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Showing posts with label mixed breed. Show all posts
Showing posts with label mixed breed. Show all posts

Thursday, December 28, 2017

Everything about your Irish Doodle

Everything about your Irish Doodle
  The Irish Doodle is a medium to large hybrid or mixed breed that crosses the Irish Setter with the Standard Poodle. She has a life span of 12 to 15 years and has talents in guarding. She is sometimes also called the Irish Doodle Setter or an Irish Setter/Poodle hybrid. She is known for being very lighthearted and is also a devoted dog.

Overview
  Also known as the Irish Doodle Setter, Irish Poo Setter, Irish Setterdoodle, and Irish Setterpoo, the Irish Doodle is a super cute, friendly, and light-hearted medium-sized crossbreed. A mix of Irish Setter and Poodle, it’s ideal for anyone seeking a dog who won’t shed a lot and who will be loyal, social, and intelligent. This dog rarely barks and will even get along great with children and pets.
  If the Irish Doodle sounds too good to be true, rest assured that it isn’t. Combing adorable looks and an equally loveable attitude, this crossbreed is becoming hugely popular. To find out if this dog would be the right fit for your family, check out some quick facts below.

Breed standards
Breed Type: Crossbreed
Breed Group: Watchdog, Sporting Dog, Guard Dog
Average lifespan: 10 to 13 years
Average size: 40-70 pounds
Coat appearance: Long, soft, wavy
Coloration: Apricot, black, white, black and tan, brown
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Singles, families with children and other pets, seniors, and those living in apartments or houses with or without yards
Temperament: Loyal, devoted, quiet, social, intelligent, friendly
Comparable Breeds: Irish Setter, Poodle

History
  The Irish Doodle is a hybrid canine, a cross between two very different breeds of hunting dog; a German retrieving dog, the Poodle, and an elegant red field hunting dog called the Irish Setter. The Poodle is often associated with France but it was actually developed in Germany, where it was known as a Pudlehund; Pudle meaning to splash around, and hund meaning dog.
  Poodles today are still sometimes employed to retrieve waterfowl, although the modern hunter is more likely to clip them short all over to prevent tangling in the brush and weeds. The Irish Setter was developed in Ireland, at some point in the 1700s as a field hunting dog and by the early 1800s, the breed was popular not just in Ireland, but also throughout the British Isles. Most experts believe that the Irish Setter is an ancestor of breeds such as the Irish Water Spaniel, the Gordon Setter, and the Irish Terrier, but written records from the time are nonexistent. The earliest Irish Setters were bred to be able to search out birds then hold their position, preventing them from entering the line of fire and they often came in either red and white or yellow and white, but in the mid-1800s their characteristic deep red color became the ideal. 
  They were imported into the United States as gun dogs and retrievers that specialized in retrieving gamebirds during the mid-1800s as well and were recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1878. Although the Irish Setter could be crossed with a Miniature or Toy Poodle, the most commonly included Poodle for this hybrid is the Standard Poodle.


Temperament
  These dogs are loving and affectionate, and are characterized by loyalty and devotion. They are eager to please and have significant native intelligence inherited from their parents. It is their intelligent mind and careful disposition that have made them equally good with kids and other family pets. This makes them an excellent family dog ideal for apartment life. Not do they just love the members of their families, but they are also comfortable meeting strangers.
  These dogs, especially the puppies, love attention until they’re well along in years. Though, it is alert and attentive. If it happens to come across anything suspicious, it would immediately alert its family.

Health
  She is generally a healthy dog and whether or not you believe in the idea of hybrid vigor there is still the possibility a puppy might inherit conditions one or both its parents are at risk of. For the Irish Doodle these include Addison's Disease, Bloat, Cushing's disease, epilepsy, Hypothyroidism, Legg-Perthes, Patellar Luxation, SA , Von Willebrand's Disease, OCD, CAD, HOD, Joint dysplasia, eye problems and Panosteitis. To avoid getting a dog with health problems you can improve the odds by only buying after seeing health clearances for both parents.

Care
  Bathing need not be a frequent occurrence with these canines, usually just a few times a year, but thorough brushing and styling will generally be needed on a regular basis. They type of grooming implements that will be required for this animal can vary a bit, depending on which parent breed they most resemble, although most will need clipping or trimming of some sort on a regular basis. 
  Crossbreeds that inherit the single-layer Poodle coat are less likely to shed and in some cases, may even be low shedding enough to be considered hypoallergenic, however, the coat of the Irish Setter is decidedly not hypoallergenic, and the full composition of the coat may not reveal itself until your Irish Doodle has reached maturity. It is also quite important to check and clean this dog’s ears on a regular basis as they can be prone to internal and external infections.

