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Showing posts with label poodle. Show all posts
Showing posts with label poodle. Show all posts

Thursday, December 28, 2017

Everything about your Lhasapoo

Everything about your Lhasapoo
  The Lhasapoo is a cross or mixed breed the offspring of a Poodle  and a Lhasa Apso. She has a life span of 10 to 15 years and is talented in areas such as agility, rally and obedience. She is sometimes called Lhasadoodle and is an adaptable and playful and affectionate small dog.

Overview
  Small and cuddly, the Lhasapoo makes a wonderful companion for singles, couples, seniors and families alike. Gentle in nature and extremely playful, this dog would make a  great addition any growing family, as they do well with both children and other dogs . A mix of Poodle and Lhasa Apso, this designer breed is gaining in popularity. It is also a protective breed, most noticeably will its favorite human, and may bark at strangers – they are small, but mighty!
  If you’re not incredibly active, the Lhasapoo will forgive you. A trip to the park here, some vigorous playtime, and running around in the yard should be plenty for their daily dose of exercise. Due to its moderate activity requirements and small size, the Lhasapoo would do just fine in an apartment, so long as he goes outside everyday.

Other Quick Facts
  • Lhasapoos come in many coat colors and patterns, depending on the genes they inherit.
  • Most Lhasapoos are best suited to homes with older children who understand how to behave around dogs.
Breed standards
Breed Type: Crossbreed

Group: Companion dog, watch dog, toy dog, lap dog

Average lifespan: 10-15 years

Average size: 10 to 20 pounds
Coat appearance: Long, dense, straight, curly
Coloration: White, black, brown, cream, apricot or combinations
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Singles, couples, seniors or families living in an apartment or house
Temperament: Intelligent, sweet, active, protective
Comparable Breeds: Poodle, Lhasa Apso

History
  The Lhasapoo is a designer breed; he is growing quite popular as of late. However, there is not a great deal of information about how the hybrid breed came to be. So, in order to learn about the Lhasapoo, we must take a look at the parent breeds. The Lhasa Apso hails from Tibet. He was a dog that was owned by nobility, and he was the guard dog of the Tibetan monasteries. 
  The only way that anyone was able to own a Lhasa Apso was if the Dalai Lama gifted a Lhasa to that person. This happened sporadically; the Dalai Lama gifted Lhasas to Chinese nobility. In the 1930s, the Dalai Lama gifted a pair of Lhasas to a naturalist and renowned traveller, C. Suydam Cutting. Cutting returned to his kennels in New Jersey and began developing the Lhasa we know today. The Poodle is also a breed that has been around for centuries. Experts believe that he is a mixture of several European water dogs and the North African Barbet, a dog that is now extinct. Eventually, the breed we know as the Poodle ended up in Germany, where he was utilized for his hunting abilities. The Poodle's exact date of origin is not known; there are Poodle-like dogs depicted on Egyptian and Roman artwork. 
  The dogs portrayed are generally retrieving game or herding animals. The Standard Poodle is traditionally used for duck hunting, and smaller Poodles were used to sniff out truffles in the woods. Eventually, travelling performers learned that the Poodle is an adept show dog. Poodles were not very populous in the United States until after World War II. However, for a number of decades, the Poodle was the most popular breed in the U.S.



Temperament 
  These intelligently smart and affectionate dogs with dignity and pride tend to please their owners picking up tricks easily and taking part in games/shows, and being an alert watchdog. They are adaptable by nature and seek for attention and love from its family. If socialized from puppyhood, they would be good to other dogs, pets and children, provided the kids are also well-behaved.

Health Problems
  Before you introduce a Lhasapoo puppy into your home, remember to see a certificate of health from your reputable breeder. As a cross-bred dog, these pups can experience health issues from either Poodle of Lhasa Apso breeds. The most common are eye problems, patellar luxation, SA, kidney problems, Addison’s disease, Cushings Disease, epilepsy, Hypothyroidism, Legg-Parthes Disease, Von Willebrand’s disease, hip dysplasia as well as allergies.

Care
  The Lhasapoo is a breed with an average energy level. It will get most of the exercise it needs when it resides indoors. However, it will appreciate the opportunity to accompany its owner on a short or long walk. The Lhasapoo is an indoor breed. It will remain active while living indoors. The breed also loves being close to its family. Any color is acceptable for the coat of the Lhasapoo. While the Lhasapoo does not shed, it does require frequent trips to the groomer for haircuts every 6-8 weeks. They will become badly matted especially under wet or snowy conditions unless their fur is kept short.

Living Conditions
  The Ideal Environment for a Lhasa-Poo is being close to the family and getting a lot of attention. Since they are a small breed they can live in apartments if given enough exercise.

Training
  Early training methods are best to ensure the Lhasapoo learns as much as s/he can as early on as possible. Although they can be a little harder to train as puppies than as adults, this will make for a more socialized, obedient dog overall. They are an intelligent breed, but are known to be a bit stubborn at times. This designer breed requires a trainer who is patient, calm and keeps a positive attitude. Remember to always reward good behavior with plenty of treats and you’ll be on the right track in no time.

