LUV My dogs: old dog

LUV My dogs

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Showing posts with label old dog. Show all posts
Showing posts with label old dog. Show all posts

Thursday, May 7, 2015

Why Should I Adopt a Senior Dog?

Why Should I Adopt a Senior Dog?
  If you are considering adding another four-legged family member to your household, please consider adopting a senior canine. In addition to giving a wonderful animal a new lease on life, you may be surprised at how many benefits there are to choosing an older dog over a young pup.

What exactly is a "senior" dog?
  Exactly when a dog is considered a senior depends on his size and his related life span. Smaller dogs, which tend to live longer than larger breeds, can often live well into their teens. Larger breeds and breed mixes typically have shorter lives but can still live more than a decade. In general, a dog is classified as a senior when he enters the final third of his projected life span. 
  It's sadder still to know many of these pets will never leave the shelter... unless more adoptive families are willing to give them a second look.


1. Be a Hero
  By adopting an older dog, you are fighting for the value and beauty of life at all ages and stages. Shelters are frequently overcrowded and older dogs are often among the first to be euthanized. By choosing an older animal you are truly saving a life. It’s heroic to see beauty and love where others often don’t even bother looking and give and older dog a second chance to live out the rest of his or her life with dignity and love.

2. Easy to Train
  Think you can’t teach an old dog new tricks? Hogwash! Older dogs are great at focusing on you—and on the task at hand—because they’re calmer than youngsters. Plus, all those years of experience reading humans can help them quickly figure out how to do what you’re asking.

3. Older dogs have manners. 
  Unlike puppies, many grown-up dogs have spent years living with a family and being socialized to life with humans. 
  They may have received obedience training and respond to commands like Sit, Stay, and Down. 
  Many are house trained and it takes a matter of hours or a day or two to help them learn the potty rules in their new home.

4. You can teach an old dog new tricks
  Dogs can be trained at any age and older dogs are just as smart as younger ones. Older dogs have a greater attention span than a puppy, which make them easier to train.

5. Fewer Surprises
  Older dogs are a known commodity, easy to assess for size and temperament. You won’t be wondering just exactly how big they’ll grow, and you’ll know who the dog is: aloof, friendly, or shy, so it’s easier to decide how the senior you choose will fit into your family and your lifestyle.

6. Your furniture…and carpet…will thank you
 Older dogs are more likely to be housebroken and have doggie manners. If their training is still a bit lacking, they have the physical and mental abilities to pick up skills fast, unlike puppies. Seniors also are much less likely to be destructive chewers.

7. Instant Companionship
   Most senior dogs have already been socialized and learned what it takes to get along with humans, and often with other pets. You can skip a lot of the training and socialization that puppies require and just get to the cuddling. Older dogs know the routine, when you open the car door they jump right in. They know what the word “walk” means or “treat” so you can have more meaningful interactions with your older dog without years of training. The reward for spending time with your new senior companion is the quick bond you create that builds a special future together.


8. You can custom order your senior pet
  If you're looking for a short-haired cat, for example, or a kitty with no history of dental disease, you can search until you find an older pet with exactly those attributes. If you already have a cat and need your adoptive dog to get along with cats, again, you'll have a much better chance of finding an older adoptive dog who is a perfect companion for your family.

9.They know how to walk on a leash.
  Leash manners are always a top priority for dog owners. Younger dogs are more eager, energetic, and less relaxed. If you want to take a nice calm evening stroll, having a senior dog as a walking buddy might better suit your needs.

10. They’re CUTE!
Need we say more?

 

  These are only some of the reasons that a senior dog makes a wonderful companion for you and your family.
  Find your best friend; adopt a senior dog!
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Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Introducing Your New Dog To Your Old Dogs

Introducing Your New Dog To Your Old Dogs
  The introduction of unfamiliar dogs to other dogs may be a perilous journey. This can be very stressful for the dogs and the owners. But to help alleviate this stress, we must understand why the introduction is difficult for our dogs .
  Maybe you have heard of children fighting over the attention of their parents or a toddler developing sibling rivalry with the new baby on the way. Conflicts and competition between siblings is referred to as sibling rivalry. It can be very irritating to watch. If you're a parent, seeing your kids fight with one another over small things can be very taxing. Did you know that this kind of competition can also happen between dogs? This normally happens when you bring home a new puppy. Your will notice your old dog becoming jealous over your new pet. Having that said, it is important to introduce properly the new dog to your resident dog or packs. How? Here's how you can make the transition easier for you and your pets.
  Maximizing the potential for a great relationship between your new dog and your current dog is a two-step process. It involves the actual introduction and then management of the new dog in your home. We’ll start with introductions and then give you guidelines for helping your dogs through the initial transition weeks of being together in your home.

Step1. Take Your Dog To A Park With The Other Dogs

  Go for a walk and take your old dogs with you. Go to a nearby park where the other dogs are hanging out. Observe how your dogs gets along with the other packs. Take note and address any belligerent behaviors that your dogs are showing. If there are, it may not be the best time to present a new pet in the family. You may want to address first your old dogs' aggressive behavior problems. If your dog is able to relate well with the other dogs, it shows that they are ready ready for the new addition to the family.

Step2. Prepare For The Arrival Of The New Dog.
  Plan and prepare the things that your new pet will need like a bed, crate, food and chew toys. During the first weeks at home, you cannot expect your resident dogs to allotment what they have with the new dog.

Step3. Before Taking Home The New Pet

  Before bringing home the new dog, make sure to visit the new dog at least once in a while. You can bring something with you like an old bedclothes from home. This will acquaint your new pet with the odors of his new life with you. Take the item back to your home and let your old dogs smell the blanket. This will give them an idea about the smell of the new dog.

Step4. Arrival Of The New Pet

  Bond with your resident dogs before you pick up the new addition to the family. Embrace your dogs, feed them, and talk to them. When picking up your new pet, wear the same clothes that you wear when you bond with your old dogs. The new dog will smell the scent of your other dogs on your clothes. This will give him an idea of what is in store for him. If possible, have another person drive you home. Do not bring your old packs with you too. This will allow you to bond with your new pet.

Step5. Find A Neutral Location To Introduce Your Dogs

  Dogs are territorial animals. Make sure that you introduce the dogs in a neutral location like a park or neighbor's front yard so that the new dog will not look like an intruder. Each dog must be on leashes and if possible, must be handled by a separate person.

Step6. Observe The Dogs When Being Introduced

  Briefly, let the dogs sniff each other. This is a normal dog greeting behavior. As they are exploring the new dog, introduce the dogs using a happy and friendly inflection. Do not allow them to sniff too long because it can escalate an aggressive behavior. Give positive remarks to your old dogs if they show good behavior.

Step7. Taking The Dogs Home

  Once you examine them tolerating one another, you can take them home. Depending on the size of the dogs, you can take them in one car or separate cars. Make sure that you have other people accompanying you if you will drive them in one car.

  After what seems like an eternity but is really only about three weeks, you'll begin to notice some signs of harmony between the dog and the puppy. If you have done your part helping the dog and puppy develop their communication skills, this is the beginning of a fabulous friendship—or at least a peaceful co-existence. Not all dogs love each another, so don't be disappointed if your dog doesn't fall head over heels in love with the new dog in the house. There is enough love for both, and comfortable cohabitation is a fine accomplishment.

  Indeed, introducing a dog to your resident dogs is not an easy task. Just be patient and don't give up. If you have problem introducing your dogs, you can contact a professional animal behaviorist for assistance.

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