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Showing posts with label love. Show all posts
Showing posts with label love. Show all posts

Tuesday, November 15, 2016

Everything about your Redbone Coonhound

Everything about your Redbone Coonhound
  As you can tell from its name, the Redbone Coonhound is a breed made famous by hunting raccoon and a few other animals. In fact, this is what it was originally bred for, having first been an “unofficial” breed in the American south for a number of years. This was before people serious about hunting wanted not only a superior Redbone Coonhound in terms of athleticism, but in coat color and overall breed quality. The result is the modern-day Redbone Coonhound, an excellent companion for families and a dog with keen hunting instincts that have also been measured against bears and cougars.
  What’s interesting about the Redbone Coonhound is just how well-suited it is for a number of households and family types. A good dog to have around children and sturdy enough to enjoy farm life and the outdoors, the Redbone Coonhound can make a highly versatile breed that brings a lot of joy to a family in so many ways.

Overview
  The Redbone Coonhound, also known as the Redbone, the Redbone Hound and the Red Coon Dog, is truly an all-American breed. This is an easy-going, friendly, good-natured hound dog that is immediately recognizable by its beautiful, deep red coat. Redbones were bred to perpetuate their instinctive desire and talent for hunting and treeing raccoons and other large game, including bobcat, cougar and even bear. Redbone Coonhounds are surefooted and swift.   They also are fantastic family dogs; they adore children and get along famously with other companion animals. Today, this is the only solid-colored purebred coonhound. The American Kennel Club accepted the Redbone Coonhound for full registration as a member of its Hound Group in 2009.

Other Quick Facts
  • Colonial settlers, especially those from Scotland and Ireland, brought red hounds with them to the United States, and those dogs are the ancestors of the Redbone.
  • The Redbone is a cold-nosed dog, meaning he’s good at following an old, or “cold,” trail.
  • Redbones occasionally have a small amount of white on their chest or feet, said to be a result of their Irish hound background.
  • The Redbone’s main quarry is raccoons, but he can also track bigger game.
  • The Redbone has a pleading expression with dark brown or hazel eyes and a sweet voice that carries over long distances.
Breed standards
AKC group: Hound

UKC group: Scenthound

Average lifespan: 11-12 years
Average size: 35-65 pounds
Coat appearance: Flat, shiny, and smooth
Coloration: Rich red
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Strong, vigorous, and striking all around, clean, well-proportioned head, black nose, strong chest, brown eyes, long, floppy ears that are close to the nose, upright tail, and small paws with thickened pads.
Possible alterations: Some may have white markings on chest and feet.
Comparable Breeds: Black and Tan Coonhound, American Foxhound

History
  In the late 18th century, many European-type hunting dogs were imported to America, most of them of Scottish, French, English, and Irish ancestry: the English Foxhound, the Harrier, the Grand Bleu de Gascogne, the Welsh Hound, the Beagle, and the Bloodhound were among these. Most often, these dogs were imported so that wealthy planters of the Tidewater could engage in foxhunting. Over time, Southern hunters selectively bred dogs that would not back down, had great stamina, and would "hound" their prey until they treed or cornered their exhausted quarry, leading to modern coonhounds.
  In the late 18th century Scottish immigrants brought red-colored foxhounds to Georgia, which would be the foundation stock of the Redbone. Later, approximately 1840, Irish-bred Foxhound and Bloodhound lines were added. The name came from an early breeder, Peter Redbone of Tennessee, though other breeders of note are Redbone's contemporary,   George F.L. Birdsong of Georgia, and Dr. Thomas Henry in the 19th century.Over time, breeders followed a selective program that led to a coonhound that is specialized for prey which climbs trees, was unafraid of taking on large animals, was agile enough to carry on over mountain or in meadow, and liked to swim if necessary. They were ideal for pack hunting of both small and larger prey. Originally, the Redbone had a black saddleback, but by the beginning of the 20th century, it was an uninterrupted red tone.
  Like many American hunting dogs, especially those from the South, they were widely known by hunters and farmers, but not well known in the show ring. The Redbone has found recognition by the two major American kennel clubs. Because of of its main use as a hunting dog rather than a show dog Redbones are extremely rare dogs outside of the United States. There are very few breeders outside of North America and it is virtually unknown in Europe or Australia.
  The Redbone Coonhound was recognized by the United Kennel Club in 1902, becoming the second coonhound breed to gain recognition.
  The Redbone Coonhound was popularized after the novel Where the Red Fern Grows, written by Wilson Rawls, was published in 1961. It told the story of Billy Colman and his Redbones.
  The Redbone Coonhound was recognized by the American Kennel Club in 2010. It was shown at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show for the first time in 2011.

Personality
  Redbone Coonhounds are determined, energetic, tenacious, tireless and fearless, especially while on the hunt. These personality traits are part of what make Redbones such fantastic scenthounds. In addition, Redbone Coonhounds are affectionate, friendly, kind-hearted, sensitive and extremely good with children and other animals. This is not a high-strung, fussy or clingy breed. Redbones adapt effortlessly to a wide variety of new situations. They are not suspicious or wary around strangers, nor are they overly boisterous or pushy. These are solid, stable hound dogs that can work in the field all day, and then comfortably relax with the family for a nice evening at home.

Health Problems
  Problems with hip dysplasia affect this dog, but that is not uncommon and they have few other health problems, making them generally pleasant around veterinarians.

