus, hot spots, skin allergies, gastric torsion, cataract, and perianal fistulas. This breed is also prone to a fatal fungal infection due to the Aspergillus mold. Because of these susceptibilities German Shepherds, like most other dogs, need to be seen by a veterinarian for routine checkups. There they will undergo hip, elbow blood, eye and other tests.

Care
  The German Shepherd can live outdoors in cool or temperate climates, but enjoys living indoors too. Frequent training or exercise sessions are essential for keeping its mind and body active, and because the German Shepherd sheds throughout the year, its coat should be brushed once or twice a week to encourage turnover as well as to minimize buildup in the home.

Living Conditions
  The German Shepherd will do okay in an apartment if sufficiently exercised. They are relatively inactive indoors and do best with at least a large yard.

Exercise
  German Shepherd Dogs love strenuous activity, preferably combined with training of some kind, for these dogs are very intelligent and crave a good challenge. They need to be taken on a daily, brisk, long walk, jog or run alongside you when you bicycle. While out on the walk the dog must be made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as in a dog's mind the leader leads the way, and that leader needs to be the human. Most shepherds love to play ball or Frisbee. Ten to fifteen minutes of fetching along with daily pack walks will tire your dog out quite nicely as well as give him a sense of purpose. Whether it is ball chasing, Frisbee catching, obedience training, participation in a canine playgroup or just taking long walks/jogs, you must be willing to provide some form of daily, constructive exercise. The daily exercise must always include daily walks/jogs to satisfy the dog’s migration instinct. If under-exercised and/or mentally challenged, this breed can become restless and destructive. Does best with a job to do.

Grooming
  The German Shepherd Dog has a thick, medium-length double coat that sheds, a lot and constantly, so much that even his fans call him a “German shedder.” The undercoat sheds heavily in spring and fall, and the German Shepherd must be brushed and bathed frequently during that time to get out all the loose hair. The rest of the year, weekly brushing is generally enough to keep him clean. If the German Shepherd is your breed of choice, purchase a heavy-duty vacuum cleaner; don’t get a German Shepherd if you have allergies or are a fussy housekeeper.
  The rest is basic care. Trim his nails every few weeks, as needed, and brush his teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath.

Is this breed right for you?
  Any household and any lifestyle are ideal for this versatile breed. Excellent family members and wonderful with children, German Shepherds make great companions and watchdogs with proper training. They can adapt to apartment living with proper daily exercise and can adjust to a variety of climates. Although they make excellent family pets, they take loyalty to their masters extremely seriously. With a long muzzle that can exert up to 238 pounds of pressure, this breed has the capability to cause serious damage. Early training and adaptation is necessary for responsible ownership. If you suffer from allergies or are bothered by dog hair, think twice before getting this breed.


Children and other pets
If he's well trained and has had plenty of exposure to kids, especially as a puppy, a German Shepherd is a great companion for children. In fact, some say he's a cross between a babysitter and a cop, both gentle with, and protective of, the children in his family.
This is a big dog, though, capable of mistakenly bumping a toddler or small child. True to his reserved nature, he's not tail-wagging friendly with kids he doesn't know, but he's generally trustworthy.
  The German Shepherd can also live peacefully with other dogs and pets, as long as he was taught to do so from puppyhood. Introducing an adult German Shepherd to a household with other pets can be more difficult if the dog isn't used to getting along with other dogs or cats. You may need to hire a professional trainer to help, or get advice from the rescue organization if that's where you acquired the adult German Shepherd.

In popular culture
  German Shepherds have been featured in a wide range of media. In 1921 Strongheart became one of the earliest canine film stars, and was followed in 1922 by Rin Tin Tin, who is considered the most famous German Shepherd. Both have stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. German Shepherds were used in the popular Canadian series The Littlest Hobo. Batman's dog Ace the Bat-Hound appeared in the Batman comic books, initially in 1955, through 1964. Between 1964 and 2007, his appearances were sporadic. A German Shepherd called Inspector Rex, is the star of Austrian Police procedural drama program, which won many awards, where German Shepherd Rex assists the Vienna Kriminalpolizei homicide unit. The show was aired in many languages.

