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Showing posts with label loyal. Show all posts
Showing posts with label loyal. Show all posts

Thursday, November 9, 2017

Everything about your Bull Terrier

Everything about your Bull Terrier
  Whenever you hear the word “Bull,” you probably imagine a frightening thing indeed. Who can blame you? Bulls can be scary – people run away from them as a sport in Pamplona, Spain. Bullfrogs are big, giant versions of frogs that we associate with big, loud noises. 
  Well, take one good look at the Bull Terrier and you’ll probably find out why it’s more terrier than bulldog. The rough name can be a little misleading, but as it turns out Bull Terriers can make loyal, energetic, and even fun pets that the entire family can enjoy – or can work as a great companion even if you’re the only member of your household. 

Overview
  There’s no mistaking the Bull Terrier for any other breed. With his football-shaped head, muscular body and unmatched swagger, this is a dog that commands attention anywhere he goes. He’s an icon, seen at the side of owners from General Patton to Princess Anne, and in advertising campaigns for beer - the famous Spuds McKenzie -- and department stores. He's a high-energy tough guy with a soft heart, crazy about kids and strongly attached to his family.
  The Bull Terrier is sometimes considered one of the breeds known as a " pit bull." Before getting one of these dogs, it is important to realize that there is much misinformation around the natures of pit bulls and there are campaigns to out-law the dogs. Check into local ordinances carefully to be sure that you can legally own one of these dogs in your town.  Also do your own research so you can help educate friends and neighbors about the merits of this breed.
  On the plus side, grooming is a breeze with a Bull Terrier; just brush him a couple of times a week to keep shedding to a minimum, and make sure his nails are trimmed and his ears are clean.
   The Bull Terrier is an indoor dog. Besides having a short coat unsuited to cold or wet weather, he’s the kind of dog who thrives on companionship and needs to be with his family when they are home.

Highlights
  • Bull Terriers thrive in the company of their people, and should live indoors with their human family. They don't do well when left alone for long periods and will wreak destruction when bored.
  • Bull Terriers aren't suited for cold, damp climates. Keep your Bull Terrier warm with a coat or sweater in winter.
  • These aren't high maintenance dogs, grooming-wise. A weekly brushing and occasional wipe-down with a damp cloth is usually all it takes to keeps them clean, although they must be brushed more frequently during twice-yearly shedding periods.
  • Ownership of Bull Terriers is restricted or banned in some cities, states, and provinces. Research your local dog laws before you get one; banned dogs may be seized and euthanized.
  • The Bull Terrier is strong-willed and can be difficult to train. He's not recommended for timid or first-time dog owners.
  • Without early socialization and training, Bull Terriers can be aggressive toward other dogs, animals, and people he doesn't know.
  • Bull Terriers are too rough and rambunctious for homes with young children, but they're tireless playmates for active older kids who've been taught how to interact with dogs.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Bull Terrier comes in two varieties: white and colored. They are exhibited in separate classes at dog shows but are otherwise the same breed. A colored Bull Terrier named Rufus won Best In Show at Westminster in 2006, the first of his variety to do so.
  • When you look at a Bull Terrier, you see a strong, muscular dog with a long oval head that resembles an egg . Small thin ears point upward, and small dark eyes with a piercing glint are sunken into the head. A short tail, thick at the root and tapering to a fine point, is carried horizontally
  • Bull Terriers have appeared in hundreds of films, ranging from "101 Dalmatians" and "Best in Show" to "The Mask" and "The Wizard of Oz."

Breed standards

AKC group: Terrier
UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan: 11-14 years
Average size: 45-50 lbs
Coat appearance: Sleek, smooth, short
Coloration: White, brown and black
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Triangular eyes; egg-shaped skull; round, muscular body.
Possible alterations: Coat coloring varies and can be seen in a variety of colors and combinations.
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles and seniors, apartments, houses with/without yards
Temperament: Independent, energetic, affectionate
Comparable Breeds: French Bulldog, Bullmastiff

History
  The family tree of the Bulldog is massive with many branches. One of those branches holds the bull-and-terrier breeds, the various results of 18 th-century crosses between bulldogs and terriers. Those crosses were made with the intent of producing a dog with the strength and tenacity of the bulldog and the intensity, alertness, agility and “game” nature of the terrier.
James Hinks Bullterrier
  The earliest Bull Terriers came in a variety of sizes. Some were as small as four to seven pounds and were considered toy breeds. Others were medium-size at 15 pounds and some ranged up to 45 to 60 pounds, close to the size of the modern Bull Terrier. They had an arched back, bent legs and an undershot jaw, all features that were reminiscent of the breed’s bulldog heritage.
  James Hinks of Birmingham, England, was a well-known breeder of Bull Terriers in the 1860s, and it was he who started them on the road to the more refined look they have today: the longer head and the more symmetrical body that was predominantly or completely white. To create them he used existing bull-and-terriers, his white Bulldog Madman, and white English Terriers, which are now extinct.
  Nicknamed White Cavaliers, they became fashionable accessories for gentlemen about town and could be soon sitting alongside them as they drove their carriages through the park. A rhyme of the time tells the story of the breed succinctly, saying that Hinks “Found a Bull Terrier a tattered old bum; Made him a dog for a gentleman’s chum.”
  The fad spread to the United States. The American Kennel Club recognized the breed in 1885, and the Bull Terrier Club of America was founded in 1897. A new variety of Bull Terrier was invented in the early 20 th century when some breeders crossed them with Staffordshire Bull Terriers, adding color to the coat. The “Colored” variety of Bull Terrier was recognized in 1936. Today the Bull Terrier ranks 53 rd among the breeds registered by the AKC.