Care
  Traditionally used as an outdoor dog, the Redbone has become more adaptable to indoor living with a family. It should be taken out on routine jogs, walks, or be allowed to swim nearby. However, these activities should only be done in safe and secure locations, as the dog can quickly roam off if it picks up a curious scent. While trailing or when excited, it has a loud and melodious voice.
  To maintain its coat, the Redbone should be brushed weekly. Many Redbone Coonhounds also have a tendency to drool.

Living Conditions
  The Redbone Coonhound will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. These dogs are relatively inactive indoors and will do best with at least a large yard. Their all-weather coat allows them to live and sleep outdoors and work in all kinds of terrain.

Training
  Redbone Coonhounds take well to training, and are so versatile and athletic that they can accomplish a high variety of tasks. Giving them tasks to fulfill – from swimming to hunting – can help it not only feel fulfilled, but help it feel like it plays a role in your pack. Every dog should certainly feel this way about humans, but should be trained with the discipline to realize that its role is subservient to every human in the house.

Exercise Requirements
  Capable of a lot of exercise – and indeed, they were bred that way – this is a great outdoor dog and a good companion for someone who wants to get plenty of vigorous exercise. If you’re looking for a low-maintenance dog that likes to lay around the house, this is not your breed.

Training
  Redbone Coonhounds take well to training, and are so versatile and athletic that they can accomplish a high variety of tasks. Giving them tasks to fulfill – from swimming to hunting – can help it not only feel fulfilled, but help it feel like it plays a role in your pack. Every dog should certainly feel this way about humans, but should be trained with the discipline to realize that its role is subservient to every human in the house.

Grooming
  The Redbone has a flashy, dark-red coat that’s short and smooth. Weekly brushing with a hound mitt or rubber curry brush will keep it clean and shiny, as well as remove dead hair so it doesn’t land on your floor, furniture or clothing.
  Bathe your Coonhound as needed. He may have a bit of a “houndy” odor, which some people love and others hate. Bathing can help reduce the smell if you don’t like it, but it won’t take it away completely or permanently.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails every week or two, and keep the ears clean and dry. Brush the teeth regularly with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Is this breed right for you?
  Great with children, the Redbone Coonhound will adapt to family life with ease. Loving and loyal, this dog loves his owner with passion. A great hunter, he can adapt well to the working life or be happy as a playmate. In need of a fenced-in yard, he has the natural instinct to sniff out his prey, including cats. Trained easily if done so at a young age, this breed is a great addition to add to a household.
Did You Know?
  The man who did the most to develop the breed was named George E. L. Birdsong, a well-known fox hunter and dog breeder who lived in Georgia.

A dream day in the life of a Redbone Coonhound
  Waking up ready to play, he'll greet you with a lick. Once you pet him and show him love, he's ready for his meal. After breakfast, he'll enjoy a fun walk and sniff around the block. Engaging in any activity the kiddos present him, he'll follow them around with ease. Happy to nap inside or outside, he'll need a lot of time in the backyard. After dinner, he'll enjoy a good rubdown, a swim in the pond and a lot of attention before he takes a snooze with his master.




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Thursday, September 15, 2016

Everything about your Transylvanian Hound

Everything about your Transylvanian Hound
  When it comes to the Transylvanian Hound, there is much to love. It has a gentle, adaptable personality that comes from centuries of working with people in the wide-ranging climate of Hungary. Gentle and good-natured, it grows very close to family members. This is the type of dog that will romp through the wilderness and cuddle on the living room floor.

Overview
  The Transylvanian Hound  is an ancient dog breed of Hungary, historically primarily used for hunting. It is a strong, medium-sized scent hound, characterized by a black body, with tan and sometimes white markings on the muzzle, chest and extremities, and distinctive tan eyebrow spots. It has a high-pitched bark for a dog of its size. The breed was rescued from extinction by focused breeding efforts in the late 20th century. There were formerly two varieties, the long-legged and short-legged, developed for different kinds of hunting in the Middle Ages. Only the long-legged strain survives.

What makes the Transylvanian Hound Unique?
  Historically, Transylvanian Hound are know primarily for hunting. These dogs re characterized by a black body, and sometimes white markings on the muzzle and they are medium-sized dogs. they are sweet, energetic, loyal and fearless.

Breed standards
FCI: Group 6, Section 1 #241
AKC: FSS- The AKC Foundation Stock Service (FSS) is an optional recording service for purebred dogs that are not yet eligible for AKC registration.
UKC : Scenthound
Life Span: 10 – 12 Years
Colour: Black, Tan
Litter Size: up to 8 puppies
Size: Males –18 to 21 inches; Females – 18 to 21 inches
Weight: Males – 66 to 77 pounds; Females –66 to 77 pounds
Origin: Hungary
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles, houses with yards, hunters
Temperament: Friendly, hardy, courageous, intelligent
Hypoallergenic: No
Comparable Breeds: Black and Tan Coonhound, Rottweiler

