LUV My dogs: loyalty

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Showing posts with label loyalty. Show all posts
Showing posts with label loyalty. Show all posts

Thursday, September 15, 2016

Everything about your Transylvanian Hound

Everything about your Transylvanian Hound
  When it comes to the Transylvanian Hound, there is much to love. It has a gentle, adaptable personality that comes from centuries of working with people in the wide-ranging climate of Hungary. Gentle and good-natured, it grows very close to family members. This is the type of dog that will romp through the wilderness and cuddle on the living room floor.

Overview
  The Transylvanian Hound  is an ancient dog breed of Hungary, historically primarily used for hunting. It is a strong, medium-sized scent hound, characterized by a black body, with tan and sometimes white markings on the muzzle, chest and extremities, and distinctive tan eyebrow spots. It has a high-pitched bark for a dog of its size. The breed was rescued from extinction by focused breeding efforts in the late 20th century. There were formerly two varieties, the long-legged and short-legged, developed for different kinds of hunting in the Middle Ages. Only the long-legged strain survives.

What makes the Transylvanian Hound Unique?
  Historically, Transylvanian Hound are know primarily for hunting. These dogs re characterized by a black body, and sometimes white markings on the muzzle and they are medium-sized dogs. they are sweet, energetic, loyal and fearless.

Breed standards
FCI: Group 6, Section 1 #241
AKC: FSS- The AKC Foundation Stock Service (FSS) is an optional recording service for purebred dogs that are not yet eligible for AKC registration.
UKC : Scenthound
Life Span: 10 – 12 Years
Colour: Black, Tan
Litter Size: up to 8 puppies
Size: Males –18 to 21 inches; Females – 18 to 21 inches
Weight: Males – 66 to 77 pounds; Females –66 to 77 pounds
Origin: Hungary
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles, houses with yards, hunters
Temperament: Friendly, hardy, courageous, intelligent
Hypoallergenic: No
Comparable Breeds: Black and Tan Coonhound, Rottweiler

History
  The ancestors of the Transylvanian Hound came with the invading Magyar tribes in the ninth century, who brought in hounds and crossed them with local varieties and with Polish hounds.
  The dog was the favourite of the Hungarian aristocracy during the breed's peak in the Middle Ages, for hunting various game animals.Two height varieties developed to hunt different game in different types of terrain, and both varieties were kept together. The long-legged variety was used for hunting woodland and grassland big game, such as European bison, bear, boar, and lynx. The short-legged variety was used for hunting fox, hare, and chamois is overgrown or rocky terrain.
  The breed declined, and was marginalised to the Carpathian woodlands, shrinking with the growth of agriculture and forestry. At the beginning of the twentieth century, the breed was nearly extinct, and not recognised and standardised by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI) until 1963. In 1968, efforts began to save it.Today, a substantial number of the long-legged variety of the dogs may be found in both Hungary and neighboring Romania. However, only the long-legged variety remains.
  The Transylvanian Hound is, naturally, recognised by the national dog breeding and fancier group, the Hungarian Kennel Club (using the FCI breed standard). The breed was recognised with a breed standard by one US-based group, the United Kennel Club (UKC), in 2006.The more prominent American Kennel Club publishes no standard for it, though the organisation at least provisionally recognises its existence, announcing its acceptance in 2015 into the AKC Foundation Stock Service Program, for breeders hoping to establishing it in the United States.


Temperament
  Even though the Transylvanian Hound was originally developed as a hunting dog it also makes a wonderful family pet. These dogs are friendly and amiable by nature and they can be quite loyal and loving with their families. This breed is curious and they have a tendency to follow scents, so you should always keep your dog on a leash when you take him outside.   The Transylvanian Hound can be somewhat independent at times due to their hunting instincts, but they love to spend time with family and they generally get along well with children and other dogs. This breed requires adequate daily mental and physical stimulation to prevent the development of problem behaviors.
  This breed is known for its protective ways and is a good addition as a family dog. The Transylvanian Hound is not only loyal, but also intelligent and easy to train. Bred for hunting purposes, the Transylvanian Hound is energetic, requiring daily exercise.