Personality
  Once upon a time Bull Terriers were bred to fight. Crossing a terrier and a bulldog produced a breed with fearlessness, tenacity and strength that made them natural gladiators. The fighting branches of the Bull Terrier's family tree have since withered away, and the modern breed is a loving, loyal, clown of a dog who makes an excellent family companion for those with active lifestyles. They love being with people and want to be included in all family activities whether it's a ride in the car, a neighborhood stroll or a romp in the park.

Health 
  Many dogs have certain propensities toward health problems, and Bull Terriers are no different, showing an inclination toward skin conditions and allergies. This can often be a good thing because it presents a problem that can be spotted, but it’s important to make sure that you take your Bull Terrier for regular checkups anyway.
  The Bull Terrier, which has an average lifespan of 11 to 14 years, may suffer from patellar luxation. It is also prone to minor health problems like heart complication, allergies and compulsive behavior, and more serious conditions such as kidney failure and deafness. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may run cardiac, thyroid, hearing and urine protein:urine creatinine ratio tests on the dog. 

Care
  A Bull Terrier needs half an hour to an hour of physical and mental exercise daily. He'll enjoy going for walks, chasing a ball, or testing his wits against an interactive toy. He's also capable of competing in agility and obedience trials. Be sure to always walk him on leash so he won't run after other animals or go off exploring on his own.
   Bull Terrier puppies are bouncy and into everything. High-impact exercise can damage growing bones, so until your puppy's full grown, at 12 to 18 months of age, beware of bone-jarring activities such as jumping on and off the furniture, playing Frisbee, or running on slick wood or tile floors. These can all stress or injure the still-developing joints and ligaments.
  Early and consistent training is essential. You must be able to provide leadership without resorting to physical force or harsh words. A Bull Terrier isn't the easiest breed to train, and you'll be most successful if you appeal to his love of play with positive reinforcement techniques while still remaining firm and consistent in what you expect.
  Bull Terriers can be difficult to housetrain. Follow the housetraining program closely; the crate method is best. A crate will also prevent your Bull Terrier from destroying your belongings or otherwise getting into trouble.

Living Conditions
  Bull Terriers will do okay in an apartment if they are sufficiently exercised. They are fairly active indoors and a small yard will do. They prefer warm climates.

Trainability
  Bullies are intelligent and have a mind of their own. Training should be started early and always done in calm-assertive manner, as they won't respond to discipline or harsh tones. Training is best done in short sessions due to Bull Terriers' short attention span and they will quickly become uninterested, even if treats are used as a reward. Lots of patience is necessary when working with a Bull Terrier, as training can be a long process.
  Even after a Bull Terrier is fully trained, they may decide to test their boundaries as they get older and project dominance. These situations should be handled with calm assertion; like a teenager, they just want to see what they can get away with.

Exercise 
  Bullies need a lot of vigorous exercise. Though short and stocky, they are a hardy breed and are happiest when they are active. Long walks, short runs, or playing long games of ball in the back yard will meet their daily activity requirements. If a Bull Terrier is not getting enough exercise, they are sure to let you know. They are notoriously destructive, making easy work of flower beds or expensive furniture, and some develop the neurotic behavior of obsessively chasing their own tail.

Grooming
  Grooming the Bull Terrier is a cinch. Though the breed is naturally clean with little doggie odor, a bath every three months (or when he’s dirty) in a mild shampoo is a good idea. Brush his sleek coat with a natural bristle brush or rubber hound mitt once a week. Use coat conditioner/polish to brighten the sheen.
  His ears need to be checked every week and cleaned if needed, and toenails trimmed once a month. Regular tooth brushing with a soft toothbrush and doggie toothpaste keep the teeth and gums healthy and the breath fresh. Introduce grooming to the Bull Terrier when he is very young so he learns to accept the handling and fuss patiently.   

Children And Other Pets
  Bull Terriers and Miniature Bull Terriers are active dogs who can play rough, so they're not recommended for homes with young children. They're great playmates with boundless energy for active older children who understand how to interact with dogs.
  Bull Terriers can, however, be aggressive toward kids they don't know, especially if there's a lot of shouting or wrestling going on. They may feel it's their duty to protect "their" children from their friends. Always supervise play; as with any dog, never leave a dog alone with a child, and teach children how to approach and touch dogs.
  With the children in their own family, they're highly tolerant, but they don't like being teased. Don't permit your children to play tug-of-war with the dog.
  Bull Terriers, especially unneutered males, can be aggressive toward dogs of the same sex, but opposite genders usually get along well. Bull Terriers shouldn't be trusted with cats or other small furry animals.

Is this breed right for you?
  Bull Terriers can get along in most living enviroments, and they thrive in families with older children to play with. This breed can get along in smaller dwellings as long as a rigorous exercise regimen is part of their daily routine. Bull Terriers can be prone to various skin allergies and other more-serious health issues. All potential owners should take into consideration the financial responsibility with regard to a variety of health concerns.
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep. No trimming or stripping needed.
Moderate Shedding: Routine brushing will help. Be prepared to vacuum often!
Difficult Training: The Bull Terrier isn't deal for a first time dog owner. Patience and perseverance are required to adequately train it.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Good for New Owners: This breed is well suited for those who have little experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  Because of his fun-loving, mischievous personality, the Bull Terrier is sometimes referred to as “the kid in a dog suit.”