Training
  The trainability of the Irish doodle is unpredictable. The standard poodle is a happy-go-lucky and easily trainable dog. But the Irish setters are not always so, but would rather get bored easily. Those Irish doodles that take after their setter parents sometimes demand commitment and patience from their trainers. But once the training process is successfully over, your Irish doodle will be the best trained dog in the neighborhood.
  Begin obedience and pack leader trainings from an early age. Train them to socialize and get accustomed to meeting new faces. Like their parents, the Irish doodles are naturally clean, and hence, are easy to be housetrained.

Exercise Requirements
  The Irish Doodle doesn’t need a lot of exercise. Instead, a moderate amount of daily activity, through games like fetch and a walk or jog, will help keep your dog happy and in great shape. If you do have an enclosed, safe yard, you can even let your pooch play freely outside when the weather permits.

Grooming 
  She does not shed much and is hypoallergenic so is good for those with allergies. She should be brushed at least twice a week still to remove mats and tangles and keep the coat looking bright and healthy. Use a solid bristle brush and you should find her coat easy to brush. She will need to have a bath as and when she gets dirty enough to need one! Check her ears once a week and wipe them clean and clip her nails if they grow too long.

Children and other animals
  When training and early socialization is completed she is very good with children and other pets. They will be happy to play and affectionate towards them. Children should be taught how to play nicely with any dog, and that things like ear or tail pulling or messing around with their food at feeding time is not acceptable.

Is the Irish Doodle the Right Breed for you?
Moderate Maintenance: Regular grooming is required to keep its fur in good shape.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Difficult Training: The Irish Doodle isn't deal for a first time dog owner. Patience and perseverance are required to adequately train it.
Slightly Active: Not much exercise is required to keep this dog in shape. Owners who are frequently away or busy might find this breed suitable for their lifestyle.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.
The Irish Setter is a more energetic dog, but when combined with the Poodle, the puppies settle down a great deal. However, I recommend these pups for more active people and families with more energetic children. They will be perfect for the person wanting a devoted running companion, as well as a therapy dog
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Wednesday, December 27, 2017

Everything about your Afghan Collie

Everything about your Afghan Collie
  The Afghan Collie, a cross breed between Afghan Hound and Border collie, was originally used as hunting dog in its native land. This dog belongs to the Hounding or Herding group. They are historically good with agility, obedience, narcotics detection, retrieving, tracking and sighting, which made them a good watchdog out on the prairies and farms.

Overview
  The Afghan Collie is a wonderful mix of an Afghan Hound and a Border Collie with a medium sized body and a long thick coat with talents in sighting, tracking, retrieving, detecting narcotics, obedience, and agility. These dogs are known to be friendly and energetic, but can also be used as guard dogs. 
  The Border Collie is known as the ultimate sheepdog and the Afghan Hound is an excellent hunter so this hybrid breed is perfect for hunting and gathering. Both breeds date back to pre-1800s and which then made their way to America by the 1900s. While the Afghan Hound is a large breed, the Border Collie is in the medium sized group so the Afghan Collie is a mid to large sized dog.

Breed standards
Breed Type: mixed breed
Average lifespan: 12 to 14 years
Average size:  20-50 pounds
Coat appearance: Dense and Short
Coloration:  white, brown, gray, blue, reddish-brown, and black
Hypoallergenic: No

History
  Because the Afghan Collie is a new breed, little is known about the history. However, the history of the parent breeds can help determine the outcome of the Afghan Collie. The Afghan Hound started out in the Afghanistan mountains prior to the 1800s when it was discovered and brought to towns to help hunters track and capture gazelle and rabbits. The popularity grew over time but this breed was mainly seen in wealthy families and among royalty. The Afghan Hound was brought to America in the 1920s and was accepted by the American Kennel Society (AKC) in 1926. 
  The breed became popular in the show ring for a while but lost its popularity since then. The Border Collie is thought to have been seen in wood carvings done by Thomas Beckwick from the History of the Quadrupeds sometime before the 1800s. During the late 1800s, the first sheepdog trial was held and won by a Border Collie named Hemp. The story states that Hemp was able to herd these sheep by just looking at them rather than barking and nipping at their heels. 
  It is thought that Queen Victoria became fond of these dogs when she saw one in Balmoral. The standard of the Border Collie was established in 1906 with a heavy emphasis on their working ability and not their physical attributes. In fact, the breed was known as a sheepdog until 1915 when they were named Border Collies. The name is thought to be derived from the region they were first recognized, between the English and Scottish borders. However, they were not recognized by the AKC until 1995.

Temperament
  They are an active, sociable and very friendly dog that make ideal family pets.  With high intelligence, partly owing to its Border Collie influence, Afghan Collies are quick learners and actually seem to enjoy and relish the opportunity to be taught.  They are lovable, clever, cheerful, high-spirited, with independent natures, getting along well with other pets and will even greet strangers with warmth and friendliness.  This type of dog loves to play and enjoys long walks in the countryside, especially with its owner by its side.  Being quite easy to train as they are obedient and have high energy levels and agile mobility. 