Health Problems
  The Transylvanian Hound is a very hardy and healthy breed for the most part, not prone to many serious health problems. Like all breeds, however, this dog can develop minor health issues. The diseases most commonly affecting this breed include hip dysplasia and elbow dysplasia.
  This dog breed lives an average of 10 to 12 years.

Care
  The Transylvanian Hound requires little coat maintenance, shedding an average amount. An occasional brushing with a firm bristle brush is sufficient, and bathing should be kept to a minimum to maintain the natural coat.

Training
  The Transylvanian Hound was originally bred for hunting so it is an intelligent breed that learns quickly – it also has the ability to hunt independently. This being the case, the Transylvanian Hound can be a little bit strong-willed at times though they generally aim to please their owners. These dogs can be trained for tracking, pointing and driving game – they may also excel at various dog sports. Positive reinforcement training methods are best for this breed and a firm but consistent hand in training is recommended. As is true for all breeds, you should start training and socialization as early as possible with Transylvanian Hound puppies.

Exercise Requirements
  As a hunting breed, the Transylvanian Hound is fairly active. This being the case, he needs a good bit of daily exercise to remain in good health. This dog will appreciate a long daily walk or jog and he will also enjoy training for hunting or other dog sports. Make sure to give this breed plenty of mental and physical stimulation to prevent the development of problem behaviors.

Coat
  The Transylvanian Hound has a short, smooth coat that is fairly dense with a shiny appearance. It is primarily black with tan markings on the muzzle and legs as well as a tan point above each eyebrow. Because the breed has a double coat, regular brushing is recommended to control shedding.

Grooming
  The Transylvanian Hound requires little coat maintenance, shedding an average amount. An occasional brushing with a firm bristle brush is sufficient, and bathing should be kept to a minimum to maintain the natural coat.

Is the Transylvanian Hound Right For You?
  They are known for being protective and is a good addition as a family dog. The Transylvanian Hound is not only loyal, but also intelligent and easy to train. Bred for hunting purposes, the Transylvanian Hound is energetic, requiring daily exercise.

What They Are Like to Live With...
  Intelligent, curious and protective, the Transylvanian Hound also serves as an admirable watchdog. It has very keen instincts, however, and knows the difference between real danger and a letter carrier, for example. Once a friend or stranger is welcomed into the house, the Transylvanian Hound relaxes and becomes more social.

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Tuesday, June 21, 2016

Everything about your Pit Bull

Everything about your Pit Bull
  The American Pit Bull Terrier has been known by many names, including the Pit Bull and the American Bull Terrier. It is often confused with the American Staffordshire Terrier, however, the United Kennel Club recognizes the American Pit Bull Terrier as its own distinct breed. Affectionately known as "Pitties," the Pit Bull is known for being a loyal, protective, and athletic canine breed.

Overview
  The American Pit Bull Terrier, also known at times as the Pit Bull, the Pit Bull Terrier, the American Bull, the American Pit Bull, the American Pit Bull Dog, the Pit Dog, the Half-and-Half, the American Bull Terrier, the Yankee Terrier, the Yankee Bull Terrier and the Staffordshire Terrier, descends from the Staffordshire Bull Terrier of England. This is a well-balanced dog whose tremendous strength is unusual for its moderate size. Pit Bulls, who are not recognized by the American Kennel Club, share a common history with the AKC-recognized American Staffordshire Terrier. Pit Bulls, like Am Staffs, are stocky, powerful yet agile, well-muscled and highly intelligent. Although descended from dogs bred for bull baiting and pit fighting, and unfortunately still used by unscrupulous owners in illegal dog fighting circles, Pit Bulls have many remarkable qualities, including their gameness, trainability, loyalty and affection.
  The Staffordshire Terrier was accepted for registration in the American Kennel Club Stud Book in 1936. The name of the breed was revised in 1972 to the American Staffordshire Terrier, to distinguish it from the Staffordshire Bull Terrier of England, which is much lighter in weight. The American Pit Bull Terrier was the first breed registered with the United Kennel Club, in 1898. Pit Bulls and Am Staffs are virtually the same animal, with different club registrations. Most Pit Bulls are between 17 and 19 inches at the withers and weigh on average between 60 and 80 pounds. Their short, stiff, glossy coat can be of any color or color combination. Pit Bulls require minimal grooming; brushing with a firm-bristled brush and an occasional bath should suffice.