In popular culture
  • General George S. Patton owned a Bull Terrier named Willie, and a portrayal of him is featured in the 1970 movie Patton.
    Bull Terrier about 1960
  • In Charles Dickens' Oliver Twist (1838), Bill Sikes' dog "Bullseye" is a Bull Terrier.
  • From 1987 to 1989, Budweiser's beer commercials featured a female Bull Terrier named "Spuds MacKenzie".
  • The book The Incredible Journey by author Sheila Burnford features a Bull Terrier named "Bodger", as well as in the 1963 film.
  • The 1993 Nickelodeon cartoon Rocko's Modern Life features a bull terrier named "Spunky", who is Rocko's pet dog.
  • The 1995 film Toy Story features a mean Bull Terrier named "Scud".
  • Target's mascot, named "Bullseye", is a Bull Terrier.
  • Ken Greenhill's 1977 novel Hell Hound recounts the story of a sociopathic Bull Terrier named Baxter, whose desire for a dominant master drives him to murder. The novel was adapted to the cult French horror film Baxter in 1989.
  • The album cover for Working Class Dog by singer Rick Springfield is of his own pet Bull Terrier named Ronnie.
  • Chris Van Allsburg, writer of books such as Jumanji and The Polar Express, includes a Bull Terrier named "Fritz" in each book he writes.
  • "Grimm" from the syndicated comic strip Mother Goose and Grimm is a yellow, cartoon Bull Terrier.
  • A formerly abandoned deaf Bull Terrier named "Patsy Ann", from 1929-1942, would greet new ships coming into the harbor in Juneau, Alaska. She was dubbed the "Official Greeter of Juneau, Alaska" in 1934. A statue in Juneau was erected in her honor in 1992.
A dream day in the life
  Games, training, running and more games. The Bull Terrier was originally bred for fighting purposes, so though it is a playful breed, training is required not only to diminish its protective tendencies, but also for mental and physical stimulation. Loyal 'til the end, Bull Terriers live for constant companionship, and a day spent with its beloved human makes this breed happy as a clown.



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Friday, September 15, 2017

Everything about your Thai Ridgeback

Everything about your Thai Ridgeback
  Few people in the United States have heard of the Thai Ridgeback, let alone met one in person. This breed was naturally developed in Thailand and has been a favored companion of those needing a loyal companion and watchdog. This breed is strong-willed and not for the novice dog owner.
  With proper socialization and training, the Thai Ridgeback can make a wonderful family pet. Of course, he needs a lot of exercise but older kids can keep him exercised by playing ball or fetch. Running is essential to this breeds physical and mental health, so a fenced yard, dog park or owner who is an avid runner is necessary.

Overview
  Primitive dogs, sometimes known as pariah dogs, have distinctive physical traits, such as a moderate size, prick ears, wedge-shaped heads, wrinkled foreheads, squarish bodies with long legs, and smooth coats. The Thai Ridgeback is a classic example of one of these dogs. He comes in four colors — red, black, blue (gray), and yellow (fawn) — and he has pigmentation or spots on his tongue, similar to the Chow Chow and the Chinese Shar-Pei. Most (but not all) members of the breed have the signature ridge of hair running down their back with up to eight different ridge patterns.
  A Thai Ridgeback needs plenty of companionship and activity to be happy. Bear in mind that he will need at least a good hour of strenuous exercise daily. Overall health permitting, a couple of long walks or runs should satisfy him. He is also eligible to compete in lure coursing competitions.
  Better yet, keep him indoors, especially if the weather is rainy or cold. Because he's from Southeast Asia, he’s not one to appreciate that type of climate.

Other Quick Facts:
  • Some Thai Ridgebacks are born with a plush coat instead of a smooth coat. This is considered a flaw, and the dogs are spayed or neutered and sold as pets.
  • The Thai Ridgeback’s tail tapers to a point. He carries it up or curved like a sickle.
Breed standards

FCI group: Primitive Hunting Dogs 
AKC group: AKC Foundation Stock Service
UKC group: Sighthound & Pariah
Average lifespan: 10 to 12 years
Average size: 35 to 55 pounds
Coat appearance: short, hard, and straight
Coloration: solid colors of blue, black, red or fawn with a black mask being acceptable on reds
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with older children, active singles, experienced owners, houses with yards
Temperament: Strong-willed, loyal, energetic, brave
Comparable Breeds: Rhodesian Ridgeback

History
  The Thai Ridgeback was first noted more than 350 years ago in Thailand, but he is thought to be far older. One theory suggests that he is a descendant of the now-extinct Hottentot dog, which may have played a role in the development of the Rhodesian Ridgeback
 Ancient artifacts show that the Thai Ridgeback originated in the isolated islands of Eastern Thailand an estimated 4,000 years ago. Because this area was secluded from others, with poor transportation methods, this dog breed has remained very pure with little to no crossbreeding.
  The Thai Ridgeback was an all-purpose dog, kept to guard property and serve as an alarm dog,  escort or pull carts, hunt small and large game, and keep cobras at bay. He lived mainly in eastern Thailand, as well as on the island of Dao Phu Quoc, near the border of Cambodia and Vietnam. His relative isolation ensured that he maintained his distinctive look.
  Today the Thai Ridgeback is considered a very rare breed outside of Thailand, with only an estimated 300 in the United States. The breed has been in the United States since 1994. The United Kennel Club recognized the Thai Ridgeback in 1996, and it was recorded in the American Kennel Club’s Foundation Stock Service in 1997.

Temperament
  Thai Ridgebacks are an intelligent breed. The energy level is typically medium to high, with most of the day spent lounging and activity periods occurring in sporadic bursts. Well bred and properly socialized Thai Ridgebacks make loyal, loving family pets. They are naturally protective of their home and family and can be aggressive or shy when not properly socialized.
  They are best kept by consistent owners who have a thorough understanding of dog behavior. Because of prior geographic isolation and lack of human contact, the Thai Ridgeback remains independent minded and much of the original natural instinct and drives remain intact, particularly prey drive. Due to its nature, the Thai Ridgeback is not recommended for the novice dog handler. They have an excellent jumping ability and may seek to roam if not properly contained.

