LUV My dogs: lover

LUV My dogs

Everything about your dog!

Showing posts with label lover. Show all posts
Showing posts with label lover. Show all posts

Friday, November 24, 2017

Everything about your Briard

Everything about your Briard
  Centuries old and beloved by the French since the Middle Ages, the Briard is busy, active dog that loves to protect his flock. And if he doesn’t have a flock to protect, he’ll be content watching over your family. Quite happy to move from the farm to a house, this breed is a wonderful companion for people who like to stay active. Also known as the Berger Briard, the Chien Berger de Brie and the Berger de Brie, the Briard is loyal to a fault and will love you with his whole heart, right from the start.

Overview
  Often called "a heart wrapped in fur," the Briard makes a great family dog. He is devoted to his owner, happiest following you around the house while you do chores or watching you watch television on a rainy day.
  With a strong instinct to herd, it's not unusual for him to try to gather or keep the children or adults in his family within certain boundaries. He may nudge, push, or bark at his "flock."
  The Briard is an intelligent breed and a quick study when it comes to training, though he can be stubborn and want to do things his own way. Owners must be prepared to establish pack leadership from an early age or the dog is likely to take a shot at the role himself.
  The Briard is an ideal companion for someone who wants a lovable, but not overly dependent, dog. A member of the Herding Group, he weighs in at around 75 pounds and lives comfortably in the country or city — as long as he's with his family and gets sufficient exercise.

Highlights
  • The Briard needs daily grooming. Although his coat is considered low- to non-shedding, it tangles and matts easily. If you do not have the time or patience for grooming, consider another breed.
  • The Briard is naturally independent, which is a wonderful quality if your puppy has been trained properly. However, without training, that independent, confident puppy can turn into an unmanageable adult.
  • The Briard must be socialized early to avoid aggression toward people or animals he doesn't know. Briards were bred to be guard dogs and still take this role seriously.
  • The Briard enjoys being with his owner. He does best when he is allowed to hang out with the people he loves.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts

  • The Briard’s long coat can be any color except white. It is usually black, gray or tawny.
  • In France, the breed is called the Berger (bair-zhay) de Brie (bree).
  • The Briard’s tail is in the shape of a J, like a shepherd’s crook. It’s known as a crochet hook.
  • Briards can be found participating in herding, agility and obedience trials, as well as flyball competitions.
Breed standards
AKC group: Herding
UKC group: Herding Dog
Average lifespan: 10-12 years
Average size: 70 to 90 pounds
Coat appearance: Long and slightly wavy
Coloration: Uniform black, fawn, grey or blue
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles, houses with yards, farms/rural areas, watchdog
Temperament: Devoted, intelligent, protective, gentle
Comparable Breeds: Bearded Collie, Barbet

History
  The Briard has a long history in France as a herding breed and guard dog, protecting flocks from wolves and poachers. His reputation is that of a brave and heroic protector. In addition, the breed has been used to track and hunt game, as a sentinel in war time and as a pack dog to carry items.
  The breed probably descends from rough-coated sheepdogs that came to Europe in the Middle Ages. Dogs that resemble the Briard are depicted in eighth-century tapestries, and the dogs are mentioned in 12th-century records. A breed standard was written for the dogs in 1867, and a French breed club was formed in 1909.
Both Thomas Jefferson and the Marquis de Lafayette brought Briards to the United States, but it wasn’t until 1922 that a litter of Briards was registered with the American Kennel Club.   The AKC recognized the breed in 1928. The breed currently ranks 125th among the breeds registered by the AKC, down from 110th in 2000.



Personality
  They can be clowns or be serious, but the one thing in common that all Briards have is they want to please you. Known to have hearts of gold that are wrapped in fur, the Briard makes a perfect family pet for those who like to keep active. If they don’t get enough exercise, this breed can become destructive. To keep your home and garden in one piece, you’ll need to be committed to daily activity.
  Even though he will be generous with his affection with the family, your Briard may be wary of strangers. You can thank their flock-protecting instinct for that. This makes him an excellent watchdog. To keep him from becoming aggressive with strangers, you should start socialization from an early age and keep up this practice throughout his lifetime.
  The Briard will get along with most pets, but can often be aggressive with other dogs. If you already have pets in your house when you bring your Briard puppy home, you should be fine, be avoid adding new animals into the mix once he has been established in the household.

Health
  With such a large breed, you can expect hip dysplasia and bloat to be an issue with the Briard. As well, they may also suffer from cataracts, central progressive retinal atrophy, congenital stationary night blindness, hereditary retinal dystrophy of Briards, hypothyroidism and lymphoma.