Health Conditions 
  These dogs have a life expectancy of 12 to 14 years. They may fall victim to allergies, cancer and hip dysplasia, and may display a sensitivity to anesthesia. They could also develop chylothorax, a rare disease that causes a leakage of the thoracic ducts.

Care
  Designer breed dogs have an average lifespan ranging from 7 years for dogs with many congenital health defects, up to 16 or 18 years for healthier breeds . The world’s oldest dog was an Australian Cattle Dog named Bluey, who was put to sleep at 29 years, 5 months. Larger designer breed dogs have a shorter average lifespan than small designer breed dogs.
  Due to their varied genetic makeup, mixed breed dogs are free from many of the health issues affecting purebreds—this is known as ‘hybrid vigor’. The most common health problem for large designer breed dogs is hip and elbow dysplasia. Generally, a designer breed will be most susceptible to health problems affecting its parent breeds.

Training
  Designer breed dogs require the same general training techniques as their purebred cousins. Most training should be conducted as early as possible . Most important is obedience training—the process of teaching your dog to reliably respond to basic commands such as ‘sit’ and ‘stay’. Any situations your dog will face in later life, such as grooming and bathing, should be introduced as early as possible.
  It is important to employ a system of consistent rewards and punishment, as well as a wide variety of training methods to hold the dog’s interest. Positive reinforcement is generally encouraged over harsh techniques, which backfire in many cases. Some designer breed dogs will recognize the trainer’s authority immediately, while others require a fair amount of effort. Housebreaking techniques will vary by breed.

Activity Requirements
  The Afghan Hound and Border Collie are both incredibly intelligent dogs who do well with any type of training. The Afghan does have a bit of a stubborn streak but the Border Collie will do whatever possible to please its owner. They are loyal and dependable due to their sheepherding heritage and have always been excellent family pets and guard dogs as well.    In fact, both breeds make good guard dogs due to their background in guarding the sheep. They are good with children but must be supervised and they tend to try to herd the younger children. It is important to socialize them to other animals early so they will get along well with other pets.

Is the Afghan Collie the Right Breed for you?
Moderate Maintenance: Regular grooming is required to keep its fur in good shape.
Moderate Shedding: Routine brushing will help. Be prepared to vacuum often!
Moderately Easy Training: The Afghan Collie is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Very Active: It will need daily exercise to maintain its shape. Committed and active owners will enjoy performing fitness activities with this breed.
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Everything about your Jack Chi

Everything about your Jack Chi
  The breed Jack Chi has been produced by crossing between the Jack Russell Terrier and the Chihuahua. They are small to medium-sized dogs with a dense coat, short neck, elongated muscular body, large eyes, and a triangular head. Their ears either erect like that of the Chihuahua, or with a curl-over like the terrier parent. This dog typically has a long nose like its Jack parent, and so is the built-up of its body, including the color patterns.   However, its coat and the length of its legs are quite similar to that of a Chihuahua. It’s not uncommon for this dog to be shorter than 10 inches at its shoulders. Like the Chihuahua, its muzzle can at times be thinner than the Jack Russell.

Overview
  Also known as the Jackuahua, the Jack Chi is a little dog with boundless energy. If you are ready to share your home with a canine that requires plenty of exercise and mental stimulation, but is intelligent, friendly, and ready to snuggle too, this designer breed could be an ideal choice.
  The Jack Chi can be a bit of a challenge, despite its many fantastic qualities and its absolutely adorable appearance, so read on to learn more about this breed and to find out if this small dog with a big heart is right for you.

Breed standards
Type: Designer dog
Group (of Breed): Crossbreed
Average lifespan: 13-18 years
Average size: 8 to 18 pounds
Coat appearance: Short, dense, wiry or can be longer if the parent Chihuahua is the long haired version
Coloration: Black, White, Brown, Chocolate, Cream, Golden, Fawn, Black & Brown, Black & White, Black and Tan, Brown & White, Dark Brown, Light Brown, Tricolor
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Singles, as well as families with children and other pets, living in a house or apartment, with or without a yard
Temperament: Energetic, alert, friendly, affectionate, playful, sweet
Comparable Breeds: Chihuahua, Jack Russell Terrier