Health
  Thai ridgebacks are a hearty, overall healthy breed with few inherent health issues. The breed has reproduced in Thailand almost exclusively by natural selection until the very recent past. The domesticated population is small. Inbreeding depression has not been observed in the breed. Thai Ridgeback Dogs are prone to dermoid sinus. Modern lines of    Thai Ridgeback, resulting from interpopulation crosses, may also be prone to hip dysplasia and other genetic disorders.

Care
  Because this dog breed originated in a tropical climate, the Thai Ridgeback generally does not do well in colder climates and should be kept as an indoor dog. The coat of a Thai Ridgeback requires little maintenance, however daily exercise is suggested to keep a healthy lifestyle for this breed.

Living Conditions
 Thai Ridgebacks will do okay in an apartment if it sufficiently exercised. These dogs prefer warm climates and cannot withstand the cold.

Training
  An independent breed, the Thai Ridgeback requires an experienced owner who can assert himself to be the leader of the family. Manhandling and harsh discipline is counter-productive to training this breed. The Thai Ridgeback responds well to positive training methods and learns rather quickly when delectable treats are involved. Repetitive training sessions will prove to be worth the time.
  One of the things that the Thai Ridgeback was bred to do was to pull carts in Thailand. Nowadays, he is well-suited for draft trials, obedience and agility. Of course, the Thai Ridgeback can be an incredible watchdog.

Exercise Requirements
  Thai Ridgebacks were bred to work and they require a lot of exercise. Long walks or jogs are great but this breed also needs room to stretch out and run. He can tolerate living in condos or apartment buildings provided there is a dog park nearby that he can use.
  Without enough exercise, the Thai Ridgeback can become incredibly destructive and disruptive. Although not a barker, the dog will become frustrated and try to communicate his need for activity vocally. He will also tear up furniture and chew whatever he can get his teeth on if he is bored. Exercise is essential to living peacefully with a Thai Ridgeback.

Grooming
  The Thai Ridgeback has a short coat that is easily cared for with a weekly brushing. Use a rubber curry brush to keep it gleaming. He sheds year-round, but not heavily. Give him a bath when he is dirty, maybe once or twice a year.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Keep the ears clean and dry, and check them weekly for redness or a bad odor that could indicate infection. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball moistened with a mild pH-balanced cleanser recommended by your veterinarian. Brush the teeth regularly with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath. Introduce your puppy to grooming from an early age so that he learns to accept it with little fuss.

Is the Thai Ridgeback the Right Breed for you?
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep.
Moderate Shedding: Routine brushing will help. Be prepared to vacuum often!
Difficult Training: The Thai Ridgeback isn't deal for a first time dog owner. Patience and perseverance are required to adequately train it.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  The Thai Ridgeback can have as many as eight different ridge patterns formed by hair growing in the opposite direction of the rest of the coat. Patterns include whorls, circles, and even the shape of a guitar.
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Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Everything about your Komondor

Everything about your Komondor
  The dreadlocked Komondor tends to be gentle and affectionate with family but wary of strangers. Intelligent and loyal to no end, he will give his life to protect his family - his flock - and property. An independent thinker with physical strength, he needs a firm, consistent leader. His corded coat requires daily grooming but sheds little.

Overview
  The Komondor is a sneaky flock-guarding dog. With his long, heavily-matted white coat, this dog blends right in with the sheep, so predators have no idea what’s in store for them! But even if he’s not guarding sheep, the Komondor is a wonderful companion for the right family. Also known as the Hungarian Komondor, the Hungarian Sheepdog and the Kom, this breed likes to be put to work. Whether it is guarding sheep or guarding your family, the Komondor is happy to be watching your back.
  He may look like a mop, but the Kom is known for his dignity, strength and courage. Even though this dog is generally reserved and serious with strangers, he’ll be open to showing his love to his family. His coat takes some time and energy to care for, so this is not a breed for anyone looking for low-maintenance grooming. Read on to learn more about the Komondor.