Care
  The Briard's coat must be brushed regularly to prevent the hair from tangling. Herding is its favorite activity, but it can also be taken for long walks or jogs in order to meet its exercise requirements. And though it is adaptable to outdoor living, it is most often considered an indoor dog. Just make sure you take it to large fields and let it play frequently.

Living Conditions

  The Briard will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. They are moderately active indoors and will do best with at least an average-sized yard. This dog is totally not suited for life in a kennel. They are happiest in the home as part of the family, but they do love to be outdoors.

Trainability
  Briards are highly trainable dogs and thrive on mastering new tasks. Training should always be done with a confident but gentle hand, as this breed is highly sensitive and boasts a long memory. A Briard isn't easy to forgive someone who treats him harshly. Establishing leadership should be done as early as possible, because Briards are dominant and will move quickly to take over the role of “pack leader” in the home, unless otherwise put in his place.
  This breed is fearless boasts excellent stamina. They can work all day alongside a farmer without losing steam and because of their versatility, trainability and endurance, Troops in WWI used Briards for a variety of tasks including, sentries, messengers and medic dogs.

Exercise 

  This is no dog for the lazy. This dog needs plenty of activity to keep him occupied – both physical and mental. Farms make an ideal environment for this breed, where he can herd sheep and protect against predators. If you don’t live on a farm, a large, fenced-in yard is necessary. Children will help tire him out, but playtime should always be supervised as he might herd the kids.
  Because they need a large area in which to move around, apartments and condos are not good living quarters for the Briard. They just won’t get the exercise they need in that small amount of space.

Grooming 
  The Briard's coat is long and very high-maintenance. While no stripping is required, two to three hours per week of brushing is required in order to keep their thick coats from matting.  When brushed properly, dirt and debris is easily removed from the coat. They shed lightly year round, but will blow their entire coat twice per year. The coat of a Briard can grow to about five inches in length, which is the acceptable standard, and in fact, clipping can lead to disqualification in the show ring. Retired Briards, or dogs who will not be shown, can have their coats trimmed in order to pear down the weekly maintenance schedule.
  As the Briard sheds, if the undercoat is not properly removed from the body, it will form mats.
  Briards need to be bathed about once every six weeks. Over-bathing this breed can lead to natural oils in the hair and skin being stripped away, causing skin irritation and even infection. The Briard's face and rear end may need to be washed more often, as their beards can hang into their food and water dishes, and their long hair can trap debris when the dog eliminates.
  In addition to brushing and bathing, Briards should have their ears cleaned on a weekly basis with a veterinarian-approved cleanser to keep harmful bacteria at bay. Weekly tooth brushing will keep teeth and gums healthy, and prevent bad breath.

Children And Other Pets
  A loving and playful companion, the Briard makes an excellent family dog. He is protective of the children in his family, and has been known to "defend" them when parents discipline.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party.
  Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  If the Briard is raised with other dogs and pets, and learns they are members of his pack, he gets along fairly well. However, his prey drive is strong, so training is necessary for him to learn not to chase the family cat or quarrel with your Beagle. Supervision is a good idea, as animals outside his immediate family are likely to trigger his instinct to give chase. Keep him on a leash when you are in public.

Is the Briard the Right Breed for you?

High Maintenance: Grooming should be performed often to keep the dog's coat in good shape. No trimming or stripping needed.
Moderate Shedding: Routine brushing will help. Be prepared to vacuum often!
Moderately Easy Training: The Briard is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Very Active: It will need daily exercise to maintain its shape. Committed and active owners will enjoy performing fitness activities with this breed.
Good for New Owners: This breed is well suited for those who have little experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
Sam and Ralph clock

  Briards have made a variety of big and small-screen appearances, most notably in the series “Married With Children” and the soap opera “All My Children,” as well as the movies “Top Dog” and “Dennis the Menace.”

Briards in popular culture

  • Dennis the Menace - "Ruff"
  • Kiss Kiss Bang Bang - "Stevie"
  • Bachelor Father - "Jasper
  • Get Smart - Agent K-13 "Fang
  • Dharma & Greg - "Stinky"
  • Addams Family - "Them" 
  • Top Dog - "Reno"
  • Dennis the Menace (1993) - "Rosie"
  • The Karate Dog 2004
  • Tell No One 2006
  • Sam Sheepdog of Looney Tunes fame

Read More

Monday, April 10, 2017

Everything about your Sealyham Terrier

Everything about your Sealyham Terrier
   The Sealyham Terrier dog breed was originally bred to hunt otters, foxes, and badgers. Today these clowns of the terrier family are primarily companion dogs and a good choice for the novice terrier owner.

