LUV My dogs: non-sporting

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Showing posts with label non-sporting. Show all posts
Showing posts with label non-sporting. Show all posts

Friday, December 9, 2016

Everything about your Lhasa Apso

Everything about your Lhasa Apso
  The Apso, as he’s known in his homeland of Tibet, is dignified yet mischievous. His alert and somewhat suspicious nature make him an excellent watchdog, and indeed that was his purpose for centuries. He has a long, flowing coat that requires extensive grooming.

Overview
  Hailing from the Himalayan Mountains, the Lhasa Apso was meant to guard and protect Tibetan monasteries and Buddhist temples. Named after the city of Lhasa, the breed was considered sacred. Gifted to the U.S. from the Dalai Lama, the Lhasa Apso became a loving household breed. Intelligent and loyal, this is a great breed for single adults or older children.
  If you are considering a Lhasa — and many find his looks irresistible — you must consider this breed's protective nature. Early socialization and training are absolutely critical to a Lhasa's success as a family member, so that he can properly direct his natural tendency toward wariness. The time invested in training him, however, is well worth your effort in terms of the loyalty, joy, and companionship that this long-lived, hardy little dog provides.
  It goes without saying that the Lhasa Apso, which was bred exclusively as a companion dog, needs to live in the house and never outdoors.

Highlights
  • The Lhasa is highly independent; his aim is to please himself, not you.
  • The Lhasa is a leader, and he'll be your leader if you allow him to.
  • The Lhasa is a naturally protective watchdog. There's no changing this, though you can teach him good canine manners. Early, positive socialization is essential to help him become a friendly, sociable pet.
  • The Lhasa matures slowly. Don't expect too much too soon.
  • The beautiful Lhasa coat needs a lot of grooming. Expect to do a lot of work, or to pay a professonial groomer.
  • Dental care is essential. Brush the Lhasa's teeth regularly, and have your veterinarian check his teeth and gums periodically.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Breed standards
AKC group: Non-sporting
UKC group: Companion
Average lifespan: 14 - 16 years
Average size: 13 - 15 pounds
Coat appearance: Dense and hard top coat
Coloration: Cream, light or brindle; black markings on the face
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Longer in body than tall; balanced and compact; dark oval eyes; feathered ears and tail; long, oversized coat, but may be altered into a puppy cut for easier grooming
Possible alterations: May be darker in color
Comparable Breeds: Shih Tzu, Tibetan Terrier

History
  The Lhasa comes from Tibet, and he takes his name from the holy city of Lhasa. For thousands of years, the Lhasa was bred exclusively by nobility and monks in monasteries to act an inside guard and protector. He's known in his homeland as Abso Seng Kye, which translates as "Bark Lion Sentinel Dog." The Lhasa's thick coat is protective; his native climate is one of intense cold and extreme heat.
  Recorded history of the breed goes back to 800 B.C. A Lhasa was considered good luck, but it was nearly impossible to buy one: he was a watchdog in temples and monasteries and was therefore considered sacred. It was thought that when an owner died, the human soul entered the body of his Lhasa Apso. Lhasas were not allowed to leave the country except when given as gifts by the Dalai Lama.
  From the beginning of the Manchu Dynasty in 1583 until as recently as 1908, the Dalai Lama sent Lhasas as sacred gifts to the Emperor of China and members of the Imperial family. The Lhasas were always given in pairs and were thought to bring with them good luck and prosperity.
  The first Lhasas to enter the United States directly were given as gifts by the 13th Dalai Lama in 1933 to C. Suydam Cutting, a noted world traveler and naturalist. Cutting owned Hamilton Farm in Gladstone, New Jersey, and the two gift dogs became the foundation stock for his kennel.
  The American Kennel Club accepted the Lhasa Apso as a breed in 1935.

Personality
  The perfect Lhasa doesn’t come ready-made from the breeder. Any dog, no matter how nice, can develop obnoxious levels of barking, digging, countersurfing, and other undesirable behaviors if he is bored, untrained, or unsupervised. And any dog can be a trial to live with during adolescence. 
  Start training your puppy the day you bring him home. Even at 10 weeks old, he is capable of soaking up everything you can teach him. Don’t wait until he is 6 months old to begin training or you will have a more headstrong dog to deal with. If possible, get him into puppy kindergarten class by the time he is 10 to 12 weeks old, and socialize, socialize, socialize.   However, be aware that many puppy training classes require certain vaccines  to be up to date, and many veterinarians recommend limited exposure to other dogs and public places until puppy vaccines  have been completed. In lieu of formal training, you can begin training your puppy at home and socializing him among family and friends until puppy vaccines are completed.
  Talk to the breeder, describe exactly what you’re looking for in a dog, and ask for assistance in selecting a puppy. Breeders see the puppies daily and can make uncannily accurate recommendations once they know something about your lifestyle and personality. Whatever you want from an Apso, look for one whose parents have nice personalities and who has been well socialized from early puppyhood.

Health
  The Lhasa Apso is known to suffer from a few health problems. For example, it is known to suffer from sebaceous adenitis, a hereditary skin disease that occurs primarily in Standard Poodles, but has also been reported in a number of other breeds, including the Lhasa Apso.   They are also known to suffer from the genetic disease progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) which can render them blind. Responsible breeders have their breeding dogs checked yearly by a canine ophthalmologist to check that they are not developing the disease, which is heritable in offspring. Lhasa Apsos are also prone to eye diseases, such as cherry eye and keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS or dry eye syndrome). A 2004 Kennel Club survey puts the median lifespan of the breed at 14 years 4 months. UK vet clinic data puts the median at 13.0 years.

