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Showing posts with label outdoors. Show all posts
Showing posts with label outdoors. Show all posts

Tuesday, January 17, 2017

Everything about your Appenzeller Sennenhund

Everything about your Appenzeller Sennenhund
  The Appenzeller originated as an all-around farm dog breed, who stayed busy herding the livestock, guarding the farm, and pulling carts in his native Switzerland. Today’s Appenzellers have still got the energy, smarts, and self-confidence that makes for valuable working dogs — but they’re anything but low-maintenance. Dogs of this breed need lots of exercise, training, and a job to do.

Overview
  Also known as the Appenzeller Mountain Dog and Appenzell Cattle Dog, the Appenzeller Sennenhunde is the rarest of the four ancient Swiss mountain dog breeds. The breed gets its name from the Swiss herders known as the Senn and Appenzell region of the Swiss Alps to which this breed is native.
  Like its cousins the Entlebucher, the Greater Swiss Mountain Dog and the Bernese Mountain Dog, the Appenzeller is a well-muscled and powerfully built dog. Although a medium-sized dog, it is extremely strong and is capable of pulling small carts and trolleys and working as an all-purpose farm dog. Appenzeller’s have a thick double-coat that is black, brown and white in color and its ears are high set and floppy.
  Appenzellers are an extremely hard working breed and require a great deal of physical and mental exercise to remain happy and healthy. Although an excellent herder and guarder of livestock, their high maintenance and high exercise requirements have not made them overly popular in the United States.

Breed standards
Dog Breed Group: Herding Dogs
Height: 1 foot, 7 inches to 1 foot, 10 inches tall at the shoulder
Weight: 48 to 55 pounds
Life Span: 9 to 12 years
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles, houses with backyards, farms and rural areas
Temperament: Lively, self-assured, fearless, reliable
Comparable Breeds: Entlebucher Mountain Dog, Greater Swiss Mountain Dog

History 
  The Appenzeller Sennenhund is descended from the general Sennenhund type which may have existed in antiquity, or descended from "cattle dogs left there by the Romans", but the first breed club for the breed was founded and the stud book for the breed started in 1906 by Albert Heim and others, who wrote the first breed standard in 1916. An early reference to the breed's predecessors was made in an 1853 book, "Tierleben der Alpenwelt" (Animal Life in the Alps), referring to dogs in the Appenzell region. The Appenzeller Sennenhund was only recognised internationally as a separate breed in 1989.
  The Appenzeller Sennenhund was originally kept primarily as a cattle herding dog, and a flock guardian. It was also used as a draft dog, and general farm dog. The breed also was known for its affinity to both herd and guard with such devotion that they would give their life to protect their charge. Today the breed is primarily kept as a companion, and excels in agility/flyball competitions, obedience competitions and Schutzhund. They are also still used in many places as working cattle dogs even now. They are highly intelligent, and learn quickly.


Temperament
  The Appenzeller's working roots are still very obvious in today's dogs. Appenzeller Mountain Dogs are exuberant, willful, playful, intelligent and loyal. While they are wary of strangers, they are very affectionate with their families and make excellent guard dogs and family dogs.

Health Problems
  The Appenzeller is an extremely healthy breed of dog with little to no hereditary health issues. This is quite rare for a breed of this size.


Living Conditions
  The Appenzell Mountain Dog is not recommended for apartment life. They prefer to live outdoors and should have acreage where they can run free, such as a farm. Appenzells that do not have acreage need extra attention to their mental and physical exercise needs. They like to bark, so they are not suited for areas with close neighbors, however giving them the proper amount of leadership and exercise can lessen their urge to bark.

Training
  Appenzellers are an extremely intelligent breed and can learn new tasks quickly. However, they are also capable of independent thinking and require owners that can demonstrate loving but firm leadership, consistently. If an owner is meek or unsure, these dogs can quickly assume the role of the pack leader and start trying to dictate terms. This can be dangerous considering the dog’s size and strength. For this reason, Appenzellers are not recommended as a dog breed for first-time owners.
Exercise Requirements
  Appenzellers were bred to work hard throughout the day, and ensuring that they have enough physical and mental exercise is an important aspect of being a responsible Appenzeller owner. Like all working dogs, Appenzellers too require a ‘meaningful’ task that they can apply themselves to each day. When denied of such a job, they can often turn moody and neurotic and can develop various undesirable behaviors.