Overview
  The Sealy peers out at the world from beneath bushy eyebrows, ever curious about the goings-on around him. Although he certainly has the look of a feisty terrier, the Sealyham Terrier doesn't have the typical attitude. He's a very mellow, laid-back dog, with modest exercise requirements and a clownish spirit. He even gets along well with other dogs. All these traits serve to make him a good pet for someone who loves the high-style look of a terrier but isn’t enamored with or capable of handling that in-your-face kind of dog.
  The Sealyham Terrier is all terrier on the outside, with the scruffy charm of his cousins and the white color of his ancestor, the West Highland White Terrier. But on the inside he's a very different dog.
  Originally bred to hunt badger, he's better described as a lover, not a fighter. He's a playful dog with a big sense of humor, and while he has a tendency to bark a bit more than most people might like, at only 20 to 25 pounds he is the perfect size for an apartment. He's a light shedder, inclined to be child-friendly and dog-friendly, and doesn't even have an overwhelming desire to chase cats.

Highlights
  • If your Sealyham Terrier becomes overweight, he can develop back problems. Be sure to monitor his food intake and give him regular exercise to keep him in shape.
  • Sealies are independent and can be stubborn when it comes to housetraining. Crate training is recommended.
  • They are reserved with strangers and make good watchdogs. Their bark is surprisingly loud and deep, but they can be trained to be quiet on command.
  • Sealies are fond of chasing rabbits, birds, and even other dogs and cats. Be sure to keep your Sealyham Terrier on leash when he's not in a secure area.
  • Because of their unusual looks and small size, they could be targets for dog thieves. Although Sealyham Terriers do well outdoors when it's cool (they don't like heat), they should be kept in your house when you can't supervise them.
  • Sealyham Terriers are a rare breed. It may be difficult to locate a reputable breeder, and even when you locate one, you may have to wait several months for a litter to be born.
  • Sealyham Terriers can be aggressive toward dogs they don't know, even dogs much larger than they are. Keep your Sealyham Terrier under control until you know that both he and the other dog are friendly to each other.
  • Although loyal and affectionate with their families, Sealyham Terriers can be a bit reserved around strangers.
  • Sealyham Terriers are happy little dogs, but they can have a dominant personality if not kept in check by a firm, consistent master.
  • Sealyham Terriers have an independent, stubborn streak. Successfully training them requires firm, consistent handling. They respond well to positive reinforcement techniques such as food rewards, praise, and play.
  • Never buy a Sealyham Terrier from a puppy mill, a pet store, or a breeder who doesn't provide health clearances or guarantees. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies and who breeds for sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts

  • The Sealyham’s long, broad head and rectangular body are two of the features that differentiate him from other terriers.
  • The Sealyham’s double coat can be all white or white with lemon, tan or badger markings on the head and ears. “Badger” is a mixture of white, gray, brown and black hairs.
  • Comparable Breeds: Dandie Dinmont Terrier, West Highland White Terrier

History
  The Sealyham Terrier derives his name from Sealyham, the estate of Captain John Tucker Edwards, in Haverfordwest, Wales. Captain Edwards developed the breed in the mid-1800s to hunt for small but tough game such as badgers, otters, and foxes. He crossed various breeds and tested the offspring for gameness and hunting ability.
  As word got out about the little white terriers, they became popular in England. In 1903, the breed made an appearance in the show ring, and the first Sealyham Terrier club was formed in 1908. In 1910, the breed was officially recognized by England's Kennel Club. The breed's first champion in England was a dog named St. Brides Demon. He achieved his championship in 1911.
  Sealies were especially popular in the early 1900s. They stood out in the show ring, and show entries often were in the hundreds. At the Pembrokeshire Hunt Hound Puppy and Sealyham Terrier show in Slade, Pembrokeshire, in 1914, , there were 600 Sealyham   Terriers entered, with 71 in the Open Dog Class and 64 in the Open Bitch Class, numbers that have never been equalled since.
  Sealyham Terriers were also recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1911, shortly after the first Sealies were imported into the U.S. The American Sealyham Terrier Club was formed in 1913.
  Since their show debut in San Mateo, California, in 1911, they have remained a popular show dog. Among the breed's many honors, a Sealyham Terrier has won Best in Show at Westminster four times.
  They have not, however, ever become a very popular dog with the general public. Despite his excellent companion dog credentials, the Sealy today is a rare breed, ranking 149th among the 155 breeds and varieties recognized by the AKC.