Highlights
  • American Pit Bull Terriers are not a good choice for people who can give them little or no attention.
  • They must be trained and socialized when young to overcome the breed's tendencies toward stubbornness and bossiness, which combined with his strength can make him hard to handle if he hasn't learned you are in charge.
  • Your American Pit Bull Terrier must be kept on leash in public to prevent aggression toward other dogs. It's not a good idea to let these dogs run loose in dog parks. While they might not start a fight, they'll never back down from one, and they fight to the finish. American Pit Bulls who aren't properly socialized as puppies can become aggressive toward other dogs.
  • Breed-specific legislation almost always includes this breed. Be aware of rules in your area as well as neighboring regions if you travel with your dog.
  • American Pit Bull Terriers have a great need to chew, and powerful jaws make quick work of cheap or flimsy toys. Give yours only tough, durable toys that can't be chewed up and swallowed.
  • American Pit Bull Terriers are best suited to owners who can offer firm, fair training, and gentle consistent discipline.
Quick Facts

  • The term “Pit Bull” is often applied indiscriminately to APBTs, American Staffordshire Terriers and sometimes Staffordshire Bull Terriers, a British breed. The term may also be used to label any dog who resembles those breeds, even if he is a Lab mix with little or no “Pit Bull” in his background.
  • An APBT comes in any color, pattern or combination of colors, except merle.
  • Celebrities who count Pitties as their best friends include actresses Jessica Alba, Jessica Biel and Alicia Silverstone; cooking guru Rachael Ray; and political satirist Jon Stewart.
Breed standards
Dog Breed Group: Terrier Dogs
Height: 1 foot, 5 inches to 1 foot, 7 inches tall at the shoulder
Weight: 30 to 85 pounds
Life Span: 12 to 16 years
Comparable Breeds: Bull Terrier, Staffordshire Bull Terrier

History
  Pit bulls were created by breeding bulldogs and terriers together to produce a dog that combined the gameness and agility of the terrier with the strength of the bulldog. In the United Kingdom, these dogs were used in blood sports such as bull-baiting, bear-baiting and cock fighting. These blood sports were officially eliminated in 1835 as Britain began to introduce animal welfare laws. Since dogfights were cheaper to organize and far easier to conceal from the law than bull or bear baits, blood sport proponents turned to pitting their dogs against each other instead.
Dog fighting was used as both a blood sport  and a way to continue to test the quality of their stock. For decades afterwards, dog fighting clandestinely took place in small areas of Britain and America. In the early 20th century pit bulls were used as catch dogs in America for semi-wild cattle and hogs, to hunt, and drive livestock, and as family companions. Some have been selectively bred for their fighting prowess.
  Pit bulls successfully fill the role of companion dogs, police dogs, and therapy dogs. Pit bulls also constitute the majority of dogs used for illegal dog fighting in America. In addition, law enforcement organisations report these dogs are used for other nefarious purposes, such as guarding illegal narcotics operations, use against police,and as attack dogs.
In an effort to counter the fighting reputation of pit bull-type dogs, in 1996 the San Francisco Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals renamed pit bull terriers to "St. Francis Terriers", so that people might be more likely to adopt them. 60 temperament-screened dogs were adopted until the program was halted, after several of the newly adopted pit bulls killed cats. The New York City Center for Animal Care and Control tried a similar approach in 2004, relabeling their pit bulls as "New Yorkies", but dropped the idea in the face of overwhelming public opposition.

Personality
  These dogs love people and have no idea that their size is something of a deterrent to being a lap dog. Confident and keenly aware of their surroundings, they are watchdogs in that they may alert you to the presence of strangers, but that's primarily because they're eager to greet "their" guests.
  While their love of people makes them failures as guard dogs, their courage is unmatched and they will defend their family with their lives.
  Like every dog, American Pit Bull Terriers need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your your puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.

