LUV My dogs: mixed breed

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Showing posts with label mixed breed. Show all posts
Showing posts with label mixed breed. Show all posts

Thursday, June 28, 2018

Everything about your Weimapeake

Everything about your Weimapeake
  The Weimapeake is a deliberate cross between the purebred Weimaraner and the purebred Chesapeake Bay Retriever. Bred to have the ‘die hard’ retriever instinct known only to the Chessie and the close working prey drive the Weimaraner is known for.  This mix makes an excellent all year hunting companion. The webbed feet and heavier coat from the Chessie allow the Weimapeake to hunt waterfowl with ease. The Weim birdiness and the Chessie retrieval instinct make the Weimapeake an outstanding upland hunter with little training needed.  Weimapeakes tend not to have the smelly, oily coat known to other retriever breeds.  Our weimapeakes are very easy to train, are close working in the field and are excellent retrievers.  They have great dispositions and are great family pets.

Overview
  They may look like your typical Labrador Retriever at first, but the Weimapeake is a unique breed all its own.
  This cross between a Chesapeake Bay Retriever and a Weimaraner has a natural retriever instinct and prey drive, but you can also expect that these attractive, large dogs will make great family pets who are loyal and protective of the humans they love.
  Whether or not you hunt, the Weimapeake could be the ideal pet for your family, but to be absolutely sure that this designer dog breed will be the right fit, get the facts below.

Breed standards
Dog Breed Group: Mixed Breed Dogs
Average lifespan: 10-12 years
Average size: 60-90 lb
Coat appearance:  short but thick
Coloration:  grayish-brown  to chocolate brown and black.
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Singles, families with children and other pets, and those living in homes with yards
Temperament: Calm, protective, playful, loyal, intelligent, and loving
Comparable Breeds: Chesapeake Bay Retriever, Weimaraner

History 
  As a fairly new hybrid, not a lot is known about the Weimapeake.  This breed is a mix of the Weimaraner and the Chesapeake Bay Retriever who are both recognised by the American Kennel Club.  The Chessie is skilled at retrieving birds and its genetics can be traced back to 1807.  It was recognized as a breed by the American Kennel Club in 1878 and sources claim that the breed descended from the English Otterhound and the curly-coated Retriever, but the Newfoundland breed is also its ancestor. The Weimaraner was recognized by the AKC much later, in 1943. This breed originated from Germany and was created in the early 19th century by the Weimar court. The Bloodhound is part of its ancestral make-up, and some sources believe that it is in fact, a direct descendant.  The Weimapeake was originally created to try and get the best of both breeds.  It was the intention to create an ideal hunting dog that possessed speed, agility, courage, and intelligence.  
  The American Kennel Club recognizes both parental breeds as a sporting breed, as they are known for their hunting skills both in the woods and in water.  The Weimapeake inherits its webbed feet from both parent breeds which makes swimming and wading easy.  
  Sources say that the Weimapeake has been bred in mid-west America for decades, but the exact dates and whereabouts are unknown.  Although the Weimapeake is not recognized by the American Kennel Club, it is recognized by both the International Designer Canine Registry and the Designer Breed Registry as a hybrid breed. 


Temperament
  The Weimapeake requires proper socialization at an early age. The Weimapeake gets along with dogs and other household pets. The Weimapeake is friendly towards people of all ages if socialized properly. The calm, yet playful nature of the Weimapeake makes it an excellent family dog. The Weimapeake is often reserved with strangers and will protect its family if threatened.

Health 
  As a hybrid breed, the Weimapeake could potentially inherit the diseases that its parents, the Weimaraner and Chesapeake Bay Retriever, are prone to. However, there is no way to predict an individual dog’s health, and he may never develop any of the common problems associated with his parents’ breeds.
  Weimapeakes have the Weimaraner ear, which features a wide ear canal and a large opening, so it can become dirty quite easily. You should take extra care to ensure that water doesn’t become trapped within your dog’s ear canal when bathing or swimming, as that could result in infection.

Care
The short hair of the Weimapeake makes it an easy keep.  Periodically brush to remove dead hairs. Normal ear cleaning, nail clipping and bathing will help keep the Weimapeake in top condition.

Living Conditions
  The Weimapeake can do okay in small house or apartment only if they are walked and exercised at least 2 to 3 times a day. If you don't have a large yard, access to a fenced in area or dog park would be great because they need to run.


