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Everything about your dog!

Showing posts with label personality. Show all posts
Showing posts with label personality. Show all posts

Wednesday, December 27, 2017

Everything about your King Shepherd

Everything about your King Shepherd
  The King Shepherd is self-confident with a well-balanced personality and healthy nervous system. They should not exhibit any shyness or nervousness. They are extremely intelligent, easy to train and eager and faithful to please their owners. This breed makes a fine sheepherder and working dog. They are also a naturally courageous guard and watchdog, showing courage, strength, and hardiness in their role of protector.

Overview
  The King Shepherd is a large breed. The build of this dog is muscular, long, and robust; the structure is solid. The head is in good proportion with the body and moderately wide between the eyes. The forehead is slightly rounded. The cheeks are not too full and moderately curved when viewed from the top. The thick, firm ears are medium-sized and moderately wide at base. The eyes are medium-sized and almond shaped. The shades of the eyes can be varying shades of brown ranging from golden brown to almost black. The chest is broad and deep. Thickly feathered, the tail reaches at least to the hocks and is slightly curved.
  The King Shepherd is self-confident with a well-balanced personality and healthy nervous system. They should not exhibit any shyness or nervousness. They are extremely intelligent, easy to train and eager and faithful to please their owners. This breed makes a fine sheep-herder and working dog. They are also a naturally courageous guard and watchdog, showing courage, strength, and hardiness in their role of protector. They make very nice companions and are friendly to other animals and children.

Breed standards
Breed Group: Herding
Breed Type: mixed breed
Average lifespan: 10 - 14 years
Average size: 90-150 pounds
Coat appearance: Coarse and Long
Coloration: Sable, black saddle with tan, gold, cream, tan or silver markings
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Singles and families with children and other pets living in a house with a yard
Temperament: Intelligent, eager to please, energetic, protective, loyal, loving, playful
Comparable Breeds: German Shepherd, Shiloh Shepherd

History
  Two American dog breeders Shelly Watts-Cross, and David Turkheimer created this large breed from the Shiloh Shepherd (American and European German Shepherd Dogs and Alaskan Malamutes), additional American-bred German Shepherd Dogs and the Great Pyrenees. An organized dog breed club was started in 1995.


Temperament
  The King Shepherd isn't solely valued extremely for its head turning good looks however the dog is gaining popularity for its working skills and glorious temperament similarly. Loving and loyal to their family, these excellent looking dogs will be trained simply as a result of their wanting to please nature and high levels of intelligence. Its protecting instincts, loyalty to its family and aloofness towards strangers create it a superb watch and working dog though' it's not hostile to strangers. As a mild, kind and playful breed, the King Shepherd makes a really smart fellow of kids and may be a trust worthy nanny for youngsters. 
  This simple to train dog is employed in search and rescue missions, as therapy dogs and in police work similarly as sheepherders. It gets on well with other dogs and pets within the family. it's not an appropriate dog for apartment living, not solely thanks to its giant size however conjointly thanks to its high exercise demands that decision for at least an oversized yard wherever the dog will look out of its exercise desires. The King Shepherd is a superb family pet, working dog and a trustworthy guardian of the family.

Health Problems
  As is the case with all other hybrid canine breeds, the King Shepherd might be susceptible to the health conditions that commonly affect its parent breeds. However, hybrid dogs can be surprisingly healthy and hardy, and you simply can’t predict an individual dog’s long-term health. Therefore, being aware of what to look out for, and working closely with your vet, will ensure you are able to give your pet the best care possible.
  King Shepherds may be prone to conditions that include Von Willebrand’s disease, hypothyroidism, joint dysplasia, eye issues, degenerative myelopathy, allergies, exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, thrombopathia, and bloat.

Care
  King Shepherds are very intelligent and energetic, and needs both challenging mental stimulation and plenty of exercise. The King Shepherd takes well to strenuous activity.

Living Conditions
  The King Shepherd dog is a large breed that requires more space. They are not recommended for apartments or other small living spaces. A large fenced in yard is ideal so the dog can get the exercise required to stay healthy and happy.

Training
  Because King Shepherds are highly intelligent, training your pet will be a pleasure. Your dog will be eager to follow your commands in order to please you, especially if you use a positive, consistent, and firm approach. Start training your King Shepherd from an early age to ensure your dog will learn all of the rules and will grow up to be a fantastic family pet.

Exercise
  Because the King Shepherd is a large breed, you will need to find time to exercise your dog every day. These canines thrive on physical and mental stimulation, and they have a lot of energy. They do best in homes with yards where they can run around and play off-leash, and they should have toys to play with while they are indoors as well.
  Use a combination of games, training, and outdoor activities to keep your King Shepherd active and healthy. Going for jogs or long walks, as well as hiking or bicycling, are great options. The key is to ensure your dog gets enough exercise to release his energy so he doesn’t become restless and potentially destructive. If you are not an active person, the King Shepherd isn’t the best choice for your lifestyle.

Grooming
  The coat is highly weather-resistant. The King Shepherd should be brushed regularly. Bathe only when necessary.

Children and other pets
  Loving and loyal to their family, these excellent looking dogs will be trained simply as a result of their wanting to please nature and high levels of intelligence. Its protecting instincts, loyalty to its family and aloofness towards strangers create it a superb watch and working dog though' it's not hostile to strangers. As a mild, kind and playful breed, the King Shepherd makes a really smart fellow of kids and may be a trust worthy nanny for youngsters.

Is the King Shepherd Right For You?
Difficult Training: The King Shepherd isn't deal for a first time dog owner. Patience and perseverance are required to adequately train it.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.
The chief qualities of this outstanding breed are : a well-balanced nervous system, readiness, lack of inhibition, vigilance, incorruptibility, combined with courage and cleverness in defense. It is known to be an excellent watch-dog and guard-dog. The King Shepherd is characterized by unsurpassed loyalty towards its master and eagerness to please.
Owing to its huge size, the King Shepherd is not recommended for apartment life. Though the King Shepherd can prove to be a good companion for kids, they should be allowed to interact with kids only under close supervision because of their stature.
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Monday, September 8, 2014

Everything about your Lowchen

Everything about your Lowchen
  The Lowchen’s German name means “little lion.” He is a cute, charismatic little dog who loves to clown around and be the center of attention. When he encounters other dogs he sometimes thinks he’s as big as a lion and must be prevented from taking them on. His long, dense coat is soft and comes in any color or combination.
  The Lowchen is a toy dog breed that was developed as a companion dog and still finds itself in this role today. Active and smart, they do very well in dog competitions such as obedience and agility, and surpass the expectations that many have for a family companion.