Care
  The Lhasa is a great choice for people with limited space. He's well suited for apartment or condo living, though he does enjoy playing outside in a fenced yard.
  The Lhasa is content with several short walks each day. He is not high-energy dog, and he doesn't tend to bounce off the walls when cooped up on a rainy day. He's happy sitting in your lap, wandering around the house, playing with his toys, and alerting you to passersby.
  Housetraining the Lhasa can be challenging, so it's wise to crate train. Also, remember that this dog will likely take a long time to mature mentally. He may reach full size at one year of age, but his behavior will still be quite puppyish. Be especially patient during training — keep it positive and consistent, and be willing to go the long haul.

Living Conditions
  These dogs are good for apartment living. They are very active indoors and will do okay without a yard.

Trainability
  Training requires a lot of patience and a gentle hand. Lhasas can be willful, and if they decide they don't want to do something, they simply won't do it. Harsh treatment will often result in the dog retaliating. Lhasas respond best to food rewards, short training sessions and varied routines. Absolute consistency is important when working with a Lhasa Apso as they will see your bending the rules as an invitation to walk all over you. The time it takes to train a Lhasa is well worth the effort. Once leadership is established and the Lhasa learns that there is food in it for him, will step up to the plate and perform the tasks at hand.
  Early and frequent socialization is important with this breed. They are naturally suspicious of strangers and this can get out of hand in the form of excessive barking and even nipping or snapping. It is imperative to teach a Lhasa to accept new people as welcome visitors.

Exercise Requirements
  Lhasa Apsos have a moderate energy level, so it doesn’t need much exercise. That doesn’t mean your dog should nap all day – you want your pup to stay healthy, trim and fit. Take your Lhasa Apso for walk, let them scamper about and run free to play in the backyard. This breed loves to play fetch and will chase the ball until it gets tired out.
  If you don’t have a backyard, don’t worry – your Lhasa Apso can exercise indoors. This breed doesn’t need a lot of space to move around, but your dog will need to get enough exercise every day.

Grooming
  If you are looking for a dog with an easy-care coat, it’s safe to say that the Lhasa Apso is not the right choice. That glamorous Lhasa you see sweeping around the show ring is the product of endless hours of grooming. Even if your Lhasa will be a pet, his long coat will still need regular care.
  For a pet, expect to brush and comb the long, straight, heavy coat daily. When you brush, be sure you get all the way down to the skin. If you just go over the top of the coat you’ll miss many mats and tangles. Your dog’s breeder can show you the best techniques to use. The American Lhasa Apso Club also has good grooming advice.
  Pet Lhasas can be kept clipped short, but that still means frequent professional grooming. Neglected coats become tangled and matted, which is painful and can lead to serious skin infections. A Lhasa needs a bath at least every two to three weeks. The good news is that he doesn’t shed much, but you will still find a few hairs here and there.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Small dogs are prone to periodontal disease so brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Children are probably not at the top of the Lhasa's list of favorite things. He tends to be intolerant of the normal antics of children, and he'll nip. The Lhasa is best suited to a home with older children who understand how to properly handle him. He's not advised for a family with young or rowdy kids.
  If he's properly socialized and trained, the Lhasa gets along with other dogs. He does like to be top dog, so he's often the leader, even around other dogs who are much larger. He isn't afraid to join in activities normally associated with large dogs, such as hiking or cross-country skiing. The Lhasa thinks he's a large dog.
  The Lhasa can get along with other pets as well, given proper introductions and training.

Is this breed right for you?
  A kind yet sturdy breed, the Lhasa Apso is absolutely devoted to his master. A good guard dog, he is aloof with strangers and requires a good amount of training and leadership to avoid developing small dog syndrome. A bit impatient, he may not do well with young children but will get along well with other animals. 
  Not requiring too much activity, he does well in apartments and is OK being indoors all day as long as he's kept in good company.   Needing a lot of grooming, his coat can be trimmed down to avoid daily brushing.

Did You Know?
  Lhasa Apsos were first bred 2,000 years ago by Buddhist monks in and around Tibet. The monks believed that when the Lhasa’s owner died, if he was not ready for Nirvana his soul would be reincarnated in the dog’s body.