Highlights
  • Komondor are rare, but unethical backyard breeders and puppy mills do breed them. It's important to find a good breeder to make sure you don't get a puppy who will develop health or behavior problems.
  • Although an apartment or condo is not the ideal living space for a Komondor, he can adjust to that lifestyle if he receives daily exercise and is trained not to bark excessively.
  • This strong-willed dog needs a confident owner who can provide leadership the Komondor will respect. This isn't a good choice for the first-time dog owner.
  • Although Komondor shouldn't be brushed, their coat needs extensive care to keep its white color and to stay free of dirt, debris, and parasites. If you want your Komondor's coat to stay clean, he should sleep indoors.
  • Komondor are barkers and suspicious of most things they see or hear. The breed is an excellent watch dog for both home and livestock and was originally developed for this role.
  • Komondor can be aggressive to other dogs.
  • Komondor aren't high-energy, and are happy just watching and following you around the house. But they still need daily exercise of at least a few walks per day to keep them healthy and at their proper weight.
  • A high fence is required to prevent the Komondor from attempting to expand his territory, a common habit of guard dogs.
  • The Komondor is happiest when he's working. He's ideal for guarding livestock, but any job will give him the mental exercise he needs.
  • Although Komondor historically spent their time outside protecting the flock, they do need time inside with their family. Like any dog, a Komondor can become aggressive, fearful, or aloof when deprived of human company.
Other Quick Facts
  • When you look at a Komondor, you see a dog with a large head; dark brown eyes; hanging ears that are shaped like an elongated triangle, slightly rounded at the tip; and a long tail.
  • The Komondor has a dense, protective coat that starts to fall into cordlike curls when the dog is a puppy. The adult Komondor has a dense, soft, woolly undercoat and a coarse outer coat that is wavy or curly. Together, the outer coat and undercoat form tassel-like cords that lengthen as the dog grows older. The coat is always white, but not necessarily a pure white.
  • Comparable Breeds: Kuvasz, Puli
History
  The Komondor is the largest of the native Hungarian breeds and has guarded  sheep and cattle for ten centuries or more. It is considered to be an almost direct descendant of the Aftscharka (or Ovtcharka), a dog found by nomadic Huns on the southern steppes when passing through Russia. However, the earliest known written record of the breed appeared in 1544. In 1673, there was a report that “the Komondor guards the herd.” The first know illustration of the Komondor dates back to 1815 and is virtually identical to the dog today.
  His corded white coat is unique in the dog world, although the related but much smaller Puli has a similar coat, but in black. This coat provided an armor of sorts against the vicious predators the Komondor met and fought in the course of his daily work , many of which were his superior in size and weight. The Komondorok coat also kept it warm in the winter and prevented sunburn in the hotter seasons. Finally, it served as camouflage when the dog mingled with its wards, adding an element of surprise during a predator’s attack.
  The Magyars bred the Komondor for more than a thousand years, focusing on his performance, vigilance and courage rather than his pedigree. The Komondor was a prized worker and guardian, and was never thought of for commercial purposes. However, these dogs were not cross-bred with other dogs, so their pedigree remains essentially pure. The Hungarian Kennel Club and the Hungarian Komondor Club, while they have records of this breed only going back maybe a century or so, are committed to controlling and maintaining the purity, soundness and historical characteristics of this ancient breed and worked together to create the existing Hungarian standard for the Komondor.
  The Kom has been in North America since the 1930’s. They are routinely seen in flock-guarding programs and in the conformation ring. The American Kennel Club has adopted a translation of the Hungarian standard as its own. Today’s Komondor retains its strong protective nature, intelligence and self-reliance. It still is used in the United States and elsewhere to protect sheep flocks from coyotes. It is distinctive in the show ring and can make a loyal companion, although it is not a particularly affectionate breed.



Temperament
  The Komondor is built for livestock guarding. The Komondor's temperament is like that of most livestock guarding dogs; it is calm and steady when things are normal, but in case of trouble, the dog will fearlessly defend its charges. It was bred to think and act independently and make decisions on its own.
  It is affectionate with its family, and gentle with the children and friends of the family. Although wary of strangers, they can accept them when it is clear that no harm is meant,but is instinctively very protective of its family, home and possessions.The Komondor is very good with other family pets, often very protective over them, but is intolerant to trespassing animals and is not a good dog for an apartment. The dog is vigilant and will rest in the daytime, keeping an eye on the surroundings, but at night is constantly moving, patrolling the place, moving up and down around the whole area. The dogs usually knock down intruders and keep them down until the owner arrives Hungarian Komondor breeders used to say that an intruder may be allowed to enter the property guarded by a Komondor, but he will not be allowed to come out again.

Health
  The Komondor, which has an average lifespan of 10 to 12 years, is susceptible to minor health issues like canine hip dysplasia (CHD) and gastric torsion, as well as otitis externa, hot spots, and entropion. To identify some of these issues early, your veterinarian may recommend hip tests for dogs of this breed of dog.

Care
  This breed is not fond of warm weather but can live outdoors in cool and temperate climates. Though the dog does not shed, its cords (which begin to develop at 2 years of age) must be separated regularly to prevent matting and excess dirt from becoming trapped in the coat. This also makes bathing and drying quite the difficult task, often taking up an entire day. Its exercise requirements, meanwhile, may be met with a few short romps in the yard or a long walk around the neighborhood.

Living Conditions
  This dog does best in a clean country environment where he can receive extensive daily exercise, but it will do okay in an apartment if sufficiently exercised. It does well in most climates, for the Komondor lives for many months outdoors in all kinds of weather.

Training
  Since this is a large dog, you must ensure that your Komondor receives obedience training. Start as early as possible for the best results. This breed becomes obstinate when bored, so it’s in your best interest to keep training sessions interesting and upbeat. Use positive reinforcements for a job well done.
  Because the Komondor can be wary of strangers, socialization skills must be introduced when your dog is a puppy. Take your dog to new places and introduce him to new people as often as you can. As a natural guard dog, the Kom will be aggressive if he is not socialized properly as a puppy.

Exercise Requirements
  Komondors do well with moderate exercise needs. These can consist of two or three short walks daily or adequate playtime in the yard. If you have a yard, it needs to be securely fenced so they can define their territory. As well, it will keep other animals from entering that territory.

Grooming
  The coat of the Komondor begins to cord when he is eight months to a year old. The coat doesn’t shed much, but the cords must be separated regularly to maintain their look, and the coat does attract dirt. Once a Komondor is past young puppyhood his coat will probably never have its earlier pristine whiteness. The coat should never be dirty, matted, or bad smelling.
  To prevent problems, ask the breeder to show you how to care for the coat. Trimming the hair around the mouth and cleaning the dog’s face after meals is one way to help reduce odor.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Keep the ears clean and dry. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Komondor can be good companions to children in their own family, but may have difficulty accepting visiting children. They're best suited to homes with older children who understand how to interact with dogs. Always supervise Komondor when they're with children, and never leave them alone with young children. They're livestock guardians, not babysitters.
  Even when exposed to them often, Komondor are generally not fond of other dogs. They do best in a single-dog home but can learn to get along with cats. They're always pleased to have livestock to guard. That is, after all, their purpose in life.

Did You Know?
  The Komondor’s coat helps him blend in with his flock and protects him from weather extremes and the attacks of predators. The cords should develop by the time the dog is 2 years old.