History
  Your Jack Chi hybrid family member is the product of the breeding of a Chihuahua and a Jack Russell Terrier for what appears to be the sole purpose of family and individual companionship.  This is a fairly new hybrid and, as such, there is little history about it beyond the fact that it was developed in the United States.  
  One can only assume that its approximate date of origin falls into the past two to three decades, a time of regeneration of crossing and mixing a variety of purebreds to create these “designer” or hybrid canine breeds.  While there is little historical information about the Jack Chi hybrid itself, there is plenty of information available on the parent breeds, the Chihuahua and the Jack Russell Terrier.  
  The Chihuahua breed hails from Mexico and can be traced back to the 9th century where images of a dog resembling the Chihuahua have been found in artwork, written works and other artifacts.  Though the history of the origination of the Chihuahua remains shrouded in folklore, it is most commonly believed to have been developed in ancient Mexico as a dwarf pet canine. This parent breed made its appearance in the United States in about 1850 and has been firmly implanted ever since.  The Jack Russell Terrier originated in the United Kingdom in the early 1800’s for hunting and tracking purposes. 
  The small size and compact build of the Jack Russell made him perfect as he was large enough to keep up with the foxhounds but small enough to “go to ground” and rout the foxes from their dens.  Today, while their noses remain ever vigilant for those unusual and interesting scents, they are primarily utilized as family pets and companion dogs.  The Jack Chi hybrid is recognized by these organizations: American Canine Hybrid Club, Designer Dogs Kennel Club, Dog Registry of America, Inc. and the International Designer Canine Registry.

Temperaments
  The Jack Chi is a friendly and playful dog who is also very affectionate and has a lot of energy. She tends to bond more closely to one owner and is quite protective. She is alert and fairly intelligent and her love of fun can make her very entertaining with acrobatics she jumps high and runs fast. She has a curious nature but those playful moments are often mixed with calm moments when she likes to cuddle and burrow in her blankets – or yours. She loves getting lots of attention and is friendly to other people. Some can be hyper though and can become overly nervous all the time.

Health Problems
  Because the Jack Chi is a hybrid dog breed, it could be prone to health conditions that affect its parents, the Jack Russell Terrier and the Chihuahua. Despite that, however, this is a hardy breed overall.
  Keep an eye out for allergic reactions to food ingredients like soy or to environmental allergens like grass. Also, your dog’s skin may be sensitive to insects and insect bites, such as fleas and mosquitoes, and he may also suffer with teary eyes.


Care
  Your Jack Chi is considered to be hypoallergenic but that doesn’t mean he won’t shed because he is also in the moderate category of shedding.  Brushing once or twice a week should help to remove loose, dead hair, parasites and debris from his coat.  He needs bathing only as necessary.  Your furry family friend will need to have his ears checked and cleaned regularly to avoid infections and keeping up with dental examinations and teeth cleaning will help to reduce the potential for periodontal disease development, which is common among canines.  Eye examinations should be done to assess and monitor any of the variety of eye problems, both internal as well as external, which are known to afflict the parent breeds.

Training
 When it comes to training your Jack Chi, be prepared to remain patient and consistent, as these dogs may not be easy to train. First-time dog owners and those with little experience training dogs may find a Jack Chi difficult, and if you do not properly train and socialize your dog from puppyhood, issues like separation anxiety and spatial aggression could occur. It’s best to be strict and assertive while focusing on positive reinforcement in order to establish yourself as the pack leader, as this little dog can be pretty tough.

Activity Requirements
  Your Jack Chi hybrid is an energetic bundle of love and playfulness.  This energy will need to be spent daily to keep him  healthy and happy, the need to avoid boredom being great.  
  Taking your Jack Chi for long walks a couple of times a day, letting him play in the dog park, run loose in your high-walled, well-fenced yard, games of fetch, frisbee and hide and seek with his toys will help achieve this. It should be said, here, that you should always keep your Jack Chi on leash when outside as his tracking and hunting nose never stops seeking those oh so interesting scents which he will happily try to investigate.  Also, because your Jack Chi is so intelligent, the hide and seek games will keep your furry family member from becoming bored and avoid the development of those annoying chewing, digging and destructive behaviors that all dog owners resent. 
  Because of his small size, he is perfectly suited for apartment or condo living, but remember that his exercise needs must be met on a daily basis.  He is friendly with everyone, his human family, other pets and even strangers, so a family home with or without the fenced yard is also good for him.  It is important to note that, because of the traits inherited from the Jack Russell side, he will need to be well-fenced in with a high-walled fence that will be difficult for him to jump.  Care must also be taken to prevent digging for an escape route.  It is also noted that the typical electric fence may not be suited for this frisky little escape artist.  He can live in urban or rural settings and can tolerate most climates, provided he is given additional protection from extremes of heat and cold weather.

Grooming 
  If she is short haired grooming is fairly easy, she will need a brush a couple of times a week. Longer hair means more tangles can happen so brush it more often. Wiry hair means she may need trips to a groomers every couple of months. She does shed a moderate amount and that can be worse around seasonal shedding times. Give her a bath just when she is dirty and is needing one so that you do not damage her skin's natural oils. Her nails will need to be trimmed when they get too long. 
  Dog nails have live nerves in them so take care or have it done by a groomer. Her ears should be cleaned by wiping them carefully once a week, and just check them for infection signs. Her teeth should also be kept clean by brushing with dog toothpaste and brush at least twice a week.