In pop culture
  • The Brazilian comic series Monica's Gang features a green-colored Lhasa Apso named Fluffy which belongs to Jimmy Five.
  • In the animated series Spider-Man and his Amazing Friends, Angelica Jones/Firestar owns a Lhasa Apso named Ms. Lion.
  • Lhasa Apsos have also appeared in at least two episodes of The Simpsons. In the episode "Three Gays of the Condo", Homer Simpson moves in with a couple of gay men. Homer started to act like a gay man and got a Lhasa Apso. Also, Milhouse Van Houten owns a Lhasa Apso.
  • In the television series The L Word, Helena is assured by her wealthy mother that she was going to leave her inheritance to her, not to her Lhasa Apsos.
    Bethenny Frankel and Cookie
  • Lhasa Apsos are said to bring luck, hence the saying "Lucky Lhasa".
  • Singer Arturo Paz owns a Lhasa Apso named Coco.
  • Actress/Singer-Songwriter Keke Palmer has a Lhasa Apso named Rust
  • A Lhasa Apso is both a major character and a plot device in the 1948 children's novel Daughter of the Mountains by Louise Rankin .
  • Singer Gwen Stefani had a Lhasa Apso dog called Lamb/Meggan.
  • Reality star Bethenny Frankel has a Lhasa Apso named Cookie, who regularly appears on her show Bethenny Ever After.
  • Science fiction author John Scalzi includes a Lhasa Apso named Tuffy in a pivotal role in the The Dog King, the seventh part of his episodic novel The Human Division.
  • Writer Kurt Vonnegut lived with a Lhasa Apso named Pumpkin.
  • Singer Barbra Streisand owned a Lhasa Apso, and dedicated her performance of "Smile" on the Oprah Winfrey Show to it, after its death. She even dressed up as her beloved pup for her 2013 "Halloween Bash" hosted by Patti LaBelle.
  • Avant-garde art collector Peggy Guggenheim loved the Lhasa Apso breed so much, she has a burial site next to her own for her 14 "Beloved Babies" in Venice, Italy.
  • Singer-songwriter Criss Starr has a Lhasa Apso named Mozart.
  • The Hard Science Fiction Web Comic Freefall  has Winston owning a Lhasa Apso called Beekay.

A dream day in the life of a Lhasa Apso
  A simple breed, the Lhasa Apso requires little to be a happy dog. Loving constant companionship, he will be all smiles as long as he's in his owner's company. Keeping an eye out on the house, he'll guard his space and owner throughout the day. An affectionate dog, he will be sure to cuddle close with a lot of petting, rubbing and stoking and follow his master from morning until night.
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Everything about your Tibetan Terrier

Everything about your Tibetan Terrier
  He’s not a terrier, but the mild-mannered “TT” is a loving family dog who was bred to traipse around snowy mountains with nomadic herdsmen. He stands out for his profuse and protective double coat, a fall of hair over the eyes, a well-feathered tail and large, round, flat feet designed for sure-footedness in snowy terrain.

Overview
  Bred in Tibet as a companion dog, the Tibetan Terrier was also raised as a herding dog. Kept by monks, the breed was never sold or traded due to the belief that the dogs brought good luck. Despite its name, the Tibetan Terrier lacks true Terrier characteristics. Not likely to dig or hunt, this is one loving and kind-spirited dog.
  It's not unusual for Tibetan Terriers to be reserved with strangers, but they shower affection on their people. They can adapt to life in many different types of households and are a good choice for families with older children who understand how to treat dogs. With their protective double coat and large, flat, round feet to provide traction — in much the same way as snowshoes — they're well suited to homes in snowy climates.

Highlights
  • Tibetan Terriers are wonderful family dogs but are best suited for homes with school-age children who know how to treat a dog properly.
  • Tibetan Terriers generally do well with dogs and other pets, especially if they have been raised with them.
  • The Tibetan Terrier requires frequent brushing and a bath at least once per month.
  • Tibetan Terriers make great watchdogs and will bark when they see or hear anything unusual.
  • If they get daily exercise, Tibetan Terriers can do well in apartments or condos.
  • Tibetan Terriers thrive on human companionship and do best in homes where they get plenty of attention and aren't left alone for long periods.
  • Barking is a favorite pastime for a Tibetan Terrier. He'll bark when people come to the door, when he sees or hears something unusual, or just out of boredom.
  • Tibetan Terriers require daily exercise and will enjoy a couple of 15-minute walks or one longer walk.
  • The Tibetan Terrier can be easy to train with positive reinforcement techniques such as praise, play, and food rewards.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from a puppy mill, a pet store, or a breeder who doesn't provide health clearances or guarantees. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies and who breeds for sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts

  • Tibet’s extreme climate and harsh terrain played a role in creating a dog with a protective double coat, compact size, unique foot construction and great agility.
  • A fall of hair covers the TT’s dark, expressive eyes, but he can see through it perfectly well thanks to his long eyelashes.
  • The Tibetan Terrier has large, round, flat feet that act like snowshoes and give the dog traction in snowy conditions.
  • The TT’s long, luxurious coat parts down the middle and can be any color or combination of colors. Colors and patterns include white, gold, tricolor, brindle, silver, black, and parti-color (a color plus white).
  • The Tibetan Terrier is not a true terrier but was given that appellation because of its size.
Breed standards
AKC group: Non-sporting
UKC group: Companion dog
Average lifespan: 12 - 15 years
Average size: 18 - 30 pounds
Coat appearance: Soft, wooly, thick double coat
Coloration: Any combination of colors
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Other identifiers: Proportionally sized body; dark brown, wide-set eyes; medium-sized head and short, black nose; ears hang beside head; feathered tail curls around to back of body
Possible alterations: None
Comparable Breeds: Lhasa Apso, Shih Tzu