Activity Requirements
  The Lhasapoo is energetic, but he is not overly active. Keep in mine that his Poodle parent breed is notorious for being destructive if he becomes bored. Give your Lhasapoo plenty of chew toys, and take him on short, brisk walks to work off any nervous energy. He will also enjoy playtime with you indoors. The key is making sure he has regular activity, even for short spurts throughout the day. He will also make friends at the dog park, and he may surprise you by hopping from couch-to-couch. Observers often say it appears the Lhasapoo is "flying" when he does so.

Grooming
  Lhasapoos can have different types of fur, including soft, tight curls; big looping curls; loose waves; or straight hair. Most have a curly or wavy coat with a minority having either the typical Poodle coat or the straight Lhasa coat. Curly or straight, it’s always soft. A Lhasapoo coat looks its best with professional grooming every four to six weeks, and it requires brushing or combing every two to three days to prevent mats or tangles, as well as regular bathing between appointments with the groomer.
  Lhasapoos are among the breeds that commonly develop reddish-brown tear stains beneath their eyes. Your best bet is to wash the face daily, carefully wiping beneath the eyes, to prevent stains from setting.
  Your Lhasapoo doesn’t need a bikini wax, but you do need to trim the genital area for cleanliness or have the groomer shave the lower belly area.
  The rest is basic care. Trim his nails every week or two, and keep his ears clean and dry. Small dogs are especially prone to periodontal disease, so brush his teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children and other animals
  She does better with older children but with early socialization and training, and being raised with them she can also be good with younger ones as long as they are supervised in case they start tugging or pulling at her when she doesn't want it. She also does better with other animals when raised with them.

Did You Know?
  A Lhasapoo’s fur can be tightly curled, loosely curled, wavy, or straight. But whatever else it is, it’s always soft.
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Everything about your Irish Doodle

Everything about your Irish Doodle
  The Irish Doodle is a medium to large hybrid or mixed breed that crosses the Irish Setter with the Standard Poodle. She has a life span of 12 to 15 years and has talents in guarding. She is sometimes also called the Irish Doodle Setter or an Irish Setter/Poodle hybrid. She is known for being very lighthearted and is also a devoted dog.

Overview
  Also known as the Irish Doodle Setter, Irish Poo Setter, Irish Setterdoodle, and Irish Setterpoo, the Irish Doodle is a super cute, friendly, and light-hearted medium-sized crossbreed. A mix of Irish Setter and Poodle, it’s ideal for anyone seeking a dog who won’t shed a lot and who will be loyal, social, and intelligent. This dog rarely barks and will even get along great with children and pets.
  If the Irish Doodle sounds too good to be true, rest assured that it isn’t. Combing adorable looks and an equally loveable attitude, this crossbreed is becoming hugely popular. To find out if this dog would be the right fit for your family, check out some quick facts below.

Breed standards
Breed Type: Crossbreed
Breed Group: Watchdog, Sporting Dog, Guard Dog
Average lifespan: 10 to 13 years
Average size: 40-70 pounds
Coat appearance: Long, soft, wavy
Coloration: Apricot, black, white, black and tan, brown
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Singles, families with children and other pets, seniors, and those living in apartments or houses with or without yards
Temperament: Loyal, devoted, quiet, social, intelligent, friendly
Comparable Breeds: Irish Setter, Poodle

History
  The Irish Doodle is a hybrid canine, a cross between two very different breeds of hunting dog; a German retrieving dog, the Poodle, and an elegant red field hunting dog called the Irish Setter. The Poodle is often associated with France but it was actually developed in Germany, where it was known as a Pudlehund; Pudle meaning to splash around, and hund meaning dog.
  Poodles today are still sometimes employed to retrieve waterfowl, although the modern hunter is more likely to clip them short all over to prevent tangling in the brush and weeds. The Irish Setter was developed in Ireland, at some point in the 1700s as a field hunting dog and by the early 1800s, the breed was popular not just in Ireland, but also throughout the British Isles. Most experts believe that the Irish Setter is an ancestor of breeds such as the Irish Water Spaniel, the Gordon Setter, and the Irish Terrier, but written records from the time are nonexistent. The earliest Irish Setters were bred to be able to search out birds then hold their position, preventing them from entering the line of fire and they often came in either red and white or yellow and white, but in the mid-1800s their characteristic deep red color became the ideal. 
  They were imported into the United States as gun dogs and retrievers that specialized in retrieving gamebirds during the mid-1800s as well and were recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1878. Although the Irish Setter could be crossed with a Miniature or Toy Poodle, the most commonly included Poodle for this hybrid is the Standard Poodle.


Temperament
  These dogs are loving and affectionate, and are characterized by loyalty and devotion. They are eager to please and have significant native intelligence inherited from their parents. It is their intelligent mind and careful disposition that have made them equally good with kids and other family pets. This makes them an excellent family dog ideal for apartment life. Not do they just love the members of their families, but they are also comfortable meeting strangers.
  These dogs, especially the puppies, love attention until they’re well along in years. Though, it is alert and attentive. If it happens to come across anything suspicious, it would immediately alert its family.