Overview
  With a name that translates to "lion dog," you might expect the Lowchen to have a fierce demeanor, but with people he's lionlike only in his looks. Playful and gentle, the Lowchen is a great companion for children and adults alike.
  He is surprisingly robust and loves to roughhouse with his people. The Lowchen generally gets along well with everyone, but he can be shy of strangers. With proper socialization, this trait can be overcome, however. Generally, Lowchen will fit into any household whether there are dogs before they arrive or not. They also get along well with other pets.
  The Lowchen is affectionate and loving. They thrive when they are with their people and can fit wherever that person is living, be it an apartment or a large estate. They should not be left outside or in a kennel, and doing so will not only lead to ill health for the dog but also to many temperamental problems. 
  Lowchens are not known for their high activity levels, but they enjoy their role as watch dog and will bark an alert whenever they see something they think merits a response. Some can also be partial to digging, and this habit can be difficult to break.
   The name "lion dog" comes from the traditional Lowchen clip, with close-cut hindquarters and a full, natural mane, but the nickname applies to the little dog's big personality as well. Lowchen have the "small dog...big personality" down pat, and that can be a joy and a frustration.
  They are lively and energetic, sweet and affectionate, and they will challenge any dog or rule if they decide to. They will take over the homes and lives of the people they love, and with their fierce determination and wonderful even temperament they will take over their owners' hearts as well.

Highlights
  • The Lowchen was not developed to be an outdoor or kennel dog. They are companion dogs and are happiest when they are in the company of the people they love.
  • Barking is a much-enjoyed pastime for the Lowchen. They make excellent watchdogs with their alarm barking but they may become a nuisance to neighbors.
  • Lowchen make wonderful apartment residents as long as their exercise requirements are met. Expect to spend at least 20 minutes per day exercising him. He makes an excellent walking companion and will go for long walks with his people.
  • Although the Lowchen doesn't shed much, he still requires regular brushing and grooming to prevent tangles and mats and keep him in good health.
  • Although not all Lowchen exhibit this trait, many enjoy digging and the habit may be difficult to discourage.
  • Lowchen can be shy of new people, and it is important to socialize them at a young age to discourage any fearfulness or timid behaviors.
  • Lowchens are companion dogs and may suffer from separation anxiety whenever their companions leave for the day. They are not the best breed for people who work long hours.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • Except to achieve the distinctive “lion” look, the Lowchen’s coat should not be trimmed. It comes in all colors and combinations of colors.
  • The Lowchen can vary in size. European dogs may stand only 10 to 13 inches, while American dogs can range from 12 to 14 inches.
  • The lion cut probably originated as a sanitary measure, but a more romantic story is that court ladies would warm their feet on the dogs’ warm, exposed skin.

Breed standards
  • AKC group: Non-sporting
  • UKC group: Companion
  • Average lifespan: 12 - 14 years
  • Average size: 9 - 17 pounds
  • Coat appearance: Wavy and long
  • Coloration: Black, white, lemon and speckled
  • Hypoallergenic: Yes
  • Other identifiers: Small and compact body with proud head held high; short skull and muzzle with dark, round eyes; high tail and feathered ears
  • Possible alterations: Clipped into a lion trim
  • Comparable Breeds: Bichon Frise, Havanese
History
  The Lowchen’s name comes from German words meaning “little lion.” Paintings and woodcuts give evidence that dogs resembling the Lowchen have existed since the 15th century. A painting by Jan van Eyck, The Birth of the Baptist, which dates to 1422, depicts one of the curious-looking little dogs and is perhaps the earliest visual proof of the breed’s age. The expressive woodcuts by German artist Albrecht Durer also provide Lowchen lovers with a glimpse of their breed’s past.
  During the Renaissance, a period rife with symbolism, the little lion dogs represented courage. Knights who were killed in battle were buried with the statue of a lion at their feet, but if they died of natural causes, the statue of a lion dog was substituted. The little lion dogs were also popular with court ladies, who kept them as lap dogs, flea catchers, and foot warmers.
  As the centuries passed, the Lowchen’s popularity waned. By World War II, the breed was   considered rare and came close to disappearing. A Belgian woman, Madame Bennert, managed to revive the breed with just two females and one male. She worked closely with German breeders to increase the Lowchen’s numbers and maintain its quality. English breeders began importing the dogs in 1968, and three Lowchen were imported by an American couple in 1971.
  The first Lowchen to achieve pop culture stardom was an untrimmed dog who starred as Freeway, the popular canine co-star of the 1980s television series Hart to Hart. The breed was recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1999. Lowchen currently rank 147th among the breeds registered by the AKC, down from 131st a decade ago.


Personality
  The Lowchen is the personification of an even-tempered breed. He is lively and active, affectionate and gentle. He is an intelligent dog who learns quickly and easily. Lowchen are fearless watchdogs and will often alert bark if they see something or someone suspicious. They don't seem to mind that they are small and will challenge larger dogs if they feel the need.
  They take control of their home, and their people may feel as if they've become a beloved possession of their sweet little dog. There is no doubt that the Lowchen is a wonderful breed with a cheerful disposition who has many people opening their hearts and homes to not just one but to many Lowchen companions.
  The Lowchen is a wonderful breed to train. They are intelligent and take to training very quickly. Like many toy breeds, they can have issues with housetraining, but this can be overcome with patience and consistency. Socialization is a must for this breed, which can be shy around people. Lowchen that are not properly socialized can become fearful or timid. They generally get along well with other pets, but socialization with other dogs is important for all breeds.

Health
  The Löwchen, which has an average lifespan of 13 to 15 years, may suffer from minor health problems like patellar luxation or be prone to serious heart conditions. To identify some of these issues early, a veterinarian may recommend knee and cardiac exams for dogs of this breed.

Care
  Although the Löwchen is not meant for living outdoors, it loves access to a yard during the day. Short daily walks or a vigorous game is sufficient to satisfy the exercise needs of the Löwchen, but it is especially fond of mental challenges.
  Its dense coat requires combing or brushing on alternate days. Clipping, meanwhile, should be done once or twice a month, in order to preserve the lion trim, the preferred choice among pet owners.

Living Conditions
  The Löwchen is good for apartment life. It is very active indoors and will do okay without a yard.