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Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Everything about your Rhodesian Ridgeback

Everything about your Rhodesian Ridgeback
  The Rhodesian Ridgeback is easy to spot among a canine crowd: He’s the one with the tiny Mohawk running down his spine. Expressive eyes reflect the sensitive spirit of this large, intelligent dog who loves to run and play. He’s not a barker, but a Ridgie will protect his family.

Overview
  Derived from Africa, the Rhodesian Ridgeback was bred to guard and protect children and family when parents were away. Designed to hunt lions and retrieve needed objects, the breed does well hunting with humans when on horseback. Doing well in African climates, the breed was brought to America in 1950. With high endurance and the ability to outlast humans, this dog is a strong, smart and loyal breed.
  As a pup, the Rhodesian Ridgeback is active and exuberant, but he matures into a dog with moderate exercise needs. Give him a vigorous walk or game of fetch a couple of times a day, plus a chance to run in a safely fenced area a couple of times a week, and he'll be satisfied — at least in terms of physical exercise. This intelligent breed also needs mental stimulation: a bored Rhodesian Ridgeback is a destructive Rhodesian Ridgeback.

Highlights

  • The Rhodesian Ridgeback is tolerant of kids, but can be too rambunctious for toddlers.
  • Because of their size, intelligence, and power, Rhodesian Ridgebacks aren't recommended for first-time or timid owners.
  • If a Rhodesian Ridgeback is raised with other pets, he'll be accepting of them. However, he can still be aggressive toward strange animals outside the family, even if he's well socialized and trained. Males can be aggressive toward other males, especially if they're not neutered.
  • If bored, the Rhodesian Ridgeback can become very destructive.
  • The Rhodesian Ridgeback needs a high fence to keep him from escaping and roaming. An underground electronic fence won't contain him.
  • Rhodesian Ridgebacks shed little, and you can keep them clean with a weekly brushing and a wipedown with a damp cloth. They also need regular nail trims and tooth brushing.
  • Training can be difficult if you don't start at a very young age. Rhodesian Ridgebacks can be stubborn and strong willed, but if you're consistent, firm, and fair, you can train your Ridgeback to a high level.
  • The young Rhodesian Ridgeback is energetic and active, but with maturity and training, he generally becomes a calm and quiet dog. He needs at least a half hour of daily exercise.
  • Rhodesian Ridgebacks can adapt to a number of living situations, including apartments, if they're properly exercised. The ideal is a home with a large fenced yard.
  • Ridgebacks generally don't bark a lot. Many will bark to alert you to something unusual, and some will bark when they are bored, but for the most part, this isn't a yappy breed.
  • Rhodesian Ridgebacks aren't serious diggers, but they'll dig a large hole if they're bored or to escape the heat.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from a puppy mill, a pet store, or a breeder who doesn't provide health clearances or guarantees. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies and who breeds for sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Ridgeback is the only dog who has a ridge of hair running down his spine in the opposite direction from the rest of his coat, though some purebred Ridgebacks do not have ridges.
  • The Ridgeback was created to help big game hunters go after lions, which is why he’s sometimes called the African Lion Hound.
  • Comparable Breeds: Bullmastiff, Great Dane

History
  The Rhodesian Ridgeback, once known as the African Lion Hound, was developed in South Africa by Boer farmers. The farmers needed a versatile hunting dog who could withstand the extreme temperatures and terrain of the bush, survive when water rations were low, protect property, and be a companion to the entire family.

  They started by crossing dogs they'd brought from Europe — such as Great Danes, Mastiffs, Greyhounds, and Bloodhounds — with a half-wild native dog kept by the Khoikhoi, a pastoral people. This dog had a distinctive ridge of hair along its back, and breeders noticed that crosses who had this ridge tended to be excellent hunters.
  At first, the Boers primarily used the dogs to flush partridge or bring down a wounded buck. When big-game hunting became popular, they found that the dogs were well suited for accompanying them when they hunted lions from horseback. The dogs would hold the lion at bay until the hunters arrived.
  A hunter named Cornelius von Rooyen began a breeding program in what was then known as Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe). A breed standard — a written description of what the breed should look and act like — was set down in 1922, and it's changed little since then. In 1924, the Rhodesian Ridgeback was officially accepted by the South African Kennel Union.
  Some Rhodesian Ridgebacks may have made it to the United States as early as 1911, but it wasn't until after World War II that large numbers were imported to the U.S., Britain, and Canada. The first Rhodesian Ridgeback registered by the American Kennel Club (AKC) was Tchaika of Redhouse, in 1955. The AKC recognized the breed that same year.
  Today, the Rhodesian Ridgeback ranks 54th in popularity among the 155 breeds and varieties recognized by the AKC. The Ridgeback is quite popular in South Africa, where he first began his journey as a breed.

Personality
  Rhodesian Ridgebacks are dignified, athletic dogs whose expressive eyes always look deep in thought. Developed in Africa, this breed was used by lion hunting parties to track, corner, and hold lions. The breed is still used for hunting in some circles, but has come to be more of a family companion than anything else. As puppies they have energy to spare, but with proper exercise and training grow into quiet, dignified housemates. They are not for novice dog owners, as it takes a lot of time and energy to properly train this breed, but for those who are experienced and who are already committed to an active lifestyle, the Rhodesian Ridgeback can be an ideal family dog.

Health Problems
  The biggest health concern for Rhodesian Ridgeback presents at birth. The condition is Dermoid Sinus, one that is closely related to Spina Bifida found in humans. Painful and sometimes fatal, most puppies born with this condition are put to sleep. If not, surgery is necessary and not always successful.