History
  The ancestors of the Transylvanian Hound came with the invading Magyar tribes in the ninth century, who brought in hounds and crossed them with local varieties and with Polish hounds.
  The dog was the favourite of the Hungarian aristocracy during the breed's peak in the Middle Ages, for hunting various game animals.Two height varieties developed to hunt different game in different types of terrain, and both varieties were kept together. The long-legged variety was used for hunting woodland and grassland big game, such as European bison, bear, boar, and lynx. The short-legged variety was used for hunting fox, hare, and chamois is overgrown or rocky terrain.
  The breed declined, and was marginalised to the Carpathian woodlands, shrinking with the growth of agriculture and forestry. At the beginning of the twentieth century, the breed was nearly extinct, and not recognised and standardised by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI) until 1963. In 1968, efforts began to save it.Today, a substantial number of the long-legged variety of the dogs may be found in both Hungary and neighboring Romania. However, only the long-legged variety remains.
  The Transylvanian Hound is, naturally, recognised by the national dog breeding and fancier group, the Hungarian Kennel Club (using the FCI breed standard). The breed was recognised with a breed standard by one US-based group, the United Kennel Club (UKC), in 2006.The more prominent American Kennel Club publishes no standard for it, though the organisation at least provisionally recognises its existence, announcing its acceptance in 2015 into the AKC Foundation Stock Service Program, for breeders hoping to establishing it in the United States.


Temperament
  Even though the Transylvanian Hound was originally developed as a hunting dog it also makes a wonderful family pet. These dogs are friendly and amiable by nature and they can be quite loyal and loving with their families. This breed is curious and they have a tendency to follow scents, so you should always keep your dog on a leash when you take him outside.   The Transylvanian Hound can be somewhat independent at times due to their hunting instincts, but they love to spend time with family and they generally get along well with children and other dogs. This breed requires adequate daily mental and physical stimulation to prevent the development of problem behaviors.
  This breed is known for its protective ways and is a good addition as a family dog. The Transylvanian Hound is not only loyal, but also intelligent and easy to train. Bred for hunting purposes, the Transylvanian Hound is energetic, requiring daily exercise.

Health Problems
  The Transylvanian Hound is a very hardy and healthy breed for the most part, not prone to many serious health problems. Like all breeds, however, this dog can develop minor health issues. The diseases most commonly affecting this breed include hip dysplasia and elbow dysplasia.
  This dog breed lives an average of 10 to 12 years.

Care
  The Transylvanian Hound requires little coat maintenance, shedding an average amount. An occasional brushing with a firm bristle brush is sufficient, and bathing should be kept to a minimum to maintain the natural coat.

Training
  The Transylvanian Hound was originally bred for hunting so it is an intelligent breed that learns quickly – it also has the ability to hunt independently. This being the case, the Transylvanian Hound can be a little bit strong-willed at times though they generally aim to please their owners. These dogs can be trained for tracking, pointing and driving game – they may also excel at various dog sports. Positive reinforcement training methods are best for this breed and a firm but consistent hand in training is recommended. As is true for all breeds, you should start training and socialization as early as possible with Transylvanian Hound puppies.

Exercise Requirements
  As a hunting breed, the Transylvanian Hound is fairly active. This being the case, he needs a good bit of daily exercise to remain in good health. This dog will appreciate a long daily walk or jog and he will also enjoy training for hunting or other dog sports. Make sure to give this breed plenty of mental and physical stimulation to prevent the development of problem behaviors.

Coat
  The Transylvanian Hound has a short, smooth coat that is fairly dense with a shiny appearance. It is primarily black with tan markings on the muzzle and legs as well as a tan point above each eyebrow. Because the breed has a double coat, regular brushing is recommended to control shedding.

Grooming
  The Transylvanian Hound requires little coat maintenance, shedding an average amount. An occasional brushing with a firm bristle brush is sufficient, and bathing should be kept to a minimum to maintain the natural coat.

Is the Transylvanian Hound Right For You?
  They are known for being protective and is a good addition as a family dog. The Transylvanian Hound is not only loyal, but also intelligent and easy to train. Bred for hunting purposes, the Transylvanian Hound is energetic, requiring daily exercise.

What They Are Like to Live With...
  Intelligent, curious and protective, the Transylvanian Hound also serves as an admirable watchdog. It has very keen instincts, however, and knows the difference between real danger and a letter carrier, for example. Once a friend or stranger is welcomed into the house, the Transylvanian Hound relaxes and becomes more social.

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Tuesday, July 19, 2016

5 Signs Your Dog Loves You

5 Signs Your Dog Loves You
  We love our dogs as if they are members of our families – because to us they are! We show our dogs we love them in so many ways outside of just their regular care and maintenance, by doing things like buying them special treats and toys. But how do our dogs tell us they love us too? Sometimes it might feel like a one-sided relationship, but dogs love us just as much as we love them!

1. He Makes Eye Contact


  In the human world, we usually make eye contact to show that we’re engaged and paying attention. That’s not the case in the dog world. When dogs lock eyes with each other, it’s often considered rude or aggressive. And yet, when dogs stare at their favorite humans, it’s usually out of love, not war. When you look into your pup’s eyes and he gazes back with relaxed eyes showing little to no white, it usually means he’s happy and comfortable with you.

2. Sleeping With You

  Dogs are pack animals, and in the wild wolves and other canids sleep huddled together in packs. This helps keep them warm and help them feel safe. It’s also a way for your dog to show you he cares. He wants to be near you, and this is his natural way of showing you he feels comfortable and sees you as family.

3. Gift Giving

  If you’re hanging out and your pup brings you their favorite toy, take it as a compliment. But, more importantly, take it and toss it out for them to fetch. Bringing you the gift is a sign of their love and desire to play.