History
  With its mountainous terrain, Tibet is sometimes referred to as the Roof of the World. It was in that harsh, high, remote land that the Tibetan Terrier was created. Prized as companions, the dogs were raised by Buddhist monks, known as lamas, from whom they took their name Holy Dog. 
Tibetan Terriers of Teasia
  But the shaggy, medium-size dogs weren't limited to life in the lamaseries where they were born. Considered to be luck bringers, they traveled the high plateaus with nomadic herdsmen, guarding their tents. Fearful of tempting fate by "selling" their luck, neither the lamas nor the herdsmen ever sold the dogs. Instead, they were given as gifts in return for favors or services or presented to officials as a mark of esteem.
  The Tibetan Terrier might have remained an obscure breed if not for a grateful Tibetan man who gave a Tibetan Terrier to Dr. Agnes R. H. Greig, who had saved his wife's life. Dr. Greig named her new puppy Bunti and became a fan of the breed. Eventually, she acquired a male, also as a gift, and began a breeding program, establishing the Lamleh line of Tibetan Terriers. Being neither a sporting dog nor a mix, the breed was given the name Tibetan Terrier, despite the fact that it wasn't a true terrier in either instinct or temperament but merely resembled one in size.
  A breed standard was created by the Kennel Club of India in 1930, and the Tibetan Terrier was officially recognized by England's Kennel Club in 1937. The first Tibetan Terrier imported into the United States, Gremlin Cortina, arrived in 1956. Owned by Dr. Henry S. and Alice Murphy, she was so beloved by them that she inspired Alice Murphy to establish her own kennel, Lamleh of Kalai. The Tibetan Terrier Club of America was formed in 1957, and the American Kennel Club recognized the breed in 1973. Today the Tibetan Terrier ranks 95th among the 155 breeds and varieties recognized by the AKC.

Personality
  The Tibetan Terrier is smart, pleasant, and affectionate. Gentle but fun loving, he's dedicated to his family but may be cautious or reserved toward strangers. Puppies are active and lively — what puppy isn't? — but settle down as they reach maturity.
  True to their heritage, they make wonderful watchdogs and will bark an alert if they see or hear anything suspicious. They don't like to be left alone for long periods, preferring the company of the people they love. Tibetan Terriers are known for adaptability and a sense of humor.
  Like every dog, Tibetan Terriers need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Tibetan Terrier puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.

Health
  The Tibetan Terrier, which has an average lifespan of 12 to 15 years, is prone to major health concerns such as progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) and lens luxation, as well as minor problems like patellar luxation, ceroid lipofuscinosis, cataract, canine hip dysplasia (CHD), and hypothyroidism. Often distichiasis is noticed in this breed; eye, hip, and thyroid tests are suggested for dogs of this breed.

Care
  Tibetan Terriers are adaptable dogs at home in a variety of households, from condos to castles. They should live indoors with their people, not stuck out in a backyard or kennel.
  Once they've matured, they are just as happy being couch potatoes as they are active family dogs. Like any dog, an adult Tibetan Terrier requires daily exercise to stay healthy and happy, but he'll be satisfied with a couple of 15-minute walks daily or one longer walk. Naturally, puppy and adolescent Tibetan Terriers are filled with energy and excitement and require higher levels of stimulation and exercise.
  Although it's nice for a Tibetan Terrier to have a securely fenced yard where he can play, it's not a great idea to leave him out there for long periods. A bored Tibetan Terrier is a barker, and a really bored Tibetan Terrier is an escape artist who's perfectly capable of climbing, jumping, or digging his way over or under a fence.
  Housetraining can take time, but you'll be successful if you're patient and give your Tibetan Terrier a regular schedule and plenty of opportunities to potty outdoors, praising him when he does so. Crate training is strongly recommended. It will make housetraining easier and keep your Tibetan Terrier from chewing things while you are away. The crate is a tool, not a jail, however, so don't keep your Tibetan Terrier locked up in it for long periods. The best place for a Tibetan Terrier is with you.
  TTs are generally amiable, but sometimes they have their own agenda. Keep training fun, be consistent, and use positive reinforcement techniques such as praise, play, and food rewards.

Living Conditions
  The Tibetan Terrier will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. It is relatively inactive indoors and a small yard will be sufficient.

Training
  Because it is intelligent, Tibetan Terriers are an ideal breed for training. But make sure you know what you’re doing, as the dog may use its smarts to get the upper hand and train you instead!  There are a few things in mind when training a Tibetan Terrier. Never use negative methods of training, as Tibetan Terriers will ignore you or rebel against the negative methods of training without modifying its behavior. You should use positive methods of training, such as treats, affection and play in order to teach obedience.
  For training to be successful, you’ll also have to be completely consistent throughout the process. Make sure that your Tibetan Terrier knows what it has to do in order to be rewarded, and don’t let your dog sucker you into giving it a reward without doing the work. When you keep your behavior consistent and give your dog achievable objectives every day, your Tibetan Terrier will master the finer points of training.

Exercise Requirements
  No matter where you live, your Tibetan Terrier needs to get some form of daily exercise. One walk a day isn’t sufficient for this breed – it needs to get out at least twice a day. It really comes in handy if you have a large, secure yard your dog can run around in. the important thing to remember is that your Tibetan Terrier needs to release its pent up energy, otherwise it may become destructive
  While walking your Tibetan Terrier, make sure it is always on a leash. Thanks to this dog’s mischievous streak, it may try to escape and explore the great outdoors. And if you chase after it, it’s all a big game to the Tibetan Terrier.