Exercise
  The Löwchen needs a daily walk. Play will take care of a lot of its exercise needs, however, as with all breeds, play will not fulfill their primal instinct to walk. Dogs that do not get to go on daily walks are more likely to display behavior problems. They will also enjoy a good romp in a safe, open area off lead, such as a large, fenced-in yard.

Grooming
  The Lowchen hallmark is the lion trim he wears: basically a mane of hair extending to the last rib, poufs of hair forming “cuffs” around the ankles, a bare rear end, and a bare tail with a plume of hair left at the tip.
  The hair on the Lowchen is long, dense, and soft to the touch. Expect to spend 10 minutes a night removing tangles and mats from his single coat, and give him a more thorough brushing at least weekly. Take him to a professional groomer for his lion trim every two months. If the lion trim doesn’t appeal to you, keep him in a cute and simple puppy cut.
  The rest is basic care. Trim his nails as needed, usually every week or two. Small dogs are prone to periodontal disease, so brush his teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for overall good health and fresh.

Is this breed right for you?
  An active breed that requires daily activity, the Lowchen is kind to children, family members and other furry friends. A cheerful breed, the Lowchen is very easy to train and is devoted to his family and home. A good watchdog, he does bark a lot. Although small, he believes himself to be quite the mighty pup. Without proper leadership or activity, the Lowchen will misbehave. Requiring some grooming, he's easy to maintain with daily walks and socializing.

Children and other pets
  Lowchen make excellent dogs for families with either children or other pets. They generally do well with children and enjoy playing with them. They are surprisingly robust and exceedingly gentle.
   Lowchen are also very sociable and will do well in homes with other pets and dogs. Unaware of their small size, they often have a desire to challenge larger dogs that they meet in public, so it's important to protect them from themselves.

Did You Know?
  Very popular in parts of Europe in the 1500s, the Lowchen was nearly extinct by World War II. A Belgian woman managed to revive the breed with just two females and one male.

A dream day in the life of a Lowchen
  A happy guy, the Lowchen may be your own private alarm clock. Waking you up with a bark, he's ready for breakfast and his daily walk. After sniffing out the neighborhood, this spirited breed will return home ready to socialize with his family. Playing with the kids and romping with the other animals, he'll be sure to keep watch on your home from morning to night. Barking at even the mailman, all of the neighbors are sure to know where the Lowchen lives. Going to sleep at the foot of his owner, he'll be as happy as a lamb to have spent the perfect day with those he loves the most.
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Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Everything about your Golden Retriever

Everything about your Golden Retriever
  The Golden Retriever is one of the most popular dog breeds in the U.S. The breed's friendly, tolerant attitude makes him a fabulous family pet, and his intelligence makes him a highly capable working dog. Golden Retrievers excel at retrieving game for hunters, tracking, sniffing out drugs, and as therapy and assistance dogs. They're also natural athletes, and do well in dog sports such as agility and competitive obedience.
  This sporting breed has a sweet, gentle, people-pleasing personality. A well-bred Golden Retriever does not have strong guarding instincts, so don’t expect him to protect your home from burglars. He will, however, make friends with them and show them where the treats are.


Overview
  It's no surprise that the Golden Retriever is one of the top ten most popular dogs in the U.S. It's all good with the Golden: he's highly intelligent, sociable, beautiful, and loyal.
He's also lively. The Golden is slow to mature and retains the silly, playful personality of a puppy until three to four years of age, which can be both delightful and annoying. Many keep their puppyish traits into old age.
  Originally bred for the physically demanding job of retrieving ducks and other fowl for hunters, the Golden needs daily exercise: a walk or jog, free time in the yard, a run at the beach or lake , or a game of fetch. And like other intelligent breeds who were bred to work, they need to have a job to do, such as retrieving the paper, waking up family members, or competing in dog sports. A tired Golden is a well-behaved Golden.
  As well as giving your Golden Retriever physical and mental exercise, you should also be prepared to include him in your family activities. The Golden Retriever is a family dog, and he needs to be with his "pack." Don't consider getting a Golden unless you're willing to have him in the house with you, underfoot, every day.
  There's one other potential drawback to the breed: He's definitely not a watchdog. He might bark when strangers come around, but don't count on it. Most likely, he'll wag his tail and flash that characteristic Golden smile.

Highlights
  • Golden Retrievers shed profusely, especially in the spring and fall. Daily brushing will get some of the loose hair out of the coat, keeping it from settling on your clothing and all over your house. But if you live with a Golden, you'll have to get used to dog hair.
  • Golden Retrievers are family dogs; they need to live indoors with their human "pack," and shouldn't spend hours alone in the backyard.
  • Golden Retrievers are active dogs who need 40-60 minutes of hard exercise daily. They thrive on obedience training, agility classes, and other canine activities, which are a great way to give your dog physical and mental exercise.
  • Although they're gentle and trustworthy with kids, Golden Retrievers are boisterous, large dogs that can accidentally knock over a small child.
  • Goldens love to eat, and will quickly become overweight if overfed. Limit treats, measure out your dog's daily kibble, and feed him in regular meals rather than leaving food out all the time.
  • Because the Golden Retriever is so popular, there are many people breeding Goldens who care more about making money out of the demand for puppies than in breeding happy, healthy dogs. To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Golden has a dense, water-repellent double coat that comes in various shades of gold. Goldens shed heavily and require frequent brushing to keep the fur from flying.
  • Goldens typically have litters of six to eight puppies. Most breeders like to keep puppies until they are at least eight weeks old. This gives the puppies time to learn how to behave toward other dogs and gives the breeder time to evaluate the puppies’ personalities so she can place each one in just the right home. A bonus is that puppies of this age are more mature and more easily housetrained.
Breed standards
AKC group: Sporting
UKC group: Gun Dog
Average lifespan: 10-12 years
Average size: 55-75 pounds
Coat appearance: Long, dense, firm
Coloration: Any shade of golden
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Luxurious golden coat, sturdy and well-balanced body frame.
Possible alterations: Cream or red coloration not accepted by AKC.
Comparable Breeds: Irish Setter, Labrador Retriever


History
  The Golden is one of the breeds created during the dog-loving Victorian era. The breeds in his background probably included a yellow retriever, the Tweed Water Spaniel, wavy- and flag-coated retrievers and a red setter.
  Dudley Marjoribanks, Lord Tweedmouth, is generally credited with producing the first dogs that were to become known as Golden Retrievers, but recent research into studbooks, old paintings and other sources suggests that dogs similar to the Golden Retriever, possibly a type of setter, existed before Lord Tweedmouth began breeding them at his Scottish estate, Guisachan. England’s Kennel Club classified the dogs as “Retriever — Yellow or Golden” in 1911, then changed the name to “Retriever — Golden” in 1920.
 Golden Retrievers were first registered with the American Kennel Club in 1925 and were officially recognized as a breed in 1932. Since then they have established themselves as versatile companions, hunting dogs and working dogs. Goldens are found doing search and rescue, animal-assisted therapy, arson detection, drug detection and assistance work for people with disabilities. Their energy, enthusiasm and intelligence make them well suited to learning and performing almost any task.
  Today, Goldens are among the most beloved of breeds and rank fifth among the breeds registered by the AKC.