Did You Know?
  President Herbert Hoover owned a German Shepherd named King Tut, who was perhaps the first dog to play a successful role in a presidential campaign, helping Hoover to appear kind and approachable.

A dream day in the life of a German Shepherd
  Tall, svelte and athletic with a nose for sniffing out trouble, German Shepherds are most often recognized for their work on the police force. German Shepherds are a product of very careful breeding solely intended for the creation of an ideal service dog. A solid combination of brains and brawn made this breed brave enough to be four-legged soldiers of war while their natural charm made them big-screen approved as seen in the likes of tail-wagging greats, including Rin Tin Tin and Strongheart. Loyal to the core, this breed can be protective and territorial.
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Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Everything about your Golden Retriever

Everything about your Golden Retriever
  The Golden Retriever is one of the most popular dog breeds in the U.S. The breed's friendly, tolerant attitude makes him a fabulous family pet, and his intelligence makes him a highly capable working dog. Golden Retrievers excel at retrieving game for hunters, tracking, sniffing out drugs, and as therapy and assistance dogs. They're also natural athletes, and do well in dog sports such as agility and competitive obedience.
  This sporting breed has a sweet, gentle, people-pleasing personality. A well-bred Golden Retriever does not have strong guarding instincts, so don’t expect him to protect your home from burglars. He will, however, make friends with them and show them where the treats are.


Overview
  It's no surprise that the Golden Retriever is one of the top ten most popular dogs in the U.S. It's all good with the Golden: he's highly intelligent, sociable, beautiful, and loyal.
He's also lively. The Golden is slow to mature and retains the silly, playful personality of a puppy until three to four years of age, which can be both delightful and annoying. Many keep their puppyish traits into old age.
  Originally bred for the physically demanding job of retrieving ducks and other fowl for hunters, the Golden needs daily exercise: a walk or jog, free time in the yard, a run at the beach or lake , or a game of fetch. And like other intelligent breeds who were bred to work, they need to have a job to do, such as retrieving the paper, waking up family members, or competing in dog sports. A tired Golden is a well-behaved Golden.
  As well as giving your Golden Retriever physical and mental exercise, you should also be prepared to include him in your family activities. The Golden Retriever is a family dog, and he needs to be with his "pack." Don't consider getting a Golden unless you're willing to have him in the house with you, underfoot, every day.
  There's one other potential drawback to the breed: He's definitely not a watchdog. He might bark when strangers come around, but don't count on it. Most likely, he'll wag his tail and flash that characteristic Golden smile.

Highlights
  • Golden Retrievers shed profusely, especially in the spring and fall. Daily brushing will get some of the loose hair out of the coat, keeping it from settling on your clothing and all over your house. But if you live with a Golden, you'll have to get used to dog hair.
  • Golden Retrievers are family dogs; they need to live indoors with their human "pack," and shouldn't spend hours alone in the backyard.
  • Golden Retrievers are active dogs who need 40-60 minutes of hard exercise daily. They thrive on obedience training, agility classes, and other canine activities, which are a great way to give your dog physical and mental exercise.
  • Although they're gentle and trustworthy with kids, Golden Retrievers are boisterous, large dogs that can accidentally knock over a small child.
  • Goldens love to eat, and will quickly become overweight if overfed. Limit treats, measure out your dog's daily kibble, and feed him in regular meals rather than leaving food out all the time.
  • Because the Golden Retriever is so popular, there are many people breeding Goldens who care more about making money out of the demand for puppies than in breeding happy, healthy dogs. To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Golden has a dense, water-repellent double coat that comes in various shades of gold. Goldens shed heavily and require frequent brushing to keep the fur from flying.
  • Goldens typically have litters of six to eight puppies. Most breeders like to keep puppies until they are at least eight weeks old. This gives the puppies time to learn how to behave toward other dogs and gives the breeder time to evaluate the puppies’ personalities so she can place each one in just the right home. A bonus is that puppies of this age are more mature and more easily housetrained.
Breed standards
AKC group: Sporting
UKC group: Gun Dog
Average lifespan: 10-12 years
Average size: 55-75 pounds
Coat appearance: Long, dense, firm
Coloration: Any shade of golden
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Luxurious golden coat, sturdy and well-balanced body frame.
Possible alterations: Cream or red coloration not accepted by AKC.
Comparable Breeds: Irish Setter, Labrador Retriever