Children and other animals
  She can be good with children, she likes to play with them and run around and have fun. She can also be gentle and affectionate towards them. She can be good with other pets too but with smaller animals she may be inclined to chase them as prey to hunt. Socialization will help this and how she gets along with other dogs as she can be bossy and does not care she is so much smaller than most of them.


Is the Jack Chi the Right Breed for you?
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep.
Difficult Training: The Jack Chi isn't deal for a first time dog owner. Patience and perseverance are required to adequately train it.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.
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Everything about your Irish Dane

Everything about your Irish Dane
  The Irish Dane is a hybrid that is a cross-breed of a Irish Wolfhound and Great Dane and may demonstrate any combination of traits from those two breeds. Hybrids have become very popular in the past few years. They play a big role in the current designer dog trend. 
  The experimentation of these hybrid or designer dogs has not been recognized by the American Kennel Club or Canadian Kennel Club. The key to cross breeding to purebred dogs is what is called hybrid vigor, the breeding resulting in a healthier dog with superior genetic constitution can come from dogs purebred for so long that they have common genetic disorders.

Overview
  Irish Danes are imposing animals with big hearts – literally and figuratively. They are sweet and social creatures with a great appreciation for companionship. They do like to stay active and will seek out opportunities to gallop in open spaces. Irish Danes have a life span of 6 to 10 years and can weigh up to 150 pounds.
   When they are full grown, they can be anywhere between 30 and 35 inches tall. Irish Danes have a harsh, rough, short to medium coat that comes in solid or multi-color combinations of black, white, blue, fawn, silver, gray, red, and cream. They can have various pattern and markings on their coat as well. In terms of large designer breeds, this one fairly established. Even so, Irish Danes can vary widely in appearance and temperament. Accordingly, they are not yet recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC).

Breed standards
Breed Type: Mix
Group: Herding
Average lifespan: 8-10 Years
Average size: 100 to 150 pounds
Coat appearance: Harsh, rough, short to medium
Coloration:  black, tan, brown, red, blue, gray, and white
Hypoallergenic: No

History
  As a hybrid dog the Irish Dane can have any combination of traits and appearances from either parent, the Irish Wolfhound and Great Dane. Hybrids have had a recent surge of popularity in the last twenty years or so, also known as designer dogs. It has caused a huge variation in prices for such dogs and many puppy mills and disreputable breeders are taking advantage of this trend. Therefore be careful from whom you buy. Unlike many designer dogs the Irish Dane actually does have more of a history to them as they were first bred in the 1800s during an attempt to save the Irish Wolfhound.


Temperament
  Though the Irish Dane has an imposing presence, it is anything but scary. Irish Danes are friendly and gentle dogs that love being around others. They will never pass up an opportunity to cuddle and play. Because they are quite social, Irish Danes also do well in multi-pet households. In fact, this breed is prone to separation anxiety if it does not receive enough attention and affection from those around it. The best way to overcome this is to ensure Irish Danes are surrounded by loving people and have a relatively consistent schedule. 
  Beyond this, the Irish Dane inherits a strong hunting impulse and guard dog mentality from its parent breeds. This can make it territorial and weary of strange adults at first. Owners can combat any negative behaviors from these instincts by socializing their Irish Danes early and consistently. Nonetheless, this breed is not known to be aggressive and can be a great family dog in the right environment.

Health
  The best way to ensure you have a healthy dog is to buy from a good breeder and ask to see health clearances for both parents. While there is some argument to hybrid vigor there is a chance in any dog of inheriting the conditions their parents are prone to. In the Irish Dane's case these conditions to be aware of include Development Issues, cancer , bloat, heart problems, surgical issues, Anesthesia Sensitivity, liver problems, Fibrocartilaginous Embolic Myelopathy, OCD, eye problems and joint dysplasia.

Care
  Irish Danes are relatively easy to maintain and do not require heavy grooming. This breed will shed moderately, however, and is not hypoallergenic or suitable for owner with allergies. If your Irish Dane has a particularly long coat, it may benefit from occasional brushing. Either way, Irish Danes only need occasional baths. They should also have their teeth cleaned on a daily basis. Beyond this, Irish Danes should have their nails clipped at least once or twice a month to avoid split or cracked nails and ears clean regularly with a damp cloth to avoid wax build up and infection.

Trainability
  He should be easy to train as he is eager to please and listens to commands and is inclined to obey. In general the Irish Dane will need fewer repetitions than many other dogs so will train quicker. Because of his size it is important to train him in good behavior from a young age when on the leash, as he will be super powerful when he is an adult and you do not want him pulling at you then. Also teach him not to jump up at people. Establish yourself as pack leader and use positive but firm methods of training. Early socialization and training are very important to get a well rounded dog.