4. Licking your face

  Dogs lick people’s faces for a few different reasons, but in many cases it’s a sign of love and affection. Puppies typically lick faces even more than adult dogs. This behavior comes from wolf cubs, who lick their mothers’ faces to signal hunger so they will be fed. Dogs don’t feed their young the same way wolves do, but the licking instinct remains. A dog may also lick you in a submissive way, to let you know that it is not a threat. And of course, your licking dog may also simply be grooming you. Dogs groom each other as a gesture of intimacy when a solid bond is in place, so you can definitely take grooming as a sign of love from your dog.


5. He Wags His Tail

  Tail wagging may seem like an obvious sign of love, but this behavior is more complex than you may think. A tail wag can have a lot of different meanings — and they’re not always friendly. Thankfully, when your dog gives a full-body wag with the tail held at mid-height, accompanied by other signs of positive body language, the message is pretty clear: He’s happy and excited to see you. Now, if your dog’s tail wags more to the right side of his rear, it just might be an even better sign he loves you. An Italian neuroscientist and two veterinarians discovered this by using cameras to track the tail-wag angles of 30 pet dogs as they were each shown their owner, a person they didn’t know, a cat and an unfamiliar dog. When the pups saw their owners, their tails wagged most strongly to the right side of the body. 


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Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Your Dog is Your Best Friend

Your Dog is Your Best Friend
  Dogs have been our constant companions for thousands of years. The history of dogs is closely tied to our own history, and no other animal on Earth shares as close a relationship with humans as dogs do. Dogs and humans understand each other, and it’s because of the undying love they show us that we keep them by our sides.
  It’s not that having a human BFF is a bad thing. It’s just that your dog makes it clear, every second, that you matter more than anyone else in the world.
  And we’re not saying you’re needy, either. But your dog is in awe of you. You feed his soul with food, walks, sleep, and play. If he could build you a shrine, he would.
  In case you’re still on the fence about whether your dog, or that friend you’ve had since you were five, is your true bestie.



He Never, Ever, Leaves Me Alone

  Buddy’s friendship means I never have to feel alone again. He makes it clear I will never have to take even one step without him. Whether I walk to the computer or across the living room, he is closer than a shadow. So close I have to be careful not to step on his paws.

 You don’t mind doing even the most mundane of activities together.



He Is My Bathroom Hero

  He watches over my safety in the bathroom. He has taught me not to close the door tightly or he’ll throw his body against it and begin frantically scratching. He knows he can’t save me if I’m not in his line of vision. My hero has made it clear to leave the door open a crack. That way he can use his nose to push the door all the way open, smile at me, and wag his tail like a metronome on speed.

You don’t even need anyone but each other to have fun.


Just having each other around brings a smile to your face.

He Loves Sharing Meals

  He shares food. My food. When I’m seated at the table the Budster comes over and rests his chin on my lap. If that doesn’t work in one millisecond, his head burrows through and pops up in the space under my arm when I’m about to bite into a sandwich. And, no matter how many people look at me disapprovingly he scoffs at them and lets me feed him bites. I’ve learned to make the food bits small because he never chews, only gulps. When the meal is over he lazily lets his head flop back in my lap with a snorty sigh of approval.


You do everything together.

Time Means Nothing to Him

  I can’t wait to run home for one of his dopamine filled hugs even if it’s only been 20 minutes since I saw him last. He can’t wait either. When he hears my keys he runs up to wait at the door. When I open it he stands up on his hind legs, and reaches his front paws towards me for a hug. He does that even if it’s only been five minutes.

You’re there for each other, even when no one else is.


He Isn’t Afraid of Feet

  He takes excellent care of my feet. After a long walk in the morning I get in the bathtub and he trots in after me (You know, in case I slip or something). I dangle my foot over the side of the tub and he rushes to lick it. And lick it. And lick it.

I Can Read Him With a Look

  He has taught me a secret language. If he gnashes his teeth together like a snapping turtle it means he’d like me to look up so he can gaze into my eyes. If he sits perched at my feet and lets out a long, slow whimper he is merely looking out for me. He’s saying I’ve been working too many hours and will feel much better if I take a break and scratch behind his ears.

You always go everywhere together (as long as it’s not the vet).

He Is Never too Shy to Make a Fuss

  He whips his tail in circles like a propeller when he sees me. If Buddy is walking my husband Steve, and then spots me approaching on the street he stands at alert, and thrashes his tail as he bursts into song. People look at us because they think he is in pain. They don’t understand that caterwauling is the Bud’s happy voice.

You can only get to sleep when you’re together.


He Respects My Sleep

  Buddy doesn’t wake me up. He waits until I stir from sleep before he pounces on my chest, leans into my face, and smothers me with slobbery kisses because he knows it’s good for me.

You help make each other’s dreams come true.

He Keeps Me Warm

  He keeps Steve and me warm in the winter. By plastering his body against us he saves us from having to buy a heating pad. When Steve gets up to make coffee Buddy moves over to Steve’s spot on the bed and curls up like a pill worm. When Steve comes back with our mugs of java Buddy slides closer to me thus presenting Steve with his gift – a warm spot on the bed.

You’ll always make time to listen to each other’s feelings.

He Wears a Cape

Buddy sacrifices to make my Halloweens joyful. He consents to wearing a Superman cape because he knows it makes me happy. Of course, I understand that he cannot tolerate booties, coats, hats, or sweaters, and because I respect his boundaries, he indulges me.

You can’t hide anything from each other.