Grooming Needs
  The long coat of the Tibetan Terrier needs to be brushed daily to keep it tangle and mat free. The coat should always be misted with water before brushed, otherwise the hair will break off. It is important to brush the coat all the way down to the skin to ensure all loose hair is removed. Mats are espcially prone to form behind the ears, on the chest, the belly and the armpits. For dogs who won't be shown, owners can opt to clip the hair into a puppy cut, which requires much less maintenance. Tibetan Terriers should be bathed monthly.
  Check the ears on a weekly basis for signs of infection, irritation, or wax build up. Cleanse regularly with a veterinarian-approved cleanser and cotton ball. Brush the teeth at least once per week to prevent tartar buildup and fight gum disease. Additionally, nails should be trimmed once per month if the dog does not wear the toenails down naturally.

Children And Other Pets
   Tibetan Terriers love kids and can match their energy levels all day long, but they're a little rambunctious for households with children under the age of 6 years.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Tibetan Terriers usually get along well with other dogs and cats, especially if they're introduced to them in puppyhood.

Is this breed right for you?
  Tibetan Terriers are wonderful with school-aged children and other animals if raised with them. Doing OK with apartment living if properly exercised, this breed is inactive indoors but enjoys a good romp outside. Enjoying his own space in the yard, he can also be satisfied with daily walks and gentle praise. In need of companionship, he may act out if he doesn't get enough attention. If not given proper leadership, the Tibetan Terrier is likely to think of himself as the alpha and may become an over-active barker. Only shedding once a year, he makes a good fit for the allergy sufferer but will need grooming every 2 to 3 days.

Did You Know?
  The Tibetan Terrier was nicknamed Luck Bringer and Holy Dog in his homeland of Tibet.

A dream day in the life of a Tibetan Terrier
  The Tibetan Terrier will be happiest starting his day in the bed of his owner. After snuggling, he'll follow his owner wherever he may go. Ready for his daily walk, you'll find this breed waiting patiently at the door. Going back inside and enjoying a nice meal, the Tibetan Terrier will likely relax the rest of his day away on the couch. Happy with a couple of play sessions and a few petting sessions in the afternoon, the Tibetan Terrier will end his day just as he began it, cuddling close to his owner.



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Thursday, December 8, 2016

Everything about your Chinese Shar-Pei

Everything about your Chinese Shar-Pei
  Though the Chinese Shar-Pei is the 134th breed recognized by the American Kennel Club, the dog breed has been around for hundreds of years. He was developed to guard, hunt, herd, and later, fight, and is known for his characteristic short, bristly coat, loose, wrinkled skin, and devotion to his family. Today, the Shar-Pei mostly enjoys life as a beloved companion.

Overview
  The Chinese Shar-Pei, also known as the Chinese Fighting Dog or simply the Shar Pei, is an ancient breed that has existed for centuries in the southern provinces of China. “Shar-Pei” literally translates as “sand skin” but more loosely means “rough, sandy coat” or “draping sandpaper-like skin.” In addition to their strange wrinkled appearance, they have a characteristic solid blue-black tongue, a feature shared only with another ancient Chinese breed, the Chow Chow. The Chinese Shar-Pei was recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1988 as a non-sporting dog and fully approved in 1992.
  The average Chinese Shar-Pei stands 18 to 20 inches at the withers and weighs between 45 and 60 pounds, with females typically being smaller than males. Their extremely rough, short, wrinkled coat is unique to the breed. It should be neither shiny nor lustrous and comes in solid colors and sable. It should be brushed regularly, and the folds of skin should be cleaned and checked frequently to avoid moistness, irritation and infection. Shar-Peis are compact and sturdy, and they normally do not bark unless they are threatened or feel the need to alert their owners.

Highlights
  • The Shar-Pei was once a guard dog and pit fighter. Today he is primarily a companion, though he retains fighting toughness. He can be aggressive toward other dogs or people, so it's imperative that he be socialized and trained from an early age.
  • Due to his short nose, the Shar-Pei is prone to overheating. Keep him inside with fans or air conditioning during hot summer months. Like other short-nosed breeds, he tends to snore and wheeze, and makes a terrible jogger.
  • Like the Chow, the Shar-Pei has a dark tongue. This is considered normal, even desirable, by dog show enthusiasts.
  • Frequent bathing isn't necessary for the Shar-Pei, but when you do bathe him, dry him thoroughly. The wrinkles and skin folds are an ideal breeding ground for fungal infections.
  • Though devoted to his family, the Shar-Pei can be willful and stubborn. He must learn right away who the pack leader is or he's likely to compete for the job.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The name Shar-Pei means "sand-skin" but translated more as “sand-paper-like coat.”  No other breed shares the short, rough coat of the Shar-Pei.
  • A Shar-Pei is a poor choice for a novice dog owner.
  • A Shar-Pei housetrains earlier than most breeds because of his natural cleanliness and ease of training. 
  • The Shar-Pei enjoys and does well in obedience, agility, herding and tracking. He would rather be with people than other dogs.
  • Those famous wrinkles need to be looked after carefully to prevent skin infections. They should be wiped out with a damp cloth and dried well to prevent infection.
  • Like other flat-faced breeds, the Shar-Pei can easily overheat.
Breed standards

AKC group: Non-sporting Group
UKC group: Northern Breed Group
Average lifespan: 9 - 11 years
Average size: 45 - 60 pounds
Coat appearance: Horse or brush-coat
Coloration: Sandy with black muzzle
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Large with wrinkled skin; blue-black tongue; dark, almond-shaped eyes; rounded, triangular ears; large muzzle with dark coloration; thick tail
Possible alterations: May have lighter eyes based on coloration
Comparable Breeds: Chow Chow, Great Pyrenees