Health
  She is generally a healthy dog and whether or not you believe in the idea of hybrid vigor there is still the possibility a puppy might inherit conditions one or both its parents are at risk of. For the Irish Doodle these include Addison's Disease, Bloat, Cushing's disease, epilepsy, Hypothyroidism, Legg-Perthes, Patellar Luxation, SA , Von Willebrand's Disease, OCD, CAD, HOD, Joint dysplasia, eye problems and Panosteitis. To avoid getting a dog with health problems you can improve the odds by only buying after seeing health clearances for both parents.

Care
  Bathing need not be a frequent occurrence with these canines, usually just a few times a year, but thorough brushing and styling will generally be needed on a regular basis. They type of grooming implements that will be required for this animal can vary a bit, depending on which parent breed they most resemble, although most will need clipping or trimming of some sort on a regular basis. 
  Crossbreeds that inherit the single-layer Poodle coat are less likely to shed and in some cases, may even be low shedding enough to be considered hypoallergenic, however, the coat of the Irish Setter is decidedly not hypoallergenic, and the full composition of the coat may not reveal itself until your Irish Doodle has reached maturity. It is also quite important to check and clean this dog’s ears on a regular basis as they can be prone to internal and external infections.

Training
  The trainability of the Irish doodle is unpredictable. The standard poodle is a happy-go-lucky and easily trainable dog. But the Irish setters are not always so, but would rather get bored easily. Those Irish doodles that take after their setter parents sometimes demand commitment and patience from their trainers. But once the training process is successfully over, your Irish doodle will be the best trained dog in the neighborhood.
  Begin obedience and pack leader trainings from an early age. Train them to socialize and get accustomed to meeting new faces. Like their parents, the Irish doodles are naturally clean, and hence, are easy to be housetrained.

Exercise Requirements
  The Irish Doodle doesn’t need a lot of exercise. Instead, a moderate amount of daily activity, through games like fetch and a walk or jog, will help keep your dog happy and in great shape. If you do have an enclosed, safe yard, you can even let your pooch play freely outside when the weather permits.

Grooming 
  She does not shed much and is hypoallergenic so is good for those with allergies. She should be brushed at least twice a week still to remove mats and tangles and keep the coat looking bright and healthy. Use a solid bristle brush and you should find her coat easy to brush. She will need to have a bath as and when she gets dirty enough to need one! Check her ears once a week and wipe them clean and clip her nails if they grow too long.

Children and other animals
  When training and early socialization is completed she is very good with children and other pets. They will be happy to play and affectionate towards them. Children should be taught how to play nicely with any dog, and that things like ear or tail pulling or messing around with their food at feeding time is not acceptable.

Is the Irish Doodle the Right Breed for you?
Moderate Maintenance: Regular grooming is required to keep its fur in good shape.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Difficult Training: The Irish Doodle isn't deal for a first time dog owner. Patience and perseverance are required to adequately train it.
Slightly Active: Not much exercise is required to keep this dog in shape. Owners who are frequently away or busy might find this breed suitable for their lifestyle.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.
The Irish Setter is a more energetic dog, but when combined with the Poodle, the puppies settle down a great deal. However, I recommend these pups for more active people and families with more energetic children. They will be perfect for the person wanting a devoted running companion, as well as a therapy dog
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Thursday, December 21, 2017

Everything about your Pinny-Poo

Everything about your Pinny-Poo
  Pinny-Poo is a cross between the Miniature Pinscher  and Poodle. These little dogs are medium to tiny by size, depending upon the size of its poodle parent. With their protective, possessive nature, these toy dogs make a good watchdog as well.
  They can either have a short coat like the min pin, or a long one like the poodle. Their elongated face ends in a prominent, dark muzzle and small beadlike eyes. Their triangular ears covered with very short ear hair, hang down to their cheeks. Considering their characteristics and good behavior, they can be a good choice for apartment dwellers.

Overview
  The Pinny-Poo is a small mixed dog being a cross of a Miniature Pinscher and a Poodle (Toy). He has a life span 10 to 15 years and takes part in competitive obedience and watchdog. He is a great dog for a family, couple or single person and he adapts well to apartment living. Other names he is known by are Min Pin Poo, Miniature Pinscherpoo, Pinny-Doodle, Min Pin Doodle and Miniature Pinscherdoodle. He is a sweet and sensible dog.
  Although the Pinny-poo is a recent hybrid created primarily for companionship, she comes from two proud, super smart, hard working breeds. The extremely popular Poodle has roots in water retrieving as well as truffle hunting and even circus work, whereas the Pinscher was mostly used for hunting and exterminating varmint.

Interesting Facts
  • A pinny poo playing with leaves is a common scene.
  • Though adaptable to all weather conditions, pinny poos might get cold in cold weathers and feel more comfortable in sweaters.

Breed standards
Type: Guard Dog, Watchdog
Average lifespan: 10 to 15 years
Average size: 6-10 pounds
Coat appearance: Long, curly, short, wire, smooth
Coloration: Apricot, black, tan, black and tan, brown, cream, white
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Comparable Breeds: Poodle, Miniature Pinscher

History
  With no history about the Pinny-Poo or anything known about who, where and why all we can really do is look at the parent breeds but keep in mind while the intention might be to get the best of the parents into the puppies this is not something that can be guaranteed. Even in the same litter variations happen in looks and in temperament.