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Saturday, May 3, 2014

The Secrets To A Happy Dog

The Secrets To A Happy Dog
   A happy dog is a friendly and more lovable member of your family. Your dog brings you joy. Do you ever look over at her while she is sleeping and wonder if you make her as happy as she makes you? Is she as glad to be yours as you are to be hers? How do you know if your dog is content? All social species have the same basic needs, just different ways those needs are fulfilled. 

Steps
1. First and foremost treat your dog with a lot of love and care. Treat him like a friend / family member. Dogs are not toys that you just play with them for a second and throw them away the next.

2. Don't keep him locked up in the house all day long. Don't put on choke chains n tie him up in a corner. Dogs love to run around and play. It's the way they are.

3. Take some time out of your schedule and play with him. Maybe a game of catch. This will help in keeping your dog active and energetic.

4. Take him out frequently for walks in the park. Let him sniff around and play with the other dogs.

5. Go swimming. Many breeds of dogs love to swim. Its also healthy for them. If you have a clean and safe river or lake near by, that's perfect. Your dog and even you if you want can go swimming. But make sure he or she likes the water.

6. Simply give him a nice scratch behind the ears or some loving pats on the head maybe a relaxing belly rub. Dogs, especially old dogs, love to just sit around and have their favorite person give them a rub or pat.

7. Bring your dog with you for a car ride. They love these, especially with open windows.

8. Give them treats. Anything which they like.

9. Find out what your dog likes to play. E.g. try tug-o-war, fetch, chase, etc. and play it often. Always give your dog attention whenever possible. Scratch and rub their bellies when they want it.

10. Above all just treat your dog with whole loads of love and affection. They are man's best friend after all!

Physiological Needs
  Clean water - The most basic and most vital need for dogs is fresh clean water. Give your dog virtually unlimited access to water. The only exception is limiting a few hours before bedtime when house training. Keep water bowls clean and free of debris. Make sure outside water does not freeze in winter or overheat in summer. Change water in outdoor containers often. Stagnant water can lead to disease. It doesn't have to be Evian, but it should be fresh! If your dog has a habit of knocking over her water bowl, it's not because she doesn't want water. It's because dogs live in the right now, and right now it's fun. It doesn't occur to her that later, she won't have any water to drink. Weighted water bowls will solve this problem.


  Good Nutrition - Ask a dozen people what dog food is the best, you will get a dozen answers. The elusive Absolute Best Brand has not yet revealed itself. However, there are better and worse choices. Feeding a quality dog food means your dog will be healthier from the inside out - from a stronger heart and bones to a shinier coat with less shedding and itching. The little extra money spent on a better food is more than made up for in fewer Vet visits. Nutritionally balanced dogs get sick much less often, fewer ear infections, fewer outbreaks of worms, fewer UT Is, and even fewer injuries. There is even evidence that better food makes for a better behaved dog, as well! A quality dog food will have meat as at least the first 2 ingredients and little or no corn as a filler. Dogs are primarily meat eaters. If your dog has a dull coat and flaky skin, it could be her food!

  Exercise - In addition to proper nutrition, exercise is vital for good health. Not only will it increase your dog's longevity, it will also decrease her unwanted behaviors. A dog's energy has to go somewhere. If she doesn't get enough exercise, she may find undesirable ways to expend that extra energy or even develop neuroses such as obsessive spinning. Just as you should see your doctor before starting an exercise program, so should your dog see hers! Some breeds need more exercise than others, and some cannot tolerate intense activity. Be sure your dog's exercise program is right for her breed. more...

  Good Hygiene - It's true, dogs love to roll around in the stinkiest thing they can find. They don't seem to mind being dirty or smelly. However, for a dog's overall happiness, cleanliness is next to dog liness! Dogs may not care how they smell, but people sure do. A smelly dog does not get petted by people and generally isn't allowed in the house, and a dog shunned to the back yard with little or no human contact is not a happy dog. Filthiness can also lead to health problems. For example, dirty ears can lead to ear mites which are itchy and can cause ear infections. Being too dirty can also be painful, especially for a long-haired dog. Mats in a dog's fur pull on the skin and are extremely uncomfortable. Nails that grow too long can cause a dog to walk awkwardly and lead to problems in their joints and muscles. Keeping coats brushed, ears cleaned, and nails trimmed is essential for a happy dog. Bathing too often can lead to dry itchy skin. Dogs need a bath only when they start to smell bad. If your dog is on a quality food, this won't be very often. 

  Chew Toys - Dogs have a physiological need to chew. This is especially true for teething puppies. Providing them with safe chew toys will help them satisfy this urge without having to gnaw on your coffee table. Thick rubber toys like Kongs are a good option because they will not break apart and become a choking or obstruction hazard. 

  Elimination - Dogs need reliable and sufficient opportunity to eliminate away from their sleeping area. Normal healthy dogs will not eliminate where they eat and sleep. Dogs who do use the bathroom in their dens do so because they have learned that they will not be given sufficient opportunity to eliminate elsewhere. For optimal happiness, make sure your dog doesn't have to hold it too long. 

  ShelterIn the wild, dogs are able to seek out shelter when they need it to get out of the rain, to shield themselves from the cold, or to find relief from the heat. In a domestic environment, we keep them confined to a limited area. They don't have the option to go out and look for adequate shelter. Therefore, it is up to us to provide it. The ideal place for your dog when it's raining or cold is in the home with you. Most dogs are happiest living inside with you. It's also the easiest way to provide appropriate shelter. However, if your dog is one of the few who prefer living outdoors, or bringing her inside is not an option, you can make sure she is well-sheltered outdoors. Follow these tips to properly prepare her dog house for winter weather.