History
  The Chinese Shar-Pei originated in the southern provinces of China where he was valued as a hunter, herder, guardian, and fighter. Some historians believe the Shar-Pei is an ancient breed, though there is no definitive evidence to prove this. Statues that look a lot like the Shar-Pei have been dated to the Han Dynasty (200 B.C.), though these statues also resemble the Chow and Pug.
  Following the creation of the People's Republic of China, the dog population in the country was practically wiped out. A few Shar-Peis, however, were bred in Hong Kong and Taiwan. If not for the efforts of one man, Matgo Law, of Down-Homes Kennels in Hong Kong, the Shar-Pei might be extinct.
  Thanks to him, a small number of Shar-Peis were brought to the United States in 1973 and breed fanciers formed the Chinese Shar-Pei Club of America, Inc., in 1974. The first National Specialty show was held in 1978. The Shar-Pei was accepted in the American Kennel Club Miscellaneous Class in 1988, and recognized by the AKC in 1991 as a member of the Non-Sporting Group.



Personality
  The large head and wrinkled face of the Chinese Shar-Pei has oven been compared to the head of a hippopotamus. They are independent and willful dogs, but when exposed to confident, consistent leadership are respectful companions and clean housemates. Their ever-present scowl coupled with their alert nature, makes them an imposing looking guard dog. The Shar-Pei's tenency toward independence them good companions for single people or working families with older children. They don't require much attention or exercise to keep them happy, and can entertain themselves with lots of chew toys or sun to bathe in.

Health
  The Chinese Shar-Pei, which has an average lifespan of 8 to 10 years, suffers from minor health issues like lip and skin fold pyodermas, otitis externa, hypothyroidism, patellar luxation, allergies, and amyloidosis, and minor problems such as entropion and canine hip dysplasia (CHD). To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may run hip, eye, knee, elbow, and thyroid tests on the dog.
  Megaesophagus is sometimes seen in this breed. The Shar-Pei is also prone to fevers, and although its cause is unknown, it often occurs with Shar-Peis suffering from swollen hocks .

Care
  The Shar-Pei lives comfortably in the city or country. He does well in a limited space, such as an apartment or condo, as long as he gets daily exercise. A backyard is not required, but he does appreciate getting out and stretching his legs. In general, the Shar-Pei is fairly happy just hanging out with his owner, wherever he may be.
  Begin training and socializing your Sharpei the day you bring him home, and commit to continuing the process all his life. He'll need the constant reinforcement since he's not naturally friendly to other dogs. He can also be stubborn and owners must be consistent and firm in order to establish leadership. He is generally eager to please, though, and responsive to training.
  The best kind of socialization exercise is to take your Shar-Pei with you everywhere — to puppy classes, outdoor events, busy parks, friends' homes — and as often as possible. This will help prevent him from becoming overly shy or overprotective. Since this breed can be aggressive toward other dogs, the Shar-Pei should be kept leashed in public.
  The Shar-Pei is classified as a short-nosed, or brachycephalic breed, similar to the Bulldog, Boxer, Pug. Their short noses make them highly sensitive to heat, which means they make lousy jogging companions. To prevent heat stroke, these dogs should be kept inside with fans or air conditioning in hot weather.

Living Conditions
  The Chinese Shar-Pei will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. It is moderately active indoors and will do okay without a yard.
  The Shar-Pei is sensitive to warm weather, partly due to the wrinkles on its head holding in the heat.
  On hot days shade should always be provided. Water should be available at all times. Provided they get enough exercise, they will be very peaceful indoors.

Training
  The proper training and socialization of a Chinese Shar-Pei from a young age is very crucial in its development. Because it can have a higher propensity to territorial aggression and can be a little worried around strangers, it should get used to the idea of other humans and should be able to realize that being around them is safe. Training will also require a good degree of patience. If you’re a first-time dog trainer, the Chinese Shar-Pei is not the ideal dog to “cut your teeth” on.

Activity Requirements
  Despite their large size, the Chinese Shar-Pei does not need a lot of vigorous exercise to maintain good health. Several walks a day will suffice, making them good city dogs. It is recommended Shar-Peis, despite their watchdog capabilities, not be raised on a farm. Their natural instinct to hunt means they can take off into the wild blue yonder after deer or other wild animals.

Grooming
  Grooming requirements depend on the individual Shar-Pei. Weekly brushing can meet the needs of both the “horse-coated”  variety and the “brush-coated” type , but some Shar-Pei of either type can be prone to skin problems. Shar-Pei with skin problems may need weekly bathing and daily brushing.
  All Shar-Pei need regular wrinkle care. The wrinkles must be wiped out with a damp cloth and then dried thoroughly to prevent infection. Do not oil the skin.
  Shar-Pei have small, tight, triangular ears that predispose them to chronic ear problems because there isn’t enough air circulating in the narrow ear canal. Although it’s not as easy to clean the ears of a Shar-Pei as it is for most breeds, regular cleaning should be done to help prevent recurrent yeast or bacterial infections.
  Bathe the Shar-Pei as you desire or only when he gets dirty. With the gentle dog shampoos available now, you can bathe a Shar-Pei weekly if you want without harming his coat.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Brush the teeth for overall good health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  The Shar-Pei is a devoted family dog who is protective of his family, including children. To best teach him to get along with kids, he should be raised with them; if he doesn't live with them, he should be exposed to children as he grows up. Because he is such an independent breed, he's best suited to families with children 10 and older who know how to treat a pet respectfully.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  In order to provide the best chances for getting along with other dogs and animals, the Shar-Pei should be raised with them from an early age. Since he tends to be aggressive with other canines, supervision is essential.