Temperament and Personality
  Ask anyone about the defining characteristic of the Golden Retriever, and the answer you will always get is temperament. The hallmark of the Golden is his kind, gentle, eager-to-please nature. He craves affection and will seek it from strangers as well as his own family.
Goldens are adaptable and people-oriented, and those characteristics are at the top of the list of reasons people love them. Unfortunately, the breed’s popularity has meant that careless or clueless people have begun churning out Goldens without any attempt to maintain their sweet, gentle disposition. Shyness and aggression can be problems, leading to fear biting or unfriendliness toward people and other dogs.
  Proper Goldens love everyone, but that love for people will often translate into jumping as a form of greeting. Basic, early obedience training is a must for these big, rambunctious dogs. Fortunately, Goldens are very easy to train, and a small investment of time when the dog is young will pay off when he's full-grown. He will readily sit on command, walk on a leash without pulling and come when called.
  If not trained, socialized and exercised daily, the good-natured exuberance of Goldens – especially as adolescents and young adults – can be overwhelming, and even frightening to small children, despite the dog’s best intentions to be friendly. Choose a Golden as a family dog only if you are prepared to supervise kids and dog when they are together and make sure everyone plays nicely. It’s normal for puppies to chase and bite in play, so you need to teach a Golden pup how to act around kids, as well as teach the kids how to play properly with the dog.
  Any dog, even a Golden, can develop obnoxious levels of barking, digging, food stealing and other undesirable behaviors if he is bored, untrained or unsupervised. And any dog can be a trial to live with during adolescence. In the case of the Golden, the “teen” years can start at six months and continue until the dog is two or three years old. Start training early, be patient and be consistent, and one day you will wake up to find that you live with a great dog.
  The perfect Golden Retriever is a product of his environment and breeding. Whether you want a Golden as a companion, show dog, canine competition dog or all three in one, look for one whose parents have nice personalities and who has been well socialized from early puppyhood.

Health
  The Golden Retriever has a lifespan of between 10 and 13 years. Some of its minor health problems include hypothyroidism, sub-aortic stenosis (SAS), eye disorders, elbow dysplasia, mast cell tumors, and seizures. Osteosarcoma is also occasionally seen in Golden Retrievers. Other major health concerns for the breed include lymphoma, canine hip dysplasia (CHD), hemangiosarcoma, and skin problems. To identify these conditions early, a veterinarian may recommend heart, hip, thyroid, eye, or elbow tests during routine checkups.

Living Conditions
  This breed will do okay in an apartment if sufficiently exercised. They are moderately active indoors and will do best with at least a medium to large yard.

Exercise
  The Golden Retriever needs to be taken on a daily, brisk, long walk, jog or run alongside you when you bicycle, where the dog is made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as instinct tells a dog that the leader leads the way and that leader needs to be the human. In addition, they like to retrieve balls and other toys. Be sure to exercise this dog well to avoid hyperactivity.

Care
  To encourage turnover over of the coat and minimize buildup of hair inside the house, it is best to routinely brush a Golden Retriever's coat at least twice a week. And though it is capable of living outdoors, the Retriever is at its best when kept indoors with the family. In addition, it is important for the Retriever to maintain a daily exercise routine, or take part in active games, so that it can spend its natural energy and relax comfortably  during "non-playing" hours.

Grooming
  It takes some dedication to live with a Golden Retriever. The Golden's profuse coat requires regular brushing and bathing to remove debris and mats. And while all dogs shed, Goldens do it with the same enthusiasm they bring to swimming and retrieving. You can keep it under control with daily brushing to remove the dead undercoat, but if shedding is a deal-breaker at your house, this is not the breed for you.
  Like most retrievers, Goldens love water. When your Golden gets wet - and he will - give him a thorough freshwater rinse to remove chlorine, salt or lake muck from his fur, all of which can be drying or otherwise damaging to the coat. Keep his ears dry to prevent infections, and use an ear cleaner recommended by your veterinarian after he goes swimming.
  The rest is basic care. Trim his nails as needed, usually every few weeks, and brush his teeth for good overall health and fresh breath.

Is this breed right for you?
  Goldens can adapt to just about every lifestyle and environment; however, they're best suited for families with children and large living spaces with room to roam. They can do well in small apartments if daily exercise is incorporated into their routine. Owners must dedicate time for regular grooming to prevent knots in their long golden coat. Goldens are eager to please their human counterparts and therefore excel at training since they love the bond it creates for their master-canine relationship. Families with young children are encouraged to enroll their Golden into basic obedience courses early on.

Children and other pets
  The amiable Golden Retriever isn't bothered by the noise and commotion of kids — in fact, he thrives on it. He's a large, strong dog, though, and he can easily knock over a small child by mistake.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  The Golden's attitude toward other pets is the more the merrier. He enjoys the companionship of other dogs, and with proper introductions and training, can be trusted with cats, rabbits, and other animals.

Notable dogs
  Liberty, the presidential pet of President Gerald R. Ford,and Victory, the presidential pet of Ronald Reagan, were Golden Retrievers
  The breed has also featured in a number of films and TV series, including: Air Bud and Air Bud: Golden Receiver, Full House, Homeward Bound: The Incredible Journey and Homeward Bound II: Lost in San Francisco, Fluke, Napoleon, Up, Pushing Daisies, The Drew Carey Show, and Cats & Dogs. Cash from The Fox and the Hound 2 was also a mix of this breed, as was Whopper from Pound Puppies.