Grooming
  Appenzeller Sennenhunds are a generally low-maintenance breed.  They do not require professional grooming, only a regular brushing.  Other than that, only those routine maintenance procedures that every breed needs, such as nail clipping and teeth brushing, are necessary.  Appenzeller Sennenhunds do shed, and they can shed very, very heavily.   This shedding is usually worst when the seasons change and the dog changes coats.   Regular brushing will help reduce shedding, but this breed is still more than capable of covering clothes, furniture, and carpets with hair.
Is this breed right for you?
  If you love the great outdoors, enjoy physical activities like hiking, jogging and long games of fetch, and have previous experience with herding dogs, then the Appenzeller could be the perfect dog for you. These dogs are still rare in the States, so if you want your loyal companion to stand out from the crowd, bring an Appenzeller Mountain Dog home today.




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Saturday, November 22, 2014

Winter Activities That Are Fun for Your Dog

Winter Activities That Are Fun for Your Dog
  The nights are colder, the days are shorter and your dog's favorite chew toy is buried under ten inches of snow. What a perfect day to play with your dog. While not all dogs care for snow in the same way, they all still need regular exercise to stay fit and healthy for life. Here are few games you can try to help boost your dog's energy and fitness level over the next few winter months.

  Winter weather shouldn't be an excuse to hibernate. There are tons of fun winter activities you can do with your dog - inside and out. If you want a happy dog, give him regular exercise, after all it will be good for both of you! 

Snowed in? Keep your pup stimulated

  Dogs are meant to be outdoors, love being outdoors, live for being outdoors. Keeping your dog well-exercised will help you both keep your sanity. Regardless of the season, professional dog behaviorist Nicola Anderson, suggests daily stimulation for your pet. I often recommend doing some basic obedience exercises with your dog – just about 10 minutes a day.

Play a game with your dog.

  Hide-and-seek is a wonderful way to get your dog up and moving and mentally engaged. You can hide a treat or her favorite toy, but it’s better to make her come find you. Start by throwing a treat to get her to go away from you, and then hide in another part of the house. This game can really tire your pup out as she rushes around searching, and it’s good for reinforcing the “come” command.

Treasure Hunt

  Try burying a stick, toy or even a treat in the snow. Then sit back and watch his natural tracking instinct kick in. For dogs that require a bit of help finding their reward, try hiding the object closer to your dog at first, then slowly burying it further away the better your dog gets at the game.

Skijoring

  Another fun activity is Skijoring, an activity where all that is required is you, your dog, and a pair of skis. Even small dogs will enjoy this outdoor activity.

Cross country skiing is a popular activity all throughout the snowbelt. Bring your dog along to enjoy the experience, and you’ll find he’s just as excited to help pull you along the trail. That’s what Skijoring is all about!

Challenge your dog’s nose.

  Dogs have incredibly powerful scenting abilities, so exercises that require your pal to use her nose are especially stimulating. Make her work for her dinner by creating an obstacle course she has to get through to find her food. Hide her meal in a box, or, better yet, put it in a Kong Wobbler or a Buster Ball.

Fetch, Catch and Beyond

  If your dog loves to fetch or catch rubber balls chances are he will love trying to do the same with snowball. Fair warning dogs really love this game so be prepared to make a large stockpile of snowballs, and be careful not to pack the show too much.

Tracking - Sniff in all that cold winter air and train your dog to track scents.
  Tracking is like a game for dogs...hide-and-seek. Tracking challenges a dog's problem solving skills and keeps their keen sense of smell active. It also rewarding when they successfully track a scent. Call a local trainer or find a good tracking training book to get started.

Tracking - Sniff in all that cold winter air and train your dog to track scents. 
  Tracking is like a game for dogs...hide-and-seek. Tracking challenges a dog's problem solving skills and keeps their keen sense of smell active. It also rewarding when they successfully track a scent. Call a local trainer or find a good tracking training book to get started.

Snow Shoe
  If the snow isn't outrageously deep, you can always have your dog join you for a snowshoe walk. Keep in mind you may have to leash your dog so be aware of the local park or trail bylaws.

  Some popular people activities are simply too dangerous to try to include your dog. While cross-country skiing seems passive and relaxing enough, skis are fun to chase for dogs and your pet may end up injuring himself.


Don’t be a wimp…get outdoors!

  Most bigger dogs love snow, and they can get a great workout by plowing through it. Spend 30 to 40 minutes in the snow, and your dog will get a workout that leaves her exhausted—and her muscles toned. When you come in, be sure to wash your dog’s paws to clean off any salt.