Training
  You should expect that housetraining your Weimapeake could potentially take a couple of months, so persistence is key. With this breed, it is all about consistent and short training sessions, and every session should end on a positive note.
  These dogs are really eager to please, and they are intelligent, so they will learn quickly. However, they can be stubborn. Establish yourself as the pack leader, and be gentle yet firm in order to make training your dog easier and to prevent your dog from becoming your boss. Once trained, this multi-talented pooch will make you proud.

Exercise
  The Weimapeake must be walked at least twice a day or have a large yard to run in. Like all sporting breeds the Weimapeake is an active dog which needs regular ‘off leash’ exercise. Without an outlet for pent-up energy the Weimapeake can become destructive and behavior problems can arise.
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Everything about your Labrador Husky

Everything about your Labrador Husky
  Though the name of this breed might suggest that it is a cross between the Labrador Retriever and the Siberian Husky, the Labrador Husky is actually a completely separate breed. This dog looks remarkably like a wolf, having the same double coat and wild appearance. The dog is still a largely unknown breed but if you are lucky enough to meet one you will never forget the experience.

Overview
  The Labrador Husky has a similar temperament to other Northern breeds which means that they can often be unfriendly or even aggressive with strangers.  However, they can be good if socialized, and they often do well with children.  Being with other dogs always makes them happy, because they are bred to work well in a pack and actually many people believe they should be bought in pairs.  Small animals do not usually do well with Nordic dogs but if they are raised together it should be fine.  Training is easy and fun for them because they naturally learns things well.  However, sometimes stubbornness will prevent them from learning silly tricks or other useless commands.  Intelligence can be their gift but can be your nightmare if they are bored.

Breed standards
Dog Breed Group: Mixed Breed Dogs
Average lifespan: 10-13 years
Average size: 60 - 100 pounds
Coat appearance: Thick double coat - thick undercoat and soft outer coat
Coloration: Solid white, solid black, black and white, red and white, and grey and white
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, active families, active singles, house with a yard
Temperament: Friendly, good-natured, intelligent, quiet
Comparable Breeds: Siberian Husky, Canadian Eskimo Dog

History
  In order to best understand the history of the Labrador Husky, an explanation of the people that these dogs live alongside and serve is necessary. The Thule Inuit people developed along the coast of Alaska sometime after 200 B.C. These people migrated east across Canada, along with their dogs, and occupied the Labrador region by 1300 A.D. The Dorset people originally inhabited this region, but due in part to their lack of canine use for travel, hunting, and companionship, they were driven to extinction by the Inuit. The Inuit brought Husky dogs with them , and over time, bred these dogs with wolves to improve their strength and endurance. As these people became indigenous to the Labrador region, this breed developed independently from the aforementioned Spitz dogs, and became distinct.
  The Labrador Huskies were used for transportation as sled dogs. Prior to the advent of the snowmobile, sleds were the only viable means of transportation across large swaths of land. The dogs contributed to the hunting success of the Inuit people, allowing them to travel further and hunt in a wider geographical range. In addition, the dogs helped keep their human companions warm in encampments. After the snowmobile was invented, these dogs were not needed as sled dogs, except in sled races, but have been utilised as companions and as search-and-rescue canines. In addition, due to their intelligence, they have also been used in bomb or narcotic detection.


Temperament
  The Labrador Husky is an unknown and often misunderstood breed. It is not a mix between a Labrador and a Husky, but a purebred dog native of coastal Labrador. It is similar in a lot of ways to the wolf. It does not bark, but can howl like a wolf. The objective in training this dog is to achieve pack leader status. It is a natural instinct for a dog to have an order in its pack. When we humans live with dogs, we become their pack. 
  The entire pack cooperates under a single leader. Lines are clearly defined and rules are set. Because a dog communicates his displeasure with growling and eventually biting, all other humans MUST be higher up in the order than the dog. The humans must be the ones making the decisions, not the dogs. That is the only way your relationship with your dog can be a complete success.

Health
  The Labrador Husky is fairly unknown so not much information is available about genetic disorders or their life expectancy.  However, special care has been taken in their breeding which could suggest that few health problems exist.

Care
  The Labrador Husky probably needs plenty of brushing as any double coated breed would.  Plus, they shed once a year and during that time they should be brushed every day to make sure the loose hair gets cleaned from their coat.  Exercise is, of course, essential to this sled dog.  A large yard to run in and long walks will help keep them calm.  However, they should also have some sort of work to do such as agility or fly ball which will keep them calm and happy.