Did You Know?
  During the Ford Administration, a Golden Retriever lived in the White House. Liberty, a gift to President Gerald Ford from his daughter Susan, spent her days keeping him company in the Oval Office and splashing in the pool at Camp David.


A dream day in the life of a Golden Retriever
  A day at the lake or pond playing fetch would be a dream day in the making for this water-loving breed. Hanging out at the park with the whole family and even making a few new neighbor friends keep this pooch's tail wagging. For an extra-special day, going for a brisk run or walk on a cool day will keep a smile on this naturally happy breed.

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Sunday, August 17, 2014

Everything about your Pug

Everything about your Pug
  Pugs often are described as a lot of dog in a small space. These sturdy, compact dogs are a part of the American Kennel Club's Toy group, and are known as the clowns of the canine world because they have a great sense of humor and like to show off. Originally bred to be a lap dog, the Pug thrives on human companionship.
  The Pug is a breed of dog with a wrinkly, short-muzzled face and curled tail. The breed has a fine, glossy coat that comes in a variety of colours, although most often fawn or black, and a compact square body with well-developed muscles.
  Pugs were brought from China to Europe in the sixteenth century and were popularized in Western Europe by the House of Orange of the Netherlands, and the House of Stuart. Pugs as breeding animals may have contributed to the English Bulldog, the modern Pekingese and the King Charles Spaniel.
  Pugs remain popular into the twenty-first century, with some famous celebrity owners. A Pug was judged Best in Show at the World Dog Show in 2004.

Overview
  The Pug's comical face, with deep wrinkles around big, dark eyes and a flat round face, can't help but make you smile. It is believed that the Pug's name comes from the Latin word for "fist" because his face resembles a human fist.
  Pugs are clowns at heart, but they carry themselves with dignity. Pugs are playful dogs, ready and able for games, but they are also lovers, and must be close to their humans. Pugs love to be the center of attention, and are heartsick if ignored.
  Pugs are square and thickset, usually weighing no more than 20 pounds. Their heads are large and round, with large, round eyes. They have deep and distinct wrinkles on their faces. Legend has it that the Chinese, who mastered the breeding of this dog, prized these wrinkles because they resembled good luck symbols in their language. Especially prized were dogs with wrinkles that seemed to form the letters for the word "prince" in Chinese.
  The moles on a Pug's cheeks are called "beauty spots." His muzzle or mask is black, with a clearly defined "thumb mark" on the forehead and a black trace down the center of the back.    His ears are smooth, black and velvety. He has a characteristic undershot jaw and a tightly curled tail.
  Personality-wise, Pugs are happy and affectionate, loyal and charming, playful and mischievous. They are very intelligent, however, they can be willful, which makes training challenging.
  While Pugs can be good watchdogs, they aren't inclined to be "yappy," something your neighbors will appreciate. If trained and well-socialized, they get along well with other animals and children. Because they are a small, quiet breed and are relatively inactive when indoors, they are a good choice for apartment dwellers. Due to the flat shape of the Pug's face, he does not do well in extremely hot or cold weather, and should be kept indoors.
  Pugs have a short, double coat, and are known for shedding profusely. If you live with a Pug, it's a good idea to invest in a quality vacuum cleaner!

Other Quick Facts
  • The Pug is among the largest of the Toy breeds.
  • He's lively and loves everyone, and his alert nature makes him an excellent watchdog.
  • This breed snores and snorts, a by-product of his flat face. Learn to think of the noise as a lullaby.
Breed standards
AKC group: Toy Dog
UKC group: Companion Dog
Average lifespan: 12 - 14 years
Average size: 14 - 18 pounds
Coat appearance: Short, fine, smooth
Coloration: Fawn, apricot, silver and black
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Compact body frame; black face mask; wrinkles cover the face; tail is high-set and tightly curled
Possible alterations: None
Comparable Breeds: French Bulldog, Pekingese
Highlights
  • Pugs can be stubborn and difficult to housebreak. Crate training is recommended.
  • Pugs can't tolerate high heat and humidity because of a short muzzle. When your Pug is outdoors, watch him carefully for signs of overheating. Pugs are definitely housedogs and should not be kept outdoors.
  • Despite their short coats, Pugs shed a lot.
  • Pugs wheeze, snort and snore, loudly.
  • Because their eyes are so prominent, Pugs are prone to eye injuries.
  • Pugs are greedy eaters and will overeat if given the chance. Since they gain weight easily, they can quickly become obese if food intake isn't monitored carefully.
  • Pugs need human constant human companion. If you own a Pug, expect him to follow you around in the house, sit in your lap, and want to sleep in bed with you.
  • Pug enthusiasts are a fun-loving bunch. They love Pug get-togethers, Pug parades, and dressing up their Pugs.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
History
  Multum in Parvo, meaning "a lot in a little," is the official motto of the Pug and sums up its description. The Pug has had various names throughout the years, including Mopshond in Holland, Chinese or Dutch Pug in England, and Mops in Germany. But the word “pug” is thought to have come from the Latin pugnus, meaning fist and attributed to its clenched fist-like head, or from the 18th-century marmoset "pug" monkey, which purportedly appeared quite similar to the dog.
  Although its exact ancestry is not known, many consider the Pug as one of the first breeds miniaturized in Asia. China is the earliest known source of the breed, where Buddhist monasteries of Tibet favored the Pug as a pet. The Chinese considered the Pug's facial wrinkles an important feature of the breed, referring to it as the "prince mark" because of its similarity to the Chinese figure for prince.
  Brought to Holland by the Dutch East India Trading Company, a pug would become a pet to William I, the Prince of Orange in the mid 16th century. The Pug was also bestowed the position of the House of Orange official dog after one of its kind saved the life of William I by alarming him to the approach of an upcoming attack of Spaniards at Hermingny in 1572. Later, when William II landed at Torbay to be crowned King of England, his cortege included pugs, making the breed fashionable for generations.
 By 1790, the Pug had made its way to France. Most notably used by Josephine, wife of Napoleon, her pug, "Fortune," carried secret messages under his collar to Napoleon while she was confined in Les Carmes prison.
  In England, the Pug gained popularity during the Victorian era. These pugs sported cropped ears, which further enhanced their wrinkled expressions. And in 1885, the American Kennel Club would recognize the Pug. Since then, the Pug has become not only a popular show dog, but a wonderful family pet.