Care
  As a house pet, it is a wonderful family member. The Ridgeback prefers to sleep indoors, spending its days both out in the yard and indoors. The Ridgeback is a good hiking and jogging companion. Fond of running, the Ridgeback needs physical and mental exercise daily, to prevent boredom setting in. Coat care for the dog is minimal, requiring occasional brushing to get rid of dead hair.

Living Conditions
  Rhodesian Ridgebacks will do okay in an apartment as long as they get enough exercise. They are relatively inactive indoors and do best with a large yard.

Trainability
  Training a Rhodesian Ridgeback can be a challenge. They are independent thinkers who also have a tendency to exhibit dominance. They need to be trained with firmness to establish leadership, but never harshness. Strong discipline will cause a Ridgeback to shut down and ignore you completely. 100% consistency is also crucial when training because Ridgebacks will constantly test boundaries, especially in adolescence, and if you bend the rules just once, he'll take that as an invitation to rule the house.

Exercise Requirements
  It may not be able to chase lions in your neighborhood, but your Ridgeback needs daily exercise. To release pent up energy, take your dog for a long run or jog. Tire them out with play time – get your kids involved in the fun. You’ll need to put aside time every day in order to ensure your Rhodesian Ridgeback gets enough exercise.

Grooming
  Ridgebacks have an easy-care short coat. A Ridgie will shed a bit all year long, but it’s not bad. Run a brush over his coat once a week, and bathe him when you think he needs it. Brush his teeth with a vet-approved pet toothpaste, clean his ears, and trim his nails regularly, and that’s it.

Children And Other Pets
  The Rhodesian Ridgeback is tolerant with children of all ages, but he's large and can be too rambunctious for a toddler.
  As with any dog, always teach children how to approach and touch your Rhodesian Ridgeback, and supervise all interactions between dogs and young kids to prevent any biting or tail pulling from either party.
  The Rhodesian Ridgeback does well with other pets if he's raised with them. Males tend to be aggressive to other males, especially if they're not neutered. It's important to properly socialize a Rhodesian Ridgeback to other dogs and animals — expose him to lots of other creatures beginning in puppyhood — because the tolerance he shows animals in his home is often not extended to animals outside his family.

Is this breed right for you?
  A strong and protective breed, the Rhodesian Ridgeback is a great family pet. Playful and sometimes rough, he's best with older children. Athletic and in need of space, he does best living in a home with a large and spacious fenced-in yard. In need of exercise, he must be walked and jogged daily. If not given proper leadership from his master, he may become mischievous and begin to rebel. Best with cats when raised with them, the Rhodesian Ridgeback is a natural hunter. An excellent jogging and hiking companion, this pup is extremely loyal and loving.

Did You Know?
  Ridgebacks are also known as the African Lion Hound. Big-game hunters found that the dogs were good at distracting a lion, allowing the hunters to take a shot.

A dream day in the life of a Rhodesian Ridgeback
  Waking up in the bed of his owner, he's ready for his morning jog. Back at the home, he'll eat breakfast with the family prior to taking a run in the backyard. After ensuring that all is well and in its place, he'll head back inside for playtime with the kiddos. A snooze on the couch and he'll be up for any type of love that you can give him. After a hike later in the day, he'll be happy to watch TV while snuggled on the couch with the family.





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Thursday, April 20, 2017

Everything about your Manchester Terrier

Everything about your Manchester Terrier
   The Manchester Terrier is quite an old breed that was developed for the purpose of hunting and killing rats, rabbits and other rodents in urban Great Britain. Named after the city of Manchester in northwestern England, this breed has also been referred to as the English Gentleman’s Terrier and the Gentleman’s Terrier. The Manchester Terrier is a direct descendant and very close relative of the old Black and Tan Terrier and shares many of its physical and mental attributes, although the Black and Tan was a heavier, coarser dog with shorter legs. The Manchester is a leaner, more athletic animal, due to outcrosses with Whippets during the early development of the breed. 

Overview
  The oldest-known terrier, the Manchester Terrier was bred in England to hunt rats. The best vermin-hunting breed, the Manchester Terrier is extremely fast. Available in both standard and toy varieties, both are considered companion dogs with the same personality traits. Unfortunately, the popularity of the Manchester Terrier has gone down in recent years.

Highlights
  • Life expectancy can be up to 15 years.
  • Manchesters can become obese if overfed and under-exercised.
  • You can find them in two sizes: small and smaller.
  • They excel at sports such as agility, obedience, and rally.
  • They are great watchdogs and will bark enthusiastically if not trained to be quiet on command.
  • Manchester Terriers can be stubborn and difficult to housebreak. Crate training is recommended.
  • Manchesters are energetic dogs and like to go for walks. Be care in off-leash or unsecured areas; when their hunting instincts kick in, training is out the window. It's all about the chase.
  • They bark, dig, and kill vermin and small critters, including pocket pets.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.

Other Quick Facts

  • The Manchester Terrier is a small dog, slightly longer than he is tall, with a short coat in jet black with rich mahogany markings. He has a wedge-shaped head with a keen, bright expression shining out of black, almond-shaped eyes. This is a breed with curves. The neck is slightly arched; the topline (back) is slightly arched over the loins; and the abdomen is tucked up with an arched line. The tail tapers to a point and is carried in a slight upward curve.
  • With the exception of size, the only difference between the Standard and Toy Manchester is ear shape. The Standard Manchester has a naturally erect ear, a cropped ear or a button ear. Cropped ears are long and pointed. A Toy Manchester has a naturally erect ear, never one that has been cropped.
Breed standards
AKC group: Toy
UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan: 15 - 18 years
Average size: 6 - 8 pounds
Coat appearance: Smooth-haired, shiny
Coloration: Black and tan
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Muscular, long tapered head, V-shaped erect ears, dark almond-shaped eyes, black nose, pointed and erect tail.
Possible alterations: Standard versions are larger in size. Ears are known to naturally flop over.
Comparable Breeds: Italian Greyhound, Whippet

History of the Manchester Terrier
  The sleek and handsome Manchester Terrier is thought to have been created by crossing Britain’s black and tan terrier with the Whippet and possibly other breeds such as the Italian Greyhound. He originated in Manchester, where popular sports included rat killing and rabbit coursing. The Manchester was designed to excel at both and became popular throughout Britain.
  The dogs were eventually imported into the United States. The American Kennel Club recognized the Toy variety in 1886 and the Standard in 1887. The Manchester Terrier Club of America was formed in 1923. Today the breed ranks 121 st among the dogs registered by the AKC.