Training
  The Labrador Husky is an intelligent breed so it should respond well to training. These dogs are likely to learn quickly as long as you maintain a firm and consistent hand in training. Positive reinforcement training methods are recommended for this breed and you should keep your training sessions short and fun to ensure that your dog doesn’t lose interest and stop paying attention. Because this breed is so smart it needs plenty of mental and physical stimulation to prevent it from becoming bored and developing destructive behaviors.

Exercise
  This breed needs to be taken on a daily long walk or jog. While out on the walk the dog must be made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as in a dog's mind the leader leads the way, and that leader needs to be the human.

Grooming
  Labrador Huskies require extensive grooming during all parts of the year. Its extremely thick and durable coat, also known as a double coat. was made to be able to withstand harsh winters in Labrador Canada. Daily brushing is required to maintain the coat. A bath is sometimes the best way to fully groom and clean the dog. Bathing the dog does not have to be done on a regular basis, but is important in order to ensure a clean and well-groomed dog. It is also vital that the owner of a Labrador Husky checks for fleas and ticks during the warmer months. 
  Because this dog has such a thick coat, it is the perfect place for a tick or flea to nestle in. Not checking for these things can lead to serious problems such as Lyme disease, which can be life-threatening to the dog. The Labrador Husky sheds constantly throughout the year, so it is important to keep up with its grooming.




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Everything about your Basschshund

Everything about your Basschshund
  The Basschshund, often misspelled as Basschund, is created by cross-breeding two of the most popular purebreds in the world – a Basset Hound and a Dachshund. The medium-sized dog, with its lively nature and noble appearance, is regarded as a great family companion. The confident little Basschshund, like its parent breeds, has a long muscular body, an elongated head with its eyes having an intelligent look, drooping ears, and short legs.

Overview
  The Basschshund is not a purebred dog. It is a cross between the Basset Hound and the Dachshund. The best way to determine the temperament of a mixed breed is to look up all breeds in the cross and know you can get any combination of any of the characteristics found in either breed. Not all of these designer hybrid dogs being bred are 50% purebred to 50% purebred. It is very common for breeders to breed multi-generation crosses.

Breed standards
Dog Breed Group: Mixed Breed Dogs
Average lifespan: 12-15 years
Average size: 25-45 lbs 
Coat appearance: Short, smooth, shiny
Coloration:  Light Brown/Golden, Brown and White, Black and Brown
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, singles , couples, apartments, houses with/without yards, seniors
Temperament: Gentle, loving, stubborn, watchful
Comparable Breeds: Dachshund, Basset Hound

History 
  The Basschshund is a modern breed, so the documentation of their history is minimal. However, the Basset Hound originated in France and was primarily bred to hunt rabbits. Because of their keen sense of smell, they were also used to hunt squirrels, pheasants, foxes and deer. Their name is derived from the French word "bas" meaning low-set. It is believed that they are descendants of the Bloodhound. Therefore, they are a scent hound and are excellent trackers. 
  The Basset Hound started being imported into the United States in 1883. The Westminster Kennel Club recognized the Basset Hound in 1884 and the American Kennel Club first recognized the Basset Hound in 1885. The Basset Hound has been on different television shows such as Columbo, Dukes of Hazzard and Coach. A Bassett Hound named Sherlock dressed in white tie and tails appeared with Elvis on The Steve Allen Show. Elvis sang the song “Hound Dog” to Sherlock. This breed is a wonderful performer, companion and hunter. It is believed that the Dachshund originated in Germany in the early 1600s.
  The breed was developed so that it could go inside of an animal’s underground den. The Dachshund would bravely fight underground and force the badger or fox out of his den. Dachshunds first came to the United States in 1870. They were imported into the U.S for rabbit hunting. The American Kennel Club (AKC) registered its first Dachshund in 1885. 

Temperament 
  The Basschshund dogs are known to be fearless, intelligent, and full of energy but may act too hastily at times. When faced with certain tasks, they like to do them in their own ways without being instructed. Because of their independent, playful, and entertaining nature, they are often regarded as mischief-makers. Like most hounds, the Basschshund may show stubbornness with an instinct to chase small animals and toys.
  They remain close to their family and love to be cuddled. If introduced to the kids and other household animals early, these dogs get along well with them. Since they have an inherent suspicious nature, they can be aggressive towards strangers. These brave and alert pets warn their owners of intruders, which makes them a great watchdog.

Health 
  There are certain issues she is more prone to, some that can be inheritied from her parents and some particular to the type of dog she is. With her back it is important to make sure she is not allowed to jump from moderate or more heights, even jumping from the couch to the floor could cause injury. Her ears means she is prone to ear infections and her love of food means she is prone to obesity. Other issues include Bloat, Von Willebrand's, Panosteitis, Eye problems, Patellar Luxation, Thrombopathia, IDD, IVDD, Cushings, Diabetes, Deafness, Allergies and Hip Dysplasia.