Temperament and Personality
  People may initially be attracted by the Pug’s unusual appearance, but they are quickly won over by his personality. He is a charming, fun-loving clown of a dog who doesn’t mind wearing a costume. It’s all in good fun, after all. Even dressed as a bumblebee, the Pug has a knack for retaining his dignity even while making people laugh.
  Pugs take well to training, too. That is, they will train you to spoil them appropriately. They love to eat, and it takes the strength of ten to resist a Pug’s pleading face when he wants one of your tater tots.
  Pugs have a reputation for being difficult to housetrain. But if you learn to read their body language, they will tell you when they need to go out.
Is the Pug perfect? Well, no, not always. Any dog, no matter how nice, can develop obnoxious levels of barking, digging, food stealing, and other undesirable behaviors if he is bored, untrained, or unsupervised.
  Start training your Pug puppy the day you bring him home. He is capable of soaking up everything you can teach him. Don’t wait until he is 6 months old to begin training or you will have a more headstrong dog to deal with. If possible, get him into puppy kindergarten class by the time he is 10 to 12 weeks old, and socialize, socialize, socialize. However, be aware that many puppy training classes require certain vaccines (like kennel cough) to be up to date, and many veterinarians recommend limited exposure to other dogs and public places until puppy vaccines (including rabies, distemper and parvovirus) have been completed. In lieu of formal training, you can begin training your puppy at home and socializing him among family and friends until puppy vaccines are completed.
  Talk to the breeder, describe exactly what you’re looking for in a dog, and ask for assistance in selecting a puppy. Breeders see their puppies daily and can make uncannily accurate recommendations once they know something about your lifestyle and personality.
  The perfect Pug doesn’t spring fully formed from the whelping box. He’s a product of his background and breeding. Whatever you want from a Pug, look for one whose parents have nice personalities and who has been well socialized from early puppyhood.


Health
  Since Pugs lack longer snouts and prominent skeletal brow ridges, they are susceptible to eye injuries such as proptosis, scratched corneas, and painful entropion. They also have compact breathing passageways, leaving many prone to breathing difficulties or unable to efficiently regulate their temperature through evaporation from the tongue by panting. A Pug's normal body temperature is between 101 °F (38 °C) and 102 °F (39 °C). If this temperature rises to 105 °F (41 °C), oxygen demand is greatly increased and immediate cooling is required. If body temperature reaches 108 °F (42 °C), organ failure can occur. Their breathing problems can be worsened by the stresses of travelling in air cargo, which may involve high temperatures. Following the deaths of Pugs and other brachycephalic breeds, several airlines either banned their transport in cargo or enacted seasonal restrictions.
  Pugs that live a mostly sedentary life can be prone to obesity, though this is avoidable with regular exercise and a healthy diet. The median life span of Pugs is 11 years, which is in line with other breeds of the same size.

Care
  Coat care for the Pug is minimal, requiring only occasional brushing to remove the dog's dead hair. Meanwhile, regular cleaning and drying is necessary to prevent skin infections, especially in the dog's facial wrinkles.
  As far as exercise requirements, the Pug's needs can be met daily with a moderate leash-led walk or an energetic game. Sensitive to humidity and heat, the Pug should be kept indoors. The breed is also prone to snoring and wheezing because of their flat, small muzzles.

Living Conditions
  The Pug is good for apartment life. It is relatively inactive indoors and will do okay without a yard. Cannot withstand hot or cold weather and should be kept indoors at a comfortable temperature.

Exercise
  Pugs are strong dogs with short, straight legs. They need to be taken on daily walks. While out on the walk the dog must be made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as instinct tells a dog the leader leads the way, and that leader needs to be the human. They enjoy energetic games and will keep in better health if given regular exercise. But be careful not to overdo it, especially if you see them start to wheeze.

Grooming
  Grooming a Pug’s coat is easy. Brush his smooth double coat weekly with a rubber curry brush to remove dead hair. And you will remove lots of it, because Pugs shed. A lot. They shed year-round, so it’s something you should expect to live with.
  The Pug’s facial wrinkles, especially the deep nose roll, must be cleaned. Each Pug is an individual, so you may have to clean them daily or only weekly. Wipe out the crud with a dampened cosmetic sponge or baby wipe, then thoroughly dry the wrinkles so they don’t mildew or become infected, a condition known to Pug people as “swamp face.”
  Bathe the Pug as needed. With the gentle dog shampoos available now, you can bathe a Pug weekly if you want without harming his coat.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails every week or two, and brush his teeth often — with a vet-approved pet toothpaste — for good overall health and fresh breath.

Is this breed right for you?
  Pugs make the best family pets — just make sure your toddler knows the difference between hugging and squeezing for the sake of those bulging Pug eyes. This breed requires low levels of exercise and makes a great apartment dweller. Although Pugs don't require multiple daily walks, they live for constant companionship. Pugs thrive with lots of human interaction so busy bees and travel enthusiasts might choose to opt out. Despite their short coat, Pugs shed like crazy so get ready to find little Pug hairs everywhere. Allergy suffers and neat freaks, this may not be the breed for you.
Children and other pets
Pugs love kids. Though small, the Pug is not delicate like some toy breeds, so he is a good breed choice for families with children. However, children who want an active pet to retrieve balls or play soccer will be disappointed with a Pug. Adults should always supervise interactions between children and pets.
Properly trained and socialized, the Pug enjoys the companionship of dogs, and can be trusted with cats, rabbits, and other animals.

Did You Know?
  Among the Pug’s rich and famous admirers are King Louis XIV; Josephine, empress to Napoleon; Queen Victoria; the Duke and Duchess of Windsor; and fashion designer Valentino.

A dream day in the life of a Pug
  No other dog provides a cuddlier shoulder to lean on as loyal Pugs make themselves available to you through thick and thin. They live to make you laugh with a mere glance at their goofy faces and their little curly tails. With an equally comical personality, don't count on this breed to sit in silence for too long; snorting, snoring and a multitude of questionable noises complete the Pug package and are a sure sign of a perfect day in the making.

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Tuesday, June 17, 2014

Everything about your Pomeranian

Everything about your Pomeranian
  The Pomeranian is a cocky, animated companion with an extroverted personality. This compact little dog is an active toy breed with an alert character and fox-like expression. Today, the Pomeranian is a popular companion dog and competitive show dog. They can come in all colors, patterns, and variations although orange and red are the most popular.
   Pomeranians are little dogs with “big dog” personalities. While lively, friendly and fun, they can be slightly territorial. They grow very attached to their owners and can develop a protectiveness that makes them suspicious of strangers. This not only makes for a loyal, tried-and-true companion, it makes for a superb watchdog. Pomeranians, though small, can really deliver on the barks when a stranger approaches the house.
  Descended from large sled dog breeds, the now-tiny Pomeranian has a long and interesting history. The foxy-faced dog, nicknamed "the little dog who thinks he can," is compact, active, and capable of competing in agility and obedience or simply being a family friend.