Activity Requirements
  Irish Danes have above average levels of energy. They enjoy being active and require quite a bit of daily exercise. This breed loves running and galloping in open spaces, as well as playing with other people and large animals. Owners should aim to provide their Irish Dane with this type of activity about 45 to 90 minutes each day. Beyond this, Irish Dane also like to cuddle with family members and lay around the house. This breed is suited for all types of environments, though it should not be over exercised in extreme hot or cold conditions. Additionally, Irish Danes are not suited for apartment, urban, or suburban living due to their large size. They do best in larger homes with lots of outdoor space.

Grooming 
  The Irish Dane is a low shedding dog and grooming him is quite easy to do. If he has a coat more like the Irish Wolfhound you may need to have it clipped occasionally. Bathe him as he needs it, it is a good idea to train him for this from a young age, as when he is full sized you will not be lifting him in and out of the bath. You could also opt to use the hose in the yard or use a bathing station at a groomers. Make sure you use a dog shampoo. Once a week you need to check his ears and wipe them clean. His teeth should be brushed at least three times a week. His nails may need clipping if he does not naturally keep them worn down.

Children and other animals?
  He is good with children as he has a gentle nature. His size does mean he may knock over small children without meaning too so they may need to be watched. Children should also be taught how to play with him and that things like pulling ears, trying to ride him and messing with his food are not things that are acceptable to do. Irish Danes are also good with other pets if they have been socialized though they can see smaller animals as prey to chase.

Is the Irish Dane the Right Breed for you?
Easy Training: The Irish Dane is known to listen to commands and obey its owner. Expect fewer repetitions when training this breed.
Very Active: It will need daily exercise to maintain its shape. Committed and active owners will enjoy performing fitness activities with this breed.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

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Everything about your Alaskan Klee Kai

Everything about your Alaskan Klee Kai
  The Alaskan Klee Kai was developed fairly recently by a woman in Alaska who took a strong interest in a small dog resembling a Husky. Over time other breeders became interested in furthering the development of the Alaskan Klee Kai; however, it is still considered a rare breed.

Overview
  Small, smart, and energetic, the Alaskan Klee Kai is a relatively new breed that looks like a smaller version of the Siberian Husky, and even the name “Klee Kai” comes from an Inuit term meaning “small dog.” While Alaskan Klee Kais may resemble larger Husky breeds, they have some key differences, especially when it comes to temperament, that distinguish it from its ancestor working class dogs of the north. 
  This breed is more suited to the life of a companion, though the Alaskan Klee Kai shares the high energy of the Huskies and demands plenty of exercise. They also tend to be shy around strangers and are prone to expressing their emotions with whines and barks. An inexperienced owner would find it difficult to take on the challenge of caring for an Alaskan Klee Kai, but for an owner that keeps up with training and physical activity, this breed is sweet, loyal, and happy to shower loved ones with affection.

Highlights
  • The words "Klee Kai" come from an Inuit term meaning "small dog," which is appropriate for this breed that is a smaller version of its Husky ancestors.
  • The breed hails from Alaska where it was developed in the 1970s and 1980s to be a companion dog, rather than a working sled dog.
  • Although it is not recognized by the American Kennel Club, Alaskan Klee Kais are a recognized breed in the United Kennel Club and the American Rare Breed Association among others.
  • Solid white Alaskan Klee Kais do exist, but breed standards do not include this coat color.
  • Although they can shed a lot, Alaskan Klee Kais do not require much grooming and mostly take care of themselves.
  • Because they are skittish around strangers, these dogs require early socialization training that should last for the rest of their lives if they are to be friendly to unfamiliar faces.
  • The high prey drive of the Alaskan Klee Kai may make them ill suited for homes with other small pets such as cats, rabbits, hamsters, etc. Though they love their human families, small children that are not taught how to interact with dogs may inadvertently hurt Alaskan Klee Kais during play or provoke them to nip or snap.
Breed standards

Dog Breed Group: Companion Dogs
UKC group: Northern Breed
Average lifespan: 12-15 years
Average size: 10 to 15 pounds
Coat appearance: Double coat
Coloration: red and white, black and white, or gray and white, though solid white 
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: families with older children, apartment, houses with/without yards, active singles and seniors
Temperament: Intelligent, energetic, loyal, curious
Comparable Breeds: Siberian Husky, American Eskimo Dog

History
  The breed was developed in Wasilla, Alaska, from the early 1970s to 1988 by Linda S. Spurlin and her family. The breed was developed with Siberian and Alaskan Huskies, using Schipperke and American Eskimo Dog to bring down the size without dwarfism. She bred these dogs in private until she released them to the general public in 1988. Originally called the Klee Kai, the breed split into Alaskan Klee Kai and Klee Kai for political reasons in 1995. 
  The breed consolidated as its current name in 2002. Though a relatively new breed the Alaskan Klee Kai has a rich history. They are extremely energetic and intelligent, and their northern heritage is evident in their appearance. In contrast to Siberian Huskies, which were originally bred as sled dogs, the Alaskan Klee Kai were bred as companion dogs. The Alaskan Klee Kai was officially recognized by the American Rare Breed Association  in 1995 and by the United Kennel Club  on January 1, 1997.