Care
  The Basschshund does shed, so he needs to be brushed weekly with a slicker brush or a grooming mitt. The Basset Hound can develop a musky smell. Because of this, the Basschshund should be bathed monthly with a gentle dog shampoo. It is important to try to prevent water from getting inside those floppy ears as breeds with this type of ear are susceptible to yeast and bacteria developing into an infection. Afterwards, your dog will need to be dried off with a towel or carefully with a hair dryer on low heat. 
  The Basschshund’s nails should be trimmed every 10 to 14 days, to reduce stress on their tiny feet. The teeth should be brushed on a regular basis to prevent tartar build-up. The Basschshund’s ears will need to be cleaned once a week. Floppy ears do not allow for good air circulation and can be prone to trouble. 

Training
  The Basschshunds are quick learners, but they need proper motivation. Use their favorite toys or treats to catch their attention. Do not extend the training sessions by using the same instructions repeatedly. They might quickly become bored, so training should be made more fun and interesting. Housetraining these dogs can be a challenging task, so be patient and persistent in your approach. As the puppies are typically rambunctious, early socialization, obedience, and crate training will help them learn basic etiquettes of living with a family.

Exercise
  The activity level of Basschshunds depends on which parent it leans towards. It can be slightly active, requiring just 30 minutes of walk per day. But it can also be very energetic and will want to go to the park for play sessions and socialize with other pets and kids. It is necessary to leash it because it loves to chase. This dog is suitable for apartment life because of its small size and moderate exercise needs.

Grooming
  A gentle rubdown with a hound glove or brush will keep your Basschshund’s coat in top condition. Since it does not shed too much, a weekly brushing is sufficient to remove loose or dead hairs. It needs an occasional bath unless it has an unpleasant smell. Ear infections could be an issue with this breed as its long hanging ears prevent proper circulation of air in its inner ear. Therefore, clean your pet’s ears every week with a vet-recommended ear cleansing solution. Keep your dog’s nails neatly trimmed and brush its teeth 3-4 times a week.

Children and other Pets
  This is a great family dog and is very good with children, being playful and affectionate with them. She can get on well with other pets too though she does chase smaller animals. Some Basschshunds can get on well with other dogs but some need more help. Early socialization is key on helping her be at her best with other people, animals and dogs.
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Wednesday, June 27, 2018

Everything about your Afador

Everything about your Afador
  A blend of noble Afghan Hound and gentle Labrador Retriever, the handsome Afador is a perfect pet for families with older children and those with previous experience as dog owners. In spite of his retriever lineage, this medium sized pooch has a spirited personality and can be a handful for a novice pet parent who may not be experienced at training a younger dog. His protective nature, wariness of strangers and resounding bark make him perfect for those who want an energetic family pet that brings watchdog benefits.

Overview
  The Afador is a hybrid dog produced, in the last decade or so, from crossbreeding the Afghan Hound with the Labrador Retriever. Afadors are highly intelligent, remarkably alert, loud barkers, more than a bit stubborn and nearly as difficult to train as they are loyal to loved ones — which is quite a bit! They don't make ideal indoor dogs due to the tremendous energy they possess, nor are they outside-only dogs as they strongly prefer to be with their family, but they do need a good amount of very secure outdoor space in which to run and play. They are also high maintenance in regards to exercise and grooming.

Breed standards
Dog Breed Group: Mixed Breed Dogs
Average lifespan: 10-12 years
Average size: 60-70 lbs
Hypoallergenic: No
Coat appearance: Long, fine, smooth
Coloration: Black, cream, yellow, chocolate, and parti colored with white
Best Suited For: Families with older children, house-owners with fenced yards, those with time for daily exercise.
Temperament: Affectionate, excitable, energetic, cautious
Comparable Breeds: Labrador Retriever, Afghan Hound