Health
  Due to their athleticism and diverse breeding background, the Pit Bull tend to be a hardy breed, with an average lifespan of 12 to 14 years, longer than many breeds of a similar size.   There are some genetic conditions to be watchful for. The Pit Bull tends to suffer from bone diseases such as hip dysplasia, degenerative myelopathy and kneecap dislocation. The Pit Bull can also suffer from skin problems, such as mange and skin allergies, because of its short coat. Other health ailments seen in Pit Bulls include thyroid and congenital heart defects.

Training
  Pitbulls require assertive owners who are adamant of being the leaders in their households. Laid back owners who can’t be bothered to work with the dog in obedience training, should rethink their decisions to getting a Pitbull. Pitbulls want to be the dominant entity in the home and without a strong leader; the family and home will be in chaos and under the control of the dog.
  All training should be done in a positive way. Harsh and physically abusive techniques will only cause the Pitbull to balk or protect himself. Indeed, dogs do have the same fight or flight instinct that humans have. Positive training techniques using praise and treats work best for Pitbulls.

Care
  Expect to spend about an hour a day walking, playing with or otherwise exercising this dog. While they love people, American Pit Bull Terriers are strong for their size and can be stubborn if left to their own devices. Begin obedience training early and continue it throughout the dog's life. Training is the foundation for a strong relationship with your American Pit Bull Terrier.
  American Pit Bull Terriers should not be left outside for long because they can't tolerate the cold well. Even regardless the climate, these dogs do best as housedogs. They form strong attachments to their families and will suffer if left alone for long periods.

Exercise Requirements
  Pitbulls are bundles of energy. They need loads of exercise to keep them healthy and happy. This hybrid dog will gladly go hiking in the mountains, running through the neighborhood or tearing through the yard chasing varmints. He is active and must have loads of exercise.
  Not the best option for apartment dwellers, Pitbulls need to have a place to burn off their energy. Without proper exercise, the Pitbull can and will become destructive. Owners can come home from work to find furniture torn apart, holes chewed in walls and doors demolished. These are strong dogs and can really cause thousands of dollars in damage without proper exercise and stimulation.

Living Conditions
  Pits will do okay in an apartment if they are sufficiently exercised. They are very active indoors and will do alright without a yard provided they get enough exercise. Prefers warm climates.

Grooming
  The grooming needs of the Pit Bull are modest. Brush his coat a couple of times a week to help manage shedding.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually twice a month. Brush the teeth frequently — with a vet-approved pet toothpaste — for good overall health and fresh breath. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball dampened with a gentle ear cleaner recommended by your veterinarian.

Children And Other Pets
  American Pit Bull Terriers love children, and we don't mean for breakfast. Sturdy, energetic, and tolerant, they are ideal playmates. That said, no dog of any size or breed should ever be left unsupervised with children.
  When no adult can be there to oversee what's going on, dogs should be crated or kenneled, especially after they reach sexual maturity, when they may begin to test the possibility of becoming "pack" leader.
  Don't allow children to pull on a dog's ears or tail. Teach them never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away.
  Because of their dog-fighting heritage, some American Pit Bull Terriers retain a tendency to be aggressive with other dogs, but if they are socialized early and trained to know what behavior is expected of them, that aggression can be minimized or overcome, and many are dog- and cat-friendly. Just to be safe, they should always be supervised in the presence of other pets.

Did You Know?
  Pit Bulls descend from crosses between Bulldogs and Terriers. The goal was to create a dog with the strength and tenacity of the Bulldog and the speed and agility of the Terrier.