Is this breed right for you?
  A good guard dog, the Shar-Pei does not require much space, making him a great fit for apartment life. For exercise, a daily walk will suit this pet just fine. Doing well with children and cats if raised with them, this breed bonds well with any and all immediate family members. Aloof and rude to strangers, he will need to be socialized well. In need of a dominant master, the Chinese Shar-Pei requires a good leader to avoid any untoward behavior. A clean breed, he doesn't shed often and requires only brushing and regular bathing.

Did You Know?
  After teetering on the brink of extinction, the Chinese Shar-Pei made a comback: in 1983, the Neiman Marcus catalog chose the dog as its his-and-hers fantasy gift, offering a pair of Shar-Pei puppies for $2,000 each.

A dream day in the life of a Chinese Shar-Pei
  A simple breed, the Chinese Shar-Pei will be happy to wake up in the comfort of his own home, surrounded by family members. Enjoying a nice, brisk morning walk, the Shar-Pei will return ready to guard his home from any possible dangers or strangers. Partaking in a bit of play and yard-romping, the breed will end his day sleeping at the foot of his master.


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Wednesday, December 7, 2016

Everything about your Norwegian Lundehund

Everything about your Norwegian Lundehund
  This odd bird, er, dog is an energetic contortionist with a complex personality. He has the look of a typical Spitz breed — prick ears, wedge-shaped head and furry tail that curves over his back. His double coat ranges from beige to tan to reddish brown with black hair tips and white markings or white with red or dark markings.

Overview
   Also known as the puffin dog, this unique and acrobatic canine was discovered on a remote island in Norway, where he was used to scale cliffs and rob puffin nests of their eggs. With six toes on each foot, including two large, functional dewclaws, and an exceptional range of motion in his joints, he can climb just about anywhere in your house or yard and squirm through the narrowest of passageways. Heck, you might even see one trying his paw at Half Dome someday.
  Cheerful, inquisitive, and mischievous, this is a dog who needs close supervision to keep him out of trouble. He's a primitive breed who's difficult to housetrain and loves to bark and dig, so keep that in mind before deciding that it would be really cool to have a dog who can bend his head backwards, splay his front legs out to the side, and close his ears to keep out moisture and dirt. Provide him with plenty of early socialization to prevent shyness and noise sensitivity. And if you're a bird lover, well, just keep in mind this breed's original purpose.

Other Quick Facts
  • The Norwegian Lundehund’s thick coat is fallow (pale brown) to reddish brown to tan with black-tipped hairs and white markings or white with red or dark markings.
  • Lundehund vocalizations include barks, yodels and howls, with the occasional scream thrown in. It can be unsettling until you get used to it.
  • The Lundehund’s unusual anatomy makes him capable of getting into hard-to-reach places that most would not expect a dog to be able to go.
  • Lundehunds often enjoy collecting shiny objects and hiding them.
Breed standards

AKC group: Non-sporting
UKC group: Working
Average lifespan: 11 - 13 pounds
Average size: 12 - 30 pounds
Coat appearance: Short and rough
Coloration: Red, reddish-brown with black tips
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Small, wedge-shaped head with deep brown eyes and double-jointed neck; ears are able to move back and forth, flip from side to side and close up; strong and flexible hind legs and shoulders; six toes on each paw and two dewclaws; tail curls onto back
Possible alterations: Older dogs may be darker in color
Comparable Breeds: Norwegian Elkhound, Norwegian Buhund

History
  The breed has a long history. They are the most ancient of the Nordic dog breeds, scientific research indicates that the breed has been in existence since before the last Ice Age, surviving by eating fish and sea birds. It is thought that the Lundehund is actually a descendant of the primeval dog, Canis forus, rather than the domesticated dog breeds, Canis familiaris. The Lundehund was a valuable working animal, essential in hunting puffin birds along the Norwegian coast for food as well as the commercial export of puffin down from the Viking Age through the 16th and 17th centuries. Its flexibility and extra toes were ideal for hunting the birds in their inaccessible nesting locations on cliffs and in caves. Interest for the breed declined when new methods for hunting puffins were incorporated and a dog tax was created. Around 1900, they were only found in the isolated village of Mostad , Lofoten. The breed was nearly extinct around World War II when canine distemper struck Værøy and the surrounding islands. In 1963, the population was further decimated by another outbreak of distemper. This time, only six dogs survived, one on Værøy and five in southern Norway, Hamar. The latter five were from the same mother. This created a population bottleneck. Due to careful breeding with strict guidelines, there are now an estimated 1400 dogs in the world (2010), with around 600 of the population in Norway and ~350 in the United States.
  The breed is being tested in Tromsø airport by the Norwegian Air Traffic and Airport Management as a solution to airplane bird strikes. The dog is used to search for bird eggs around the airport for disposal.
  The Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. is recognized by the AKC as the Breed Parent Club for the USA.