History 
  First bred in Alaska, the Afador is a perfect balance between the Labrador Retriever and the Afghan Hound. Although it is still a rare breed, the Afador has become quite popular in the last decade.
  With the intelligence and energy from the Labrador and the beauty and grace of the Afghan, they can be a great pet for anyone. When the breed first originated, the Afador was always a mix of Labrador Retriever and Afghan Hound, but now there are many breeders who have begun to use second generation Afadors to breed new Afadors. Due to this multibreed mixing, there is no guarantee of which attributes these Afador puppies will have. It depends on the amount of each original breed that was in the first generation and which genetics are the most dominant. 
  Breeders are now trying to stabilize the Afador breed by determining what amounts of each type of dog are most desired. The Afghan Hound originated in Afghanistan and is considered to be one of the oldest dog breeds there are, believed to have been around during the pre-Christian era. The Labrador Retriever is intelligent, lovable, and playful. This breed is one of the most popular guide dogs and working dogs because they are smart and friendly. The Afador is usually a strong and confident retrieving dog that likes to work but also has a playful and protective nature as well. 
  They make great watchdogs at home but also like to venture outdoors often and may want to retrieve random small animals even when you do not request it. Because they are a mixed breed, they are not a true purebred dog so they are not registered with the AKC. However, they are considered to be part of the hounding and sporting groups.


Temperament 
  The Afador is considered a hybrid or designer dog.Described as affectionate, independent, intelligent and loyal, the Afador is a greatly family pet who loves to play outdoors, but adapts well when spending time indoors. He loves kids but his high spirited nature means he does best with older kids who won’t get knocked about if he decides to jump up. He’s an alert and watchful dog who enjoys a good bark and to alert his human pack when strangers arrive. Because he comes from a hounding and sporting background, Afadors are known for their work in search and rescue, tracking, sledding, hunting, police work, narcotics detection, retrieving, herding and agility.

Health 
Afadors are generally a healthy breed, but some individuals may be affected by certain health conditions like allergies, hypothyroidism, cataracts, elbow dysplasia, hip dysplasia, epilepsy, and myopathy.

Care
  Because of the Afador’s long, fine coat, a lot of maintenance is needed to prevent matting and tangles. The Afghan Hound is known to be almost hypoallergenic but the Labrador Retriever is a moderate shedder, so the Afador is likely to shed. They should be brushed at least twice a week with a metal comb and bristle brush. The best way to brush your Afador is to comb one handful at a time starting at the bottom to keep it free of tangles. 
  Shampooing your Afador may be needed more often than other dogs due to their long fur and affinity for playing outdoors. Use a mild shampoo recommended by your veterinary care provider. The ears should be checked and cleaned once a week to get rid of excess wax and debris. They should be fed about two to three cups of premium dog food per day, depending on your Afador’s size and age. Because Afghan Hounds are prone to bloat, you should talk to your veterinarian about feeding your Afador smaller meals several times a day.

Living Conditions
  The Afador is not suited to living in apartments because of his energy levels nor in warm climates though he is fine in colder ones. 
  He does not bark a lot but will bark and can do so loudly if a stranger approaches. He is stable but should not be kept as an outside dog because of their more social nature.

Training
  The willful Afador can be a handful to train so best to start early with a particular focus on socialization to lessen his wariness of strangers. The breed is typically independent however is highly intelligent and when training is properly administered, he is known to listen to commands with few repetitions needed. For owners not seasoned at training a head-strong pooch, a professional dog trainer would be a good investment.

Activity Requirements 
  The Labrador Retriever and the Afghan Hound are medium sized dogs that do require at least 45 minutes a day of exercise. Both breeds can easily become couch potatoes and obese, therefore, when the two breeds are mixed, their offspring can also easily become obese and lazy. Ensure that your dog is getting plenty of exercise to build muscle tone and keep his body healthy. Do not just leave him in the back yard to play by himself, he will not do so and may even become destructive. By getting out there with your dog and playing games or simply taking a walk around the neighborhood you are building a bond with your dog that will last a lifetime.

Grooming
  With frequent brushing, its coat can be kept free from tangles and dirt while cleaning its ears every month using a vet-approved solution helps reduce accumulation of wax and dirt. Brush its teeth several times a week and trim its nails once a month.

Talents and Facts
  • The Afador is not officially recognized by any canine organization
  • The name of the dog is a portmanteau of the first syllable of the word “Afghan” and the last syllable of the word “Labrador”
  • Based on its mix, the Afador is sometimes referred to as an Afghan Hound Dog or a Labrador Retriever Hybrid Dog
  • These are not commonly used terms; they are simply acknowledgments of the cross-breed origins of the dog

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Everything about your Afghan Retriever

Everything about your Afghan Retriever
  The Afghan Retriever is a large breed with a long flowing coat, floppy ears, and a muscular but lithe body. In fact, this breed looks like a smaller built Golden Retriever. Both breeds are known for their hunting abilities so they are often used for that purpose. These dogs are bred to be sporty and energetic enough to take hunting but calm and friendly enough to be a good house pet. The Afghan Retriever is independent but lovable, smart and silly. They are good with kids and other pets but should not be left alone with any children under five years old. You will mostly find these dogs in yellow, cream, gold, white, and chocolate.