Temperament
  Min Pin and Poodle crosses will vary much more in temperament than their purebred predecessors. This hybrid may be more Poodle like or have more of the Pinscher personality, perhaps it could even be an equal mixture of both! In general, the Pinny-poo temperament is best described as energetic, vibrant, playful and very, very smart. This breed is also usually very sweet towards its family and will enjoy being in their presence, although they aren't overly needy and should be fine while the owner is gone for his/her daily activities.
  This breed is better suited for older kids that are not rough or annoying to it- kids that have been taught how to appropriately handle a pet. Although this breed is protective, they are also pretty quiet and only bark when they feel it is necessary to alert you. Note that it's important to socialize them early because, while many get along just fine with household pets, it may be more difficult for them to fit into a household with multiple dogs. Both parent breeds are very smart and very trainable so with firmness and consistency you should find them quite willing to please.

Health
  To have a healthy dog you need a healthy puppy bought from good breeders who take care of their dogs and who can show you health clearances for the parents. A Pinny-Poo can inherit issues from his parents. Those include Addisons, Cushings, epilepsy, hypothyroidism, patellar luxation, eye problems, Von Willebrands, Legg-Calve-Perthes, Joint dysplasia and skin problems.

Care
  Though, being little dogs, the Pinnypoos do not need lots of space, but they love to run around and play, jump high, dig and so on. For this, it is always good if you have an enclosed yard for this playful canine. Keep it without a leash when at home. They would remain active all day, playing with your family members, while burning their calories at the same time. However, like other dogs, take them out for a short walk or jog ever day. They are great runners.

Training
  Though they are born intelligent, training a Pinny Poo might require a good level of patience at times. Some pinnies can be difficult to train, and hence, it is always advisable to begin training right from the time when you bring your puppy home from your breeders. Because they are often restless and protective, teach them obedience and the etiquette of good behavior with your friends and neighbors, or other dogs. Socialize them well, so that there would be no behavioral issues in future. Also, take the lead when you take your dog out for a walk, and act like the leader always. This should also make it clear to them that it’s you who is the leader of its ‘pack’.

Grooming 
  He can be hypo-allergenic with the right coat as mentioned. He is usually low shedding so there is less clear up to do after him. He will still need brushing but a couple of times a week may be sufficient. He will need a bath when he gets dirty using a dog shampoo. If his coat is long like a Poodle's he may need regular trips to a groomers to trim it. He needs his ears checked for infection and wiped clean once a week. His nails will need trimming when they get too long being sure to not cut too low. Teeth should be brushed at least twice a week.

Children and other Pet
  The Pinny-Poo is good with children, affectionate and playful but needs to be supervised especially with younger ones to ensure he does not get hurt considering his size. He does also get on well with other pets even cats. However where the socialization comes into play is how he gets on with other dogs as he can be aggressive towards them.

Is the Pinny-Poo the Right Breed for you?
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Moderately Easy Training: The Pinny-Poo is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Not Good with Kids: In isolation, this dog breed might not be the best option for kids. However, to mitigate the risks, have the puppy grow up with kids and provide it with plenty of pleasant and relaxed experiences with them.




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Thursday, November 9, 2017

Everything about your Toy Poodle

Everything about your Toy Poodle
  Size differentiates the Standard, Miniature, and Toy Poodles, who are otherwise similar. These elegant dogs have Einstein-like smarts and they make excellent family dogs. Most of them don’t have the runway styling of a show dog, but they do need professional grooming unless you are prepared to learn to use clippers.

Overview
  The Poodle, also known as the Caniche and the Pudle, is a breed of dog that comes in three sizes. The Standard and Miniature Poodles are in the Non Sporting Group, and the Toy Poodles are in the Toy Group. This is one of the most popular house pet breeds known, and poodles are famous for their companionable temperaments and extremely high degree of intelligence. The Poodle was recognized by the AKC in 1887 and AKC approved in 1984.
  When groomed to show dog standards the body is meant to give off a square appearance. It is approximately the same length as the height at the withers. The skull is moderately rounded with a slight but definite stop. It has a long, straight muzzle. The dark, oval-shaped eyes are set somewhat far apart and are black or brown. The ears hang close to the head and are long and flat. Both the front and back legs are in proportion with the size of the dog.   The topline is level. The tail is set and carried high. It is sometimes docked to half its length or less to make the dog look more balanced. Dewclaws may be removed. The oval-shaped feet are rather small and the toes are arched. The coat is either curly or corded. It comes in all solid colors including black, blue, silver, gray, cream, apricot, red, white, brown or café-au-lait. While it does not make the written show standard, some breeders are breeding parti-colored Poodles. 