Personality
  Alaskan Klee Kais are intelligent, energetic, and loving to their families. They don't much care for strangers and require lifelong socialization training if they are to be friendly to new people. Their wariness of new faces does, however, make them excellent watchdogs. When it comes to training, Alaskan Klee Kais are quick to pick up on basic commands and may even find themselves at the top of the class. 
  They are eager to please and highly food motivated, and they are more than capable of taking on agility training, which can help burn off some of their high energy throughout the day. Once they have at least a good, long walk and a healthy play session, they're usually happy to spend the rest of the day being couch potatoes, but neglect their exercise needs, and they may become bored, anxious, and destructive. Be careful on walks, as these dogs have a high prey drive that may cause them to bolt if they see wildlife. Alaskan Klee Kais love to be the centers of attention in their families, but they will also be vocal when their needs are not being met. Though they do not tend to be overly mouthy and are generally quieter than their Husky forbears, they will bark and whine to express their displeasure, and they can be sensitive.

Health
  The Alaskan Klee Kai is considered to be quite a healthy breed with few genetic problems. However, owners should be aware that the breed is predisposed to certain conditions that they should keep an eye out for, including luxating patella, thyroid disease, heart conditions, liver shunts, factor VII deficiency, and cataracts. They may also keep their baby teeth, which can cause problems when adult teeth grow in. They may need to have these teeth removed.

Care
  When it comes to Alaskan Klee Kai care, it is very important to make sure their exercise needs are met, as they may become high strung and anxious if they do not have an outlet to burn off energy. Like any dog breed, they require regular teeth brushings, nail clippings, and ear cleanings. You should ask your veterinarian about your dog's specific needs.

Living Conditions
  Because of their size, these dogs can live in an apartment, but a house with at least a small yard is recommended.

Training
  Due to its high intelligence, the Alaskan Klee Klai typically responds well to training. These dogs are quick learners and they enjoy being given a task to complete. For this reason, Alaskan Klee Klais excel in obedience training as well as agility – agility training also gives the dog a way to exercise its brain as well as its body. Because this breed is prone to developing Small Dog Syndrome, it is essential that you start training early and that you maintain a firm and consistent hand.

Exercise Requirements
  The Alaskan Klee Klai is a very active and energetic breed that requires a significant amount of daily exercise. This breed can be adaptable to apartment life but you will need to take the dog for a long walk on a daily basis. Regular playtime is also encouraged to help this breed work off its energy.

Grooming
  Unlike many other breeds, Alaskan Klee Kais do not usually develop a dog odor, and they generally like to groom themselves, so they may not need to bathe as frequently as some other dogs. They will likely need regular brushing during the seasons in which their coats blow out, which happens before summer and winter. During this time, they tend to shed profusely, while they only shed moderately the rest of the year.

Children And Other Pets
  The Alaskan Klee Kai is a dedicated family dog that loves its humans, even children. However, they are small dogs, and children that are very young are not always taught how to interact with animals. They may injure or provoke Alaskan Klee Kais to nip. Children should always be supervised when playing with dogs, and the Alaskan Klee Kai is no exception to that rule. 
  Alaskan Klee Kais are usually good with other dogs, especially if they have been socialized early on, though they have a high prey drive. This makes them ill suited for homes that have smaller pets unless they are specifically trained to live with them.

Is the Alaskan Klee Kai the Right Breed for you?
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Moderately Easy Training: The Alaskan Klee Kai is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Very Active: It will need daily exercise to maintain its shape. Committed and active owners will enjoy performing fitness activities with this breed.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.
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Everything about your King Shepherd

Everything about your King Shepherd
  The King Shepherd is self-confident with a well-balanced personality and healthy nervous system. They should not exhibit any shyness or nervousness. They are extremely intelligent, easy to train and eager and faithful to please their owners. This breed makes a fine sheepherder and working dog. They are also a naturally courageous guard and watchdog, showing courage, strength, and hardiness in their role of protector.

Overview
  The King Shepherd is a large breed. The build of this dog is muscular, long, and robust; the structure is solid. The head is in good proportion with the body and moderately wide between the eyes. The forehead is slightly rounded. The cheeks are not too full and moderately curved when viewed from the top. The thick, firm ears are medium-sized and moderately wide at base. The eyes are medium-sized and almond shaped. The shades of the eyes can be varying shades of brown ranging from golden brown to almost black. The chest is broad and deep. Thickly feathered, the tail reaches at least to the hocks and is slightly curved.
  The King Shepherd is self-confident with a well-balanced personality and healthy nervous system. They should not exhibit any shyness or nervousness. They are extremely intelligent, easy to train and eager and faithful to please their owners. This breed makes a fine sheep-herder and working dog. They are also a naturally courageous guard and watchdog, showing courage, strength, and hardiness in their role of protector. They make very nice companions and are friendly to other animals and children.