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Wednesday, April 2, 2014

Spring tips for dogs

Spring tips for dogs
  Spring is here!! And that means it’s time to get off the couch, grab the leash and get outside with your dog. I cannot think of a more exciting time of year for us humans or our canine friends when everything is blooming and hope springs eternal . And speaking of Spring, we’ve got lots of new articles to spring on ya that will also hopefully help you out as you dive into warmer weather.
  Dogs tend to love spring because they get to spend more time outdoors. After being cooped up during the winter it is a joy for them to be able to take advantage of the lengthening and warming days to release all of their pent up winter energy. It is equally joyful for us watching our dogs have a good time. However the warmer days bring about certain health concerns so take a moment and make sure your dog is fully prepared for spring.

Depending on where you live mosquitoes start becoming more active. 

  Generally heartworm preventative medication should be given year round to prevent infection because mosquitoes thrive year round in many parts of the country and as our climate continues to warm mosquitoes tend to stay active longer each year. Despite this some pet owners do not give heartworm preventatives in the winter so spring is a good time of year to make sure your dog has been checked for heartworm and is current on his heartworm preventative medication. The cost of heartworm preventative medication is a bargain when compared to how much it costs to treat heartworm disease

Ticks and fleas become more prevalent .
  There are a variety of products available to combat these nuisances, so ask your veterinarian which one is best for your dog. Start early as preventing ticks and fleas from becoming a problem is far easier than dealing with a major flea infestation and get into the habit of regularly checking your dog for ticks. Ticks are typically found around the head, on the ears, neck, chest and forelegs although they can be found anywhere. Usually it is easier to find them by feeling for them instead of looking depending on how long your dog’s coat is.

Save the Sticks
  Sticks — now readily available after the winter thaw — can cause choking and severe injuries in dog’s mouths and throats. (Read the Daily Mail article: “How throwing Fido a stick could kill him.”) So if your dog likes to chew and chase, pack a Frisbee, tennis ball or other toy instead.

Keep Fido Away from New Plants
  Many dogs like to eat grass, but if your dog likes to chew on other plants, now’s the time to get out your plant guide. Some native plants can cause vomiting, diarrhea or even death, so before you let your pooch chomp down on those leafy greens, check out this guide to toxic and non-toxic plants.

Achoo! Does Your Dog Have Allergies?
Does your dog have itchy skin all of a sudden? Is she sneezing more than usual? Here are some tips to help you look for allergy symptoms in your dog and also some remedies to help you get your pet feeling better in no time.
April fools is right around the corner but no reason to fool around when it comes to your dog. Go ahead and enjoy the warmer weather with your dog on a walk tonight – he will be so thankful. In fact, he might even jump for joy!


Spring is a good time to check and make sure your dog’s vaccinations are up to date.
 Dog to dog contact increases in the spring and continues on into the Summer months. Your dog is exposed to more infectious diseases during this time of year. For example many veterinary clinics start to see increased incidence of kennel cough in the spring because of increasing dog-to-dog contact.

Use Pet-Friendly Products for Spring Cleaning
Spring cleaning is the perfect occasion to review your cleaning product’s pet-friendliness. If the bottles do not say their contents is dog-safe, it’s best to keep these products where your dog can’t get them. If your dog does ingest a household cleaner, the Chicago Veterinary Medical Association recommends you, “do not call a human poison control center; they do not have any information on pets. Instead, contact your veterinarian and/or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center Hotline (888-426-4435) for accurate information.”

Hide the Antifreeze
 Cars use antifreeze year-round, so you always need to stay vigilant to keep your pup safe. Many dogs like the taste of antifreeze because it’s sweet, but it’s also deadly. Learn more about preventing antifreeze poisoning here and contact your vet immediately if you suspect your dog’s been exposed.

Prevent Dog-Park Bullying By Knowing the Signs
  As the weather gets warmer, you may be bringing your dog to the dog park more often. Make sure it’s a safe and fun time for all by knowing the symptoms of bullying and how to deal with them. Learn these simple tips for spotting and preventing dog-park bullying and know how to stop a dog fight before it starts.

Keep Artificial Sweeteners Away from Your Dog
  Easter’s right around the corner and that means plenty of chocolate and other dangerous dog treats. Keep your pup safe as you celebrate spring by keeping all sweets, candies and gum away from your dog. While many people know about the dangers of chocolate, only a small amount of the common artificial sweetener xylitol can be deadly.

With spring rains come spring mud, keep your dog’s feet dry and your house clean by keeping a towel near the door and perhaps in your car as well.

Spring means fun times for dogs  so pick up the leash and go for a walk or hit the dog park. You are bound to notice a little spring in your dog’s steps.


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