History
  The Golden is one of the breeds created during the dog-loving Victorian era. The breeds in his background probably included a yellow retriever, the Tweed Water Spaniel, wavy- and flag-coated retrievers and a red setter.
  Dudley Marjoribanks, Lord Tweedmouth, is generally credited with producing the first dogs that were to become known as Golden Retrievers, but recent research into studbooks, old paintings and other sources suggests that dogs similar to the Golden Retriever, possibly a type of setter, existed before Lord Tweedmouth began breeding them at his Scottish estate, Guisachan. England’s Kennel Club classified the dogs as “Retriever — Yellow or Golden” in 1911, then changed the name to “Retriever — Golden” in 1920.
 Golden Retrievers were first registered with the American Kennel Club in 1925 and were officially recognized as a breed in 1932. Since then they have established themselves as versatile companions, hunting dogs and working dogs. Goldens are found doing search and rescue, animal-assisted therapy, arson detection, drug detection and assistance work for people with disabilities. Their energy, enthusiasm and intelligence make them well suited to learning and performing almost any task.
  Today, Goldens are among the most beloved of breeds and rank fifth among the breeds registered by the AKC.



Temperament and Personality
  Ask anyone about the defining characteristic of the Golden Retriever, and the answer you will always get is temperament. The hallmark of the Golden is his kind, gentle, eager-to-please nature. He craves affection and will seek it from strangers as well as his own family.
Goldens are adaptable and people-oriented, and those characteristics are at the top of the list of reasons people love them. Unfortunately, the breed’s popularity has meant that careless or clueless people have begun churning out Goldens without any attempt to maintain their sweet, gentle disposition. Shyness and aggression can be problems, leading to fear biting or unfriendliness toward people and other dogs.
  Proper Goldens love everyone, but that love for people will often translate into jumping as a form of greeting. Basic, early obedience training is a must for these big, rambunctious dogs. Fortunately, Goldens are very easy to train, and a small investment of time when the dog is young will pay off when he's full-grown. He will readily sit on command, walk on a leash without pulling and come when called.
  If not trained, socialized and exercised daily, the good-natured exuberance of Goldens – especially as adolescents and young adults – can be overwhelming, and even frightening to small children, despite the dog’s best intentions to be friendly. Choose a Golden as a family dog only if you are prepared to supervise kids and dog when they are together and make sure everyone plays nicely. It’s normal for puppies to chase and bite in play, so you need to teach a Golden pup how to act around kids, as well as teach the kids how to play properly with the dog.
  Any dog, even a Golden, can develop obnoxious levels of barking, digging, food stealing and other undesirable behaviors if he is bored, untrained or unsupervised. And any dog can be a trial to live with during adolescence. In the case of the Golden, the “teen” years can start at six months and continue until the dog is two or three years old. Start training early, be patient and be consistent, and one day you will wake up to find that you live with a great dog.
  The perfect Golden Retriever is a product of his environment and breeding. Whether you want a Golden as a companion, show dog, canine competition dog or all three in one, look for one whose parents have nice personalities and who has been well socialized from early puppyhood.