Overview
  The Afghan Retriever is not a purebred dog. It is a cross between the Afghan Hound and the Golden Retriever. The best way to determine the temperament of a mixed breed is to look up all breeds in the cross and know you can get any combination of any of the characteristics found in either breed. Not all of these designer hybrid dogs being bred are 50% purebred to 50% purebred. It is very common for breeders to breed multi-generation crosses.

Breed standards
Dog Breed Group: Mixed Breed Dogs
Average lifespan: 12-14 Years
Average size: 55-80 pounds
Coat appearance: thick, flowing coat
Coloration: brown and white, dark brown, chocolate, light brown, golden, white or cream
Hypoallergenic: No
Comparable Breeds: Golden Retriever, Afghan Hound

History 
  Because this breed is new, the history is not known yet. However, by looking at the history of the parent breeds, this can give you a good idea of the characteristics of the Afghan Retriever.
  The Afghan Hound is an ancient breed from Afghanistan, where these dogs were found roaming in the Afghan mountains. When these independent beauties were discovered, they were brought down to town and used in hunting and gathering rabbits and gazelle for food. In the 1920s, the Afghan Hound was brought to the United States but was mainly found among the wealthy. They were registered by the American Kennel Club (AKC) in 1926 and became popular as show dogs for a while before losing their popularity in the 1950s. 
The Golden Retriever originated in England in the early 1800s and was documented by Lord Tweedmouth on the estate with Sir Dudley Majoribanks. This breed is famous for its retrieving abilities but is also good at hunting, field trials, obedience, and is often used as a guide dog for blind people. In fact, the first three dogs to win the obedience champion titles were all Golden Retrievers.
 This breed came to the United States in 1900 with Lord Tweedmouth’s sons to live on the family’s Texas farm. They quickly became popular as show dogs and as pets, being registered by the AKC in 1925 and is presently the 3rd most popular dog breed in the United States. The Afghan Hound ranks 113th most popular. Their fast learning skills made them invaluable to those who needed therapy dogs, guide dogs, and service dogs for the blind and handicapped, as well as narcotics detection.


Personality
  The Afghan Retriever can be sweet and silly, dignified and proud. They make great family pets and are good with children. As loyal, smart and obedient dogs, they tend to train very well and like to be given tasks to do. Even though they're easy to train, care should be given to treat them with firmness, fairness and consistency. They are a proud breed, but have no problem acting silly and playful when warranted.

Health 
  Afghan Retriever is a healthier breed like other hybrid breeds. However Afghan Retriever has tendency to suffer from cancer, hip dysplasia, Von Willebrand's condition, heart complications and congenital eye defects. 

Training
  Afghan Retriever require training in early age like other hybrid dogs. Afghan Retriever is easy to train.  It learns basic commands such as sit, stay, come easily. Behavior training is also very important for your Afghan Retriever.  Behavior training prevents and or corrects bad habits of your puppy or dog. Behavior and basic commands training for your Afghan Retriever should must on these lines. Do not get impatient. You will probably have to repeat the command many times. Never use negative reinforcement. Do not call your dog to come to you for punishment because this will teach your dog not to come on command. Be sure to keep any frustration out of the tone of your voice. If you feel yourself becoming frustrated, take a break. Your dog can sense this and will start to associate training with your unhappiness. You cannot hide your frustration from a dog. You cannot pretend. Dogs can feel human emotion, so stay relaxed, firm and confident.

Exercise 
  Daily exercise for your Afghan Retriever is important, dogs are living with human since thousands of years, wild dogs have challenges to survive so they work daily to find food, save food and themselves from other animals but companion dogs have nothing to do, they have ready food and couch to sit, which may affect their health, habits and activity. 
  Your Afghan Retriever is recommended Tuging,Running,Walking regular according to its breed specific exercise requirements. 

Care
   The Afghan Hound is hypoallergenic but the Golden Retriever is a mild seasonal shedder so you should expect some level of shedding during the warmer months of the year. It is best to brush your Afghan Retriever at least every other day to promote good skin care and prevent mats. You should also clean their ears and eyes at this time and check for any redness or swelling. Many owners of both the Golden Retriever and the Afghan Hound take their dogs to be professionally groomed every few months, which is a fine idea if you live in a warm climate. Otherwise, you can bathe your dog with a mild shampoo when needed and trim the nails regularly as well.