Overview
  Pomeranians are the tiniest of the Spitz, or Nordic, breeds, but they have the courage of much bigger dogs. A perennially popular breed, the Pom weighs less than 7 pounds, but you won’t often find him in a puppy purse. That’s because Pomeranians think big. They know they have four feet and prefer to use them, just as larger dogs would.
  Everything about the Pomeranian is bright: his eyes, his temperament, and his intelligence. Though he’s very fond of his family and delighted to get some lap time, he’s also a busy little guy. You’re more likely to find him trotting around your house on an important mission than snoozing on the sofa.
  The Pom’s activity level makes him an ideal pet for someone who wants a small dog with the personality traits of the full-size sled and herding dogs from which this breed originates. Because he’s tiny, he can probably get enough exercise indoors, but he’s happiest when he gets to go on long walks, chase leaves, and play with other small dogs. He is athletic and frequently participates in dog sports such as agility, freestyle, obedience, rally, and tracking. Because of his diminutive size, he is suited to life in an apartment, but he is just as at home on a ranch or estate. However, he’s far too tiny to live outdoors. He needs to live inside with his family.
  Pomeranians have a profuse double coat that needs regular brushing but are otherwise easy to care for. And, make no mistake, Poms bark. It may not be deafening, but it can be annoying and difficult to stop, even with training. As with many small dogs, Pomeranians may be harder to housetrain.
  Ask your breeder about any behavior or health problems in dogs related to your prospective puppy. If she says there aren’t any, run. She should provide you with written documentation from the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) that the parents of the puppy had normal hips, elbows, and knees, as well as from the Canine Eye Registry Foundation (CERF), certifying that they were free of vision problems.
  A Pomeranian can go to his new home at 8 to 10 weeks of age, but some breeders like to keep pups until they are 12 to 14 weeks old to make sure they are mature enough to go to their new homes and to see which ones will shake out as show prospects.

Highlights
  • Pomeranians often are suspicious of strangers and can bark a lot.
  • Pomeranians can be difficult to housetrain. Crate training is recommended.
  • High heat and humidity can cause your Pom to become overheated and possibly have heat stroke. When your Pom is outdoors, watch him carefully for signs of overheating and take him inside immediately. They definitely are housedogs and should not be kept outdoors.
  • While Poms are good with children, they are not a good choice for very young or highly active children because of their small size. Never let your small children and your Pom play without supervision.
  • Because they are so small, Poms can be perceived as prey by owls, eagles, hawks, coyotes, and other wild animals. Never leave them outside unattended, and be watchful if there are predatory birds in your location. If this is the case, stay close to your Pom to discourage birds from trying to carry them off!
  • Because they are small and attractive, Poms are targets for dognappers, another reason why you shouldn't leave them outside unattended, even in a fenced yard.
  • Although they are small, Poms don't seem to realize it and can have a "big dog" attitude. This can spell disaster if they decide to chase a bigger dog that they think is encroaching upon their territory, or if they jump from a high place. It's up to you to make sure that your little one doesn't harm himself due to not realizing his limitations.
  • When your Pom gets old, he may develop bald spots in his beautiful coat.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Breed standards
AKC group: Toy Dog
UKC group: Companion Dog
Average lifespan: 12 - 15 years
Average size:  4 - 6 pounds
Coat appearance: Harsh, thick, dense
Coloration: Varies
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Other identifiers: Compact, square body frame; tiny pointed ears stand erect; high-set feathered tail
Possible alterations: None
Comparable Breeds: Papillon, Yorkshire Terrier

Other Quick Facts
  • The breed became popular in 1888 after Queen Victoria fell in love with a Pom while vacationing in Italy.
  • Pomeranians have a thick, beautiful coat that comes in many colors and patterns, and they are easy to groom.
  • Pomeranians get along well with other pets but should be protected from rambunctious children.

History
  The forerunners of today's Pomeranian breed were large working dogs from the Arctic regions. These dogs are commonly known as the Wolfspitz or Spitz type, which is German for "sharp point" which was the term originally used by Count Eberhard zu Sayn in the 16th Century as a reference to the features of the dog's nose and muzzle. The Pomeranian is considered to be descended from the German Spitz.
  The breed is thought to have acquired its name by association with the area known as Pomerania which is located in northern Poland and Germany along the Baltic Sea. Although not the origin of the breed, this area is credited with the breeding which led to the original Pomeranian type of dog. Proper documentation was lacking until the breed's introduction into the United Kingdom.
  An early modern recorded reference to the Pomeranian breed is from 2 November 1764, in a diary entry in James Boswell's Boswell on the Grand Tour: Germany and Switzerland. "The Frenchman had a Pomeranian dog named Pomer whom he was mighty fond of." The offspring of a Pomeranian and a wolf bred by an animal merchant from London is discussed in Thomas Pennant's A Tour in Scotland from 1769.
  Two members of the British Royal Family influenced the evolution of the breed. In 1767, Queen Charlotte, Queen-consort of King George III of England, brought two Pomeranians to England. Named Phoebe and Mercury, the dogs were depicted in paintings by Sir Thomas Gainsborough. These paintings depicted a dog larger than the modern breed, reportedly weighing as much as 14–23 kg, but showing modern traits such as the heavy coat, ears and a tail curled over the back.
  Queen Victoria, Queen Charlotte's granddaughter, was also an enthusiast and established a large breeding kennel. One of her favoured dogs was a comparatively small red sable Pomeranian which she named "Windor's Marco" and was reported to weigh only 5.4 kg. When she first exhibited Marco in 1891, it caused the smaller type Pomeranian to become immediately popular and breeders began selecting only the smaller specimens for breeding.   During her lifetime, the size of the Pomeranian breed was reported to have decreased by 50%. Queen Victoria worked to improve and promote the Pomeranian breed by importing smaller Pomeranians of different colors from various European countries to add to her breeding program. Royal owners during this period also included Joséphine de Beauharnais, the wife of Napoleon I of France, and King George IV of England.
  The first breed club was set up in England in 1891, and the first breed standard was written shortly afterwards. The first member of the breed was registered in America to the American Kennel Club in 1898, and it was recognized in 1900.
In 1912, two Pomeranians were among only three dogs to survive the sinking of RMS Titanic. A Pomeranian called "Lady", owned by Miss Margaret Hays, escaped with her owner in lifeboat number seven, while Elizabeth Barrett Rothschild took her pet to safety with her in lifeboat number six.
  Glen Rose Flashaway won the Toy Group at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show in 1926, the first Pomeranian to win a group at Westminster. It would take until 1988 for the first Pomeranian, "Great Elms Prince Charming II", to win the Best in Show prize from the Westminster Kennel Club.
  In the standard published in 1998, the Pomeranian is included in the German Spitz standard, along with the Keeshond, by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale. According to the standard "Spitz breeds are captivating" and have a "unique characteristic, cheeky appearance."
  The Pomeranian has been among the more popular dog breeds in the United States, featuring consistently in the top 20 of registered AKC dog breeds over the last 10 years. The breed ranked 17 in the 2011 rankings, dropping two spots from the previous year.
It is not listed in the top 20 breeds in the UK in either 2007 or 2008. In Australia their popularity has declined since 1986, with a peak of 1128 Pomeranians registered with the Australian National Kennel Council in 1987; only 577 were registered in 2008. However, this is an increase from 2004, when only 491 dogs were registered.