Security- Huck on the patioHappy dogs feel safe in their environment from threats either real or perceived. Dogs who live confined outdoors but without a physical fence are not secure. Invisible fences and chains may keep the dog in the yard, but they do not keep other animals out. A dog living this way is a sitting duck. She is vulnerable to attacks from coyotes, other dogs, and even mean people, and she has no way to escape. The dog who lives this way is not a happy dog.

Social Needs-  Dogs are social animals who thrive on companionship with others. They are unique in the animal world because they enjoy companionship with people as much as they do with other dogs. A dog who lives in a backyard with only minimal human contact is a lonely dog, like a hermit living on an isolated mountain. The happy dog gets lots of ear scritches and belly rubs. She gets to associate with lots of different people and dogs because she has been well-socialized and trained in basic obedience and manners. She is a dog who can go anywhere, and people are happy to see her.  

Esteem Needs- Do dogs have a sense of self-esteem? If you doubt it, just watch a dog who has accomplished a complicated task. See how she holds her head high and struts! Dogs need to have confidence in themselves and their ability to master tasks. Training a dog builds her self-esteem. It makes them feel good to master the perfect Sit and earn your appreciation! Learning tricks is fun for dogs. There are also all sorts of canine sports available that dogs enjoy. Agility, flyball, ultimate frisbee, and lure coursing are just some of the examples. A dog with a hobby is a fulfilled dog.

Cognitive Needs- Dogs are more than just instincts. They also have the ability to think and problem solve. They need to experience more than just the same old scenery of their own home. Mental stimulation leads to a happy dog. Just walking a different path and letting her smell new smells and see new sights provides mental stimulation. At home, puzzle toys like the Buster Cube let her put her brain to use. You can play games with her like hiding and she has to find you, or hiding a treat that she has to find. Learning new tricks also works her brain. Put her to work. Make her fetch the paper (make sure it's safe first) or bring you a drink from the fridge. Yes, working makes for a happy dog!

The Secret to Happiness
The meaning of life is to live it. The secret to a happy dog is to help her live a fulfilled life. That means she actively participates in it. She plays, goes places, and does things. Basically, the secret to a happy dog is not much different at all from the secret to a happy person.

Tips
  • Whenever you call your dog, make sure it is always in a nice and friendly tone.
  • Give your dog some toys, bones, or kong toys to keep them busy while you're at work or at school.
  • Avoid shouting at your dogs, they may not understand your words but they read emotions.
  • Train your pet all the basics at least... A trained pet is always more enjoyable.
  • Talk to your dog and smile at him/her as you would a human and/or in a cooing voice. Even if your dog doesn't understand your words it helps you and your dog bond.
  • If you are always at work, school, college, or any activity where you are not home often and you have a dog, you should consider getting another dog to keep him/her happy and content, or getting a dog-sitter.
  • Treat your dog with respect, he or she is a family member too that deserves good treatment, love and exercise.
  • Always cuddle with your dog and lay down and just pet them.
  • Always be friendly to dogs so they don't feel upset, they can sense it.
  • Teach your dog new tricks. Put a dog treat on the ground and have your dog sit in front of it but don't let him eat it just yet. Say colors such as red, blue, yellow, basically any color but green. If at any time while your saying the colors, your dog goes for the treat, gently but firmly hold him back and have him sit again. Finally,when your dog knows not to eat the food when you say those words, say green and signal to your dog that he can now eat it. This is just a simple trick to have your dog go on green, like a car! Try the trick again, just to make sure your dog has it down and then your done! You can now feel proud of both yourself and your dog!
  • If your dog likes to play fetch, after you throw the ball or toy, hide somewhere so that your dog will need to find you. This will help his tracking skills.
  • Take your dog out to socialize with other dogs.
  • Get two dogs; they keep each other company and entertain each other.






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Friday, May 2, 2014

How to Love Your Dog - Believe It or Not!

How to Love Your Dog - Believe It or Not!
   Love is one of the greatest gifts we can share with our dogs. Dogs are affectionate animals. Touch means a lot to them, both in their natural world and when they live with us. However, affection that hasn't been earned and is shared at the wrong time can be detrimental to a dog.
  Children (and adults too) often want to show love to dogs the way we show love to each other, through hugs and kisses. Dogs do not naturally understand this, or even enjoy it. Hugs and face-to-face contact can be very threatening to dogs. The dog may tolerate this for a while, but at some point may bite or snap to protect himself once he has exhausted all his means of more subtle warning. Some dogs do enjoy a hug from a special person, if it is on their terms and done with some extra scratching on the chest. Few, if any dogs enjoy hugs the way young children do this, which is to clasp around the neck and hang on. Parents, teach your children to avoid face-to-face contact with any dog (even their own dog) and to show love to the dog in ways other than hugging and kissing.

Steps!
  Give your dog plenty of exercise. When your dog needs to go out, take him or her out. You will know he needs to, because he will give you pleading looks, stand by the door, bark, etc. There may be whining, scraping and barking accompanying the need for exercise outdoors as well.

  Pet him. If he puts his head in your lap, don't scratch behind his ears! Well, you can, but when dogs do that, they're actually trying to figure out where you've been, who you've been with, and what you just ate! Dogs just want to be loved. They love neck and tummy scratches and a dog massage is one of the best ways to show your affection for your dog.