Children and other pets
Afghan Retriever are good with children and other pet.

Talents and Facts
  • This cross between the Afghan Hound and the Golden Retriever belongs to the sporting and hounding group
  • This breed requires lots of exercise
  • When left to play outdoors, they will run around to burn off energy
  • When indoors, they can be fairly playful and lively
  • Take them on daily walks or runs and make sure they have plenty of space to roam in a large backyard



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Tuesday, June 26, 2018

Everything about your Pomsky

Everything about your Pomsky
  Cute, silly, and suited for apartment life, the Pomsky is a dog that likes to be the center of attention, and with their adorable looks and playful antics, they often get the adoration they crave. Their unfortunate start as a designer breed mixed between Siberian Husky and Pomeranian parents hasn’t stopped them from earning popularity with dog lovers. Unfortunately, those who rush to buy Pomsky puppies from breeders are often overwhelmed and unprepared for their needs, and dogs of this breed sometimes find themselves left at shelters or with rescue groups. 

Overview
  The Pomsky is a mixed breed the result of crossing the Siberian Husky with a Pomeranian. She is a medium sized dog with a life span of 13 to 15 years. She is bred using artificial insemination as natural breeding would be dangerous due to the size difference between the parents. She is a fun and watchful dog who is great for families with older kids, couples or singles or seniors as long as she can be given the exercise she needs.
  The Pomsky is a dog best suited for a household that does not have children or other pets unless she is going to be raised with them. Early socialization and training are important for her. If you love the look of the Husky but do not have the room or the energy for a purebred the Pomsky is a great though expensive substitute.

Highlights
  • Pomsky are very trainable, but may inherit some stubbornness from the Siberian Husky, so they are best suited for experienced dog owners.
  • The Pomsky's thick coat makes it more tolerant of cold weather than most other kinds of lap dogs.
  • Pomskies are vocal dogs that tend to be yappy if they aren't properly trained.
  • The coat of the breed comes in a variety of colors, just like its parent breeds.
  • Socialization with other dogs and people is important, especially at an early age.
  • Pomsky are highly adaptable, don't have large space requirements, and only have moderate exercise needs, making them good apartment dogs.
Other Quick Facts

  • A Pomsky typically has a soft, fluffy, silky coat, prick ears and a furry tail that swishes over the back.
  • The Pomsky is usually bred from a Siberian Husky female and a Pomeranian male. Breedings are usually done through artificial insemination because of the size difference in the two breeds.
  • The size of a Pomsky can vary dramatically, from toy size to medium size. Like their parent breeds, the dogs can come in many different patterns and colors, such as grey/white, brown red, blue merle, blonde and more.
Breed standards
Dog Breed Group: Mixed Breed Dogs
Average lifespan: 12 to 15 years
Average size: 20-30 lb
Coat appearance: Fluffy, soft, wavy, double
Coloration: black-and-white coloration,this breed can exhibit a wide range of colors including black, grey, brown, red, blue, blonde, and more
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with older children, singles and seniors, apartments and houses with/without yards
Temperament: Loving, friendly, energetic, playful
Comparable Breeds: Pomeranian, Siberian Husky

History
  Pomsky breeders have formed the Pomsky Club of America, with the goal of achieving a recognized purebred dog. This can take years, however, and will not be accomplished any time soon.
  But crossing two breeds over and over does not a breed make. To achieve consistency in appearance, size and temperament, breeders must select the puppies with the traits they want and breed them over several generations for the traits to become set.
Crossbreeds such as Pomskies have become popular over the past 10 or 20 years as people seek out dogs that are different from the everyday Yorkie or Poodle. It’s also often claimed that crossbreeds are hypoallergenic or have fewer health problems or will carry the best traits of each breed, but this just isn’t true.
  Whatever his breed, cross or mix, love your dog for what he is: a unique and loving companion.

Personality
  The Pomsky is a bit of a comedian and tends to know that its cute antics will be met with plenty of adoration from human onlookers. They are highly adaptable to change, and their moderate exercise needs make them fairly suited to apartment living, so long as they get at least one long walk per day. That said, they tend to inherit their Husky parents' chatty howling and whining tendencies along with their Pomeranian parents' penchant for yapping.   This makes them very vocal dogs that may get on the neighbors' nerves. Also, they shed a ton, so be prepared to find hair everywhere and have some lint rollers and a vacuum cleaner at the ready. Pomskies tend to latch on to one favorite family member, though they may get along with all humans in the household. Socialization is very important and should begin at an early age. Pomskies can be nervous around strangers if they haven't been properly socialized.