Notable pit bulls
  Pit bull breeds have become famous for their roles as soldiers, police dogs, search and rescue dogs, actors, television personalities, seeing eye dogs, and celebrity pets. Historically, the Bull Terrier mix Nipper and the American Staffordshire Terrier, Pete the Pup from the Little Rascals are the most well known. Lesser known, but still historically notable pit bulls include: 
  • Billie Holiday's companion "Mister",
  • Helen Keller's dog "Sir Thomas",
  • Buster Brown's dog "Tige",
  • Horatio Jackson's dog "Bud", 
  • President Theodore Roosevelt's Pit Bull terrier "Pete", 
  • "Jack Brutus" who served for Company K, 
  • the First Connecticut Volunteer Infantry during the civil war, 
  • Sergeant Stubby who served for the 102nd Infantry, 26th (Yankee) Division during World War I, 
  • and Sir Walter Scott's "Wasp".
Contemporary significant pit bulls are
  • Weela, who helped save 32 people, 29 dogs, 3 horses, and 1 cat; 
  • Popsicle, a five-month-old puppy originally found nearly dead in a freezer, who grew to become one of the nation's most important police dogs;
  • Norton, who was placed in the Purina Animal Hall of Fame after he rescued his owner from a severe reaction to a spider bite;
  • Titan, who rescued his owner's wife, who would have died from an aneurysm, 
  • D-Boy, who took three bullets to save his family from an intruder with a gun,
  • Lilly, who lost a leg after being struck by a freight train while pulling her unconscious owner from the train tracks
  • Daddy, Cesar Millan's right-hand dog was famous for his mellow temperament and his ability to interact calmly with ill-mannered dogs.







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Friday, January 30, 2015

Top Loyal Dog Breeds

Top  Loyal Dog Breeds
  We all know dogs are man’s best friend, but which breeds are the most loyal dog breeds? All dogs are loyal and have the capacity to show great loyalty, but some may have stronger instincts for loyalty than others. Throughout history, there have been numerous stories of dogs displaying great valor in order to protect, save or remain alongside their owners. 


German Shepherd – The German Shepherd Dog is hailed as the world’s leading police, guard and military dog, however, this dependable breed is more than its 9-to-5 job. Consistently one of the United States most popular breeds according to AKC Registration Statistics, the German Shepherd Dog is also a loving family companion, herder and show competitor. The breed is approachable, direct and fearless, with a strong, muscular body. The GSD may be most colors, but most commonly is black and tan. – source. These dogs have done anything from save soldiers, police officers, rescue children from fires, you name it.
Story of Loyalty: One family avoided being robbed, and possibly even worse, because of their German Shepherd, Moti’s bravery! Moti jumped into action, barking and trying to protect his family when man with a gun broke into the family’s home. The intruder shot Moti and, rather than continue with whatever misdeeds he had planned, fled the home, leaving the family safe. Moti fully recovered from his gunshot wound, but his family will not likely soon forget his heroism that night. 


Rough Collie- Rough Collie is a breed that hails from Scotland. These dogs are known to be very loyal and nice to their owners. The intelligence and activeness found in these dogs is supposed to create a strong bond between them and their owner. They are quite protective about their owner and save them from all the adverse circumstances. These dogs are often termed as family dogs, because of their friendly nature and the ability to play with children. These dogs generally suffer from the ailment of eye disorders; such a problem is witnessed in this breed quite often.
 Story of Loyalty Sassy, a Rough Collie, is a therapy dog with some pretty amazing skills. In addition to being trained to perform typical tasks for a therapy dog, Sassy is able to tell if someone is going to have a seizure using her sense of smell. A family is hoping to adopt Sassy for their son who suffers from an unusual form of epilepsy, which can cause him to have several seizures a day.


Beagles- This breed of dogs is commonly used by the security people because of the ability of this breed to sniff well. The origin of this breed is Great Britain. They have been used in many references in article dating back to ancient Greece period. These dogs are very friendly and gentle. The attachment they show to their owners makes them one of the most loyal dogs.
Story of Loyalty: When her diabetic owner had a seizure and collapsed, a Beagle named Belle jumped into action. She dialed 911 for her owner by biting into his cell phone so he was able to get the medical attention he needed. 