Other Quick Facts
  • Poodles are canine scholars. Their intelligence combined with their desire to please makes it easy to train them.
  • The original purpose of the Standard Poodle was to retrieve waterfowl for hunters, and he is still capable of performing that task today.
  • Poodles need regular mental stimulation and physical exercise.
  • Poodles are not prissy and are just as likely as other dogs to enjoy wet or muddy fun.
  • A Poodle’s grooming needs are considerable. Clipping must be done regularly, typically about every 6 to 8 weeks, or that fine curly coat will mat into gnarly knots.
  • Poodles can be one of the best family dogs possible. For the tiny dog’s safety, though, most breeders won’t place Toy Poodles in homes with children younger than 10 years.
Breed standards
AKC group: Toy
UKC group: Companion Dogs
Average lifespan: 14 to 18 years
Average size: 5 to 10 pounds
Coat appearance: Corded, Dense, and Harsh and Rough
Coloration: It comes in all solid colors including black, blue, silver, gray, cream, apricot, red, white, brown or café-au-lait
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Families with children, singles, seniors, houses with yards
Temperament: Intelligent, easy to train, obedient, playful

History 

  Poodles are thought to have originated in Germany, where they were called Pudel, meaning "splash in the water,”  a reference to their work as water retrievers. The exaggerated show cut seen today began as a practical way to keep the dog’s joints and torso warm in cold water.
  The Standard is the oldest of the three Poodle varieties. The Miniature and the Toy were created by selecting for smaller size. They, too, were working dogs. Miniatures are said to have sniffed out truffles, a type of edible mushroom that grows underground, and Toys and Miniatures were popular circus dogs because of their intelligence, love of performing and ability to learn tricks.
  The curly-coated dogs became popular in England and Spain, but in France they were adored. King Louis XVI was besotted with Toy Poodles and the breed became thought of as France’s national dog. It was in France that the breed achieved status as companions, and Poodles still enjoy that status today. They are beloved around the world and are consistently ranked among the most popular breeds. Today the Miniature is the most popular of the three sizes, and the three varieties together are ranked ninth in popularity among the breeds registered by the American Kennel Club.

Personality
  Poodles have a reputation for being “sissies.” They way their hair is cut for shows probably doesn't help that image, but Poodles are by no means fragile, shrinking violets.   They are outgoing, friendly dogs who love to run and romp, and interestingly, they were originally used to assist hunters of water fowl. They are true family dogs who can play hard with children all afternoon, then curl up in the living room for an evening of relaxation. Toy Poodles make excellent watchdogs, they are alert and curious and will sound the alarm that a person or animal is approaching. They make an excellent choice for families of all sizes and ages, and are great for first time dog owners.

Health
  This dog has a lifespan of 12 to 14 years and may suffer from minor diseases like trichiasis, entropion, cataract and lacrimal duct atresia, and major aliments like progressive retinal atrophy (PRA), Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, patellar luxation, and epilepsy. Urolithiasis and intervertebral disk degeneration are sometimes noticed in the breed. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may run hip, knee, and eye exams on the dog.

Care
  The Toy Poodle is not meant for outdoor living, but it enjoys moving to and from the yard. Its coat requires it to be brushed on alternate days. When hair sheds, it does not fall off easily, but gets tangled, thus causing matting. Clipping is recommended four times annually, while the feet and face require monthly clipping. Most Poodles need professional groomers, but owners of the dogs can also learn the grooming procedure. Poodles require plenty of physical and mental exercise - indoor games, short walks, etc. -as well as lots of interaction with humans.

Living Conditions
  Toy Poodles are good for city life as well as country living. Given enough exercise, they are not active indoors. They will lie right next to you and are more sedate when indoors, although they love to play outdoors and are a highly intelligent breed, so they do like lots of thoughtful activities to stimulate their mentality. They will do okay without a yard.

Trainability
  Poodles are highly trainable dogs. They catch on very quickly to patterns and don't require much motivation beyond praise and a couple of treats. Poodles should never be treated harshly as they will simply stop listening to you. They are natural learners, however, so they shouldn't test your patience too far during training sessions.
  Once basic obedience has been mastered, Poodles should graduate on to advanced obedience, trick training, or the agility course. They are thinking dogs and will appreciate the opportunity to learn new things.

Activity Requirements
  Toy Poodles can live as happily in and apartment as they can in a large home with a yard. Wherever they dwell, they do need daily walks and several chances to run every week. Poodles who aren't exercised enough can become high strung and bark excessively.
  They are a smart breed who need to use their minds as much as their bodies, so it is important to give your Poodle lots of interesting activities to do during the day.

Grooming
  Grooming is a significant consideration in Poodles. The fine, curly coat that works well in the water needs to be clipped regularly, typically about every six to eight weeks, depending on your preferences. It mats easily, and requires regular brushing at home, even with professional grooming care. Left untrimmed, the coat will naturally curl into cords. Some people want the coat to cord because they prefer the look.
  Dental care is an issue, particularly for the Toy and Miniature Poodle. Those small mouths full of teeth can cause problems. Keep on top of it by brushing the teeth regularly with a vet-approved pet toothpaste and having regular dental checks when you go to the veterinarian.
  Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Don’t let them get so long that you can hear them clicking on the floor.