Temperament
  An independent dog, the Sealy is perfectly fine with being left alone while his humans work but he is also thrilled to snuggle up on their laps when they get home. This breed does tend to be relentless barkers however; they are not quite as bad as other terrier breeds. Their personalities and clown-like antics will keep the family laughing for hours.
  The Sealy might be small but he doesn’t understand the concept of this. Because he can be food and toy aggressive, this breed is not appropriate for families with young children. Considering his strong instinct to chase, he should not live with cats or other small animals. If raised with another dog in the home, the Sealy will get along famously with it, but can be aggressive toward strange dogs.

Health
  This is a hardy breed with few breed specific health problems. The main hereditary problem highlighted by the American Sealyham Terrier Club is an eye condition called lens luxation, for which there are DNA tests. Lens luxation is a condition in which the lens slips out of position in the eyeball due to the weakening of the fibers that holds it in place.
  This in turn blocks the flow of fluids in the eye, leading to a painful increase in intra-ocular pressure glaucoma and often irreparable optic nerve damage, leading to visual field loss and eventual blindness.
  As of November 2011, the Kennel Club has not highlighted any specific concerns regarding the breed's health to conformation show judges. Due to the low numbers of the breed, two of the most prevalent problems facing the breed today is the popular sire effect and the general problem of genetic diversity within the breed.

Care
  The Sealyham Terrier's small size and robust build make him a good choice for city or country dwellers. He's relatively inactive indoors and can adapt to life without a yard as long as he's walked daily. If he does have a yard, it should be fenced to prevent him from chasing other animals or wandering off to go hunting.
  Sealyhams are rather low-key, not "busy" like most terriers. Due to their size, their loyalty to their families, and their preference for cool temperatures, they do best as housedogs.
Like most terriers, Sealies likes to dig and bark. This dog is an independent thinker and requires firm and consistent handling, but he responds well to training with positive reinforcement techniques such as food rewards, praise, and play.
  Sometimes Sealies can be difficult to housetrain, but patience and a regular schedule usually brings success. Crate-training is recommended.

Living Conditions
  Good for apartment living. They are relatively inactive indoors and will do okay without a yard. Prefer cool weather.

Training
  Sealyham Terriers are feisty and strong-willed dogs. They require an assertive but kind family that won’t let the dog walk all over them. The Sealy needs regular training sessions to keep him from misbehaving. Consistency, along with loads of praise and treats, is best when working with a Sealy. Training should begin from the time you get the new puppy. This should go on throughout the dog’s life to ensure that he never forgets his place within the family.
  Sealies were bred to hunt small animals so they do remarkably well at Earthdog competitions. Being the mellowest of the terriers, this breed can be wonderful therapy dogs as well as family companions. Of course, with a lot of hard work, the Sealy can do well in obedience trials as well as in the breed ring.

Exercise
  This breed needs a daily walk. Play will take care of a lot of their exercise needs, however, as with all breeds, play will not fulfill their primal instinct to walk. Dogs that do not get to go on daily walks are more likely to display behavior problems. They will also enjoy a good romp in a safe, open area off lead, such as a large, fenced-in yard. The breed is a low-energy dog that makes a good walking companion. The overriding characteristic about Sealyhams is that they are low energy, couch potatoes. They are not "busy," not "active" and therefore make a low-key companion.

Grooming
  The Sealy has a long, weather-resistant double coat that doesn’t shed much but requires stripping or clipping in addition to regular brushing or combing with a slicker brush, pin brush, or stainless steel Greyhound comb. Be sure you brush or comb all the way down to the skin. The beard requires daily combing to keep it clean.
  The Sealy doesn’t shed much at all, but his hard terrier coat may need special care. If the show ring is in his future, the Sealyham's coat will have to be “hand-stripped,” a labor-intensive task that involves pulling out dead coat a little bit at a time, using a special tool.   Dogs whose career involves your sofa and garden will simply need to be kept brushed and occasionally clipped for neatness and to minimize shedding and matting of the coat. Clipping will soften the texture of the coat, so think about whether that’s important to you before you have it done.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  All Terriers are rambunctious, even the laidback Sealyham. This breed is best suited to families with older children who understand how to handle and interact with dogs.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how good-natured, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Sealies are generally good with other pets, including cats, especially if they're raised with them. They can be aggressive toward dogs they don't know.

Did You Know?
  The Sealyham is named after the estate of the man who developed the breed, Captain John Edwardes, who lived in Wales.



Read More