AKC recognition
  The Norwegian Lundehund was approved into the American Kennel Club's Miscellaneous Class on July 1, 2008, after a unanimous vote by the AKC Board of Directors on November 13, 2007. The Lundehund made its AKC conformation debut at the Roaring Fork Kennel Club show in Eagle, Colorado on July 12, 2008. It made its introductory premier at a major US event at the AKC/Eukanuba National Championship in Long Beach, California, on December 13 and 14, 2008.
  On February 12, 2010, the Board of Directors of the American Kennel Club voted to accept the Norwegian Lundehund into the AKC stud book on December 1, 2010. On January 1, 2011, it became a part of the Non-Sporting Group.



Temperament
  Lundehunds are cheerful, alert, inquisitive, watchful and sometimes stubborn little dogs that make wonderful companions when placed into the right homes. Long-time Lundie owners treasure the breed’s intelligence and playfulness. These are free-thinking dogs that can be quite independent. Some Lundehunds are wary of strangers, although they are not known to be aggressive even when challenged. Generally, they are fun and easy to live with. Lundehunds get along quite well with children and other animals, especially when they are well-socialized from puppyhood.
  Early and extensive socialization is important for this breed. Lundehund puppies should be exposed to loud noises, unfamiliar people, animals of all ages and types, unusual environments, cars, motorcycles, new and potentially scary situations and as many other stimuli as possible starting at a young age. Lundehunds that are not well-socialized tend to become shy, hypersensitive to sounds and easily stressed by unfamiliar situations. It can be difficult to undo these traits once they become ingrained.

Health Problems
  Prone to Leaky Gut Syndrome, Lymphagetasia, Lundehund Syndrome (a series of digestive problems). This unique syndrome renders the lifespan of a particular dog almost unpredictable if not fed properly. It is reported that it is not a disease but an inability to digest grains of any sort. Fed a diet with no grains, the dogs do not get sick. They need only the same care that any dog should get and they live a long life. This syndrome or allergy is under research.

Care
  The Norwegian Lundehund is known to shed a great deal, requiring daily coat brushing with a firm bristle-brush. It can also tend to be a shy breed, so the dog should be socialized at a young age. The Norwegian Lundehund enjoys just about any outdoor activity and is very energetic. A large yard is best for this dog breed; however the intelligent Lundehund is good at escaping, so a secure fence is suggested.

Living Conditions
  The Norwegian Lundehund would do best living in a house with at least a small, fenced-in yard.

Training
  The Norwegian Lundehund is intelligent, but can prove to be stubborn when it comes to training. For the best results, use positive training techniques. A common complaint with the Lundie is house training, so this is not a dog for the novice owner. You’ll find that introducing crate training early on will help curb this problem. In fact, crate training can prove to be easier with this breed, as it likes to be in cave-like spaces.
  Because the Lundie is so agile, you should consider enrolling your dog in agility training courses. It’s a great form of exercise and it will allow them to use their natural agility abilities.

Activity Requirements
  Lundehunds are high-energy animals that love to participate in almost any outdoor activity. Lundehunds are especially happy when they can play and explore outside, with plenty of opportunities to find and proudly retrieve unusual treasures for their owners. They enjoy taking long walks and trips in the car. They like romping in the park and strolling along sandy beaches. They love to explore new terrain. Lundehunds are athletic, active and extremely agile, making them excellent hiking and backpacking partners. They excel at canine sports that require speed, intelligence, discipline and precision. Lundies can be escape artists, which makes a safe, secure, well-fenced yard an absolute requirement for owners of this breed. Regular exercise and a loving home environment are important for the Lundehund’s long-term physical and mental well-being.

Grooming
  This is a Northern or Spitz breed with an undercoat that sheds heavily twice a year. He also sheds small amounts daily.
  Brush the Lundehund’s double coat once a week to keep it clean and remove loose hair. During spring and fall shedding seasons, daily brushing will help keep hair under control.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails every 3 to 4 weeks or as needed. You may also want to clip the tufts of hair between the toes, but other than that, the coat needs no trimming. Brush the teeth often — with a vet-approved pet toothpaste — for good overall health and fresh breath, and keep the ears clean.

Puppies
  The Norwegian Lundehund puppy is a challenge to house train. You’ll have to keep a close eye on this little fellow when he’s not in his crate. Keeping up with a consistent routine will help the process go smoother, as will crate training. As well, early socialization is important to ensure he learns proper dog manners when meeting new people and animals.

Is this breed right for you?
  A loving and cuddly breed, the Norwegian Lundehund loves people of all ages and sizes and being very close to them. Kind, he is likely to love with all that he has. Requiring a yard to play and romp in, the breed is not ideal for apartment life. A natural-born hunter, the Lundie enjoys sniffing things out and is easy to groom. The breed does have an incredibly hard time becoming housebroken and will require a lot of patience and intelligent training. In addition, a Lundie needs a human who is able to provide leadership and discipline to avoid behavioral problems. In need of a lot of socializing, he is a watchdog and barker.

Did You Know?
  The Norwegian Lundehund is also known as the Norwegian puffin dog.

A dream day in the life of a Norwegian Lundehund
  Given the opportunity, the Norwegian Lundehund would wake up next to his owner and stay in bed with her all day. But if this is not an option, the dog will instead poke around the house looking for affection and play. After a few fun games of fetch, he'll head outside for a romp. Sniffing out any questionable smells, this natural-born hunter may chase a bird or two. As the day ends, the Norwegian Lundehund will love more cuddles and play before snoozing off to dreamland with his best friend at his side.





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