Is the Toy Poodle the Right Breed for you?
High Maintenance: Grooming should be performed often to keep the dog's coat in good shape. Professional trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Difficult Training: The Toy Poodle isn't deal for a first time dog owner. Patience and perseverance are required to adequately train it.
Slightly Active: Not much exercise is required to keep this dog in shape. Owners who are frequently away or busy might find this breed suitable for their lifestyle.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  Toy Poodles have been popular pets for centuries, including in the court of Louis XVI. Poodles didn’t originate in France, but they are often referred to as French Poodles because they were so popular in that country.



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Friday, September 15, 2017

Top 10 Dog Breeds For Seniors

Top 10 Dog Breeds For Seniors
  One of the best things a person can do at any age is to adopt a dog.  Dogs can provide a tremendous amount of love and joy, and are a great way to overcome loneliness or boredom, which sometimes can affect seniors in their retirement. There are so many different breeds that sometimes it can be difficult to decide which dog is best for you. Seniors need to think about how much exercise certain types of dogs need, and whether they can provide it. 
  Owning a pet has it's pros and cons, and you have to really think what type of pet, whether a cat or dog, and what type of breed is right for you.  For example, you have to factor in if you will have the time and energy for a larger dog, or whether a small lap dog is more your speed. There are an almost infinite amount of sizes and temperaments when it comes to dogs.  If you do choose to adopt a furry friend, they quickly become a loving and wonderful addition to any family.

1. Pug
  The short-faced pug is both gentle and quiet. But don’t let their laid-back nature fool you. These compact dogs have a lot of personality! They don’t need tons of exercise, but they love being social and definitely need to be a part of the group.
  Pugs are known as adaptable, charming, and eager to please — affectionate and playful without requiring a lot of exercise to maintain their health. They are small, so they generally meet the size requirements of assisted living communities. They can be a bit mischievous, and they tend to shed quite a bit, especially in warmer climates.

2. Bichon Frise

  Independent spirit, intelligent, affectionate, bold and lively. They are bright little dogs that are easy to train and love everyone. They need people to be happy and always love to tag along. They are competitive and obedient.

  The fluffy little Bichon Frise is a joyful and affectionate dog that makes an excellent companion. With an average weight of about 7-12 pounds, this small breed is extremely easy to handle for most people. Bichons are also relatively simple to train. The Bichon will need to be groomed periodically but is otherwise fairly low-maintenance. Many Bichon owners choose to take their dogs to a professional groomer every month or two. Moderate daily exercise is usually enough to keep the Bichon healthy and happy as long as he has your companionship.

3. Miniature Schnauzer

  Schnauzers come in various sizes, including miniature, so they offer a lot of choice to a senior trying to meet a community’s pet size requirements. They are energetic, playful, trainable, and good with children, although they can have strong guarding instincts. They can be quite active; the AKC notes that they have a medium energy level, so playtime with your schnauzer can help keep you active as well.

  Miniature Schnauzers are the smallest of the Schnauzers and they are intelligent, fun-loving dogs that are a great choice for a more active lifestyle. They are the perfect choice for an older individual looking to maintain a relatively active lifestyle, as they enjoy exercise but not so much as a larger breed. 


4. Beagle

  Beagles are moderately active dogs that can do well with a daily walk. They are social dogs that enjoy spending time with their people and make an excellent choice for someone older looking for a companion. 

  Beagles are cute (think Snoopy), funny, loyal, and friendly, enjoying the company of other dogs and humans. They love to play and are excellent family dogs. They can also be independent, which may make training a challenge, and they do need plenty of exercise – which is great for fitness-minded seniors. They shed a lot, but their coat is relatively easy to care for with regular brushing.

5. Chihuahua
  If you live in a small assisted living apartment, why not consider one of the smallest dogs there is?Chihuahuas make a great choice for seniors because they are relatively low maintenance and small enough to be easily handled. They require minimal exercise and are perfectly happy being lapdogs. 
 Chihuahuas have a ton of personality for their size, and love being showered with affection; on the flip side, they are so loyal and protective that they might need a bit of training before dealing with children, and some Chihuahuas bark a lot. They can be active, but being small, they can often get sufficient exercise by playing indoors.

6. Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

  Another dog bred for companionship, the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is a great option if you want a dog that is as happy to snuggle in your lap as they are to be out exploring with you. They’re also great family dogs, and love nothing more than to be the center of attention.

  The Cavalier is a beloved puppy-like dog that is affectionate and adaptable. This is a small dog that is often happiest when snuggled up beside her owner. This breed typically weighs about 11 to 18 pounds and is easy to handle and train. The Cavalier has some grooming needs, such as regular hair brushing, ear cleaning, and possibly the occasional trip to a groomer. Overall, Cavaliers are favored among those who love small, snuggle companions.

7. Pembroke Welsh Corgi

  If you want a small to medium dog that makes a great companion, the Corgi might be for you. Weight 24 to 30 pounds, this breed is still small enough for most people to handle. Corgis are smart and fairly easy to train. They are also quite adorable with those short little legs! A herding dog by nature, your Corgi will need routine exercise, but daily walks will often be enough. The Corgi has minimal grooming needs, which can be very convenient. 

  The spunky corgi is the perfect companion for an active senior. Compact in size, this herding breed has the energy of larger dogs, but in a more manageable package. They’re the favored companions of Queen Elizabeth and are a loving—albeit stubborn!—breed.