Personality
 The Pomeranian has a proud and glamorous appearance with a personality to match. He’s an extrovert who is clever and lively. It’s hard to appear in public with a Pom and not attract attention. The adorable little dogs with the dark, almond-shaped eyes and alert, happy expression are tiny but intrepid. They have a take-charge temperament and tend not to be fearful of strangers or other animals. For more than a century, the Pom has had a well-deserved reputation for being a great watchdog. He may weigh only a few pounds, but he views himself as absolute guardian of his home and family.
  The perfect little Pom is calm and easy to live with. He enjoys sitting in your lap and giving kisses. He is busy but doesn’t bounce off the walls. That said, Poms do like to bark. Start early and be consistent if you plan to teach him the “No bark” or “Quiet” command.
  Poms may look like toys, but they are not good pets for young children. They are too delicate to be handled roughly, and they prefer the company of adults.
  Housetraining does not always come easy to Poms. They can be stubborn about going outside to potty, especially if it’s rainy or cold outside. As a compromise, consider paper-training a Pom so that you both have options when the weather is bad.

Right Breed for You?
  Pomeranians make excellent companions for all households. Due to the size and frame of Pomeranians, it's important to watch this breed around young children to ensure they are handled properly. Owners of this energetic breed must be able to provide time for daily exercise and playtime. Their pocket-size frames make Pomeranians very suitable for apartment dwellers provided they can get their pets out for frequent walks. Potential owners should be ready to love being surrounded by luscious locks of Pomeranian fur, as this breed is very prone to shedding.

Health 
Pomeranians are prone to dislocated patella (kneecap), slipped stifle, heart problems, eye infections, skin irritations and tooth decay and early loss. It is recommended that they are fed dry dog food or crunchy Milk Bones daily to help keep the teeth and gums in good condition. Newborn Pom puppies are very tiny and fragile. Three newborns can be held in the palm of one’s hand. Dams on the smaller side often need to deliver by cesarean section. When the dog is old it may become molted with bald spots.

Care
  Pomeranians are very active indoors and are good choices for apartment dwellers and people without a fenced yard. They have a moderate activity level and will enjoy several short daily walks or play times.
   They are remarkably hearty and enjoy longer walks, but always keep in mind that they are small and sensitive to heat. They love to play and can get bored easily, so be sure to give them lots of toys and rotate them frequently so there's always something new. They especially enjoy toys that challenge them.
  One activity that both you and your Pom will enjoy is trick training. Poms love to learn new things and enjoy being the center of attention, so teaching them tricks is a perfect way to bond with them while providing them with exercise and mental stimulation.
  They have a short attention span, so keep training sessions brief and fun. Reward your Pom with praise, treats, or play whenever he correctly performs a command or does something else you like.

Grooming
  Pomeranians have what is called a double coat. The undercoat is soft and dense; the outer coat is long and straight with a course texture.
  Thanks to their small size, Pomeranians are easy to groom, even with all that coat. Brush the coat a few times a week to prevent mats or tangles. Use a medium to harsh slicker brush that will get down to the skin without hurting the dog.
  You may have heard that Poms don’t shed. Forget that. They do. Luckily, they are small enough that the amount of hair they lose is negligible. If you brush your Pom regularly, shedding shouldn’t be a big issue.
  Bathe a Pom every couple of months or more often as needed. If you use a gentle dog shampoo, you can even bathe a Pom as often as once or twice a week if you want.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the toenails every week or two. They should never get long enough to clack on the floor. Brush teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good dental health and fresh breath.

Living Conditions
  The Pomeranian is good for apartment living. These dogs are very active indoors and will do okay without a yard. Be careful they do not overheat in hot weather.

Exercise
  Poms need a daily walk. Play will take care of a lot of their exercise needs, however, as with all breeds, play will not fulfill their primal instinct to walk. Dogs that do not get to go on daily walks are more likely to display behavior problems. They will also enjoy a good romp in a safe, open area off lead, such as a large, fenced-in yard.
Children and other pets
  The bold and active Pomeranian loves to play, but he's best suited to a home with older children who can be trusted to handle him carefully. Many breeders refuse to sell puppies to homes with very young children, for good reason. Sturdy though he is, the diminutive Pom is all too easily injured if he's accidentally dropped or stepped on by a clumsy child.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Pomeranians can get along great with cats and other animals, especially if they're raised with them. Protect them from bigger dogs. Poms don't realize just how small they are, and they have no fear of challenging bigger dogs.

Did You Know?
  The original Pomeranians weighed 20 to 30 pounds — much larger than the Pom that we know and love today.
A dream day in the life of a Pomeranian
  The adorable Pom knows its own cuteness and demands constant pampering and attention, but one look at that face and you'll be happy to oblige. These petite partners are known for big, full and spunky hair, fit to match their equally boisterous personalities. Pampering a Pomeranian with weekly brushings and frequent trips to the groomer is a must to keep them happy. This happy-go-lucky pup loves socializing as much as she loves curling up on a warm lap, and a day of play and cuddles would make for time well spent.



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