Breed standards
Breed Group: Herding
Breed Type: mixed breed
Average lifespan: 10 - 14 years
Average size: 90-150 pounds
Coat appearance: Coarse and Long
Coloration: Sable, black saddle with tan, gold, cream, tan or silver markings
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Singles and families with children and other pets living in a house with a yard
Temperament: Intelligent, eager to please, energetic, protective, loyal, loving, playful
Comparable Breeds: German Shepherd, Shiloh Shepherd

History
  Two American dog breeders Shelly Watts-Cross, and David Turkheimer created this large breed from the Shiloh Shepherd (American and European German Shepherd Dogs and Alaskan Malamutes), additional American-bred German Shepherd Dogs and the Great Pyrenees. An organized dog breed club was started in 1995.


Temperament
  The King Shepherd isn't solely valued extremely for its head turning good looks however the dog is gaining popularity for its working skills and glorious temperament similarly. Loving and loyal to their family, these excellent looking dogs will be trained simply as a result of their wanting to please nature and high levels of intelligence. Its protecting instincts, loyalty to its family and aloofness towards strangers create it a superb watch and working dog though' it's not hostile to strangers. As a mild, kind and playful breed, the King Shepherd makes a really smart fellow of kids and may be a trust worthy nanny for youngsters. 
  This simple to train dog is employed in search and rescue missions, as therapy dogs and in police work similarly as sheepherders. It gets on well with other dogs and pets within the family. it's not an appropriate dog for apartment living, not solely thanks to its giant size however conjointly thanks to its high exercise demands that decision for at least an oversized yard wherever the dog will look out of its exercise desires. The King Shepherd is a superb family pet, working dog and a trustworthy guardian of the family.

Health Problems
  As is the case with all other hybrid canine breeds, the King Shepherd might be susceptible to the health conditions that commonly affect its parent breeds. However, hybrid dogs can be surprisingly healthy and hardy, and you simply can’t predict an individual dog’s long-term health. Therefore, being aware of what to look out for, and working closely with your vet, will ensure you are able to give your pet the best care possible.
  King Shepherds may be prone to conditions that include Von Willebrand’s disease, hypothyroidism, joint dysplasia, eye issues, degenerative myelopathy, allergies, exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, thrombopathia, and bloat.

Care
  King Shepherds are very intelligent and energetic, and needs both challenging mental stimulation and plenty of exercise. The King Shepherd takes well to strenuous activity.

Living Conditions
  The King Shepherd dog is a large breed that requires more space. They are not recommended for apartments or other small living spaces. A large fenced in yard is ideal so the dog can get the exercise required to stay healthy and happy.

Training
  Because King Shepherds are highly intelligent, training your pet will be a pleasure. Your dog will be eager to follow your commands in order to please you, especially if you use a positive, consistent, and firm approach. Start training your King Shepherd from an early age to ensure your dog will learn all of the rules and will grow up to be a fantastic family pet.

Exercise
  Because the King Shepherd is a large breed, you will need to find time to exercise your dog every day. These canines thrive on physical and mental stimulation, and they have a lot of energy. They do best in homes with yards where they can run around and play off-leash, and they should have toys to play with while they are indoors as well.
  Use a combination of games, training, and outdoor activities to keep your King Shepherd active and healthy. Going for jogs or long walks, as well as hiking or bicycling, are great options. The key is to ensure your dog gets enough exercise to release his energy so he doesn’t become restless and potentially destructive. If you are not an active person, the King Shepherd isn’t the best choice for your lifestyle.

Grooming
  The coat is highly weather-resistant. The King Shepherd should be brushed regularly. Bathe only when necessary.

Children and other pets
  Loving and loyal to their family, these excellent looking dogs will be trained simply as a result of their wanting to please nature and high levels of intelligence. Its protecting instincts, loyalty to its family and aloofness towards strangers create it a superb watch and working dog though' it's not hostile to strangers. As a mild, kind and playful breed, the King Shepherd makes a really smart fellow of kids and may be a trust worthy nanny for youngsters.

Is the King Shepherd Right For You?
Difficult Training: The King Shepherd isn't deal for a first time dog owner. Patience and perseverance are required to adequately train it.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.
The chief qualities of this outstanding breed are : a well-balanced nervous system, readiness, lack of inhibition, vigilance, incorruptibility, combined with courage and cleverness in defense. It is known to be an excellent watch-dog and guard-dog. The King Shepherd is characterized by unsurpassed loyalty towards its master and eagerness to please.
Owing to its huge size, the King Shepherd is not recommended for apartment life. Though the King Shepherd can prove to be a good companion for kids, they should be allowed to interact with kids only under close supervision because of their stature.
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