8. Boston Terrier

  The Boston Terrier is a loving, gentle and clownish breed with an endearing personality. They make a great choice for seniors because of their outstanding temperaments and easy keeping. 
  Boston Terriers often make the list of top dogs for seniors because of their manageable size, friendliness, ease of grooming, and love of spending time with their owners. 

  Known as the American Gentleman, the Boston Terrier is lively, smart, and affectionate with a gentle, even temperament. They can, however, be stubborn, so persistence and consistency are definite musts when training.

9. Poodle

  Poodles are great companions. They’re easy to train, devoted to their families, and a low-shedding breed (though they still need to be groomed). 

  Coming in different sizes from large to tiny, there’s a poodle out there for everyone, even if you live in a small apartment. Smart, proud, and active according to the AKC, it’s no surprise that poodles are the 7th most popular breed overall. They’re easily trained and enjoy a variety of activities, which makes them very adaptable to different-sized living situations. Their coats require regular grooming, but they are also hypo-allergenic.

10. Greyhound

  The biggest dog on our list best dog breeds for seniors is also the laziest. Retired racing greyhounds are a great option for seniors because they are huge couch potatoes. If you adopt a greyhound from the track, you’re also getting a furry friend who has seen a lot and is well socialized.

  How can a racing dog be good for older adults? You may be surprised to learn that Greyhounds are not the high-energy dogs many think they are. Although Greyhounds will enjoy daily walks and the occasional chance to run, most tend to be "couch potatoes" that enjoy loafing around with their owners. They are usually very responsive to training and therefore easy to handle, even though most weight about 60 to 80 pounds. If you like larger dogs but worry about being able to handle one, the Greyhound is a breed to consider.
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Saturday, July 8, 2017

10 Most Popular Dog Breeds in America

10 Most Popular Dog Breeds in America
  Americans really, really love their dogs. And that’s in spite of dogs not being the easiest pet you could bring into your home. Training a dog is difficult, especially if you end up with a headstrong canine. Choosing the right dog breed for your lifestyle or your family can be a challenge. And owning a dog can be surprisingly expensive thanks to an assortment of hidden costs.
  So which dog breeds do Americans love the most? Take a look at the American Kennel Club’s ranking of the most popular dog breeds in America for 2016. Some of them might surprise you.

10. Boxers
  In 10th place is the boxer, part of the AKC’s Working Group. The boxer is a fun-loving dog that, interestingly enough, was one of the first breeds selected in Germany for police training. The AKC recognized the boxer in 1904. This breed is a medium-sized, square-built dog with an alert, curious face and a distinctive muzzle. Boxers move smoothly and gracefully. They’re related to practically all recognized breeds of the bulldog type. Boxers are patient and protective, which makes them great family dogs.
  Boxers were originally bred to be medium-size guard dogs. Today, although they are a part of the AKC’s Working Group, they mostly find homes as loving family companions.


  In ninth place is the Yorkshire terrier. The AKC first recognized this member of the Toy Group in 1885. Yorkies first became popular pets in the late Victorian era, and they have a distinctive coat and confident manner of carrying themselves. The AKC notes that Yorkshire Terriers “offer big personalities in a small package.” They’re brave and energetic, and most owners would say these dogs don’t know how small they are.
  Small in size but big in personality, the Yorkshire Terrier makes a feisty but loving companion. The most popular toy dog breed in the U.S., the “Yorkie” has won many fans with his devotion to his owners, his elegant looks, and his suitability to apartment living.

  In eighth place is the Rottweiler. This breed, a member of the Working Group, is one of the descendants of Roman drover dogs. The AKC recognized it in 1931. Rottweilers are powerful dogs, and the AKC notes that “the Rottweiler is happiest when given a job to perform.” The breed’s intelligence and endurance makes Rottweilers great service dogs and companions. And according to the AKC, “No one told him that he’s not a toy breed, so at some point he’s going to plop onto your lap for a cuddle.”
  If you want a Rottweiler, learn how to raise it first! If you don't get these dogs off to the right start, you may never be able to control them, and they will be a constant danger to you, your family, and others. With a bite strength roughly 25% greater than a German Shepherd, they must be trained - it isn't optional. If you do learn to do it right, you will own one of the best and safest pets it is possible to own.

  In seventh place is the poodle, a member of the Non Sporting Group. Poodles, officially recognized by the AKC in 1887, are a single breed commonly divided into standard, miniature, and toy sizes. Poodles are known for being very intelligent and active dogs. They excel in obedience training and are eager to please their humans. All sizes of poodles can be trained successfully. The standard poodle tends to be more outgoing.
  These fluffy dogs weren't always the delicate beauties they are today. Poodles were once natural-born hunters and were originally bred as water retrievers. These prim and proper pups are still excellent swimmers with a knack for anything that involves using their brains as well as their brawn. Named after the German word for puddle, this breed's webbed feet and water-resistant coat make them great lake and pool companions who love the challenge of obedience training at the highest levels.