Health
  The Golden Retriever has a lifespan of between 10 and 13 years. Some of its minor health problems include hypothyroidism, sub-aortic stenosis (SAS), eye disorders, elbow dysplasia, mast cell tumors, and seizures. Osteosarcoma is also occasionally seen in Golden Retrievers. Other major health concerns for the breed include lymphoma, canine hip dysplasia (CHD), hemangiosarcoma, and skin problems. To identify these conditions early, a veterinarian may recommend heart, hip, thyroid, eye, or elbow tests during routine checkups.

Living Conditions
  This breed will do okay in an apartment if sufficiently exercised. They are moderately active indoors and will do best with at least a medium to large yard.

Exercise
  The Golden Retriever needs to be taken on a daily, brisk, long walk, jog or run alongside you when you bicycle, where the dog is made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as instinct tells a dog that the leader leads the way and that leader needs to be the human. In addition, they like to retrieve balls and other toys. Be sure to exercise this dog well to avoid hyperactivity.

Care
  To encourage turnover over of the coat and minimize buildup of hair inside the house, it is best to routinely brush a Golden Retriever's coat at least twice a week. And though it is capable of living outdoors, the Retriever is at its best when kept indoors with the family. In addition, it is important for the Retriever to maintain a daily exercise routine, or take part in active games, so that it can spend its natural energy and relax comfortably  during "non-playing" hours.

Grooming
  It takes some dedication to live with a Golden Retriever. The Golden's profuse coat requires regular brushing and bathing to remove debris and mats. And while all dogs shed, Goldens do it with the same enthusiasm they bring to swimming and retrieving. You can keep it under control with daily brushing to remove the dead undercoat, but if shedding is a deal-breaker at your house, this is not the breed for you.
  Like most retrievers, Goldens love water. When your Golden gets wet - and he will - give him a thorough freshwater rinse to remove chlorine, salt or lake muck from his fur, all of which can be drying or otherwise damaging to the coat. Keep his ears dry to prevent infections, and use an ear cleaner recommended by your veterinarian after he goes swimming.
  The rest is basic care. Trim his nails as needed, usually every few weeks, and brush his teeth for good overall health and fresh breath.

Is this breed right for you?
  Goldens can adapt to just about every lifestyle and environment; however, they're best suited for families with children and large living spaces with room to roam. They can do well in small apartments if daily exercise is incorporated into their routine. Owners must dedicate time for regular grooming to prevent knots in their long golden coat. Goldens are eager to please their human counterparts and therefore excel at training since they love the bond it creates for their master-canine relationship. Families with young children are encouraged to enroll their Golden into basic obedience courses early on.

Children and other pets
  The amiable Golden Retriever isn't bothered by the noise and commotion of kids — in fact, he thrives on it. He's a large, strong dog, though, and he can easily knock over a small child by mistake.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  The Golden's attitude toward other pets is the more the merrier. He enjoys the companionship of other dogs, and with proper introductions and training, can be trusted with cats, rabbits, and other animals.

Notable dogs
  Liberty, the presidential pet of President Gerald R. Ford,and Victory, the presidential pet of Ronald Reagan, were Golden Retrievers
  The breed has also featured in a number of films and TV series, including: Air Bud and Air Bud: Golden Receiver, Full House, Homeward Bound: The Incredible Journey and Homeward Bound II: Lost in San Francisco, Fluke, Napoleon, Up, Pushing Daisies, The Drew Carey Show, and Cats & Dogs. Cash from The Fox and the Hound 2 was also a mix of this breed, as was Whopper from Pound Puppies.

Did You Know?
  During the Ford Administration, a Golden Retriever lived in the White House. Liberty, a gift to President Gerald Ford from his daughter Susan, spent her days keeping him company in the Oval Office and splashing in the pool at Camp David.


A dream day in the life of a Golden Retriever
  A day at the lake or pond playing fetch would be a dream day in the making for this water-loving breed. Hanging out at the park with the whole family and even making a few new neighbor friends keep this pooch's tail wagging. For an extra-special day, going for a brisk run or walk on a cool day will keep a smile on this naturally happy breed.

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