Temperament
  Manchester Terriers are lively, spirited, sharp-witted dogs. Although they look like small Dobermans, Manchesters are true terriers, through and through. They are extremely smart, somewhat independent and devoted to the people in their close circle. This is neither a cuddly nor a clingy breed. In fact, Manchester Terriers can be stubborn and, like most other terriers, they have a tendency to test boundaries. Manchesters can become destructive and noisy if left unattended for long periods of time. They typically get along well with children, as long as they are well-socialized with kids from an early age. Manchester Terriers are not particularly suspicious of strangers, although they can be a bit aloof and stand-offish. All in all, this is an alert, attentive breed that makes an ideal companion for city-dwellers.

Health 
  Manchester Terriers have an average life span of about 15 years. Breed health concerns may include von Willebrand disease, Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, pattern baldness (mainly in females), Ehler-Danlos syndrome (cutaneous asthenia), lens luxation, cataracts and generalized progressive retinal atrophy (GPRA). These short-haired dogs become easily chilled and should wear a sweater or coat when outside in icy weather for any length of time.

Care
  Minimal coat care is required for the Manchester Terrier. It is an active and alert breed that should be led on moderate on-leash walks, off-lead outings in safe areas, or fun romp in the garden. Although it likes to spend the day in the yard, it should not be allowed to live outdoors and it needs a soft, warm bed.

Living Conditions
  The Manchester Terrier is a good dog for apartment living. They are very active indoors and will do okay without a yard. Manchester Terriers prefer warm climates.

Training
  Not the easiest breed in the world when it comes to training, the Manchester Terrier needs a patient and calm trainer. His stubborn streak means that the trainer must always have loads of cookies to keep him interested in the session. Harsh methods and yelling will cause this breed to shut down.
  Many owners have found that their Manchester Terriers can be great therapy dogs. They are easy to put in the car and actually like going for rides, which makes visiting hospitals and nursing homes easy. Providing they were socialized properly and had basic obedience training, Manchesters can do good things for those in less than ideal health.

Activity Requirements
  Manchester Terriers are active, athletic dogs, but unlike some little breeds they typically are not neurotic or excessively busy. A healthy dose of moderate exercise should suffice to keep them happy, healthy and fit. Manchesters love to accompany their human family members on all sorts of outings, from a simple stroll around the neighborhood to a trip to the grocery store. They absolutely adore playing fetch.

Grooming
  When it comes to grooming, the Manchester Terrier is an easy keeper. Though the breed is naturally clean with little doggie odor, a bath every three months (or when he gets dirty) in a mild shampoo is a good idea. Brush his sleek coat with a natural bristle brush or mitt. Use coat conditioner/polish to brighten the sheen.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually once every few weeks. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.   Check the ears weekly for dirt, redness or a bad odor that can indicate an infection. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball dampened with a gentle, pH-balanced ear cleaner recommended by your veterinarian. Introduce the ManchesterTerrier to grooming when he is very young so he learns to accept it, particularly nail trimming, patiently.

Children And Other Pets
  Typically, a Manchester is devoted to his family and likes children but his small size makes him vulnerable to youngsters who aren't old enough to know it hurts when you yank his ears. Some breeders prefer homes without very young children. It helps to expose him to a lot of children, small and not so small, when he's young.
  Show your children how to approach and touch dogs, and supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should be left unsupervised with a child.
  Manchesters and other pets depends on... the other pets. They are less scrappy than many terriers, but don't lose sight of why they were bred: to kill vermin. They have a strong prey drive. So while they generally do well with other dogs, cats might be pretty nervous around them, and small critters like rats, hamsters, and guinea pigs would be in permanent danger around this terrier.

Is this breed right for you?
  A completely devoted breed, the Manchester Terrier is very loyal, loving and faithful. Active and full of life, it needs a lot of mental and physical stimulation to avoid behavioral problems. Not capable of being left alone for long periods of time, it is in constant need of human companionship. With a natural instinct to hunt, it does not do well with cats but can get along with other dogs if raised with them. Enjoying walks, games of fetch and other forms of activity, it does best with a large yard. A good family pet, it does best with children if introduced to them as a puppy.

Did You Know?
  The Manchester Terrier and Toy Manchester were registered as separate breeds until 1959. They are now treated as one breed — the Manchester Terrier — with two varieties: Toy and Standard.

A dream day in the life of a Manchester Terrier
  A breed that enjoys snuggling with its favorite humans, it will enjoy waking up to the alarm in its owner's bed. Known for cuddling, it will wait to get out of bed until its master does. Once up for the day, it'll greet the kids with affection before going for a romp in the yard. After a good breakfast, it will enjoy engaging in a game of fetch. After a nap with the smaller humans, the Manchester Terrier will follow them outside to sniff out the perimeter for any unwelcome visitors. Ending its day exactly as it started, it'll be keen for a nightly snuggle session.


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