  Try (if possible) avoid hugging your dog. Most dogs, especially large dogs, hate this because dogs want to feel dominant. If you are holding him back, he doesn't feel like he's in charge.

  Reward your dog. Many dogs, Goldens and Shelties in particular, exist to please their owners, and they will do it. You have to reward them. Give them treats that are healthy and made specially for dogs. You don't have to buy the treats, you can make excellent ones yourself at home. 

  Talk to your dog. Dogs love it when you talk to them. You will develop your own language together and share intimate moments. And no dog will ever tell you to stop going on about a bad day at the office!

  Spend quality time with your dog. Your dog loves attention. Set aside time every day to spend just with your dog. Even if it's just lying in front of the TV together, stroking your dog's ears and resting together.

  Prioritize yourself to your dog. Set regular and consistent times to feed your dog and take him or her for walks. Your dog will love you for it because it's doing him or her a world of good for their well-being. Doing things for your dog at the same time every day will let it know what to expect at that time.

  Cherish your dog. Always respect your dog and the love that your dog has brought into the house. Be kind, caring and considerate in the way that you treat your dog. Your dog is a family member.

  Give your dog a comfortable place of its own. Your dog's sleeping area should be its alone, not to be shared with piles of washing or storage boxes. Make sure it is out of the way of people who walk through and other annoyances. 

  Discipline your dog. Just like a child, if you don't discipline your dog, that means you don't love him or her too much. Whenever your dog does something wrong, discipline him/her! You can do this by being consistent and sticking with the rules.


  Give affection - but at the right time!
Remember anytime you give affection, you reinforce the behavior preceding it. Reward stability. Share your love when your dog is in a calm-submissive state.

Share affection after a dog has...
exercised and eaten, changed an unwanted behavior into a behavior you asked for, responded to a rule or command, or entered a calm-submissive state.

Don't share affection when your dog is...
fearful, anxious, possessive, dominant, aggressive, whining, begging, barking, or breaking a household rule.

 And don't forget exercise and discipline.
Prove your love by giving your dog what he or she needs: long walks; rules, boundaries, and limitations

  Understand Your Dog
  • Learn to read dog body language so that you can understand what your dog is trying to tell you.
  • A happy dog pants and wags his tail loosely. He may wag all over.
  • An anxious dog might show a half moon of white in his eye or he may lick his lips or yawn. He may turn his head away or walk away. He wants to be left alone.
  • A dog that suddenly goes stiff and still is very dangerous and might be ready to bite.
  • A dog with his mouth closed and ears forward and/or with his tail held high is busy thinking about something and does not want to be bothered.
  Building a solid foundation of respect and trust with your dog leads the way to your being able to do virtually anything with him. Once you have established a trusting bond so that your dog understands you will protect him from harm, he will come to at least tolerate essential physical activities, and at best, enjoy them.


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Friday, April 4, 2014

The Most Expensive Dog Breeds

The  Most Expensive Dog Breeds
  Man’s best friend doesn't always come free. In fact, some are willing to pay in the thousands for certain types of dogs, even breeds that are fairly easy to obtain. Though costs will vary based on location and breeder, these 13 breeds often have the highest average price tag.
  The most popular dog breeds are not the worlds most expensive dog breeds,  but the luxury dogs rate high in the top of the list. Popular dog breeds change from year to year and from country to country; and so do the most expensive dogs in the world.

What Makes a Dog Expensive?
  There are a variety of factors which make dogs expensive. Purity of breed or their rarity can make dogs extremely expensive. When they are offspring from prize winning dogs the prices can skyrocket too, but the biggest factor is the C-factor. As soon as a dog is spotted or photographed in possession of a celebrity, the dog’s price will shoot beyond the moon. It has happened in the past, and it will happen in the future.

The most expensive dog ever sold
  The most expensive dog ever sold was recently in March 2011, a red “Tibetan mastiff” called Big Splash, or “Hong Dong” in Chinese.  This most expensive dog ever is already 11 months-old and already stands nearly three-feet-high at the shoulder and weighs more than 180lbs, says his breeder, Lu Liang.   He was purchased by a chinese multi-millionaire coal baron.
  ‘Big Splash’ sold for an amazing 10 million Yuan which is about 1.5 million US Dollars and beats the earlier record set by another Tibetan Mastiff Tibetan mastiff” called Yangtze River Number Two which was sold to a chinese woman in 2009 for a whopping 4 million Yuan (About $609,000).   But this still doesn’t make the Tibetan Mastiff generally the most expensive dog breed.

The Most Expensive Dog Breeds
  Roaming along the internet, in a variety of countries here is a countdown of the top most expensive dog breeds our editors found.

1.Irish Wolfhound ($1,500 to $2,000)
  Two thousand dollars might seem a small price to pay for the tallest of dogs, also known for a commanding appearance. Irish Wolfhounds are known for their athletic ability, especially in endurance running. And of course, there is an Irish proverb to describe their personality: “Gentle when stroked, fierce when provoked.”

2.Saluki – $2,500
  The Saluki is a breed of dog that is known for its aloofness. This breed is very loyal to its owner and can become extremely attached to a single person. These are great with children as long as the children do not roughhouse and act as a threat.
  The Saluki is an insecure breed that must be trained gently but with a firm and consistent manner. They are submissive by nature and can be easily distracted. It’s important that you establish your status as the pack leader or else your Saluki will not feel secure with its surroundings.