Kuvasz- This breed hails from the Hungarian lands. The initial use of this breed was to safeguard the livestock of farmers. It is just recently that these dogs have emerged to be house pets. They are highly intelligent and understand the signals of their owner well. They like having attention around them. The built of these dogs makes them good guards of their owner.
Story of Loyalty: Due to his size and strength, a Kuvasz named Pilot is the perfect companion and assistant for his owner. His owner is unable to lift or carry anything that weighs more than five pounds due to injuries she sustained to her neck and shoulders. He helps his owner perform tasks she otherwise would be incapable of performing. Pilot brings laundry up from the basement and pulls the grocery cart, among other tasks. When his owner, who also suffers from dizziness and chronic pain, has a dizzy spell, Pilot is right there for her to lean on so she never has to worry about falling and injuring herself. 


Labrador Retrievers- They hail from the east coast of North America. This breed is known for its happy nature and great energy levels. The friendly nature of this breed with the owners make it the most suitable and loyal breed of dogs available in the market.

Story of Loyalty: A Labrador Retriever named Patty saved her owner from drowning, and possibly hypothermia, after their boat capsized in freezing waters. Patty swam an unknown distance through a strong current, with her owner holding on to her tail, to get them to the safety of dry land where they waited to be rescued. 


Brittany- This breed is the produce of Brittany region of France. These dogs were originally assigned the mission of bird hunting. They are easy to handle and they train easily with the trainers. They have a good nature. They like being pampered by people and are the most loved breed in France.
Story of Loyalty: In the middle of the night, a couple was awoken by their Brittany, Cooper’s barks. Upon looking out of a window, Cooper’s owners saw that both of their vehicles had caught fire and were burning in their driveway. The flames got dangerously close to spreading to the house through a tree in between the drive and the house itself. The family believes that Cooper saved their lives! 


Boxers- This breed hails from Germany and they are known for their kill mode. They are dangerous dogs with incredibly strong jaws. They are used to hold the board or deer until the hunters make an appearance. They are ruthless to the opponent. However, they can be very sweet-natured towards the family. They are lovely to the owner and like to go for outdoors in order to keep fit and to do leisure activities.
Story of Loyalty: After somehow falling off of a 200-foot cliff, Roxy, a Boxer, waited for eight days with her owner, who was killed by the fall. Upon being located, it took the man’s daughter several attempts to get the dog to leave her owner’s side. 


Dachshunds- They also have roots in Germany. Because of the long length of body, these dogs are often referred as the hot dogs. They are commonly used to hunt rabbits and other prey on the basis of their strong jaws and energy-bound legs. These dogs like to play with the family members. The love for outdoors is seen in this breed too. The attachment they show towards the owner is incomparable.

Story of Loyalty: When JoJo, a Dachshund, kept leaving their sleeping daughter’s room and trying to get their attention, his owners knew something was up. As they checked their daughter’s room, they found the wall behind her bed to be giving off a lot of heat. It turned out that an outlet was incredibly close to catching fire. Not only did JoJo save the girl from potential harm, he saved his family’s home! 


Golden Retrievers- Hailing from the greens of Scotland, this breed of dogs is used for the retrieving game. They are quite happy to play with people and do not like to be alone. The patience practiced by them is often admirable. They are often considered as a family dog and never falsify this statement.
Story of Loyalty: A Golden Retriever named Toby saved his owner from choking on an apple. She performed a sort of dog Heimlich maneuver, by jumping hard onto his owner. The force of Toby’s paws hitting his owner’s chest knocked the piece of apple lodged in her throat loose so she could breath again. 


Yorkshire Terriers- They are often termed as Yorkie. They are the tiniest of the terrier breeds available in the market. Their forefathers come a long way from 1800’s. They are often used in dog shows and their ability to train well makes them the most attractive breed among the others in the dog shows. They are admirable and most of the owners just love them.

Story of Loyalty: A Yorkshire Terrier named Smokey was the first therapy dog! While recovering from an injury during World War II, a U.S. Navy corporal was given a Yorkie by a friend. Not only did little Smokey have an uplifting effect on his owner, he also helped the other soldiers who were recovering from their injuries. Dr. Charles Mayo began taking the little pooch along on his rounds to brighten the soldiers’ days. 














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