  In sixth place is the French bulldog, which is included in the Non Sporting Group. The AKC notes that two distinctive features of this breed, which it recognized in 1898, are its bat ears and the unique silhouette of its skull. French bulldogs are affectionate and playful. And the AKC reports that this breed “is a great companion for single pet owners, as well as families with young children.” They’re a little bit stubborn in nature, so you’ll need to exercise some patience when training a French bulldog. But in general, Frenchies are intelligent and eager to please their family.
  The Frenchie will make you laugh. He's a charming, clever dog with a sense of humor and a stubborn streak. Bred for centuries as a companion, he's very fond of people, and becomes particularly attached to his family. In fact, sometimes he becomes a little too attached, which means he's not the best choice for someone who'll be away long hours every day. It also means he absolutely, positively cannot live in the backyard or garage, but only indoors as a member of the family. That's doubly true given that he, like all brachycephalic, or "flat-faced" breeds, has difficulty regulating his body temperature and needs to live in a climate-controlled environment.

  In fifth place is the beagle, part of the AKC’s Hound Group. The AKC first recognized the breed in 1885. The beagle was bred primarily for hunting rabbits and hares, and beagles are still excellent hunting dogs and companions. They enjoy the company of people and other dogs; however, they’re a challenge to train because they want to follow their noses. As the AKC puts it, “Beagles are at best temporarily obedient due to their independent nature, which is common among most hounds.”
   Small, compact, and hardy, Beagles are active companions for kids and adults alike. Canines in this dog breed are merry and fun loving, but being hounds, they can also be stubborn and require patient, creative training techniques. Their noses guide them through life, and they're never happier than when following an interesting scent. The Beagle originally was bred as a scenthound to track small game, mostly rabbits and hare. He is still used for this purpose in many countries, including the United States.

  In fourth place is the bulldog, a member of the Non Sporting Group. The bulldog originated in the British Isles, and the AKC recognized it in 1886. Bulldogs are thick-set dogs with short faces and sturdy limbs. The AKC describes these medium-sized dogs as “equable, resolute and dignified.” Despite a “well-earned” reputation for stubbornness, bulldogs are very intelligent and can be very successfully trained.
  Bulldogs originally were used to drive cattle to market and to compete in a bloody sport called bullbaiting. Today, they’re gentle companions who love kids. A brief walk and a nap on the sofa is just this dog breed’s speed.

  In third place is the golden retriever, a highly identifiable breed, which the AKC recognized in 1925. Golden retrievers are a member of the Sporting Group and are active, alert, and confident. As the AKC explains, “It’s not surprising that golden retrievers are one of the most popular dog breeds in the United States. Along with being exuberant and friendly, they are strong dogs and hard workers.”
  The Golden Retriever is one of the most popular dog breeds in the U.S. The breed's friendly, tolerant attitude makes him a fabulous family pet, and his intelligence makes him a highly capable working dog. Golden Retrievers excel at retrieving game for hunters, tracking, sniffing out drugs, and as therapy and assistance dogs. They're also natural athletes, and do well in dog sports such as agility and competitive obedience.
 This sporting breed has a sweet, gentle, people-pleasing personality. A well-bred Golden Retriever does not have strong guarding instincts, so don’t expect him to protect your home from burglars. He will, however, make friends with them and show them where the treats are.

  In second place is the German shepherd, a member of the Herding Group. The AKC recognized this breed in 1908. These dogs are smart and courageous, and they come from a long lineage of old herding and farm dogs. German shepherds are loyal family dogs and good guard dogs. According to the AKC, German shepherds are “considered dogdom’s finest all-purpose workers.”
 The German Shepherd Dog is a natural protector and so adaptable and intelligent that he has performed just about every job known to dog. If he had opposable thumbs, he would be unstoppable.
  The German Shepherd Dog is one of America's most popular dog breeds — for good reason. He's an intelligent and capable working dog. His devotion and courage are unmatched. And he's amazingly versatile, excelling at most anything he's trained to do: guide and assistance work for the handicapped, police and military service, herding, search and rescue, drug detection, competitive obedience and, last but not least, faithful companion.

  In first place is the Labrador retriever, a friendly and active member of the Sporting Group. The AKC recognized the breed in 1917. The Labrador retriever, the most popular dog breed in the United States, comes in three colors: yellow, black, and chocolate. These dogs are eager to please, which means they excel not only as family dogs, but also “as guide dogs for the blind, as part of search-and-rescue teams, or in narcotics detection with law enforcement.”
  Labrador Retrievers are among the most popular dog breeds out there today. Loyal, easy to get along with, and easy to train, these retrievers could be considered a neighborhood classic all around the United States and even in other parts of the world. But what exactly makes them such popular, well-respected dogs… and does a strong breed always mean that a Labrador Retriever will be the right dog for you?
  The Labrador Retriever was bred to be both a friendly companion and a useful working dog breed. Historically, he earned his keep as a fisherman’s helper: hauling nets, fetching ropes, and retrieving fish from the chilly North Atlantic. Today’s Labrador Retriever is as good-natured and hard working as his ancestors, and he’s America’s most popular breed. These days the Lab works as a retriever for hunters, assistance dog to the handicapped, show competitor, and search and rescue dog, among other canine jobs.



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