3.Pharaoh Hound ($2,500 to $6,500)
  Another one of the oldest domesticated dogs in history, the Pharaoh Hound is thought to have originated in Egypt as far back as 3000 B.C., according to the AKC. A medium-sized dog with a coat that can range from tan to chestnut to red golden, Pharaohs have a unique "blush" in which their nose and ears turn a deep rose color with excitement. Used today for hunting, obedience and lure coursing, Egyptian Pharaoh Hounds are friendly, playful and intelligent family members. Their athleticism also requires regular exercise, particularly in a fenced-in area to prevent them from chasing after small game. 


4.Akita ($1,500 to $4,500)

  The Akita breed originated in Japan. Akita dogs are docile, courageous, fearless, and surprisingly intelligent. They are family oriented dogs. Akitas socialize well and they can be very spontaneous. The Akita needs a firm and confident pack leader or else they will act spontaneously and out of order often.

  Because the Akita needs a firm leader, it is important that all humans establish their higher-order over the dog, or else you may see excessive biting and growling coming from it. The proper training and exercise will ensure that you have a well-tempered animal.



5.Chow Chow – $3,000 – $8,000

  An ancient breed that dates back to around 300 B.C., Chow Chows are thought to have originated in China and served as hunting, birding and guard dogs. A medium-sized dog with a large head and round muzzle, the Chow Chow is recognizable by their blue-black tongue and lion-like coat. Loyal to their owners and prized by dog fanciers for their regal appearance, Chow Chows are truly a unique breed.




  Though it is thought to be one of the most influential and ancient dog breeds, the history of the Tibetan Mastiff remains a mystery. While some function as livestock protectors, most Tibetan Mastiffs are kept as family guardians and companions. A large, strong breed with a massive head, thick coat and long, bushy tail, the rareness of the Tibetan Mastiffs can drive up their prices. In 2011, a Tibetan Mastiff by the name of "Big Splash" was sold for an astounding 1.5 million dollars by a Chinese businessman, making it the most expensive dog ever sold.

  The massive Tibetan Mastiff displays a “noble bearing” and a royal price tag to go with it. It is an aloof and watchful breed, with an immense double coat and a kind expression. But the breed’s dignified personality can also translate into a reluctance to participate in organized activities like obedience.

7.Cavalier King Charles Spaniel –  $1,000 - $14,000 
  Named in honor of King Charles II of England, the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel has been considered a fashionable lap dog and family companion since the 17th century. Easygoing and friendly, Cavalier King Charles Spaniels thrive in both the city and the country and require regular grooming.

8.Rottweiler ($2,000 to $8,000)
  Rottweilers are as multi-talented as they are robust and powerful. The intelligent, patient breed often works as a police dog, herder, service dog, therapy dog, or obedience competitor. But Rottweilers are also protective and self-confident, making them excellent companions.

9. Lowchen ($5,000 to $8,000)
  Löwchen means “little lion” in German, a fitting name for this small dog with an impressive mane of hair and talent for agility. The breed is often given a “lion” trim, too: clipped close to the skin at the hindquarters, with cuffs of hair around the ankles and a plumed tail.

  Originally used during the 19th century in England for bull baiting, Bulldogs exhibit courageousness and ferocious tenacity. With a clownish and amiable personality, Bulldogs have become popular companion dogs and are now among the most popular breeds in the United States. Known for its affinity for sleeping and eating, Bulldogs require little more than a daily walk. Because of their short muzzles, the breed is prone to breathing problems among other health-related issues, making them a more expensive choice than other breeds.

11. Samoyed ($4,000 to $11,000)
  Bright and alert, with a weather-resistant coat, Samoyeds excel at agility, herding, weight pulling, sledding, pack hiking, and conformation shows, among many others. But the Samoyed’s premium price could also be due to its looks: a coat that ranges from pure white to biscuit, and black lips that curl into a well-known “Samoyed smile”.
  Originating from Siberia, the Samoyed is a devoted and friendly man’s best friend who is not afraid to be playful when the time is right. Samoyeds are a gentle breed who are friendly to everyone they come in contact with, including intruders of your home. It’s much too friendly for you to use it as a watchdog, although it will definitely alert you when they are in the presence of someone strange.

12.German Shepherd- $3,000 - $24,000 
  A breed that's both intelligent and versatile, the German Shepherd was originally developed to guard and herd flocks of sheep but today makes for an ideal companion and, among other things, police, guard, war and search-and-rescue dog. Because of their versatility and skill set, a well-trained German Shepherd can be a costly expense. The breed is a devoted family dog but can be protective and suspicious towards strangers and other dogs.

13.Bearded Collie- $1,000 and $5,000
  The Bearded Collie is considered as one of Britain’s oldest breeds. It was in 1514 when a Scottish shepherd was said to breed a Polish Sheepdog with his other herding and flock dogs such as the Komondor and Old English Sheepdogs. These breeds were said to form the foundation of the breed. In 1967, the first litter of Bearded Collies in the USA was whelped.
  Bearded Collies are good hunting and herding dogs. They can grow to a height of 20-22 inches and can weigh 60 pounds. They do not thrive well when kept indoors in cramped living spaces. They hate to be confined and prefer to be outdoors even in adverse weather conditions.

  More is not always better. The price of the dog is not important, it is all about the love it gives to you and the love you can give back to the animal.

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