Health
Since the breed is so new, not much is known about any common Pomsky health conditions. Keep in mind, though, that as is common with most mixed breeds, any hereditary health conditions that show up in either the Pomerian  or the Husky  may show up in your Pomsky, as well.

Care
As with any other breed, Pomskies need to be groomed on a regular basis to make sure their coats and skin are kept in top condition. They also need to be given regular daily exercise to ensure they remain fit and healthy. On top of this, dogs need to be fed good quality food that meets all their nutritional needs throughout their lives.

Living Conditions
The Pomsky’s generally small size makes this breed the perfect companion for someone living in an apartment all the way up to a larger home.

Training
Pomskies are highly intelligent and respond well to reward based training methods. However, they can sometimes inherit the Pomeranian’s stubbornness and the willfulness of the Siberian Husky and should therefore be handled with calm and assertive leadership. Failure to do so can result in “small dog syndrome” and other behavioral problems. For instance, Pomskies can be prone to resource guarding like the Pomeranians, and catching early signs of this behavioral problem will help you eliminate before it becomes a serious issue.
  For most new dog owners, it’s important to start with the basics such as potty training and learning to walk on a leash. Depending on the breeder you’ve got your Pomsky from and the puppy’s age, they might already know a trick or two, but it’s also highly likely you’ll need to be the one that that housetrains them. Training a puppy is not an easy feat, but it’s important to teach your Pomsky fur baby manners while they’re still young. If they sniff out you’re not an alpha, they’ll shamelessly exploit your weak side to their advantage- as any smart pupper would do!

Exercise
  Pomskies are high energy, intelligent dogs, much like both parent breeds. As such they must be given the right amount of daily exercise and as much mental stimulation as possible for them to be truly happy, well-rounded dogs. They need to be given a minimum of 30 to 40 minutes exercise a day, but more would be better so that boredom does not set in which could lead to a Pomsky developing some unwanted behavioural issues around the home.
  A shorter walk in the morning would be fine, but a longer more interesting one in the afternoon is a must. These dogs also like to be able to roam around a back garden as often as possible so they can really let off steam. However, the fencing must be extremely secure to keep these energetic dogs in because if they find a weakness in the fence, they will soon escape out and get into all sorts of trouble.

Grooming
  A Pomsky has a double coat that is usually soft, fluffy and silky. Brush or comb the Pomsky coat with a bristle brush at least weekly to distribute skin oils and prevent or remove mats and tangles.
  Bathe a Pomsky as needed. That might be weekly , monthly or somewhere in between.
Twice a year he “blows coat” as it’s called, losing a great deal of hair so new hair can grow in. This period can last up to three months during each shedding season — typically spring and fall. Brushing him daily at this time will help to ensure that loose fur comes out when you want it to and helps to keep it off your clothing and furniture.
  Other grooming needs include trimming his nails every few weeks, keeping his ears clean and dry and brushing his teeth regularly — daily if you can — with a vet-approved pet toothpaste. Small dogs can be especially prone to periodontal disease.

Children And Other Pets
  Pomskies are often wary of small children who may not be properly trained on how to handle animals, and they can nip if they feel uncomfortable or threatened. They can get along with other dogs if they are socialized, especially if they have been raised with them, though the high prey drive they inherit from the Husky means they might like to give chase to smaller animals like cats. It is best to socialize them early, especially if you plan to have them in a household with children or other pets.

Fun Facts About the Pomsky
  • The Pomsky is usually made by crossing a female Siberian Husky with a male Pomeranian to avoid complications caused by the smaller Pomeranian bearing a litter of larger puppies.
  • There is no way to predict which characteristics the Pomsky will inherit from each parent breed, but many Pomskies become protective of their owners and are skittish around children – they may not be the best family pet.
  • Though the black-and-white Husky-like coloration is the most popular for Pomskies, these dogs can range in coat type and length as well as color, including shades of brown, red, and even blonde.
  • Is the Pomsky a vulnerable breed? No, they have become one of the more popular cross breeds thanks to their kind natures and charming looks
  • A Pomsky’s sire is a Pomeranian and their dam is a Siberian Husky to avoid birthing complications
  • They come in lots of sizes, but prospective owners should be careful when considering buying an extra small Pomsky because of the health issues associated with their size
Did You Know?
Pomskies can be smart and learn quickly, especially when motivated by praise and food rewards.
  
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